Philippines - Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey - 1999

Publication date: 1999

Republic of the Philippines NATIONAL STATISTICS OFFICE Manila unicef• United Nations Children's Fund Table of Contents Introduction What is the MICS? Sampling design Research instrument Field work and processing Results and findings Executive summary . . . . Missing data . . . . Response rates . . Age distribution . . . . . . . . Characteristics of the household population . . . . . . . . . . Women (15-49 years old) . . . . . . Children (below 18 years old) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Literacy . . . . . . . . . . . . Basic education . . Early childhood education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maternal health care . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Prenatal care . . . . . . . . . Childbirth care . . . . . . . . . . . Low birth weight . . . . Infant and child health care Vitamin A supplementation . . . . . . . Iron supplementation . . . . Salt iodization . . Acute respiratory infections (ARI) . . . . . . Antihelminthics . . . . Weight monitoring Children's rights . . . . . . Awareness ofCRC . . . . . . . . . . . Birth registration . . . . . . . . Orphanhood and living arrangements . . Working children . . . . HIV-AIDS Awareness 1 2 3 4 4 5 5 7 8 8 9 9 10 10 11 13 13 14 14 14 15 16 16 16 17 18 18 18 18 18 19 19 20 20 Matrices Major goals for child survival, development and protection Selected indicators, 1996 Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey MICS section-module and survey respondent Charts and graphs 2 3 4 Figure 1. Single year distribution of the household population by sex . . . . . . . . . 8 Figure 2. Percent distribution of women (15-49) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Figure 3. Percent distribution of literacy rate of Filipinos (10 years-older). . . 10 Figure 4. Literacy percentage per age bracket . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Figure 5. Proportion of children (5-12) who were enrolled in 1999 . . . . . . . . 11 Figure 6. Primary school participation rate, 1996 and 1999 MICS . . . . . 12 Figure 7. Percentage distribution of women with live births . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Figure 8. Percentage distribution of women with LBW infants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Figure 9. Vitamin A coverage of children (1-4) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Figure 10. Proportion of households consuming iodized salt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Figure 11 . Proportion of children (5-17) who are currently "working" . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Appendix A. Appendix B. Appendix C. Summary of indicators Tables Appendices 1999 MICS questionnaire The 1999 Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey Introduction Picture this. A one-year old toddler sits on the lap of his doting mother. He watches intently as his mother begins his first lesson on numbers. She holds his right hand, and slowly sets upright one tiny finger. "One," she says. The scene is played over and over again, day after day, until the child learns the cue. He slowly moves from one finger to another, from one number to the next. As his motor and mental skills develop, his mother awaits the completion ofhis maiden lesson. "One. Two. Three. Four. Five. Six. Seven. Eight. Nine. Ten." Indeed, there is much to celebrate when a child learns to count from one to 10. The number 10 is a significant figure. Weights and records are rounded off to the nearest tens. People refer to trends and fads by decades. "Ten years ago and ten years after." These words carry much weight especially to those whose work entails envisioning what the future will be and looking back at what the past had been. This year, the Philippine government joins other states in looking back at the last 10 years of the 20111 century to review what has been done for the children of the world. In September 1990, world leaders gathered in New York to attend the World Summit for Children (WSC). Considered as the largest gathering of heads of nations, the World Summit introduced a Declaration on the Survival, Protection and Development of Children. The summit also came up with a Plan of Action for implementing the Declaration in the 1990s. The WSC strongly endorsed the Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC) which was adopted by the United Nations General Assembly in 1989. "To give every child a better future." This phrase, as plain as it may sound, constitutes the urgent universal appeal declared at the WSC. The summit defined the immediate future as a period of ten years. The year 2000 was then marked as the reference point for evaluating what has been done for the children of the world. Extensive consultation in various international fora had been made even before the WSC to formulate target goals for the survival, development, and protection of children. Each country that took part in the summit vowed to implement appropriate strategies in its national plan of action to meet these goals by the end of the decade. The Philippines charted its own direction in the Philippine Plan of Action for Children (PPAC). PPAC was officially recognized in January 1992 through Proclamation No. 855. Updated in 1993, PPAC built the framework that aligns the national plan of action for children with the articles of the CRC. The plan is now dubbed as "The Filipino Children: 2000 and Beyond." 1999 MICS At the first National Summit for Children held in Manila in October 2000, President Joseph Ejercito Estrada endorsed Child 21. Child 21 is the Philippine National Strategic Framework for Plan Development for Children. It provides a roadmap to achieve the vision for the quality of life of Filipino children by 2025. The President's subsequent signing of an Executive Order implementing Child 21 galvanized the government's covenant to continue to promote and uphold the rights of Filipino children. Major goals for child survival, development, and protection Infant and under-5 child Reduce the number of children who die at a young age by one third of mortality rates the 1990 levels. Or reduce the number of deaths of infants to 50 for every 1 ,000 live births and deaths of children below five years old to 70 for every 1 ,000 children. Maternal mortality Reduce the number of mothers who die because of pregnancy or childbirth by one half of the 1990 level. Severe and moderate Reduce the number of children below five years old who are severely malnutrition and moderately malnourished by one half of the 1990 levels. Access to safe drinking Provide all households with access to safe drinking water and sanitary water and sanitary means of means of waste disposal. waste disposal Basic education Provide at least 80 percent of children of primary school age access to basic education and ensure that they complete primary education. Adult illiteracy rate Reduce the number of adults who cannot read and write by 50 percent of the 1990 level, focusing on improving female literacy. Children in special need of Improve the services provided for children who are in need of special protection protection. What is the MICS? Midway through the decade, a review was done to assess how countries had fared in achieving the goals for the year 2000. Many countries lacked current data on key indicators. The United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) developed the Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey (MICS) as a household survey tool. This was done in coordination with other agencies like the World Health Organization (WHO), the United Nations Statistics Division, the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, and the United States Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The MICS is a research instrument organized into different question modules. One particular module covers a set of indicators. For example, a maternal health module may contain questions about a mother's pregnancy history, prenatal care experience, coverage of vitamin A supplementation, and breastfeeding. The MICS was used in 100 countries in various forms to fill data gaps. In the Philippines, the National Statistics Office (NSO) and the Department of Health (DOH) used a modified MICS version to gather data about children's health and education in 1996. In November 1999, another MICS was conducted by the NSO. It gathered national level data on the health of children below five years old and basic education of children below 18 years old. The survey also focused on the following key areas: maternal health care, vitamin A supplementation, iodized salt consumption, birth registration, care of cough and weight monitoring, working children, awareness of HIV- AIDS, and awareness of children's rights. 2 1999 MICS Selected Indicators 1996 Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey, NSO-UNICEF Indicator Philippines Urban Rural Population coverage Fully immunized child 50.4 59.9 42.8 12-23 months Vitamin A coverage Children 12-23 months 79.0 76.7 80.9 Children 24-59 months 81.2 82.1 80.6 Iodized salt consumption 14.6 20.2 9.6 All households Access to safe drinking water 85.6 91.1 80.7 All households Access to sanitary toilets 75.2 88.5 63.3 All households School enrolment rate Children 6-12 years old 76.8 79.3 75.0 Children 7-12 years old 88.7 91.0 86.9 Sampling design The 1999 MICS used a stratified multi-stage modified cluster sampling design. The selection of the sample population was done on different levels. The first stage involved the gathering of sample barangays (villages) from an official list of Filipino barangays. As the basic unit oflocal governance, the barangays served as the primary sampling units (PSUs). After the selection of barangays, enumeration areas were determined from each barangay. These areas served as the secondary sampling units (SSUs) . An enumeration area refers to a cluster of households selected from a particular barangay. For the 1999 MICS, the NSO adopted the master sample design of the Integrated Survey of Households (ISH). Sample barangays and enumeration areas were selected systematically with probability proportional to size using the number of households as measure of size. Sample selection was done independently by stratum for each city-municipality-provincial domain. From the list of randomly selected households in each sample barangay, a cluster of 24 households was chosen. The total number of 7,680 sample households was distributed proportionally to the 16 regions. Because the sample was stratified by regions, sample weights were used to project the results on a national level. 3 1999 MICS Research instrument Although patterned after the UNICEF model questionnaire, the 1999 MICS excluded questions related to the modules on water and sanitation, child mortality, tetanus toxoid, contraceptive use, breastfeeding, malaria, immunization, and anthropometry. Data for the said modules could be taken from the 1998 National Demographic Health Survey, the 1999 Family Planning Survey, and the surveys conducted by the Food and Nutrition Research Institute (FNRI). The UNICEF model instrument is composed of three separate questionnaires each for the household, women (15-49), and children (under 5) modules. The 1999 MICS used only one questionnaire to cover the said modules to simplify data enumeration and encoding. Each questionnaire was also designed to contain three columns to accommodate multiple respondents. The matrix below shows the specific survey respondent to whom a particular section of the MICS questionnaire was administered. Section-Module Survey Respondent a. Household membership Any responsible member of the household b. Children away from home c. Education d. Socio-economic characteristics e. Salt and iodization f. Maternal and infant health Woman 15-49 years old g. HIV-AIDS h. Working children Mother or caretaker of the child/children i. Children's rights (A caretaker refers to a person looking after the j. Care of cough and weight monitoring child/children.) k. Vitamin A supplementation I. Birth registration and antihelminthics Fieldwork and processing The 1999 MICS was also done in collaboration with the Department of Health (DOH), Department of Education, Culture and Sports (DECS), Department of Science and Technology (DOST), National Economic and Development Authority (NEDA), Department of Social Welfare and Development (NEDA), Department of Labor and Employment (DOLE), and National Statistical Coordination Board (NSCB). Two separate seminars were conducted to train field supervisors and interviewers in the conduct of the survey. These activities were held in the early part of November 1999. The supervisors were tasked to monitor the implementation of the project. Field enumeration was set for 12 days from 22 November to 4 December. The processing of the MICS results took two levels. Manual processing included the coding of items in the questionnaire and the verification of both accomplished and unanswered entries. Coded items from the questionnaire were then transferred into electronic files using a data entry program called the Integrated Micro-Computer Processing System (IMPS). Only those files that underwent data checking and verification were used for the tabulation of results. 4 1999 MICS Results and findings Executive summary Most Filipinos know that children inherently have rights. The 1999 MICS finds that majority of women and caretakers of children can easily identify a child's right to have education. This survey also suggests that significant advances have been achieved in the areas of elementary school participation rate, birth registration, and prenatal care of pregnant women. However, the 1999 MICS indicates that government and private agencies should focus on the areas of micronutrient supplementation, consumption of iodized salt, early childhood education participation, child labor, and HIV-AIDS awareness. Household population • The 1999 MICS projects a total household population of75.332 million with an almost equal number of males and females. • Approximately 43 percent are children below 18 years old. Only six percent are senior citizens over 60 years old. Half of the total household population are Filipinos of productive ages 18 to 59 years old. Education • Majority (89%) of the population over age 10 years is literate. Around seven percent more are seen as moderately literate. There is an almost equal distribution of literate males and females. The urban population posts a higher literacy status of 94 percent. • The literacy percentage declines from an average of93 percent among those aged 15-34 to 70 percent among the population aged 65 and older. • There are about 22 million children of school age (5-17 years old). Seventy-seven percent of these children (5-17 years old) are reportedly enrolled in school year 1999-2000. About 86 percent of children of primary school age (6-12) are attending school at the time of the MICS. There seems to be no significant difference between urban and rural school enrolment. • Enrolment rate appears to dwindle as the school level progresses. Enrolment rate from grade one to grade six drops by almost 20 percent. • Enrolment in pre-school education remains low. Only 15 percent of children aged three to five years are attending some form of organized early childhood programme. Maternal and infant health care • There are an estimated 19 million women in the reproductive ages 15-49. Approximately 93 percent of these women are literate. Fifty-five percent reside in urban areas. • About 58 percent had given birth at least once. Ten percent of these mothers (1.96 million) gave birth in the year prior to the MICS. The mean age of these mothers is 28. • Nine out of ten mothers reported that they made at least one visit to a health center with prenatal care facilities. On the average, these mothers made five visits. Almost half of them had their first consultation in the second three-month period of pregnancy. Most of these mothers held their first prenatal visit only in the fourth month. • Nearly 84 percent of these mothers consulted a midwife, a doctor, and any other skilled heath care provider for their prenatal check-up. In rural areas, more mothers (46%) tum to a midwife. Those in urban areas (33%) prefer going to a doctor. • Both parents jointly decide where the delivery will take place. This is claimed by 46 percent of mothers who had live births in the year prior to the MICS. 5 1999 MICS • A trained "hilot" attended to 41 percent of these deliveries. The percentage is higher among mothers in rural areas (60%). ct Approximately 55 percent of women who gave birth in the year prior to the survey perceived that their babies were of average size when they were born. Results of the MICS significantly indicate that only six percent of these mothers actually had infants with low birth weight (less than 2.5 kg). • Out of 119,000 mothers who gave birth to infants with LBW, only 26 percent admitted to having given the child iron supplement. Younger literate mothers (20-29 years old) would more likely give iron supplement to their children. • Only 33 percent of all mothers who had given birth in the year prior to the MICS received Vitamin A supplement Child health • The 1999 MICS projects a total of3.8 million children aged less than two years old. About 46 percent of these children were reportedly weighed on a regular basis. • Out of 7. 7 million children (1-4 years old), 36 percent received vitamin A supplement within the last six months prior to the MICS. • Out of 9.4 million children (2-6 years old), 42 percent had received antihelminthics within the six months prior to the MICS. • Out of 9.6 million children (0-4 years old), only 16 percent were diagnosed with acute respiratory infections (e.g. coughs). Sixty-four percent of those with ARI were treated at an appropriate medical center. Salt iodization • Only 22 percent of 14.6 million Filipino households consume adequately iodized salt. Households in urban areas (27%) are more prone to using iodized salt than those in rural areas (18%). Birth registration • The births of 84 percent of children below seven years old have been registered. Birth registration in urban areas is slightly higher than in rural areas. Across age, the lowest figure is at 77 percent among children less than a year old. No significant difference is recorded between boys and girls. Awareness of the rights of the child • Out of 32 million Filipinos who act as caretakers of children (below 18 years old), 83 percent know that children have rights and can identify at least one right. • The right to education is the most frequently mentioned right for these caretakers (75%). • Only two percent have recognized that children should be defended and given assistance by the government. Living arrangements • Four of five children still live with their parents. • Approximately eight percent of 32 million children (less than 18 years old) are not residing with their parents. • Approximately four percent (1.4 million) live away from their nuclear families. A child in this situation is most likely a teen-age girl who comes from a rural area. 6 1999 MICS Working children • The 1999 MICS estimates a total of 22.5 million children who are 5-17 years old. • Close to five million children (21%) in this age group are working either for a family member or for someone who is not a member of the household. Three of five working children are boys. More children in rural areas are considered working. • Three million working children (68%) are engaged in family-operated agricultural or business activities. • About 1.5 million children are working for someone other than a household member. One- fifth of working children receive payment in cash or in kind. Approximately ten percent render unpaid work. · HIV-AIDS awareness • Out of 19 million women (15-49 years old), 92 percent have heard of AIDS. • Most women are aware of the ways of preventing the transmission of HIV -AIDS from one person to another. Nearly 72 percent believe that avoiding multiple sex partners lessens the likelihood of transmission. Almost 55 percent say that the use of condom prevents the transmission of the virus. Sixty percent have identified that a drug abuser who indiscriminately uses an infected syringe can get infected with the virus. Almost 80 percent are aware that a pregnant mother with HIV-AIDS can transmit the virus to her child. • Most women (70%) tend to disagree with the misconception that a healthy-looking person is immune from HIV-AIDS. However, only 40 percent are able to identify that getting the virus from mosquito bites is a misconception. • Most women appear to exhibit discriminatory attitude toward people with HIV-AIDS. Around 62 percent think that a teacher with HIV-AIDS but is not physically sick should not be allowed to work. Close to 73 percent dispel the notion of buying food from a vendor with HIV-AIDS. • The 1999 MICS focuses on the accurate identification of HIV prevention and misconceptions as basis for computing a person's sufficient knowledge of the disease. Only 2.4 of these women have correctly identified all these elements that are included in the MICS. • Fifty-five percent know where to get an HIV-AIDS test. Six often women in urban areas are aware of this information. The figure is lower for women gathered from the rural clusters (48%). Younger women appear to be more aware of this information than those in the 40- and-above bracket. Missing data To check the quality of the survey data, a look at the number of cases of missing information is necessary. Table 1 lists down the percentage of entries that have missing data. Only five items in the study yielded missing cases of one percent and less, namely: number of hours spent by working children doing household chores; grade/year level of children who are currently attending school; complete birth date of women (15-49) with live births; knowledge of women (15-49) on where to consult for HIV test. Four percent of women (15-49) with a live birth in the year prior to the survey failed to indicate the birth weight of their infants. By international standards, this percentage is relatively negligible. 7 - r::: Q) (J . Q) a. 1999 MICS Response rates In the 1999 MICS, a household pertains to a group of persons who share and take their meals together but live in separate and adjacent living quarters for convenience. Of the 7,680 households selected for the 1999 MICS sample, 7,556 were completely interviewed. This yielded a high response rate of 98.4 percent. The response rates in both rural (99 percent) and urban areas (98 percent) were considerably high (Table 2). In these households, 9,615 women aged 15-49 were identified as eligible for an interview. Of these, 9,424 were successfully interviewed, yielding a response rate of 98 percent. In addition, 4, 705 children under age five were listed in the household questionnaire. Questionnaires were completed for 4,639 children for a response rate of98 percent. Age distribution There are now about 75 million Filipinos. Put ten Filipinos together in one room. Let this group be representative of the total projected population of 75.332 million. Four of them are children below 18 years old. Five are adults aged 18 to 59 years old. The last one is a senior citizen 60 years or older. There appears to be no significant difference between the number of males and females, as shown in Table 3 and Figure I. However, a cursory look at Table 4 will reveal that there are more males than females in the below 20 age group. This is a significant occurrence that may be used as a take-off point for checking the possibility of gender bias in selected indicators. Figure 1. Single year age distribution of the household population by sex, Philippines, 1999. n = 75.3 million 3 2.5 2 1.5 0.5 0 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50 55 60 65 70 Age 8 1999 MICS Characteristics of the household population There are nearly 15 million Filipino households. The 1999 MICS estimates a total of 14.583 million households. There are more households in rural areas than in urban centers. Almost 52 percent of the households (7.556 million) are rural and 48 percent (7.027 million) are urban. Table 5 presents the percent distribution of households in the 1999 MICS sample by background characteristics. Most of the households have two to seven members. About 77 percent have at least one child of less than 18 years old. However, only 26 percent of these households have at least one woman aged 15-49 years old. Women (15-49 years old) A little over one-fourth of the total Filipino population are women ages 15-49. There are an estimated 19 million women in these reproductive ages. Table 6 shows the characteristics of these women. Fifty-five percent of them reside in urban areas. Teen-age girls (15-19) comprise the greatest percentage of the sample at 20 percent. This percentage declines across age groups until age bracket of 45-49 at nine percent, as seen in Figure 2. Approximately 60 percent of women in the sample are currently married. The same can be said for the number of women who had ever given birth. Figure 2. Percent distribution of women (15-49 years old), Philippines, 1999. n = 19.265 million 15 - 19 20 - 24 25 - 29 30 - 34 35 - 39 40 - 44 45 - 49 Age 9 1999 MICS Children below 18 years old Two-fifths of the Filipino population are children. There are 32 million children comprising 43 percent of the population. Table 7 provides a description of these children. Boys (51%) slightly outnumber girls ( 49% ). There are more children residing in rural areas (54%) than in urban areas (46%). Thirty-six percent of these children are below six years old. Literacy Nine of ten Filipinos can read and write a simple message. For years, the Philippines has been noted for its high literacy rate. Literacy is defined as the ability of an individual to read and write. In the 1999 MICS, a literate person is someone who can easily read and write a simple message in any language or dialect. A moderately literate person can read and write but with difficulty. A person who cannot both read and write a simple message is illiterate. The vast majority of the population over age 10 years is literate, as shown in Figure 3. Of the nearly 56.2 million Filipinos aged 10 years and older, approximately 90 percent are literate. About four million (7%) are seen as moderately literate. Only three percent are perceived as illiterate. There is an almost equal distribution of literate males and females, as indicated in Table ~- Figure3. Percent distribution of literacy rate of Filipinos (10 years and older), Philippines, 1999. n = 56.2 million Moderately literate 7.2% Ollliterate 3.4% 1!1 Literate 88.9% More literate people come from urban areas. Of the total literate population, 55 percent reside in urban areas. The urban population has a higher literacy rate of 95 percent compared to 84 percent among those in rural areas. The literacy percentage declines from an average of 93 percent among those aged 15-34 to 70 percent among the population aged 65 and older. Illustrated in Figure 4 is the literacy percentage of each age bracket. 10 1999 MICS Figure4. literacy percentage per age bracket, Philippines, 1999. 10-14 15-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65- OYer lvJa Basic education Primary school enrolment rate in 1999 swelled by more than 10 percent of the 1996 level. The 1999 MICS estimates about 22.525 million children (5-17 years old). Seventy-seven percent of them were reportedly enrolled in school year 1999-2000. About five million children (23%) were not attending school at the time of the 1999 MICS data gathering. Table 9 shows the number of children attending school in urban and rural areas stratified by age and sex. Although there seems to be more children who are attending school in rural areas (9.1 million) than in urban areas (8.3 million), the figure only represents 75 percent of all rural children. As seen in Figure 5, enrolment rate in urban areas is notably higher at 81 percent. Figure 5. Proportion of children (5-12) who were enrolled in school year 1999-2000, Philippines, 1999. 20 tn c 15 0 ·- E c 10 1. Cl) .c § 5 z Urban Rural Total I El Enrolled II Not enrolled I - --····- ~--··-·---- -- 11 1999 MICS A major goal for basic education is to provide equal opportunities to boys and girls. The survey reveals that there appears to be no gender bias against girls. This suggests that more girls are now being given the chance to get educated in a formal school environment. The enrolment rate in primary (elementary) education is computed at 86 percent of the population of children (6-12). This value is ten percent more than the recorded rate in the 1996 MICS as illustrated in Figure 6. The highest enrolment record is in the grade one level. Eighteen percent of all elementary students are grade one pupils. The mean age of grade one students is seven. However, enrolment rate appears to dwindle as the school level progresses. Enrolment in the sixth grade is smaller by almost 10 percent than the grade five level record. Refer to Table 10 for the details. Figure 6. Primary school participation rate, 1996 and 1999 MICS. 100 89.5 90 G) Cl 80 .f! s:::: G) (.) . 70 G) Q. 60 50 Total Urban Rural ~~96 G199ij The 1999 MICS, however, was not designed to ascertain the cohort survival rate or the number of children who eventually reach grade five. Two major reasons are noted why children do not go to school. These are the high cost of education and the seemingly lack of interest from children themselves. The lack of personal interest appears more apparent among children in rural areas. It is the foremost reason provided for almost 754,000 (15%) children. In urban areas, the high cost of education has kept 627,000 ( 12%) children out of school (Table 11.) 12 1999 MICS Early childhood education Very few children go to pre-school and day care centers. The early years of a child's life, 0-6 years old in particular, serve as the foundation for learning throughout life. Hence, the Early Childhood Care and Development (ECCD) programme becomes one of the most critical support strategies for achieving education for all and education for life. However, the 1999 MICS findings indicate that enrolment in pre-school education still remains wanting. Only 15 percent of approximately 7.6 million children aged three to six years old attended some form of organized early childhood programme in pre-school, nursery, and day care centers at the time of the survey. There are slightly more children in urban areas enrolled in an early childhood education programme than in rural areas. Table 12 also indicates that there are more young girls than boys who attended pre-school at the time of the 1999 MICS. Figure 7. Percentage distribution of women with live births, Philippines, 1999. n = 1.955 million 30 -1: Q) ~ Q) D. 40-44 Age Maternal health care 45-49 More Filipino women are learning to seek proper maternal health care. The 1999 MICS projects an estimate of 19 million women of reproductive ages 15-49. About ten percent or nearly two million of these women had live births in the year prior to the survey (Table 13). The mean age of these women is 28. Figure 7 shows the percentage distribution of these live births across ages. An important World Summit Goal that addresses the rights of mothers is the access of all women to proper prenatal care and obstetric care. Two key indicators of this goal are the proportion of women who had at least one visit to skilled health personnel and the proportion of births attended by skilled health personnel. 13 1999 MICS Prenatal care Nine of ten pregnant women seek health care. On the average, pregnant mothers made five visits to a health center for prenatal check- up. Almost half of them had their first consultation in the second three-month period of pregnancy. Most of them scheduled their first prenatal visit only in the fourth month. Details of this information are outlined in Tables 14-15. About 45 percent of mothers in urban areas reported to have made their first prenatal visit in the critical first period of pregnancy. In rural areas, 52 percent of mothers had theirs in the second period. Table 16 shows the type of personnel who attended to mothers during their prenatal care consultations. In rural areas, more mothers (46%) turned to a midwife. Those in urban areas (33%) preferred going to a doctor. Respondents were also asked what are the particular symptoms that they could identify that would prompt them to seek health care during pregnancy. The most frequent response is vaginal bleeding. A more detailed outline is shown in Table 17. Childbirth care Two of five live births are assisted by a trained hilot. The word hilot is a Filipino term for "massage" when used as a treatment for sore and fracture. It is also used to refer to people who assist in the delivery of babies without a formal educational background in obstetrics. This practice is most prevalent in rural areas with 58 percent of all live births assisted by a trained hilot. Despite the preference for doctors during prenatal care, the data from urban mothers suggest a preference for midwives in the delivery of babies. Almost 44 percent of live births in urban areas were delivered by a midwife (Table 18). Women should be empowered by giving them informed choices about their own health. About 46 percent of women who had live births in the year prior to the 1999 MICS said that the decision to where the baby would be delivered was jointly made with their husbands. Similar responses are observed from both the urban and rural samples as indicated in Table 19. Low birth weight There are only a few reported cases of low birth weights. Another indicator set at the World Summit for Children is the reduction of low birth weight rate to less than 10 percent of all live births. An infant with LBW weighs less than 2.5 kg. Babies with LBW are at a higher risk of a serious illness or death. Figure 8 presents the percentage distribution ofLBW births among women. (Refer also to Tables 20-21.) Surprisingly, the cases of infants with LBW among teen-age mothers or those with high-risk pregnancies are minimal. 14 Figure 8. Percentage distribution of women with LBW infants, Philippines, 1999. n = 119,000 -c Q) e Q) 0. Age 1999 MICS 45-49 Respondents were asked about their opinions on the size of their babies at birth. If available, information about the child's actual birth weight was taken from existing documents such as the child's birth certificate, vaccination cards, and others. Approximately 17 percent of women who gave birth in the year prior to the 1999 MICS thought that their babies are either very small or smaller than average. Most of these mothers (55%) believed that their newly born infants are of average weight. After being tabulated against registered birth weights, results of the survey indicate that only six percent of these mothers actually had infants with LBW. This is found in Table 22. Infant and child health care Children first! This is a cry that resounds across the country. Children should be given utmost attention especially in health and nutrition programmes. The Department of Health and its support agencies have been taking the lead to quell malnutrition in the country. Through programmes like the National Immunization Day and the Preschoolers' Health Week among others, the DOH has focused on core and critical areas such as immunization, growth monitoring, micronutrient supplementation, food fortification, and salt iodization. Critical in all nutrition programmes is the focus on micronutrients such as vitamin A, iron, and iodine. Deficiency in these micronutrients leads to increased infant, child, and maternal mortality and morbidity rates. 15 Vitamin A supplementation Vitamin A supplementation has gone low in 1999. In the 1999 MICS, questions were formulated to evaluate vitamin A and iron supplementation of mothers and children. Vitamin A coverage is one of the most important components of child and maternal survival programs. It is essential for the normal functioning of the immune system. It also prevents night blindness and susceptibility to other infections. 1999 MICS Figure 9. Vitamin A coverage of children (1-4 years old), Philippines, 1999. n = 7.7 million Never receive 27% Not sure if received 14% Not sure when 1% Last 6 months 35% Prior to last 6 months 23% Out of about two million mothers who had given birth in the year prior to the 1999 MICS, only 33 percent received Vitamin A supplement (Table 23). A key indicator toward eliminating vitamin A deficiency is the proportion of mothers who receive a high-dose vitamin A supplement before the infant is two months old. Based on the 1999 MICS, this indicator refers to only 25 percent of these mothers. For children ages one to four years old, almost 60 percent received vitamin A within the period covering one year before the 1999 MICS. Approximately 27 percent did not receive a dose of vitamin A at all. Table 24 also looks at the time period when a child received vitamin A. Iron Few infants with low birth weights receive iron supplement. Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is a condition in which the concentration of hemoglobin in a person is below the normal level. Hemoglobin is the substance in blood that carries oxygen. Anemic pregnant women are prone to deliver babies with LBW. Children with IDA have short attention span, reduced ability to learn and are usually irritable. In the 1999 MICS, out of 119,000 mothers who had given birth to children with LBW, only 12 percent reported to have given the child iron supplement. The figure is lower at 7 percent for women in urban areas. Table 25 provides a detailed account of the proportion of children with LBW who were given iron supplement and the age of their mothers. Salt iodization Consumption of iodized salt is still low. Iodine deficiency in pregnant women causes spontaneous abortion, still births, impaired fetal brain development and infant deaths. An iodine deficiency disorder (IDD) also causes mental retardation and neurological complications in children. 16 Figure 10. Proportion of households consuming iodized salt, Philippines, 1999. n = 14.6 million 15 Number of 10 5 households (values in millions) 0~--------~--------~--------~ Philippines Urban Rural l liiWith iodized salt •without iodized s}ili] 1999 MICS In 1995, the Philippine government embarked on a salt iodization program as a long-term measure to prevent IDD. Republic Act 8172 or "An Act Promoting Salt Iodization Nationwide and For Other Purposes" aimed for universal salt iodization use nationwide by 2000. The law requires all food grade salt to be iodized. It also mandates all salt traders to make iodized salt available to all Filipinos. Despite massive campaign on the use of iodized salt, consumption in the Philippines remains low. The 1999 MICS findings indicate that out of 14.583 million households, only 22 percent use iodized salt. With tool kits provided by the DOH, field researchers tested the presence of iodine in cooking and table salt used in Filipino households. Households in rural areas (18%) are less prone to consuming iodized salt than those in urban areas (27%). Figure 9 shows the proportion of urban and rural households that consume iodized salt. Refer also to Table 26. Acute respiratory infections (ARI) Three of five children with ARI have received proper medical treatment. Acute respiratory infections (ARI), particularly pneumonia, are one of the leading causes of child deaths. In the 1999 MICS questionnaire, children with ARI are defined as those who had an illness with a cough accompanied by rapid or difficult breathing and whose symptoms were due to a chest problem, a clogged nose, or both. Included also were questions inquiring whether the caretaker was aware of the source of the problem and if treatment was sought. Sixteen percent of children under five years old had an acute respiratory infection in the two weeks prior to the survey. Approximately 64 percent of these children were taken to an appropriate health provider. Treatment was mostly administered in health centers. Tables 27-28 provide this information. 17 1999 MICS Antihelminthics More children in rural areas have been dewormed. In the 1999 MICS, caretakers were asked if the child (2-6 years old) was given antihelminthics medicine in the six months prior to the survey. Table 29 presents the proportion of these children who received deworming medicine. Out of 9.4 million children, approximately 42 percent had been dewormed, with more children in rural areas (45%) than in urban areas ( 40%) receiving such medication. Weight monitoring The weights of children are not regularly monitored. Post-natal infant care includes the monitoring of the child's growth in terms of height and weight. In the 1999 MICS, focus was given to weight monitoring of children. Table 30 presents the proportion of children (0-1 year old) who have been weighed regularly after birth. More children were not regularly weighed after birth. Out of 3.8 million children, only 46 percent had been weighed on a regular basis. Children's Rights Awareness ofCRC Most Filipinos know that children inherently have rights. Table 31 shows that out of 35 million Filipinos who act as caretakers of children below 18 years old, 84 percent know that children have rights and can identify at least one right. Awareness is higher among respondents from urban areas (88%) than those in rural areas (81% ). Table 32 provides a list of the most commonly identified children's rights. The right to education is the most frequently mentioned right for these caretakers (67%). It should be noted that only two percent have recognized that children should be defended and given assistance by the government. Birth registration Four of five children below seven years old have official birth certificates. The civil code and other laws in the country are concerned with the provisions of legal or civil rights to the citizens. The government therefore is the sole provider of such rights to its citizenry. Proof of one's claim to such rights depends much on official registration. A person's birth is one of the vital events for official registration. The official document of such recording of birth events is the birth certificate. Thus, the 1999 MICS included a module that would determine the extent of birth registration of children below seven years old. Out of 13 million children in this age bracket, 84 percent have their births registered, as shown in Table 33. Birth registration in urban areas (87%) is slightly more frequent than in rural areas (81% ). Across age, the lowest figure is at 77 percent among children less than a year old. No significant difference is recorded between boys and girls. 18 1999 MICS Respondents were also asked why the birth of the child was not registered. The cost of registration was one of the most frequently mentioned reasons. Other responses are indicated in Table 34. Orphanhood and living arrangements Four of five children still live with their parents. One of the most basic rights of children is to have a family who will love and care for them. This involves having a home they can call their own. Children who are orphaned or living away from their parents may be at increased risk of impoverishment, discrimination, denial of property rights and rights to inheritance, various forms of abuse, neglect, and exploitation of their labor or sexuality. Thus, monitoring the level of orphanhood and the living arrangements of children assists in identifying those who may be at risk and in tracking changes over time. Table 35 provides the proportion of children below 18 years old by their living arrangements. This indicates whether a child is living or not with both parents. Out of almost 32 million children, close to 84 percent are still living with both parents. There are about five percent who live with only one parent even if the other parent is still alive. About eight percent are not living with both parents with only less than one percent considered as orphans. It should be noted that only 10 percent of these children living with both parents are aged 15-17 years old. This indicates that more teenagers are living away from home. Table 36 offers a look at the proportion of children below 18 years old who live away from home by age group and sex. Of the 1.4 million children reportedly living away from their homes, there are more girls (56%) than boys (44%). This incidence is higher in the cases of children in rural areas who comprise 57 percent of the total number of children living away from their homes. Working childre11 More boys are involved in paid and unpaid work. More children in rural areas are engaged in such work. Child labor deprives children of their childhood. It endangers their health and education. It takes away all their chances to discover, explore, and carry out the promise of good life. It is therefore imperative to check the extent to which children work and the type of work in which they participate. Children who are working are less likely to attend school and more likely to drop out from school. Working conditions for children are often unregulated with few safeguards against potential abuse and exploitation. In addition, many types of work are ultimately hazardous to children. In the 1999 MICS, respondents were asked whether the child in the household performed any kind of paid or unpaid work for someone who is not a member of the household. Another question inquired if the child was involved in any economic activity, whether agricultural or not, that is operated by a member of the child's family. Table 37 presents in detail the number of children who are considered currently working. About five million children are said to be working for a family member or for someone else. 19 1999 MICS The survey estimates that about one million children aged 5-17 years old (5%) are engaged in paid work. Payment may either be in cash or in kind. Two percent (478,175) participate in unpaid work for someone other than a household member. There are more boys who belong to these two categories. Whether given a remuneration or not, children in rural areas are more likely working for someone other than a member of their households. Children in rural areas comprise 65 percent of all children who work in other family- operated activities, such as farming, fishing, manning retail stores or market stalls. Again, younger children (10-14) are involved in these kinds of work. Figure 11. Proportion of children (5-17) who are considered "working", Philippines, 1999. n = 4. 7 million oUnpaid work 10.1% 11rlPaid work 21.6% • Family- operated activity 68.3% Children who live away from their homes commonly find themselves employed in service-oriented jobs. Close to 1.2 million children (5-17) live away from home. As seen in Table 38, about 814,000 children (69%) are working either as household helper, food server, retail store attendant, or other jobs that provide service to clients. There are more girls doing such jobs. As may be expected, there are more children in urban areas who find themselves in an industrial type of work. Those engaged in agricultural work are more likely to be boys living in rural areas. IDV-AIDS Awareness Most women have heard of AIDS but only few have sufficient knowledge about it. In the 90s, there has been a widespread campaign on the nature of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and its full-blown state called the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). Although the rate of HIV-AIDS infection has not yet reached catastrophic level, information programmes have continued to educate people. Respondents in the 1999 MICS were given a set of statements that pertain to different issues concerning HIV-AIDS such as its ways of prevention, modes of transmission, and discrimination against people with HIV-AIDS. About 92 percent of women (15-49 years old) in the MICS are aware of HIV-AIDS. More women from urban than rural areas have heard of HIV-AIDS. The percentage is higher in 20 1999 MICS urban areas (94%) than in rural areas (88%). Younger women (15-24) appear to be more knowledgeable of the virus. (See Table 39.) More than 50 percent of females of reproductive ages can properly identify ways to prevent the transmission of the virus from one person to another as shown in Table 40. Seventy- two percent agree that having only one uninfected sex partner can prevent HIV transmission. A little over 50 percent believe that using a condom every time one has sex can prevent transmission. Table 41 contains the degree of agreement of respondents to statements on possible modes of transmission of HIV from one person to another. Sixty percent are aware that the virus can be transmitted with the use of an infected syringe. Close to 80 percent agree that a pregnant mother with HIV can infect the child. Most women (70%) tend to disagree with the misconception that a healthy looking person cannot be infected with the virus. However, only 40 percent are able to identify that getting the virus from mosquito bites is a misconception. (Table 42.) The 1999 MICS findings also suggest that women tend to exhibit discriminatory attitudes toward persons with HIV-AIDS. When asked if a teacher with HIV-AIDS should be allowed to work, approximately 62 percent of these women disagreed with the statement. About 73 percent dispel the idea of buying food from a vendor afflicted with HIV-AIDS. These are shown in detail in Table 43. A woman who has sufficient knowledge about HIV-AIDS is someone who knows the two ways to prevent transmission and has correctly identified the two misconceptions on HIV- AIDS mentioned above. Only two percent of the female respondents gave such accurate responses. (Table 44). Some 55 percent meanwhile know of a place where they can get tested for HIV-AIDS. As seen in Table 45, women in urban areas are more likely aware of a place than those in urban areas. Older women are less likely familiar with a place where HIV test is available. 21 APPENDIX A Summary of Indicators ---- ···--- - ------ ---- ----- - - -- Indicators derived from the 1999 Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey, Philippines 17 Primary school participation rate of children of school age (6-12) who are currently 86.4 89.5 83.8 in primary education 10,961 110 5,851 Preschool enrolment rate of children (3-6) who are currently attending some 15.3 17.5 13.5 of early childhood education 1,155 592 563 Literacy rate 88.9 94.1 83.3 Proportion of women (15-49) with a live birth in the year prior to Prenatal care the MICS who made at least one visit to a health clinic during 90.5 92.2 89.1 pregnancy 1,769 854 918 Childbirth care Proportion of live births of women (15-49) attended by health 46.1 31.4 14.5 personnel (doctor, midwife, nurse) 899 615 285 Low birth weight Proportion of women (15-49) whose infants weighed below 2.5 6.1 5.7 6.4 kilograms at birth 119 53 66 Mothers receiving vitamin A of mothers (15-49) with a high dose of vitamin A 11.0 13.1 9.1 infant was one month old 214 278 152 Children receiving vitamin A of children (12-59 months old) who have received a 36.1 35.1 37.0 dose of vitamin A in the past six months 2,792 1,233 1,562 Children with LBW receiving iron Proportion of infants with low birth weights who received iron 12.2 7.3 10.3 supplement 26 15 22 Indicator Definition Philippines . . Children with ARI who received Proportion of children (0-4) with Acute Respiratory Infection who 63.7 72.0 58.4 proper treatment received proper treatment 987 438 549 Children dewormed Proportion of children (2-6) who received antihelminthics 42.4 39.6 44.7 medicine in the past 6 months 3,995 1,701 2,294 Weight monitoring Proportion of children (0-1) whose weights are checked regularly 46.2 53.3 40.0 1 781 961 820 Iodized salt consumption Proportion of households consuming iodized salt .4 27.2 18.0 Proportion of caretakers who know that children have rights and identify at least one right 29,531 13,740 1 791 Birth registration Proportion of children (0-6) whose births were registered 84.1 87.5 81.3 13,285 6,103 7,182 Children away from home Proportion of children (0-17) who are living away from home 4.3 4.0 4.5 1,376 587 789 Working children Proportion of children (5-17) who are engaged in some type of work Paid work 4.6 3.7 5.3 1,025 378 647 Unpaid work 2.2 1.2 2.9 478 125 354 Family-operated activities 14.4 10.9 17.3 3,235 1,123 2,112 17,643 10,048 7,595 Knowledge of HIV-AIDS test Proportion of women (15-49) who know where to get an HIV-AI 54.6 59.9 48.0 test 10,523 6,394 4,129 Transmission of HIV-AIDS Proportion of women (15-49) who agree that HIV-AIDS can be 77.5 81.9 72.0 transmitted from a mother to her child at pregnancy 14,924 8,737 6,187 Transmission of HIV-AIDS Proportion of women (15-49) who agree that HIV-AIDS can be 60.3 67.7 51.2 transmitted when a drug abuser uses an infected syringe 11 ,617 7,225 4,399 Prevention of HIV-AIDS Proportion of women (15-49) who agree that not having sex with 71.6 78.5 63.0 multiple partners can prevent transmissioin of HIV-AIDS 13,794 8,378 5,413 Prevention of HIV-AIDS Proportion of women (15-49) who agree that the use of condom 55.4 61.7 47.5 can prevent transmission of HIV-AIDS 10 083 Misconception on HIV-AIDS Proportion of women (15-49) who agree with the misconception 35.0 36.4 33.2 that AIDS can be transmitted by mosquito bites 6,743 3,885 853 Misconception on HIV-AIDS Proportion of women (15-49)who agree with the misconception 13.4 11.6 15.7 that a healthy-looking person cannot get HIV-AIDS 2,582 1,238 1,349 Attitude toward a person with HIV- Proportion of women (15-49) who agree that a teacher with HIV- 25.7 32.2 17.7 AIDS but is not physically sick should be allowed to work 4 3,437 1,521 toward a person with HIV- Proportion of women (15-49) who agree that it is all right to buy 15.9 19.1 11.9 from a vendor with HIV-AIDS 3,055 2,037 1 18 APPENDIX B Tables List of tables Number Title 1 Cases of missing information for selected questions 2 Response rates for households, women and children 3 Single age distribution of household population by sex 4 Household population by sex and age group 5 Characteristics of households 6 Characteristics of women ( 15-49) 7 Distribution of children (0-17) by sex, area, and age 8 Literacy status of population ( 1 0 - older) 9 Enrolment rate of children (5-17) 10 Proportion of children (5-17) attending school by grade and year levels 11 Reasons for not attending school 12 Early childhood education rate for children (3-6) 13 Proportion of women (15-49) with a live birth in the year previous to MICS 14 Prenatal care: Number of visits made by mothers (15-49) to a health center 15 Prenatal care: Period during pregnancy of first prenatal care visit of mothers (15-49) 16 Type of personnel who provided prenatal care to mothers (15-49) 17 Symptoms recognized by pregnant mothers (15-49) before seeking health care 18 Type of personnel who assisted in the delivery of live births of mothers {15-49) 19 Identity of person who decided the place of delivery for mothers (15-49) 20 Actual birth weights of infants born in the year prior to the MICS 21 Proportion of mothers (15-49) whose infants have low birth weights 22 Perception of mothers (15-49) on the size of their infants at birth 23 Mothers (15-49) receiving vitamin A supplement 24 Children (1-4) receiving vitamin A supplement 25 Infants with low birth weights receiving iron supplement 26 Percentage of households consuming iodized salt 27 Proportion of children with Acute Respiratory Infection (ARI) who received treatment 28 Source of advice and treatment for children (0-4) with ARI 29 Children (2-6) who received antihelminthics medicine 30 Proportion of children (0-1) who are weighed regularly 31 Proportion of caretakers of children who are aware of the rights of children 32 Rights of children identified by caretakers 33 Proportion of children whose births were registered 34 Reasons for the non-registration of births 35 Living arrangements of children (0-17) 36 Children (0-17)who are living away from home 37 Children (5-17)who are currently working 38 Nature of work of children (5-17) who live away from home 39 Proportion of women (15-49) who have heard of HIV-AIDS 40 Women (15-49) who agree to statements on the prevention of HIV-AIDS 41 Women (15-49) who agree to statements on the transmission of HIV-AIDS 42 Women (15-49) who can identify misconceptions on HIV-AIDS 43 Women (15-49) who agree to non-discriminatory statements about a person with AIDS 44 Women (15-49) who have sufficient knowledge of HIV-AIDS 45 Women (15-49) who know where to get tested for HIV Table 1. Percentage of cases of missing information for selected questions, Philippines, 1999. Indicator Grade/year of education currently attending I Number of hours worked a. Outside the household b. Household chores ! Knowledge on the place to test for HIV r Birthweight of infants Reference population Children (5-17) currently attending school Working children (5-17) " Women (15-49) who have heard of HIV-AIDS I I Women (15-49) with a live birth in the last 12 months Source: NSO-UNICEF, 1999 Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey I Percent missing 0.04 0.59 0.07 0.25 0.27 3.94 Table 2 Number of households, women, and children and response rates, Philippines, 1999. Variable Households Sampled Completely interviewed rate Women (15-49 years old) Eligible 6,202 Completely interviewed 6,062 Response rate 97.7 Children 0-4 2,607 5- 17 6,073 Response rate of caretakers 0-4 98.3 5- 17 98.5 Note: The base values are still unweighted. Source: NSO-UNICEF, 1999 Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey 7,680 3,416 9,618 3,362 9,424 98.4 98.0 2,098 4,705 5,242 11,315 99.1 98.6 99.1 98.8 Table 3. Single age distribution of household population by sex, Philippines, 1999 . . Total Male Female 0 1,847 2.45 968 2.55 879 2.35 1 2,006 2.66 1,066 2.81 941 2.51 2 1,875 2.49 940 2.48 935 2.50 3 1,832 2.43 899 2.37 933 2.49 4 2,020 2.68 1,029 2.71 991 2.65 5 1,923 2.55 964 2.54 958 2.56 6 1,781 2.36 893 2.35 888 2.37 7 1,878 2.49 1,059 2.79 819 2.19 8 1,791 2.38 951 2.51 840 2.25 9 1,884 2.50 906 2.39 978 I 10 1,718 2.28 902 2.38 816 2.18 11 1,799 2.39 950 2.51 849 2.27 12 1,832 2.43 932 2.46 901 2.41 13 1,699 2.26 874 2.31 825 2.20 14 1,541 2.04 730 1.92 811 2.17 I 15 1,586 2.11 788 2.08 798 2.13 16 1,643 2.18 818 2.16 825 2.20 17 1,452 1.93 727 1.92 725 1.94 18 1,556 2.07 795 2.10 761 2.03 19 1,602 834 2.20 768 2.05 20 1,580 2.10 812 2.14 768 2.05 21 1,418 1.88 721 1.90 696 1.86 22 1,361 1.81 676 1.78 685 1.83 23 1,318 1.75 618 1.63 700 1.87 24 1,325 1.76 662 1.75 664 1.77 I 25 1,172 1.56 558 1.47 615 1.64 26 1,226 1.63 599 1.58 627 1.68 27 1,348 1.79 702 1.85 646 1.73 28 1,262 1.67 628 1.66 634 1.69 1 . Total Male Female I 30 1,401 1.86 695 1.83 706 1.89 31 1,018 1.35 505 1.33 513 1.37 32 1,060 1.41 530 1.40 530 1.42 33 1,051 1.40 504 1.33 547 1.46 34 972 1.29 515 1.36 457 1.22 35 1,006 1.34 518 1.37 488 1.30 36 898 1.19 431 1.14 467 1.25 37 920 1.22 477 1.26 443 1.18 38 907 1.20 458 1.21 449 1.20 39 1,004 1.33 491 1.30 512 1.37 40 1,029 1.36 503 1.32 526 1.41 41 686 0.91 350 0.92 336 0.90 42 837 1.11 453 1.19 384 1.03 43 763 1.01 381 1.00 383 1.02 44 694 0.92 328 0.87 366 0.98 I, 45 781 1.04 358 0.95 422 1.13 46 612 0.81 303 0.80 309 0.83 47 649 0.86 355 0.94 294 0.79 48 603 0.80 297 0.78 306 0.82 49 642 0.85 339 0.89 303 0.81 51 479 0.60 250 0.67 52 573 0.76 306 0.81 267 0.71 53 413 0.55 208 0.55 206 0.55 54 466 0.62 234 0.62 232 0.62 55 417 0.55 193 0.51 224 0.60 56 405 0.54 192 0.51 213 0.57 57 421 0.56 199 0.53 222 0.59 58 414 0.55 224 0.59 190 0.51 59 407 0.54 212 0.56 195 0.52 60 467 0.62 217 0.57 250 0.67 61 273 0.36 122 0.32 151 0.40 62 304 0.40 153 0.40 151 0.40 63 294 0.39 143 0.38 152 0.41 64 253 0.34 141 0.37 113 0.30 Total Male Female . II 65 354 0.47 154 0.41 200 0.53 66 207 0.28 109 0.29 99 0.26 67 238 0.32 112 0.30 126 0.34 68 182 0.24 95 0.25 86 0.23 69 196 0.26 91 0.24 106 0.28 Note: Details may not add up to an absolute total because numbers have been rounded off. Source: NSO-UNICEF, 1999 Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey Table 4. Household population by sex and age group, Philippines, 1999. Mif1tftMMMf1tWI#§i&itj Values in '000' 0-4 9,581 4,902 4,679 5-9 9,256 4,773 4,483 I 10 -14 8,590 4,388 4,202 15 -19 7,839 3,962 3,877 20-24 7,002 3,489 3,513 25-29 6,269 3,133 3,136 30-34 5,502 2,749 2,753 35-39 4,734 2,375 2,359 40-44 4,010 1,995 1 50-54 2,665 1,334 1,331 55-59 2,064 1,020 1,044 60-64 1,593 776 817 65-69 1,178 561 617 70- over 782 Note: Details may not add up to an absolute total because numbers have been rounded off. Source: NSO-UNICEF, 1999 Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey Table 5. Percent distribution of household by area, size, presence of children (0-17) and women (15-49), Philippines, 1999. Background characteristics Area Urban Rural Size of the household Only one (1) household member 2-3 household members 4-5 household members 6-7 household members 8-9 household members 10 and more than 10 members ' Number of households with: At least one child aged 0-1 At least one child aged 0-4 At least one child aged 1-4 At least one child aged 0-6 At least one child aged 2-6 At least one child aged 5-17 At least one child aged 0-17 At least one woman aged 15-49 I! Number of households: With a child aged 0-17 Without a child 0-17 With a woman aged 15-49 Without a woman aged 15-49 I I! I 7,027 7,556 471 3,072 5,003 3,290 1,584 1,164 780 2,046 1,704 3,032 2,252 9,110 11,156 3,827 1 Note: Details may not add up to an absolute total because numbers have already been rounded off. 48.2 51.8 3.2 21.1 34.3 22.6 10.9 8.0 5.3 14.0 11.7 20.8 15.4 62.5 76.5 26.2 76.5 Source: NSO-UNICEF, 1999 Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey Table 6. Percent distribution of women (15-49) by area, age group, marital status, obstetric record, and literacy status, Philippines, 1999. Background characteristics Literacy status Literate Moderately literate Illiterate 17,869 92.7 859 4.4 443 2.3 39 0.2 Note: Details may not add up to an absolute total because numbers have been rounded off. Source: NSO-UNICEF, 1999 Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey Table 7 Percent distribution of children (0-17) by sex, area, and age group, Philippines, 1999. Background Characteristics Sex Number ('000') Percent %' Male 16,396 51 .1 Female 15,711 48.9 ~l~ll~ili~~l~~tl~ll~ll1~~~i1~~1~l1~~ill~lllii~~lll~i~1i~ll~llij!~ll~1~~l~l~i~i~lili~i~i~~i~~t~l~i~~~i~i~i~~il~!~111llllli~ij1~I!l!j!j~lili~i~i~~li~i~f~~~[~J~li]1ll~l~~~;i~ii~fi~!~~~!~i~~il~i~~~~~l)~ Area Urban 14,746 45.9 Rural 17,360 54.1 !Jj~lllJJjif~t~~l~li~i~~lii1ili~~~i~i~~~~~~j~~~~j~i*i~~~~~~l~~~~ililif![ff~jJ~i~iii~iili~i~i1Ii~iffi[i11i~ii!ll~~iii~~li~i~~i~llli~iiili~li~iii~i!~1I~~li~iili~li1i~i~~~i~!~li1ili1i~1li~ilili~t~ Age 0. 2 5,728 17.8 3. 5 5,775 18.0 6. 8 5,449 17.0 9-11 5,401 16.8 12. 14 5,072 15.8 15. 17 4,681 14.6 iiiili~~~i~ili~~~i~~~~~~~IJiii11i1~i~~i1~1~liliii~1i~liliii~~i~~j!jiiillli~~~!l!~li!i~!~!liil!ili~~~i!I!~iiii1~l~~i~i~i~l!!ili~~~~i~i~i~i~i1i~i~~i~tfllll~~~i~iii~ili~~i~~~i~~i~i~i~~~liii~i~iiil Note: Figures may not add up to an absolute total because numbers have already been rounded off. Source: NSO-UNICEF, 1999 Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey Table 8 Literacy status of population (10 years and older) by sex, area, and age, Philippines, 1999 . Area, sex, age group • Sex Male 28,241 Female 28,255 Area Urban 29,113 Rural 27,383 Age group 10- 14 8,590 15-24 14,840 25-34 11,769 35-44 8,746 45-54 5,952 55-64 3,656 65 and over 2,941 Literate 88.3 89.5 94.1 83.3 87.0 93.5 92.1 90.9 86.8 78.1 69.8 Literacy status (%) Moderately literate 7.8 6.5 3.9 10.6 9.6 3.9 5.0 6.3 8.4 14.3 16.4 Illiterate 3.3 3.4 1.4 5.5 2.6 2.2 2.4 2.4 4.1 6.7 12.8 Note: Details may not add up to an absolute total because numbers have already been rounded off. Source: NSO-UNICEF, 1999 Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey ---- ------ --- Don't know 0.5 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.8 0.4 0.5 0.5 0.7 0.9 1.0 Table 9 Number of children (5-17) years old who are currently enrolled by age, sex, and area, Philippines, 1999. · Age Enrolled · Not enrolled · and Total Total •Nn• •fli'i'E'rw Area .KIIIIIJW Age 5 1,923 512 26.7 10.5 16.2 1,410 73.3 39.7 33.7 6 1,781 972 54.6 23.9 30.7 809 45.4 26.2 19.2 7 1,878 1,583 84.3 48.0 36.3 295 15.7 8.4 7.3 8 1,791 1,634 91.2 47.7 43.6 157 8.7 5.4 3.3 9 1,883 1,772 94.1 44.4 49.7 111 5.9 3.7 2.2 10 1,718 1,601 93.2 48.4 44.8 117 6.8 4.1 2.7 11 1,799 1,688 93.8 48.7 45.2 111 6.2 4.1 2.0 12 1,832 1,710 93.3 46.8 46.5 123 6.7 4.0 2.7 13 1,699 1,493 87.9 43.5 44.4 206 12.1 8.0 4.2 14 1,540 1,234 80.1 36.8 43.4 306 19.9 10.6 9.3 15 1,586 1,244 78.4 36.9 41.5 343 21.6 12.8 8.8 16 1,643 1 '181 71.9 33.5 38.4 462 28.1 16.3 11.8 17 1,452 819 56.4 27.6 28.8 633 43.6 22.5 21.1 5 897 261 29.1 12.4 16.7 636 70.9 35.6 35.3 6 790 447 56.5 26.7 29.8 343 43.5 25.0 18.4 7 857 764 89.1 52.6 36.5 94 10.9 6.9 4.0 8 829 799 96.4 52.7 43.6 30 3.6 1.9 1.7 9 823 789 95.8 46.3 49.5 35 4 .2 3.1 1.2 10 765 738 96.4 50.0 46.4 28 3.6 1.8 1.8 11 812 782 96.3 50.2 46.1 30 3.7 2.0 1.7 12 829 792 95.5 45.1 50.4 37 4 .5 2.4 2.0 13 730 692 94.9 46.9 48 .0 37 5.1 3.7 1.4 14 724 608 84.0 39.8 44.3 115 16.0 7.3 8.6 15 740 603 81.5 40.2 41.3 137 18.5 8.4 10.1 16 759 583 76.8 37.2 39.7 176 23.2 10.4 12.8 17 775 488 63.0 32.5 30.4 287 37.0 16.3 20.7 Rural 12,195 9,098 7l4i6 36.1 38',5 :31096 . 1&%· i~i4 15 . 2 10.2 5 1,025 251 24.5 8.8 15.7 774 75.5 43.3 32.2 6 991 526 53.0 21.7 31 .3 465 47.0 27.2 19.8 7 1,020 819 80.3 44.1 36.2 201 19.7 9.7 10.0 8 961 835 86.8 43 .3 43.6 127 13.2 8.5 4.7 9 1060 983 92.8 42.9 49.9 76 7.2 4.2 3.0 10 953 863 90.6 47.1 43.5 90 9.4 6.0 3.4 11 988 907 91.8 47.4 44.4 81 8.2 5.9 2.3 12 1,003 918 91.5 48.2 43.3 86 8.5 5.3 3.2 13 969 800 82.6 40.9 41.7 169 17.4 11 .2 6.3 14 817 626 76.7 34.1 42.5 191 23.3 13.5 9.8 15 847 641 75.7 34.0 41 .7 206 24.3 16.6 7.6 16 884 598 67.7 30.4 37.3 286 32.3 21.4 11.0 17 677 331 48.9 21.9 27.0 346 51.1 29.6 21.5 Note: Details may not add up to an absolute total because numbers have already been rounded off. Source: NSO-UNICEF, 1999 Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey Table 10 Proportion of children (5-17) who are currently attending school by grade/year level, Philippines, 1999. Currently attending school GradeN ear Urban Rural Pre-school 948 466 5.6 482 Grade 1 2,032 914 11.0 1,118 Grade 2 1,929 880 10.5 1,050 Grade 3 1,935 829 9.9 1,105 Grade 4 1,790 838 10.0 952 Grade 5 1,788 845 10.1 943 Grade 6 1,616 753 9.0 863 Year1 1,499 747 8.9 753 Year2 1,300 657 7.9 643 Year3 1,161 596 7.1 566 Year4 982 506 6.1 475 Post high school 459 310 3.7 149 Non-standard 4 4 0.1 5.3 12.3 11.5 12.2 10.5 10.4 9.5 8.3 7.1 6.2 5.2 1.6 Note: Details may not add up to an absolute total because numbers have been rounded off. Source: NSO-UNICEF, 1999 Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey Table 11. Proportion of children of school age not attending school by reasons for not attending in urban and rural areas, Philippines, 1999. Reasons Number of children who are not enrolled Total Urban Rural for not attending school WJNe!•iW-MtltnM8-eK•ltl•iW- 'Total Other reasons Lack of personal interest High cost of education Looking for work/employment Inaccessibility of school location llness/disability Inability to cope with school work Housekeeping 5i082 3,169 754 627 203 77 92 99 60 100 1,986 62.3 1,279 14.8 224 12.3 288 4.0 112 1.5 9 1.8 28 1.9 15 1.2 30 Note: The figures in this table have been rounded off to the nearest whole number. Source: NSO-UNICEF, 1999 Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey 3~ ., 3;096 60 25.2 1,890 37.2 4.4 530 10.4 5.7 339 6.7 2.2 91 1.8 0.2 68 1.3 0.5 65 1.3 0.3 83 1.6 0.6 30 0.6 Table 12. Proportion of children (3-6) who are attending some form of early childhood education programme by sex, area, age, Philippines, 1999. Attending programme Sex Male 3,785 13.9 528 Female 3,772 16.6 627 Area Urban 3,381 17.5 593 Rural 4,175 13.5 563 Age 3 1,832 10.3 189 4 2,020 14.5 293 5 1,923 19.7 380 6 1,781 16.4 293 Note: Details may not add up to an absolute total because numbers have been rounded off. Source: NSO-UNICEF, 1999 Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey Table 13. Proportion of women (15-49) with a live birth in the year previous to MICS by age and area, Philippines, 1999 . Women with live births in the past 12 months . • • Rural . I 15 -19 3,878 2.7 107 5.4 41 38.6 65 61.4 20-24 3,514 16.4 578 29.5 271 46.9 307 53.1 25-29 3,137 17.1 536 27.4 265 49.4 271 50.6 30-34 2,753 14.9 411 21.0 204 49.5 208 50.5 35-39 2,359 9.4 222 11.4 101 45.3 122 54.7 40-44 1,996 4.4 87 4.4 41 47.5 46 52.5 45-49 1,634 0.9 0.8 21.8 12 78.2 Note: Details may not add up to an absolute total because numbers have been rounded off. Source: NSO-UNICEF, 1999 Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey Table 14. Number of visits made by pregnant mothers (15-49) to a health center by age and area, Philippines, 1999. 15 -19 20 - 24 25-29 30-34 35-39 40-44 45-49 ·'tlr6~n~. 15 -19 20-24 25-29 30-34 35-39 40-44 45-49 Rural 15 -19 20-24 25-29 30-34 35-39 40-44 45-49 Mothers with live births ('000') 3,878 3,514 3,137 2,753 2,359 1,996 1,634 41 271 265 204 101 41 3 1,030 65 307 271 208 122 46 12 Number of visits made during pregnancy •~!oidM•••••••••II•+·N§I Percentage 14.9 29.3 37.8 10.8 6.1 4.7 34.4 38.9 16.0 4.4 9.7 28.9 30.8 21.0 7.7 5.6 35.0 32.4 17.1 7.5 5.0 39.2 35.0 12.2 7.4 20.8 27.0 34.9 15.4 1.9 8.1 36.1 30.9 5.8 26:0. 33.7 12.3 41.2 27.9 15.7 4.4 26.0 38.6 22.3 6.8 3.4 23.9 31 .3 26.7 9.2 5.8 30.1 30.5 21 .1 10.3 2.6 29.0 34.1 21.0 12.1 24.1 25.1 27.3 19.6 3.9 37.3 62.7 9.1 38.8 35.4 11 .2 ~.3 ;,7; 24.3 40.0 35.6 4.9 41 .8 39.2 10.5 2.3 13.0 33.7 30.2 15.5 6.2 5.3 39.8 34.3 13.2 4.6 6.9 47.6 35.7 4.9 3.6 17.7 28.7 41.9 11.7 46.2 22.1 1.1 1.6 1.9 2.4 1.2 0.0 24.9 2.9 1.9 5.5 2.2 1.2 0.0 0.0 1;~, 0.1 1.3 1.4 2.8 1.3 0.0 31 .7 Note: Details may not add up to an absolute total because numbers have been rounded off. Source: NSO-UNICEF, 1999 Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey Table 15. Period during pregnancy when mothers (15-49) made their first prenatal care visit to a health center by age and area, Philippines, 1999. Total 15 -19 20-24 25-29 30-34 35-39 40-44 45-49 I WrJ.:>ao 15 -19 20-24 25-29 30-34 35-39 40-44 45-49 Rurar. 15 -19 20-24 25-29 30-34 35-39 40-44 45-49 Mothers with live births ('000') 19,267 3,878 3,514 3,137 2,753 2,359 1,996 1,634 !I I .926 41 271 265 204 101 41 3 1,030 65 307 271 208 122 46 12 Period (in months) of first prenatal care --·· Percentage ,6.1 34£0 48:0 1012, 1*.7 2.1 31 .5 56.4 8.4 1.6 5.8 31 .1 51.2 11 .3 0.6 6.7 36.4 46.2 8.7 2.0 8.0 38.7 39.6 11.0 2.7 5.2 29.9 52.9 11 .7 0.3 4.7 26.4 59.3 9.6 0.0 47.5 24.8 ,7·:6 37.7 43.2 1'012 ~ :3· 50.6 41.5 3.8 4.1 6.2 33.5 44.4 14.7 1.2 8.5 40.3 40.8 9.4 1.0 9.5 39.5 40.2 8.5 2.3 9.3 32.3 53.2 4.6 0.6 4.6 37.9 42.7 14.8 0.0 62.7 37.3 0.0 4~9 30:6 52:4 1'0~3 1.8 3.5 19.5 65.7 11 .3 0.0 5.4 28.9 57.2 8.2 0.3 5.0 32.6 51.5 8.1 2.8 6.5 38.0 39.1 13.4 3.0 1.9 28.0 52.7 17.4 0.0 4.8 16.1 74.3 4.8 0.0 43.2 25.0 31.8 Note: Details may not add up to an absolute total because numbers have been rounded off. Source: NSO-UNICEF, 1999 Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey Table 16. Type of personnel who provided prenatal health care to mothers (15-49) with live births in the year prior to MICS, Philippines, 1999. Type of personnel Total Urban Rural " "who assisted mothers in the delivery of live births llmlilmDI - llmlilmDI . . Skilled attendant: Midwife Any skilled personnel Doctor Nurse Traditional attendant: Trained hi/of Untrained hi/of Unsure if trained/untrained Others 732 471 405 39 93 17 1 11 37.4 24.1 20.7 2.0 4.8 0.9 0.1 0.6 262 238 302 16 23 2 38 13.4 12.2 15.4 0.8 1.2 0.1 1.9 470 233 103 23 70 15 1 46 24.0 11.9 5.3 1.2 3.6 0.8 0.1 2.4 No prenatal care 147 7.5 53 2.7 94 4.8 No answer 40 2.0 24 1.2 16 0.8 Note: Details may not add up to an absolute total because numbers have been rounded off. Source: NSO-UNICEF, 1999 Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey Table 17 Proportion of mothers (15-49) with a live birth in the last 12 months and the symptoms they recognized before seeking health care during pregnancy, Philippines, 1999. Total Urban Rural Symptoms recognized M•N•M . M•N•M . M•N•PW . Vaginal bleeding 254 13.0 137 14.8 117 11.4 Headache, dizziness, blurred vision 241 12.3 117 12.7 123 12.0 Pale or anemic 200 10.2 92 10.0 107 10.4 Swollen face and/or hands 111 5.7 52 5.6 59 5.7 Others 277 14.2 132 14.3 145 14.1 Note: These figures represent multiple responses. Source: NSO-UNICEF, 1999 Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey Table 18. Type of personnel who assisted in the delivery of live births of mothers (15-49), Philippines, 1999. Total Urban Rural Type of personnel who assisted mothers in the delivery of live births . . Skilled attendant: Midwife 539 27.6 406 20.8 133 6.8 Doctor 308 15.8 183 9.3 126 6.4 Nurse 52 2.7 26 26 1.3 Traditional attendant: Trained hilot 807 41.2 208 10.6 599 30.6 Untrained hilot 124 6.3 52 2.6 72 3.7 Unsure if trained/untrained 35 1.8 7 28 1.4 Note: Details may not add up to an absolute total because numbers have been rounded off. Source: NSO-UNICEF, 1999 Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey Table 19. Identity of person who decided the place of delivery for mothers (15-49), Philippines, 1999. Area Urban Rural Age 15- 19 20-24 25-29 30-34 35-39 40-44 45-49 Mothers with ' live births ('000') 926 1,030 107 578 536 411 222 87 15 Self 296 31 .9 409 39.8 26 24.0 202 35.0 176 32.9 154 37.5 94 42.1 46 53.1 7 46.9 Total Husband Both 83 9.0 439 62 6.0 453 11 10.2 45 38 6.6 232 47 8.8 275 23 5.7 209 15 6.9 98 7 8.0 31 3 17.0 3 Note: Details may not add up to an absolute total because numbers have been rounded off. Source: NSO-UNICEF, 1999 Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey Others 47.5 108 11.6 44.0 105 10.2 42.4 25 23.0 40.1 105 18.2 51.2 38 7.0 50.8 25 6.1 44.4 15 6.6 35.2 3 3.6 20.9 3 17.7 Table 20 Proportion of mothers (15-49) with a live birth in the year prior to the MICS and actual birth weight of infants by area, Philippines, 1999. Area and Age of mothers Area Number of mothers with live births Birth weight in kilograms Urban 926 5.7 34.4 36.5 15.7 5.4 1.6 0.3 Rural 1,030 6.4 28.8 41.4 11.1 3.9 6.8 1.0 Age 15- 19 107 8.0 34.8 34.5 17.5 1.6 1.5 2.1 20-24 578 7.0 31 .2 38.9 15.2 5.0 2.3 0.2 25-29 536 4.3 32.2 41 .0 11 .5 3.9 4.3 1.2 30-34 411 8.6 26.6 43.3 8.9 5.9 6.6 35-39 222 2.9 40.6 27.6 20.5 4.1 3.0 1.3 40-44 87 4.5 28.9 41 .0 11.6 2.5 11.5 45-49 15 8.1 54.2 19.6 18.1 Note: Details may not add up to an absolute total because numbers have been rounded off. Source: NSO-UNICEF, 1999 Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey Table 21. Proportion of mothers (15-49) whose infants weighed less than 2.5 kg Philippines, 1999 . Infants with low birth weights • Total Urban Rural wu.r.w-aw.r.r.g 15 -19 107 8.4 9 7.1 6 5.1 2 2.0 20-24 578 6.9 40 34.0 16 13.8 24 20.2 25-29 536 4.3 23 19.3 8 6.9 15 12.5 30-34 411 8.5 35 29.8 16 13.2 20 16.6 35-39 222 2.7 6 5.4 2 1.3 5 4.1 40-44 87 4.6 4 3.3 4 3.3 45-49 15 6.7 1.0 1.0 i! ! Note: Details may not add up to an absolute total because numbers have been rounded off. Source: NSO-UNICEF, 1999 Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey Table 22 Proportion of mothers (15-49) with a live birth in the year prior to the MICS by actual birth weight of infants and perception of mothers on the size of the infant, Philippines, 1999. Perception of mothers on infant size by area Very large Larger than average Average Smaller than average Very small Don't know Very large Larger than average Average Smaller than average Very small Don't know Very large Larger than average Average Smaller than average Very small Don't know Number of mothers with live births 114 416 1,076 226 100 23 56 206 502 105 45 12 59 210 573 121 54 12 3.9 4.9 13.2 18.6 8.4 2.4 3.9 12.8 29.6 16.8 5.5 5.7 13.5 9.4 Birth weight in kilograms - 21 .0 38.5 13.9 24.2 41 .7 20.7 36.7 38.2 10.5 30.7 39.8 12.9 23.5 39.2 11.8 7.5 29.1 16.6 27.4 22.3 16.1 22.1 43.6 24.6 42.0 35.1 13.4 42.4 36.2 6.3 6.2 41.3 17.6 24.1 33.4 14.8 53.9 11 .8 26.4 39.8 31 .1 32.1 40.9 8.0 20.5 42.9 18.6 38.0 37.5 7.1 18.8 34.0 Note: Details may not add up to an absolute total because numbers have been rounded off. - 16.7 10.0 4.4 5.0 3.8 4.1 3.2 0.4 2.4 4.4 8.9 11.9 30.0 4.2 5.2 2.2 3.2 1.4 1.6 1.0 5.4 17.8 3.9 15.5 3.7 7.8 4.3 6.5 4.5 8.1 23.6 0.8 17.7 0.2 11.8 1.4 23.5 Table 23. Proportion of mothers (15-49) who received vitamin A supplement after giving birth by area, Philippines, 1999. ···~~"K'-'•It!'-!!t"'il•-lj.(n•MI-M•m•N-Wi•m•MI-Number of mothers who received vitamin A Total Before infant was 1 month old When mfant was 1-2 months old After infant was 2 months old Urban Rural 926 1,030 333 312 35.9 30.3 121 93 124 154 13.4 14.9 88 64 Note: Details may not add up to an absolute total because numbers have been rounded off. Source: NSO-UNICEF, 1999 Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey 9.5 6.3 Table 24. I Proportion of children (1-4 years old) who received vitamin A in the last six months, Philippines, 1999 • . Children who received Vitamin A Within last 6 months Prior to last 6 months Not sure when Not sure if received Never received • Mj•ltUjM . Mj.UUjM . Mj.U!t@M . Mj.U!tjM . Mjm!tjM . Sex Male 3,934 1385 35.2 881 22.4 24 0.6 555 14.1 1094 27.8 Female 3,800 1409 37.1 862 22.7 23 0.6 490 12.9 1018 26.8 Area Urban 3,513 1233 35.1 794 22.6 35 1.0 552 15.7 903 25.7 Rural 4,221 1562 37.0 950 22.5 13 0.3 494 11.7 1207 28.6 Age 1 2,006 765 38.1 417 20.8 16 0.8 199 9.9 610 30.4 2 1,875 619 33.0 465 24.8 4 0.2 278 14.8 512 27.3 3 1,832 652 35.6 465 25.4 11 0.6 244 13.3 462 25.2 4 2,020 758 37.5 394 19.5 18 0.9 323 16.0 525 26.0 Total figures may not add up due to rounding off. Source: NSO-UNICEF, 1999 Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey Table 25. Proportion of infants with low birth weight (LBW) who were given iron supplement by age group of mothers and by area, Philippines, 1999 Age group of mothers 20-24 25-29 30-34 35-39 40-44 45-49 Number of mothers of LBW infants 40 23 35 6 4 1 Infants (LBW) who received iron supplement Total Urban Rural lil!•ltiJ"'i,Aiil!•ltiJ"}M li•N•iJ"}M 1.6 2 9 7.4 3 1.5 6 2.6 3 2.6 3 1.5 2 1.6 2 0.9 5 4.1 5 2.3 4 3.3 4 1.8 1 1.0 1 0.6 Note: Details may not add up to an absolute total because numbers have been rounded off. Source: NSO-UNICEF, 1999 Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey Table 26 Percentage of households consuming iodized salt, Philippines, 1999. Area Urban Rural Total number of households ("000') 7,027 7,556 I With iodized salt Without I salt at home Percentage(%) Source: NSO-UNICEF, 1999 Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey Salt was not tested Table 27. Proportion of children (0 to 4 years old) with Acute Respiratory Infection (ARI) who received proper treatment, Philippines, 1999. Background , characteristics Sex Male Female Area Urban Rural il Age <1 1 2 3 4 Number of children ('000') 4,902 4,679 I~ 1,847 2,006 1,875 1,832 2,020 Children With ARI 17.3 849 15.0 700 13.8 608 20.1 941 18.1 334 18.2 365 14.8 278 15.9 291 13.9 281 Note: Details may not add up to an absolute total because numbers have already been rounded off. Received treatment 66.8 567 60.0 420 72.0 438 58.4 549 70.7 236 63.9 233 61.9 172 59.2 172 61.7 173 Source: NSO-UNICEF, 1999 Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey Table 28. Source of advice and treatment for children (0 to 4 years old) with ARI, Philippines, 1999. Source of advice and treatment for children with ARI • . Rural health unit/Urban health center Government hospital/clinic Private hospital/clinic Barangay health station Other private sources Private doctor/midwife/nurse Other public sources Pharmacy/store Community health worker 323 228 182 125 80 45 28 21 Note: These figures represent multiple responses. n = 987 children (0-4) with ARI 33 23 18 13 8 5 3 2 Source: NSO-UNICEF, 1999 Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey Table 29. Proportion of children (2-6) who received antihelminthics medicine in the past 6 months, Philippines, 1999 . Background characteristics • Received antihelminthics • . Sex Male 4,725 42.0 Female 4,706 42.7 1~1 Area Urban 4,301 39.6 Rural 5,130 44.7 Age 2 1,875 36.9 3 1,832 44.7 4 2,020 45.3 5 1,923 42.1 1 Note: Details may not add up to an absolute total because numbers have already been rounded off. Value ('000') 1,984 2,011 ! 1,701 2,294 692 818 914 808 Source: NSO-UNICEF, 1999 Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey Table 30. Proportion of children (0-1 year old) who are weighed regularly, Philippines, 1999 Background characteristics • Proportion of children (0-1 year old) 0 Weighed Not weighed . Sex Male 2,034 47.4 963 52.6 1,070 Female 1,820 44.9 818 55.1 1,002 I I I Area Urban 1,802 53.3 961 46.7 841 Rural 2,052 40.0 820 60.0 1,232 Age group < 6months 941 50.4 474 49.6 467 6-11 months 906 50.1 454 49.7 451 12-23 months 2,006 42.4 852 57.6 1,155 !II I I Note: Details may not add up to an absolute total because numbers have already been rounded off. Source: NSO-UNICEF, 1999 Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey Table 31. Proportion of caretakers of children (below 18 years old) who are aware of the rights of children, Philippines, 1999 Know that children have rights Can identify any one right Cannot identify Do not know that children have rights Mi•ltltN-·K·N··-··1·"»•- Note: Details may not add up to an absolute total because numbers have already been rounded off. Source: NSO-UNICEF, 1999 Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey Table 32. Proportion of caretakers of children (below 18 years old) who can identify the different rights of children, Philippines, 1999. Rights of children To have adequate food, a healthy and active body I II To have a family who will love and care for the child To be given opportunities for play and leisure To be able to express the child's view To be born, have a name and nationality To live in a peaceful community and a wholesome environment e ~ @I ~ To be defended and given assistance by the government . ill . Other rights Total eKmnw 19,716 66.8 12,885 43.6 10,383 35.2 9,530 23.7 4,434 15.0 I. 3,135 10.6 2,900 9.8 1.9 1,806 6.1 Note: This table represents multiple responses. n = 29,531 caretakers who can identify any one right of children Source: NSO-UNICEF, 1999 Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey Urban Rural 9,624 32.6 10,093 34.2 5,933 20.1 6,953 23.5 5,143 17.4 5,240 17.7 I 4,999 16.9 4,531 15.3 4,356 14.7 2,637 8.9 2,525 8.6 1,909 6.5 1,362 4.6 1,769 6.0 1,559 5.3 1,340 4.5 239.08 0.8 316.44 1.1 862.19 2.9 944.15 3.2 Table 33. Proportion of children (0-6 years old) whose births were registered, Philippines, 1999. Background characteristics Sex Male Area Urban Rural ll Age <1 1 2 3 4 5 6 •mm• *''""'* 6,759 6,526 6,103 7,182 II 1,847 2,006 1,875 1,832 2,020 1,923 1,781 Registered 83.7 5,655 84.6 5,521 87.5 5,337 81.3 5,839 76.5 1,413 83.4 1,674 86.3 1,618 84.4 1,546 86.7 1,752 85.9 1,651 85.5 1,523 Note: Details may not add up to an absolute total because numbers have already been rounded off. Source: NSO-UNICEF, 1999 Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey Table 34. Proportion of children (0-6 years old) whose births were not registered and the reasons for non-registration, Philippines, 1999. Total Reasons for non-registration (Values in percent) Background characteristics Sex Male Female Area Urban Rural Age <1 1 2 3 4 5 6 number of children 6,759 6,526 6,103 7,182 1,847 2,006 1,875 1,832 2,020 1,923 1,781 Costs too Must travel much too far 2.2 1.4 1.9 1.5 1.7 0.8 2.3 2.1 3.6 2.6 2.6 1.6 1.6 1.4 2.0 1.4 1.7 1.2 1.8 1.5 0.8 1 Note: This table represents multiple responses. Late, did not want to pay fine 0.6 0.8 0.4 0.9 0.5 0.6 1.4 1.1 0.5 0.3 0.3 Source: NSO-UNICEF, 1999 Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey Did not know Did not know Other child should where to reasons be registered register 0.9 1.7 6.7 0.8 1.2 6.2 0.5 0.7 5.4 1.1 2.1 7.4 0.9 1.3 11.7 0.5 1.8 8.1 1.1 1.4 5.7 1.1 1.2 7.1 0.7 1.9 5.2 0.9 1.1 3.7 0.7 1.3 3.9 Don't know 1.0 1.0 0.8 1.2 1.6 0.6 0.7 1.0 0.7 0.9 1.4 Table 35. Proportion of children (0-17 years old) by living arrangement, Philippines, 1999. Total Background number Living with characteristics of both parents children Living with mother only Father Father alive dead Living with father only Mother Mother alive dead Only father alive ('000') % ('000') Percentage(%) Sex Male 16,396 43.5 13,953 3.5 2.6 1.1 0.9 0.4 Female 15,711 40.4 12,999 3.7 2.8 1.3 0.8 0.5 Area Urban 14,746 38.1 12,217 4.5 2.9 1.3 0.5 0.4 Rural 17,360 45.8 14,735 2.8 2.6 1.2 1.2 0.5 Age 0-4 9,581 27.1 8,683 4.5 0.8 0.3 0.3 0.2 5-9 9,255 25.1 8,071 3.1 1.9 0.5 0.5 0.3 10- 14 8,590 21.4 6,874 3.4 3.9 1.3 1.3 0.8 15-17 4,681 10.3 3,323 3.1 6.0 1.8 1.8 0.7 I Not living with both parents nly mothe Both alive alive 0.8 5.1 1.2 6.5 0.8 6.3 1.1 5.3 0.2 2.6 0.9 4.6 1.4 6.8 2.0 12.9 I Note: Figures may not add up to an absolute total because numbers have already been rounded off. Source: NSO-UNICEF, 1999 Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey Both dead 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.1 0.3 0.6 0.8 Table 36 Proportion of children (0-17) who are living away from home by area, sex, and age group, Philippines, 1999. Children (0-17) who are living away from home Total Male Female Area Urban 14,746 4.0 587 42.6 299 21.7 288 20.9 Rural 17,360 4.5 789 57.4 312 22.7 477 34.7 Age group 0-5 11,504 1.3 152 11.0 72 5.2 80 5.8 6- 11 10,851 3.4 372 27.1 182 13.2 190 13.8 12- 17 9,752 8.7 852 61.9 357 25.9 495 36.0 Ill Note: Figures may not add up to an absolute total because numbers have already been rounded off. Source: NSO-UNICEF, 1999 Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey Table 37. Proportion of children (5-17) who are currently working by sex, area, and age group, Philippines, 1999 . Background characteristics Sex Male Female Area Urban Rural Age group 5-9 10- 14 15- 17 • • . Total 11,494 24.7 2,843 11,032 17.2 1,896 10,331 15.7 1,626 12,195 25.5 3,112 9,255 10.4 962 8,590 24.0 2,061 4,681 36.6 1,715 Children who are considered currently working Family-operated Paid work 60.0 1,922 40.6 661 13.9 40.0 1,313 27.7 364 7.7 34.3 1,123 23.7 378 8.0 65.7 2,112 44.6 647 13.7 20.3 749 15.8 78 1.6 43.5 1,447 30.5 413 8.7 36.2 1,038 21.9 535 11.3 Note: Figures may not add up to an absolute total because numbers have already been rounded off. Source: NSO-UNICEF, 1999 Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey Unpaid work 260 5.5 219 4.6 125 6.6 354 7.5 135 2.8 201 4.2 142 3.0 Table 38. Proportion of children (5-17) who live away from home by nature of their work, sex, area, age group, Philippines, 1999. Number of children who live away from home and nature of their work Background characteristics Male Female Urban Rural 5-9 10 -14 15-17 Total 520 668 507 681 252 445 492 Services 43.8 337 28.4 56.2 477 40.1 42.7 298 25.1 57.3 516 43.4 21.2 164 13.8 37.4 317 26.7 41.4 333 28.0 Industry Agriculture 94 7.9 81 6.8 119 10.0 70 5.9 157 13.2 51 4.3 55 4.6 100 8.4 65 5.5 19 1.6 82 6.9 46 3.8 65 5.5 86 7.3 Note: Figures may not add up to an absolute total because numbers have already been rounded off. Source: NSO-UNICEF, 1999 Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey Not classified 8 0.7 3 0.2 10 0.9 3 0.2 8 0.6 Table 39. Proportion of women (15-49) who have heard of HIV-AIDS by area and age, Philippines, 1999 . • Total number of women ('000') Have heard of HIV-AIDS • . Area Urban Rural ge Group 15-19 20-24 25-29 30-34 35-39 40-44 45-49 10,673 8,592 3,876 3,513 3,135 2,752 2,359 1,996 1,634 Percent 94.1 88.4 91 .0 90.8 90.6 93.7 92.4 92.6 90.6 Note: Figures may not add up to an absolute total because numbers have already been rounded off. Value ('000') 10,048 7,595 3,527 3,191 2,839 2,579 2,179 1,847 1,481 Source: NSO-UNICEF, 1999 Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey Table 40 Proportion of women {15-49) years old who agree to statements on the prevention of HIV-AIDS by area and age group, Philippines, 1999 Area Number and of Age Women group ('000) Area Urban 10,673 Rural 8,592 Age Group 15-19 3,876 20-24 3,513 25-29 3,135 30-34 2,752 35-39 2,359 40-44 1,996 45-49 1,634 Type of Prevention Not having sex with more than one partner Agree Disagree Don't know 78.6 6.2 15.3 63.0 7.1 29.8 69.9 6.9 23.2 71.1 7.2 21.7 71.6 6.5 21.9 73.8 6.7 19.5 73.5 5.2 21.3 73.0 5.7 21.3 68.9 7.9 23.2 Using condom everytime they have sex Agree Disagree Don't know Percentage (%) 61.7 18.0 20.2 47.5 15.6 36.8 53.0 16.5 30.5 56.0 17.5 26.5 57.1 15.2 27.7 57.8 17.7 24.6 55.4 16.7 27.9 54.8 18.3 27.0 53.3 18.1 28.6 Agree to both 57.0 43.1 48.6 51.0 52.1 53.1 51.6 50.7 48.5 Note: Figures may not add up to an absolute total because numbers have already been rounded off. Source: NSO-UNICEF, 1999 Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey {MICS) Agree Disagree to to one both 26.4 2.0 24.3 2.7 25.7 2.4 25.2 2.6 24.6 2.1 25.4 2.3 25.8 1.7 26.4 0.2 25.2 3.4 Table 41 Proportion of women (15-49) years old who agree to statements on the transmission of HIV-AIDS by area and age group, Philippines, 1999 Area Number and of Age Women group ('000) Area Urban 10,673 Rural 8,592 Age Group 15-19 3,876 20-24 3,513 25-29 3,135 30-34 2,752 35-39 2,359 40-44 1,996 45-49 1,634 Type of Transmission A drug user using an infected syringe Agree Disagree Don't know 67.7 12.3 20.0 51 .2 12.0 36.8 60.2 10.7 29.0 59.5 14.0 26.5 58.7 14.2 27.2 61.3 13.1 25.6 61.3 10.8 27.9 61.9 8.9 29.2 60.9 12.0 27.1 From a mother to her child during pregnancy Agree Disagree Don't know Percentage (%) 81.9 7.6 10.5 72.0 7.8 20.2 76.5 7.0 16.5 75.8 9.1 15.1 76.5 8.1 15.4 80.3 7.8 12.0 79.0 6.1 14.9 77.7 8.3 14.0 77.7 6.9 15.4 Agree to both 61.8 46.1 54.5 53.0 53.5 56.6 57.5 54.8 54.9 Note: Figures may not add up to an absolute total because numbers have already been rounded off. Source: NSO-UNICEF, 1999 Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey {MICS) Agree Disagree to to one both 25.9 2.1 31.1 2.3 27.8 1.6 29.2 2.6 28.1 2.5 28.5 3.0 25.4 2.0 30.0 1.6 28.9 1.6 Table 42 Proportion of women (15-49) years old who agree to statements on misconceptions on HIV-AIDS by area and age group, Philippines, 1999 Area Number and of Age Women group ('000) Area Urban 10,673 Rural 8,592 Age Group 15-19 3,876 20-24 3,513 25-29 3,135 30-34 2,752 35-39 2,359 40-44 1,996 45-49 1,634 Type of Misconception Can get virus from mosquito bites Healthy looking person cannot have AIDS Agree Disagree . Don't know Percentage (%) 36.4 41.6 23.4 11.6 76.7 12.4 33.2 29.3 42.4 15.7 57.8 30.0 33.5 34.8 34.8 13.5 67.4 20.9 33.4 38.1 31.4 15.6 66.3 19.9 35.2 37.5 30.1 13.4 67.4 21.1 38.4 35.6 27.8 13.7 70.7 16.6 36.1 35.9 30.4 11.6 69.5 20.4 35.0 35.2 32.3 12.6 69.4 19.5 34.5 34.4 34.2 11.8 69.0 21.2 Agree to both 4.6 4.8 4.7 5.6 5.4 4.2 3.9 4.1 3.8 Note: Figures may not add up to an absolute total because numbers have already been rounded off. Source: NSO-UNICEF, 1999 Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey (MICS) Agree Disagree to to one both 38.9 35.3 39.3 21.3 37.6 28.0 37.8 30.9 37.8 30.3 43.6 28.4 39.8 28.9 39.3 27.8 38.8 28.1 Table 43 Proportion of women (15-49) years old who agree to non-discriminatory statements about a person with AIDS by area and age group, Philippines, 1999 Area Number and of Age Women group ('000) Area Urban 10,673 Rural 8,592 Age Group 15-19 3,876 20-24 3,513 25-29 3,135 30-34 2,752 35-39 2,359 40-44 1,996 45-49 1,634 Non-discriminatory attitude Allowing a teacher with AIDS to continue teaching Buying food from a person with AIDS Agree . Don't know Percentage (%) 32.2 58.5 9.3 19.1 72.5 8.4 17.7 66.2 16.1 11.9 73.0 15.1 26.0 61.5 12.5 14.9 73.0 12.1 27.3 59.8 12.9 15.9 72.5 11.6 26.7 59.6 13.7 16.7 69.7 13.6 25.2 63.9 10.9 15.4 74.9 9.6 24.6 64.3 11.1 16.4 73.1 10.6 24.0 64.1 11.9 16.4 73.6 10.0 24.1 62.8 13.1 15.9 73.5 10.7 Agree to both 12.7 5.7 9.0 10.2 9.5 9.5 9.6 10.0 9.3 Note: Figures may not add up to an absolute total because numbers have already been rounded off. Source: NSO-UNICEF, 1999 Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey (MICS) Agree to one 25.9 18.1 22.9 22.8 24.4 21.8 21.8 20.4 21.5 Disagree to both 51.7 59.5 54.8 54.3 51.3 57.6 56.8 57.2 56.9 Table44 Women 15-49 years old who have sufficient knowledge of HIV/AIDS by background characteristics, Philippines, 1999. Area and Agegroup Area Urban Rural 20-24 25-29 30-34 35-39 40-44 45-49 Number of Women ('000) 10,673 8,592 3,876 3,513 3,135 2,752 2,359 1,996 1,634 % 94.1 88.4 91.0 90.8 90.6 93.7 92.4 92.6 90.6 Heard of AIDS ('000) 10,048 7,595 3,527 3,191 2,839 2,579 2,179 1,847 1,481 Know 2 ways to prevent HIV transmission ('000) 6,081 57.0 3,707 43.1 1,883 48.6 1,790 51 .0 1,633 52.1 1,461 53.1 1,217 51.6 1,012 50.7 793 48.5 Correctly identify 2 misconceptions about HIV ('000) 486 4.6 416 4.8 183 4.7 196 5.6 170 5.4 117 4.2 93 3.9 82 4.1 61 3.8 Note: Figures may not add up to an absolute total because numbers have already been rounded off. Source: NSO-UNICEF, 1999 Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey (MICS) Have sufficient knowledge 249 2.3 208 2.4 93 2.4 104 3.0 76 2.4 57 2.1 50 2.1 40 2.0 36 2.2 Table 45. Proportion of women {15-49) who know where to get tested for HIV by area, age group, Philippines, 1999 . Background characteristics • Aware of a place for HIV testing Area Urban Rural Age group 15- 19 20-24 25-29 30-34 35-39 40-44 45-49 . 10,673 8,594 3,877 3,513 3,136 2,753 2,359 1,995 1,634 • Percent 59.9 51.1 55.4 55.8 55.9 54.4 55.8 55.8 Note: Figures may not add up to an absolute total because numbers have already been rounded off. Value ('000') 6,394 4,129 1,981 1,945 1,749 1,539 1,284 1,114 912 Source: NSO-UNICEF, 1999 Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey APPENDIX C Questionnaire * Republic of the Philippines NATIONAL STATISTICS OFFICE 1999 MULTIPLE INDICATOR CLUSTER SURVEY November 1999 Set of sets CONFIDENTIALITY: This survey is authorized by Commonwealth Act No. 591 . All information obtained about any individual will be held strictly confidential. GEOGRAPHIC IDENTIFICATION PROVINCE CITY/MUNICIPALITY BARANGAY CLUSTER . -- --· · --- ---- -- - ---·· ---· -··· --- --- ---- ·· · · -- --· · ·· · ···· ··· · -·-- ·· · ----· · · ·· -·- · ··· . . . E A NUMBER -- -- ··· - --·-··· · . . . -- . . . . . . . -- --··· ··· ··· -· ··· -· · ····· -· · · ·· · · ---------- -- URBAN/RURAL (Urban = 1, Rural = 2) . --- --··- -·-·--····- -·· ·· ----- · · --- -- · · - · ·· -· ····· --- - MICS HOUSEHOLD SERIAL NUMBER . ···· ··· · -·· ···· ·· . . . . . ----- -· · · · --· ··· · ·· · -· · ·· - MICS HOUSEHOLD CONTROL NUMBER · ·· ··· -·-· -··· ··- · -· · ·· ··-· ····· ···· ··· · -- -- -- ---·- NAME OF HOUSEHOLD HEAD ADDRESS I INTERVIEWER VISITS 1 2 3 FINAL VISIT DATE DAY --· ·· ·---- ---- ---- -· TIME BEGAN TIME BEGAN --- -- - TIME ENDED TIME ENDED . RESULT* RESULT* . . -- INTERVIEWER'S NAME INTERVIEWER'S AND SIGNATURE CODE NEXT VISIT: DATE TOTAL NUMBER D TIME OF VISITS . ··· · · ·· · ·- RESULT CODES 1 COMPLETED TOTAL NO. OF rn 2 PARTLY COMPLETED ELIGIBLE WOMEI-.J · · · ·· ·· ·· · 3 POSTPONED 4 REFUSED 5 HOUSEHOLD NOT AROUND/NO AVAI LABLE NO. OF INTERVIEWS . rn RESPONDENT COMPLETED . 6 OTHER (SPECIFY) PROCESSING RECORD - FIELD EDITED BY OFFICE EDITED BY KEYED BY NAME SIGNATURE rn f----· KEVER'S DATE CODE A. HOUSEHOLD MEMBERSHIP MODULE I would like to know some information about the members of this household . - -- - - - - ---- - --------- -- - - - ---·-·-··- - - --,.-·-- - - - -- ·-··- - -.,-- - -,---- - -·- --··-- ------ - - LINE USUAL RESIDENTS RELA- SEX AGE NO. TIONSHIP ----!----···---- - - ----- ·----·- -- EN- CIR- CLE LINE NO. OF RES- PON- DENT (1) Please give me the names o f the persons wl1o usually live in your household starling with the head of the household . (LAST ~lAME , FIRST NAME) ·- - - (2) TO HEAD OF HOUSE- HOLD -- - - - - ----- What is the rela- tionship of (NAME) to the head of this house- hold? ENTER CODE - --- (3) 1------- - ------ Is How old was (NAME) (NAM E) on male or his/her last female? bi rthday? E~I T ER IF 2 98 ' YRS . FOR OLD 98 OR YRS. BELOW, OLD ENTER AND NO. OF OVER MOS. 1 MALE 2 FEMALE (4 ) (5) (6) CHECK IF 10 YRS. OLD OR OVER (7) FOR PERSONS AGE 10 OR OVER ENTER I What is 1 IF the ocw marital AND I status of GO TO (NAME)? NEXT HH MEM· BER 2 IF NOT ocw ENTER CODE (8) (9) Can (NAM E) read and write a simple message in any language or dialect, easily, wi th di fficulty or not at all? ENTER CODE (10) 01 02 - --- -----·--·······---··-·- - ----- ---- - - 1----+---- - f----1·- - --1- - -- t-- - - - 1 - - ----·-- ---- ---------- ---··-·-- ·-··---- -- - - --- --+-- ---i----1- - ·--t-- - - - - 03 - - - - - - - - - --- - ···-··- -- -- - - -······-- ·····--···- - - ------ -- - 1----1-- ---1-- - - -- ----- 04 ---- - --'--·-------------· ·--- -··-- -- -----· - - --··-·- - ·1--- -t-- ·- - -1-------+---- -1 05 ···-·· ·-·---- --···· ···- ·-··-- - ·-·· -·--· ·-- -- f- ---1- - -- - - ----- - ---- - - 06 ·- ···--- - ------- - ----·- ---- - -- - - ----·-··- - - ----- ------- ~---t---1----+--- -·--t----- - 1 07 !------!···-- ---- - --- - ---- 08 . ·----- - -···-··--f-- - -1-- -- - - ---·-·--- ------ - 09 -- ----- -· --- ---- t- ---1-··- - - - - - -····-···- f- - ··--- - 10 11 ··-. ···-· -- ---· ·--------1--- - 1---- -·-- ··---- -··--··· ·- ----- - - --- ----··--· -··-----··-·-·-- - -·- - -·---- --- ·-·-----····- ··- - - --------+---+- - - - - -- ------ - - - - - 12 --- -- --- - ------ --········--·- - ···-f--- -·-·-··-· . ··---------·· ·-- - - - - -·- t---.,.·- - -+---- - -r------- 13 -- --- - ---------·--··--·-·- . ·-··- -···--- ··-··-·-·-- -- ··-·---·----··- . --- -- ----- --1--- -+--- -·- - ---·- ·- - ----- - 14 1---- - ----··· -·--·- - - -·--·-- ---- ··-·· ····- ----·····-··- - - --·····- ·- ---·- ----·-·· ·- - - --·+----1------ -·· --··-- 1------- - - 15 - -·-- - - ---· -·· - -----·---·--····-····- - - ·-- ···- - - - ·-······- - -- --- --· ·- ·- · · ··-···-··- ---··· . --· Just to make sure that I have a complete listing, I have listed _ _ people. Is this correct ? MAKE APPROPRIATE CORRECTIONS, IF ANY. TICI< HERE IF CONTINUATION IS USED. D B. CHILDREN (0 TO 17 YEARS OLD) AWAY FROM HOME Do ~ou ~::e any children a~ed ~~~ G~ :;~;:~11dEI~.il~~~l~ew llere7 __ -- -·--·-- - - -- · - - ------ -- . __ Q ____ _ (a) (b) (c) J-·---1--- --- ----- ----- ------····------- ···-·------··-·-·- - - -···---- ----- - --r----- -----'--- --1 2 Please give me tile names o f all children who live away frorn home, _ _ _ star~~g _fc()nl th_e _(l!dE)sl, _ . __ . . 3 Is (NAME) rnnle or female? 1 MALE 2 FEMALE D -----~--· · 4 How old was (NAM E) on his/her last birthday? CD 5 AGE OF (NAME) IS 5 TO 17 YEARS ? 1 YE S 2 NO - -·-1> GO ·10 ~I EXT CHILO liVI NG /\WAY FR OI•I HOME [] 3 DON'T KNOW - -· ·---- - - --·------ . . -- - - ---· · 6 W as (NAME) C l l~ageci in <l ilY eco 110111ic ilct ivity during tile past week? 1 YES - - ·- __ _ l_~~I{TI9:J_?Vv _ _ ::::}-• ~~~~~~~~~:!~.~~!HOI,JE 7 What is the nature o f hi s/her work? . - - . ··- . c==r==T==i" - D (DESCRIBE I HF SPECIFIC II'.:: I IVI IY, E.G., 001.1FSTIC IIFLI'ER , TYPIST, ___ _ E~~s:~~~CI(II~~ -~ IS:) _ --·· _ _ ____ _ _____ . _ ··- ··-- - •. · ·=·---~====~ 8 What is lh e major type of business/inclustry of ( I~AM E)? 1 AGRICULTURE 3 SERVICES D 2 IIIDUSIR I D OJ D D 0 -------.-~ -·----[I] D D ·· rrn ···-·--rrn D D A. HOUSEHOLD MEMBERSH.IP MODULE C. EDUCATION MODULE FOR CHILDREN FOR CHILDREN 0 TO 17 YEARS OLD 3 TO 6 YEARS OLD Who is the Is Does Is Does Is (NAME) currently During CHECK mother or (NAME'S) (NAME'S) (NAME'S) (NAME'S) CHECK attending any the past LINE IF the primary natural natural natural natural IF organized learning week, NO. 0-17 caretaker of mother mother father father live 3 T06 or early childhood about YRS. this child? alive? live in this alive? in this YRS. education how OLD house- house- OLD programme such as many · . : RECORD LINE hold? hold? a private or hours did NO. OF government facility, (NAME) MOTHER/ including attend? CARETAKER kindergarten or day care (includes Rural Improvement Club ENTER '00' IF Centers)? CARETAKER IS 1 YES 1 YES 1 YES 1 YES 1 YES NOTA ENTER MEMBER OF 2 NO, 2 NO 2 NO, 2 NO 2 NO, GOTO NUMBER THE GOTO GOTO COL. 22 OF HOURS HOUSEHOLD COL 16 COL 18 (11) (12) (13) (14) (15) (16) (17) (18) (19) (20) 01 - 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 · . ·. 09 10 - 11 12 13 14 ~ ----~- 15 -- . . _____ ------ ····-·· - - -- - -- -·· ------ --------- -- ----- --- - ------- ----- ---- -------------- CODE FOR COL 3 CODE FOR COL 9 CODE FOR COL 10 (RELATIONSHIP TO HH HEAD) (MARITAL STATUS) (LITERACY) 01 HEAD 1 NEVER MARRIED 1 EASILY 02 WIFE OR HUSBAND 2 MARRIED/IN UNION 2 WITH DIFFICULTY 03 SON OR DAUGHTER 3 WIDOWED 3 NOT AT ALL 04 SON-IN-LAW OR 4 DIVORCED 9 DON'T KNOW DAUGHTER-IN-LAW 5 SEPARATED 05 GRANDCHILD 06 PARENT 07 -88BENT-IN-LAW 08 BROTHER OR SISTER 09 OTHER RELATIVE 10 ADOPTED/FOSTER/STEP CHILD 11 NOT RELATED : C'i,;~eptJc:AitloN ·MoouLi:··· "~ ~~' . "· FOR CHILDREN 5 TO 17 YEARS OLD Has What is Is What During the During What Did What (N.i:ME) the (NAME) was the current the past grade or (NAME) grade or CHECK ever highest currently main school week. year is attend year did CHECK LINE IF attend- grade/ attending reason year, did how (NAME) school (NAME) IF NO. 5i17 ed year/ school? for nQt (NAME) many current- last attend wo- VRS. • school? level attend- attend days did ly year? last MAN OLD ' comple- lng school at (NAME) attend- year? 15-49 ted by school? any time? attend ing/has YRS. (NAME)? school? atten- OLD ded? 1 YES 1 YES, 1 YES, 1 YES ENTER GOTO ENTER GOTO WRITE ENTER ENTER CODE COL. 28 CODE COL. 29 NUMBER CODE CODE OF DAYS 2 NO, 2 NO, 2 NO 2 NO, IN SPACE GOTO GOTO GOTO BELOW COL.32 COL. 32 COL. 30 (21) (22) (23) (24) (25) (26) (27) (28) (29) (30) (31) (32) 01 02 - 03 04 05 •··· 06 07 08 . 09 10 ·~·> ·~?' ., . 11 • 12 - 13 14 15 · . ·· CODES FOR COL 26 CODES FOR COLS. 24, 29, AND 31 :REASONS FOR NOT ATTENDING SCHOOL) (GRADE/YEAR/LEVEL) 1 SCHOOLS ARE VERY FAR/ 98 NO GRADE COMPLETED NO SCHOOL WITHIN THE BARANGAY 2 NO REGULAR TRANSPORTATION 00 PRESCHOOL 3 HIGH COST OF EDUCATION/ PARENTS CANNOT AFFORD EXPENSES ELEMENTARY SECONDARY 4 ILLNESS/DISABILITY 01 GRADE 1 11 FIRST YEAR 5 HOUSEKEEPING 02 GRADE 2 12 SECOND YEAR 6 EMPLOYMENT/LOOKING FOR WORK 03 GRADE 3 13 THIRD YEAR 7 LACK OF PERSONAL INTEREST 04 GRADE 4 14 FOURTH YEAR 8 CANNOT COPE WITH SCHOOL WORK 05 GRADE 5 15 GRADUATE 0 OTHERS. SPECIFY - - - - - - -- 06 GRADE 6 07 GRADUATE 20 POST SECONDARY COLLEGE OR HIGHER 2 1 NON-STANDARD CURRICULUM E.G., MADRASAH D. SOCIO-ECONOMIC MODULE NO. QUESTION ---------------- -------------- Does your household have/own: Electricily? A radio/radio cassette? A television") A telephone? A cellular phone/pager? A refrigerator/freezer? An airconditioning unit? VHSNCDIDVD? Personal computer? Microwave oven? CODING CATEGORIES ELECTRICITY- ----- -·--- -- --- RADIO/RADIO CASSETTE _ TELEVISION- ---- ------- -- ---- TELEPHONE------- ---··· · CELLULAR PHONE/PAG ER REFRIGERATOR/FREEZER _____ . . . . . . . AIRCONDITIONING UNIT __ VHs/vcD/DVD _____ ___ ____ __ ------- ---·- · -· -- PERSONAL COMPUTER __ MICROWAVE OVEN SKIP TO YES NO 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 -----~-------------------------------------~----------------------------4-----~----~-------l 2 Does any member of your household own: A bicycle? A motorcycle? A car/jeep/van? A motorized banca/boat? A tractor? 3 How many rooms are used for sleeping by your household? 1- 4 MAIN MATERIAL OF THE FLOOR RECORD OBSERVATION. YES NO BICYCLE 2 MOTORCYCLE -- -- ------ -·· ·· · ·· · 2 CARIJEEP/VAN ___ _ ····· ---- ---- - ---·---- 2 MOTORIZED BANCA/BOAT _____ ----- -- - 2 TRACTOR 2 NO. OF ROOMS __ [I] NATURAL FLOOR EARTH/SAND_ RUDIMENTARY FLOOR WOOD PLANI<S PALM/BAMBOO __ FINISHED FLOOR PARQUET OR POLISHED WOOD . -·- · · - · · · · · · · ·· ·- VINYL OR ASPHALT STRIPS CERAMIC TILES CEMENT--- ------···· ·- --·-· -· -· MARBLE ____ __ ·····-- ·- --·-·-·--··- · · · -· -· -·-· -· -· ·- OTHERS , SPECIFY------------------ 2 3 4 i 5 6 7 8 0 ----- --------- ------------------ -------- - - - - --+----------------------------- ---'------i------- 5 MAIN MATERIAL OF THE ROOF RECORD OBSERVATION. GALVANIZED IRON/ALUMINUM __ TILE CONCRETE/CLAY TILE------- --·- --· HALF GALVANIZED IRON AND HALF CONCRETE WOOD ___ _________ __ ···· ·---- --------·-- -- - COGON/NIPA/ ANAHAW ASBESTOS _________ _ ---- ---- ----- ----·· MAKESIIIFT/SALVAGED/IMPROVISED MA-TERIALS OTHERS , SPECIFY--------------- 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 t------t-------------------------------1---- ------- -----------l--,---1-----~ 6 MAIN MATERIAL OF THE WALLS CONCRETE/BRICK/STONE__ _ . . . _ 1 RECORD OBSERVATION . E. SALT AND IODIZATION MODULE WOOD 2 HALF CONCRETE/BRICI</STONE AND HALF WOOD . . . . . . . . GALVANIZED IRON/AL UMINUM __ . BA~IBOO/SAWALI/COGON/NIPA ASBE STOS __ GLASS MAKESHIFT/SAL'/AGEOII MPROVISEO MATERIALS_ 01 HERS , SPECIFY ------------ NOWAU.S . . . 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 We would like to ch eck tile type of sa lt used by your housel10 ld. ~ ~~:~:~::5~~,~~~~f~~~;~~~:;:,,;;.:~-~-:f:~\~~E~~~ocATEGo,;,s ~l·l-1'""'o- RECORD -~E-~~--~U fCOME . SALT I JOT T~=E:~~o~~E-~ - -------- - ~ 4 ~ - 2 Do you use the same for your Iallie sa lt'! IES 1 1 ------++- NEXT 110 i 2 ! MO- 3 May I see the SCJmple of the srJ IIIJ serl <IS t<Jble s<Jit? EXAMINE HIE Sf\ i. r RFCORD 1 EST ')U !COME. --- lit""~ NOT USII•IG TABLE SALT . IODIZFll (WITH COLOR ) I lOT IOD17FD (110 CO! OR ) 1-!0 S/\\.lll ll-101,\E . SALT I<O f TESfEO/r-JQT SEEI·J F. MATERNAL AND INFANT HEALTH MODULE WOMEN 15- 49 YEARS OLD NO. NAME:------==== rn LINE NO. LINE NO. NAME: - - ---==== rn QUESTION NAME: _____ _ rn LINE NO. r-Tn ,---- - ·-l2l- ·----- -----·----·- (3) ---- - ------~4) Have you ever given YES . . 1 YES ----- 1 YES ·-· ·-·-· ··· · ··· I birth? NO . . . ] NO ·J NO . J I mean, to a child who ever breathed or cried or GOTO GOTO GOTO showed other signs of life even if he or she Jived MODULE G MODULE G MODULE G only a few minutes or --·- _lJours2_ _______ _ ______ ----- ··---·------ -- ·------- --- - ------1---------- --- 2 Of all births you have had, when did you deliver the last one (even if he or she has died)? --------- -- - --------- DATE OF LAST BIRTH: DATE OF LAST BIRTH: DATE OF LAST BIRTH: MONTH DAY YEAR MONTH DAY YEAR MONTH DAY YEAR OJ OJ DJJJ OJ OJ I I I I I OJ []] OTIJ DK.DA TE OF LAST Dl< DATE OF LAST DK DATE OF LAST BIRTH __ . 99999999 l BIRTH . __ 99999999l BIRTH _ . 99999999l GO TO MODULE G -.1 GO TO MODULE G -.1 GO TO MODULE G -.1 3 DID THE WOMAN'S LAST YES _ . 1 YES --- __ 1 YES __ __ __ . . BIRTH OCCUR WITHIN NO NO ___ _9_~Y~n2t~~r;~;o~~=~---.Q9 TO_MODUL!0_9__~ __ __ .QQ~J_Q_r0_~~~h!O G -~ ~~Q_iQ ~QP;_L_~~ :.J YES YES --· YES . . ___ __ _____ -- ····· _1 _1 NO/NOTVEIW NO/NOT VEI~Y NO/NOT VEI~Y 4 When you were pregnant wilil your (NAME OF LAST CHILD), did you have a good/cle<Jr vision at daytime? WELL . . . . . . . 2 WELL 2 WELL . ____ ______ ----··-- 2 DON'T f<NOW 9 DON'T 1\NOW __ 9 DON'T KNOW 9 5 During that pregnancy, did you experience any of the following : YES NO OK ~~l~o ·---.--D-K- l-Y-E_s_ [ ____ ~;-r-;~-- 1 f 1 I 2 9 2 Sa Haziness/Blurred of vision 9 ,I 2 9 at dusk or nigc:h_t:.:t:::in:.:.le"_?:.· ----1f-----·- - ---------- ___ ___ _ _ _ _ 5b Bumping into things <Jt 2 9 2 9 9 ___,! 1 [,-·- ----2 2 _ _____ 9 9 - - dusk or night time? _ 5c Immobility because of 2 9 2 poor or no vision at dusk t---t--o~r__l_l_ig!:J!c.:ti"n'-'-'le'-'? _ _____ 1 ___________ _ ______ ------- ------ --- --+--: _ _ __________ _ 5d Groping in dark or 2 9 2 9 2 9 ___ __r:JJ_g_J:l.!tjr_ll_~1 _ ______________ _____ - -------- -·---------- --- ---------- ----- -- --- --- - - ---1--- - --- - ---- ------- Se Inability to CJdap l to 1 2 9 1 2 9 2 9 darkness inside movie -- --- _b_~§E)SO~ -~_ar~_ p_I_<JCE)~? ___ ___ _ -- - - - --------------- -- --------- - ------ - ------- - - 6 7 When you were pregnant with your ICJst chi ld, did youi;-Ji(e iron supplenr ent? During lili s pregn,mcy. did you t:1ke iron supplernent dCJily for :1 period of six ITlon tils or 11101 e? Did )'OU see :1nyn11'? for pren;-J lill C;Jr e lor t1 1is preg iJ811Cy? IF YES: Wllo1n rlid you S(~0 ') YES __ 1 YES _ _ . 1 YES . . 1 NO . 2 J NO ~~ NO j GQ_IQ 0 ,8 ,._ _ _ ___ QQ_IQ_9c_§_ _ _ ____ G_O_TO ~_I!_ ____ __ YES NO - . . 2 IIEi\LTII Pf\O I'E SS IOI,IAI. noc1 C' l' . A NURSE R MIIYNIFE _ C HI LOT TP i\ II•IFil ll UI·JlllAINEU ___ E Dl< If m All-- lED OR Ul-lrf'AII·IED O i liER (' ·' ~ ~.~ 110 ONE r;( I 'I 0 0 . 1 I YES NO . . - __ 1 . ---- _.2 HEALTH PROFESSIONAL: DOCTOR_ ~IUI<S E MlrJWJFE _ HI LOT: A B c '\PAINED I) lii~THA I NEU__ _ ___ E Dl< IF Tf<AINED OR UNTIU1III F: D F () JIIU~ _____ __ ____ (; (Si"F . CIF \) ~10 ()I- IF r ;() I () r) I I ~IJ YES . . - ____ _ 1 NO . . . . . 2 HFALTI-1 Pr<O rF.S Si mJAL_ DOClOR. A NUilSE R ldiDWIFE . C I-IILOT: TRAINED 1.11-l mf,I I·H=I J 1)1\ IF TRAINED em UNTF<i\11--I EIJ OTIIEI' ~10 ONE (-;(} TO 0. I I () E F , . F. MATERNAL .AND INFANT HEALTH MODULE / / WOMEN 15 - 49 YEARS OLD NO. QUESTION NAME: NAME: NAME: LINE NO. OJ LINE NO. OJ LINE NO. OJ (1) (2) J3) (4) (5) 9 How many months MONTHS OJ MONTHS ITJ MONTHS OJ pregnant were you when you first received prenatal DON'T KNOW DON'T KNOW 98 care? DON'T KNOW ····· . . 98 . . . 98 . · ·· ···- 10 How many times did you NO. OF TIMES ITJ NO. OF TIMES ITJ NO. OF TIMES OJ receive prenatal care during this pregnancy? DON'T KNOW 98 DON'T KNOW 98 DON'T KNOW 98 ···· ··-· · · " ·· ···· . . . . ·-···· f--- . --- 11 When you were pregnant with (NAME OF LAST YES 1 YES 1 YES 1 CHILD) did you know of ·· --· · · ··- · · · · · ··· --··· " -· ··· ··· ·· ·· ·· ····· · - . . . . . ·- -· · · ·· ·- ·· ···-·· any signs, symptoms or conditions that would NO . . . . . . . ~ NO . . . . . . :] NO ··········---·····---~ cause you to go to a GOTOQ.13 GOTOQ.13 GOT00.13 health facility/professional health care provider right away? 12 What are these symptoms VAGINAL BLEEDING . " A VAGINAL BLEEDING ---- --- A VAGINAL BLEEDING ··· -··· A or conditions? HEADACHE. DIZZINESS, HEADACHE. DIZZINESS, HEADACHE, DIZZINESS, BLURRED VISION ·--- B BLURRED VISION . . B BLURRED VISION . . B What else? SWOLLEN FACE AND/ SWOLLEN FACE AND/ SWOLLEN FACE AND/ OR HANDS · · · - ··· ·· --· c OR HANDS ··· ··· ·· . . c OR HANDS ··· ···· ··· ··· c PALE OR ANEMIC --- -· -· D PALE OR ANEMIC . D PALE OR ANEMIC . . D OTHER E OTHER E OTHER E (SPECIFY) (SPECIFY) (SPECIFY) 13 Where did you give birth HOME HOME HOME to (NAME)? OWN HOME . . -- -- --- 11 OWN HOME " --- - ---- ·· 11 OWN HOME ····-- -- ---- 11 OTHER HOME ·- --·- ·· 12 OTHER HOME ····· ··· .1 2 OTHER HOME · -· ··· ·· . 12 PUBLIC SECTOR PUBLIC SECTOR PUBLIC SECTOR GOV'T. HOSPITAL . . 21 GOV'T. HOSPITAL -·· · 21 GOV'T. HOSPITAL . . 21 HEALTH CENTER/ HEALTH CENTER/ HEALTH CENTER/ RHU/BHS ···- --·· ··- 22 RHUIBHS ·-···· ·· . 22 RHUIBHS ···· ····· ··· · 22 LYING-IN . . ····· ···· ··· 23 LYING-IN · ····· ·········· 23 LYING-IN ·· ·· ···· ······ ··· 23 PRIVATE MEDICAL PRIVATE MEDICAL PRIVATE MEDICAL SECTOR SECTOR SECTOR PVT. HOSPITAL/ PVT. HOSPITAL/ PVT. HOSPITAL/ CLINIC . ··· ··· 31 CLINIC · ····--·-···· · 31 CLINIC ·-·- · ·- --· ·· 31 PRIVATE LYING-IN . 32 PRIVATE LYING-IN ·--- 32 PRIVATE LYING-IN " 32 OTHER 96 OTHER .96 OTHER 96 (SPECIFY) (SPECIFY) (SPECIFY) r----- 14 Who decided the place of SELF . . . ···· ·· ····· ·· . . 1 SELF . . . . . . . 1 SELF . . ·· ···· · . . . 1 your delivery? HUSBAND . 2 HUSBAND ·· ···· -·· ···· · . 2 HUSBAND . . ·· ···· ·· ····· 2 BOTH SELF & BOTH SELF & BOTH SELF & HUSBAND ····· ···· ·· · · · 3 HUSBAND . " . . 3 HUSBAND . . . ···· ··· " 3 OTHERS 4 OTHERS 4 OTHERS 4 (SPECIFY) (SPECIFY) (SPECIFY) ·-----· ·---~--------------~--------- 15 Who assisted with the HEALTH PROFESSIONAL: HEALTH PROFESSIONAL: HEALTH PROFESSIONAL: delivery of (NAME OF DOCTOR . . . . . " A DOCTOR " . . . . . A DOCTOR . . . · ······ · A LAST CHILD)? NURSE · ··· ····· ·· · ·- . " B NURSE . . . ·- . . . . B NURSE . . . · · ······ B Anyor.e else? MI DWIFE . . . . . c MIDWIFE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . c MI DWIFE . ··· ·· · ·· ···· ··· c HILOr HI LOT HILOT TRAINED · ···· ·· ··· ·· ··· ·· · · D TRAINED . D TRAINED . . . . . . . D UNTRAINED . . . . . . E UNTRAINED E UNTRAINED . . . . . . E Dl< If' TRAINED OR Dl< IF TRAINED OR DK IF TRAINED OR UNTRAII·JED F UNTRAINED F UNTRAI NED F . . . . . . . . . . . . . . " RETA TI VE/Ff<I END G RELATI VE 'FRIEND G RELATIVE/FRIEND G . . . ········ OHlER . --- ------ ---- H OTHER --------- H OTH ER - ------ H (SPECIFY) (SPECIFY) (SPECIFY) NOmJE I NO ONE I NO ONE I . . . . . G. HIV/AIDS MODULE WOMEN 15 - 49 YEARS OLD Na. QUESTION NAME:------ NAME:------ NAME: _____ _ LINE NO. OJ LINE NO. OJ LINE NO. OJ (3) (4) (5) Now, I would like to talk with you about your awareness on serious illness, in particular, about HIV and AIDS. Have you ever heard of the HIV virus or an illness called AIDS? YES 1 NO . . . . . . . . . J GOTOQ.5 YES 1 YES . . . . . . 1 N0 . . . . . . . . 5 . . J GO TOO. NO . . . . . . . . . J2 GO TOO. 5 - - -- ----- ----- -- - - --+--- ------t------------1 2 Is there anything a person can do to avoid getting HIV, the virus that causes AIDS? YES _ . . . . . . . . . 1 :: .•.•. •• ••.•.••• ,:j GO TO 0.3e YES . . . . ··· ·· · · . . . . 1 YES . . . . . . 1 ------ ~- ----·---- --- - - - - - ---·---- ------···- ··- - - --· ----- - - -- - ---- '---- ----------1 Now. I will read some statements about how people can protect themselves from the AIDS illness. These questions include some issues related to sexuality which some people might find difficult to answer. However, your answers are very important to help understand the needs of Filipinos. Again, this information is all completely confidential. ----- ,--------- - - ------,----,-----,---.----.----.,---.---,-------,----i 3 Please tell me if you agcee or disagree on the AGREE DISAGREE DK AGREE DISAGREE OK AGREE DISAGREE DK following statements: 3a People can protect themselves from the AIDS virus by using a condom correctly every time they have sex. 3b Person can get AIDS virus from mosquito bites. 3c A drug user using injection (e.g., heroin) can get infected with AIDS virus. 3d People can protect themselves from getting infected with the AIDS virus by not having sex with more than one partner. 3e The AIDS virus can be transmitted from a mother to a child during pregnancy. 2 9 2 9 2 9 2 9 2 9 2 9 2 9 2 9 2 9 2 9 2 9 2 9 2 9 2 9 2 9 ---· 1----------r---------r---------r-------~ 3f A teacher with AIDS virus hut is not physically sick. should be allowed to continue teaching in school. ---- - -· - -- - ·---- ------ 3(] You would buy food from 8 person with AIDS. 2 9 2 9 2 9 2 9 2 9 2 9 -· ·-·- - ·------ - --- ---- - -- - ------ - -- - --- -- -+ ----------- +-- --- --- - - --1 3h It is possible for a healthy- looking person to have the AIDS virus. 2 9 2 9 2 9 F. MATERNAL AND INFANT HEALTH MODULE -----------------~WOMEN15-49YEARSOLD NO. 16 QUESTION When (NAME OF LAST CHILD) was horn. was he/she very large, larger than average, average, smaller than average, or very small? NAME: _________ _ LINE NO. rn VERYLARGE 1 LARGER THAN AVERAGE . . 2 AVERAGE . . . 3 SMALLER THAN AVERAGE . . . ___ 4 VERY SMALL . . DON'T KNOW . . . 5 . . 9 NAME: ----------- LINE NO. rn {4) VERYLARGE 1 LARGER THAN AVERAGE 2 AVERAGE 3 SMALLER THAN AVERAGE . . . 4 VERY SMALL 5 DON'T KNOW 9 NAME: ----------- LINE NO. rn VERY LARGE . . . . _1 LARGER THAN AVERAGE . . . 2 AVERAGE . . . . 3 SMALLER THAN AVERAGE . . . . . 4 VERY SMALL 5 DON'T KNOW . . . . . 9 J----1------------------- -------------------~------------------1------------------l 17 Was (NAME OF LAST YES . . . . . . . . . . 1 YES . . . 1 YES . . . . . 1 CHILD) weighed al birth? NO. . . . __ j_ 2 DON'T KNOW 9 GOT0~.-21 . . NO. ~ ooN·T.KN·o·w . : ~. ·· · 9 GOTOQ 21 -- ___________ . . . ------ . . , . _ __ _____ ___ ----··---------- ----------1------------- ----- 18 19 20 How mucl1 did (NAME OF LAST CHILD) weigh? RECORD WEIGHT FROM HEALTH CARD, IF AVAILABLE. IS (NAME'S) WEIGHT LESS THAN 2500 GRAMS OR LESS THAN 5.5 LBS. Was (NAME OF LAST CHILD) given iron supplement? FROM GRAMS CARD _____ 11 I I I I I FROM POUNDS 12 rn.rn GRAMS RECALL 21 POUNDS 22 rn.rn FROM GRAMS CARD . 11 I I I I I POUNDS 12 rn.rn FROM RECALL 21 GRAMS POUNDS 22 rn.rn DON'T KNOW . . 999!J DON'T KNOW . 99:;J GO TO Q. 21 GO TO Q. 21 YES . . . . . . . . 1 NO . . . . . . . 2l GO TO Q. 21 ---.J YES . . . . . . 1 NO DK . . . . . . . 2 3 YES . . . . . . 1 NO . . . . 2l GO TO Q. 21 ---.J YES . . . . . . 1 NO OK . . . . 2 . . . 3 FROM GRAMS CARD 11 I I I I I POUNDS 12 rn.rn FROM RECALL 21 GRAMS POUNDS 22 rn.rn DON'T KNOW . . 999!J GO TOO. 21 YES . . . . 1 NO . ~~-~~~ - ~-; . ~ YES . . . . . 1 NO OK . . . . . . 2 . . . . 3 ~--~-----------------+---------------~------------------r---------------~ 21 22 Does {NAME) have a birth certificate? May I see it please? COPY THE WEIGHT IN THE BIRTH CERTIFICATE. YES, SEEN . . . . . __ 1 GRAMS . . 1 [TTD LBS . . z m.m NO WEIGHT RECORDED . . . . 8888 YES, SEEN . . . . 1 YES, NOT SEEN . . 3 . 2 N0 . . . . 3 GO TO Q. 23 GRAMS . 1 I I I I I LBS . . 2 m.rn NO WEIGHT RECORDED . . . 8888 YES, SEEN . . . 1 GRAMS . 1 I I I I I LBS . . . 2 o::J.o::J NO WEIGHT RECORDED. . . 8888 1------ -------------+---------------+--------------+-----------------i 23 Aller giv ing birth , did you lake Vitamin A capsule? YES . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 NO 2 GO TO. ~~~~~E G J YES . . . . . 1 .YES . . . . . . 1 NO 2 GO TO MODULE -~ J NO 2 GO TO MODULE G J - -+-- -----·--------- --- -- ---------1-----------------+---------------- How old was (NAME) in months when you took AGE IN MONTHS [I] AGE IN MONTHS [IJ AGE IN MONTHS [IJ Vitamin A? 24 G. HIV/AIDS MODULE ------------------TW~O~MEN15-49YEARSOLD NO. QUESTION NAME: ___ _______ _ LINE NO. rn NAME:---------- LINE NO. rn NAME: - ---------- LINE NO. rn -l2T ·-- ·------- . -------T3T __________ -- ---·---(4) --- --f--------'15) _____ _ 4 At this time , do you know YES 1 YES 1 YES 1 . . . . . . ·· ········ ··· ·-- · · -- . . ·· ········ of a place where you can go for a test to see if you NO 2 NO 2 NO 2 have the AIDS vi rus? ·· ··· · -- . . . . . . -- . --- . . --- - ------- ---- · --· -· -· -- . . t~ ------·----------·- -- ----- ------------- ------- -----·-·------------ r--------------- - -t 5 g~~i~~~E:OO~f: A~~ YES GO TO MODULE H . ] YES GO TO MOD~L-~ r1 ] YES GO TO ~~~ULE ~ 1J YEARS OF AGE? NO . . . . . 2 NO 2 NO . . . . 2 --- -------------------- - ---- - --------- ------1'--------- -t---- - - - --- -1 6 SEE COL. 32 OF MODULE A. DOES ANOTHER ELIGIBLE WOMAN RESIDE IN HIE HOUSEHOLD? YE:O;~ -~f)~lJI.E ; ;~-~~ J ACCOMPLISII FC>R TilE !~EX T WOMAN 15-49 YEARS OLD. NO 2 YES 1 GO -~~ ~~~lJL~ -~ ~~DJ ACCOMPLISH FOR THE NEXT WOMAN 15 - 49 YEARS OLD. NO . . . . 2 YE:OT~ ~~~~LE F ~~~] ACCOMPLISH FOH THE NE XT WOMAN 15- 49 YEARS OLD. NO 2 r------ - ---- -----·--·--- - - -----------·-· -------- - -----+-------- - - 7 ~~~~~~·2 OF YES . . . ; . 1J GO TO MODULE H AND IS THERE ANYMORE MOTHER/CARETAI<ER NOT YET INTERVIEWED? INTERVIEW THE CARET AI<ER OF CHILDREN 0 TO 17 YEARS OLD. NO . . . 2l END INTERVIEW BY_.] THANKING THI;: RESPONDENT(S) FOR HERfTHEIR COOPERATION. GATHER TOGETHER ALL QUESTIONNAIRES FOR THIS HOUSEHOLD AND TALLY THE NUMBER OF INTERVIEWS COMPLETED ON THE COVER PAGE. y:O -~~ ~~~UL~ -~ AN~J INTERVIEW THE CARETAKER OF CHILDREN 0 TO 17 YEARS OLD. NO . . . 2l END INTERVIEW BY__.j THANKING THE RESPONDENT(S) FOR HERfTHEIR COOPERATION. GATHER TOGETHER ALL QUESTIONNAIRES FOR THIS HOUSEHOLD AND TALLY THE NUMBER OF INTERVIEWS COMPLETED ON THE COVER PAGE. YES . . . . . 1J GO TO MODULE H AND INTERVIEW THE CARETAI<ER OF CHILDREN 0 TO 17 YEARS OLD. NO . . 2l END INTERVIEW BY_.] THANKING THE RESPONDENT(S) FOR HERfTHEIR COOPERATION. GATHER TOGETHER ALL QUESTIONNAIRES FOR THIS HOUSEHOLD AND TALLY THE NUMBER OF INTERVIEWS COMPLETED ON THE COVER PAGE. H. WORKING CHILDREN MODULE roBE ADMINISTERED TO MOTHER/CARETAI<ER OF EACH CHILD 5 THROUGH 17 YEARS OLD. COPY NAME AND LINE NUMBER OF EACH ELIGIBLE CHILD AND LINE NUMBER OF MOTHER/CARETAKER FROM HOUSEHOLD LISTING. ---· . . . ···· ·- - ---·-------------- ··----·-··----------------- -- -- ------·------ ---- CHILDREN 5- 17 YEARS OLD ____________ .____ -----------,-----------1 NO. QUESTION NAME: NAME: NAME:---- LINE NO. LINE NO. CD LINE NO. ITJ LINE NO. OF CARETAKER [0 [I] LINE NO. OF f-ri LINE NO. OF ITJ CARETAKER L.J._j CARETAKER . (1) . (3) -- -------- -- --- -------------{4)--------·--···- - - ______ ,, ____ ____ (5)·-- - -- -·-· - Now, I would like to <1~k you niJout <lilY work lll'll children in this household rnily do . During the pils t week, did (NAME) do ilny kind of work for someone who is not <1 member of this llOIISP. IlolcP YES, fOR PAY (CASH OR KIND) . . . 1 YES. UNPAID. . . . _ 2 YES, FOR PAY (CASH OR KIND) . . 1 YES. UNPAID . 2 YES, FOR PAY (CASH OR KIND) . 1 YES. UNPAID 2 . 3 I NOG . 0 . T . 0 . Q.4 . ~ 3J NOGO TO Q·.4· . . 3 l ___ G_Q_:[Q_Q_.4 _ _ ~--f--=c.:.:=-='-'-'--- -~-"--- _.::-.:::.:.:::.=.:.__.:.-.-J __ 1 NO 2 During the p<Jst week, about how many 1.1ours did he/she do this work for someone who is not a member of this household? NO. OF HOURS I I I I NO. OF I HOURS I I I NO. OF I I I I H 0 U RS '--'---''--' IF MOHE THAN ONE JOB, INCI UI1F All. HOURS IN ALL JOBS. --- ----------------- - · --·----------1- -----------------~-1 4 At any time during the past year, did (NAME) do any kind of work for someone who is not a member of this household? YES, FOR PAY (CASH OR KIND) . . . . 1 YES. UNPAID_ . 2 NO 3 YES, FOR PAY (CASH OR KIND) . . . . . 1 YES, UNPAID . . 2 NO . . . 3 YES, FOR PAY (CASH OR KIND) . . 1 YES, UNPAID. . . . 2 NO 3 ·--------------------+------- ----+--------- +---------1 YES . 1 YES . . . . . . 1 YES . . . . . . 1 5 During tt1e past week, did (NAME) help in housekeeping chores such as cooking, shopping, cleaning, washing clothes, fetcl1ing water, or caring for children? NO GO TO -~ - ;. J NO GO~~-Q7 . J NO~~~~ Q7 . J ··- ·- -- ----·--·· -···- -- ·- ·-· . - ------·---···-·· - ·-·-·---. ·-·------------ - - ------ ---.00-"'--'-'='--'"-'-'----1 6 During the past week, about how many hours did he/she spend doing these chores? NO. OF I I I I NO. OF I I I I HOURS . HOURS . . . . NO. OF HOURS I I I I ---···- ·· ---·-- ·-------------- ·--- ------------+-------- ------- ---- - ------ 7 During the p;.~st week, did (NAME) do <my work on family-operated fil rrn or business? YES . . . . 1 YES. . . . . . . 1 N0 . . . . ~2 N0 . . . . ~2 GO TO NEXT CHILD GO TO NEXT CHILD 5 TO 17 YEARS 5 TO 17 YEARS --~ ------------------------t-cO'-'L"'D'--------t--O-=-=LD=--~------- 8 During the past week, <~bout how 111811Y hours did he/sl1e do this wori;? NO. OF HOURS LLD NO. OF HOURS * !:.~AM.l.'_L_E~_Qf:.Q<:j::_\l_!".f\_liON.J.Jl.Bf'ii£.\J.!J.Q. H E[:I_L_ll:!. SAF!;l.Y AN_Q_ MORA~(Q,.J.l EXPOSED TO PHYSICAL. PSYCHOLOGICAL OR SEXUAL ABUSE; WORI<S UNDERGROUND. UNDERWATER, AT DANGEROUS HEIGHTS OR IN CONFINED SPACES: WORI<S VVIHID/It·IGEROUS M/\CHINEPY. EOUIPMENT /\NO TOOLS, OR WHICII INVOLVES 'II IF. lvi/\NUAL H/\1-li.JLII-Jl; OR mA~ISPORT 01- HEAVY LOADS; WORI<S INI!IN UIJHEALTHY ENVIflOI-JMEN'f .WHICH MAY. l-OR \: XAivlPLF. , EXPOSE CIIILIJREN TO 11/\ZAROOUS SUASTI\1-JCES, ,\.,GENIS OR PROCESSES, OR TO I E I,IPERI\TUf~ES. NOISE LEVEL. OR VIBRATIONS DAMAGING 10 THEIR HEI\Lll-1: WORI<S U~I I.1ER PAIHICIJL/\RI. Y DlfTICLJLT CONUITIOI·JS SUCH /\S WOIW FOI~ LOIJC; HOLJnS OR f.ll !11 1NG 'I I IE NIGHT OR WORI< WIIERE TilE CHILD IS IJJ·JI~E/\SON/\ Il l Y COI-JFINFU 10 THE Pl~ E MISES<JF ri- lE EMI"L(JYf:R . I I I I NO. OF HOURS I I I I I~ CHILDREN'S RIGHTS MODULE CHILDREN 0- 17 YEARS OLD NO. QUESTION NAME: NAME: NAME: AGE rn AGE rn AGE rn LINE NO. rn LINE NO. rn LINE NO rn LINE NO. OF rn LINE NO. OF rn LINE NO. OF rn CARETAKER CARETAKER CARETAKER '(1) --···-- (2)" _______ ·-'-·- . ---------- -{3) . ···- . - -- -----~-(4)-----=- - ---··(5) - ------- :-ASK Q. 1 AND 2 ONLY ONCE FOR EACH MOTHER/CARETAKER Do you know if children have rights? '2 What are these rights? What else? DO NOT READ CATEGORIES. YES . . . . . NO . . . . . . . 21 GO TO NEXT CHILD ._] 0 TO 17 YEARS OLO YES YES . . . 1 NO . . . 21 NO . . 21 GO TO NEXT CHILD ._] GO TO NEXT CHILD ._] 0 TO 17 YEARS OLD 0 TO 17 YEARS OLD CANNOT SPECIFY CANNOT SPECIFY CANNOT SPECIFY RIGHTS . . A RIGHTS . . A RIGHTS . . _.A TO BE BORN. TO TO BE BORN, TO TO BE BORN. TO HAVE A NAME AND HAVE A NAME AND HAVE A NAME AND NATIONALITY . . B NATIONALITY . B NATIONALITY . . B TO HAVE A FAMILY TO HAVE A FAMILY TO HAVE A FAMILY WHO WILL LOVE WHO WILL LOVE WHO WILL LOVE AND CARE FOR AND CARE FOR AND CARE FOR THE CHILD . C THE CHILD . C THE CHILD . c TO LIVE IN A PEACEFUL COMMUNITY AND A WHOLESOME ENVIRONMENT . D TO HAVE ADEQUATE FOOD AND A HEALTHY AND ACTIVE BODY . . . . . E TO OBTAIN A GOOD EDUCATION AND DEVELOP THE CHILD'S POTENTIAL F TO BE GIVEN OPPORTUNITIES FOR PLAY AND LEISURE G TO BE PROTECTED AGAINST ABUSE, EXPLOITATION, NEGLECT; VIOLENCE AND DANGER H TO BE DEFENDED AND GIVEN ASSISTANCE BY THE GOVERNMENT . 1 TO BE ABLE TO EXPRESS THE CHILD'S VIEWS J TO LIVE IN A PEACEFUL COMMUNITY AND A WHOLESOME ENVIRONMENT D TO HAVE ADEQUATE FOOD AND A HEALTHY AND ACTIVE BODY E TO OBTAIN A GOOD EDUCATION AND DEVELOP THE CHILD'S POTENTIAL F TO BE GIVEN OPPORTUNITIES FOR PLAY AND LEISURE G TO BE PROTECTED AGAINST ABUSE, EXPLOITATION, NEGLECT. VIOLENCE AND DANGER H TO BE DEFENDED AND GIVEN ASSISTANCE BY THE GOVERNMENT . 1 TO BE ABLE TO EXPRESS THE CHILD'S VIEWS J TO LIVE IN A PEACEFUL COMMUNITY AND A WHOLESOME ENVIRONMENT . D TO HAVE ADEQUATE FOOD AND A HEALTHY AND ACTIVE BODY E TO OBTAIN A GOOD EDUCATION AND DEVELOP THE CHILD'S POTENTIAL . F TO BE GIVEN OPPORTUNITIES FOR PLAY AND LEI SURE . . G TO BE PROTECTED AGAINST ABUSE, EXPLOITATION, NEGLECT, VIOLENCE AND DANGER . H TO BE DEFENDED AND GIVEN ASSISTANCE BY THE GOVERNMENT . I TO BE ABLE TO EXPRESS THE CHILD'S VIEWS . J OTHER-.,:-="""':::-:-- K OTHER--,:-=:-::-:-:::-::-- K OTHER-,.,:-=~::-::-- K (SPECIFY) (SPECIFY) (SPECIFY) J. CARE OF COUGH AND WEIGHT MONITORING MODULE CHILDREN 0- 4 YEARS OL.::::.D ___ ____ ___ _ NO. NAME:------.,-=- NAME:----== NAME:----==- DAGE DAGE D QUESTION AGE LINE NO . rn LINE NO. rn LINE NO rn . ___ __ -~~~:r~~~~_[0_11~~E~~·~~'--=j ='='--' +--'"~-~~:r~·K~~ [0 ·n)-~~---------··_--_· ·-_- ·_··~(z~)_--_-_-____ -r------~<3L)------r-----~<~4) ______ +-_·---==~<s~)~--------~- 1 Did {NAME) h<~ve a cough at ;my tilne in the last two weeks? YES. I·JO DONTKNOW . GO TO Q. 6 YES . ·· ·· · ·· . . 1 NO . . . . . . . . . . ~] DON'T I< NOW . . ~ GO TO Q. 6 YES . . . . . 1 NO . :] GOTOQG :J DON'T KNOW . . . · ·······---·- ---- -----· - · ·- - - - -- - -· . -- ----·- ---··--1-·- - --- ---- ---1------- - - - - --- 2 When (NAME) had a cough, did lie/sire brenthe faster than usual with short, quick breaths or haVf'! difficulty in breathing? -· . -·-· · 3 Were the symptoms due to a rrohlern in the chest or a clogged/IJiocked nose? YES 1 YES 1 YES NO ··~2 DON'T KNOW. GOTOQ. 6 CLOGGED/BLOCKED CLOGGED/BLOCKED CLOGGED/BLOCI<ED NOSE 1 PROBLEMIN J CHEST 2 BOIH . 3 OTHER 4 (Sf'ECII Y) GO 10 0 . 6 NOSE 1 NOSE 1 ;~~~:~ '" ,~' ~~~~:'~ '" J: (SI'ECIFY) (SPECIFY) GO TO Q 6 GO TO Q. 6 Dl< . . 9 OK . . . . 9 OK . 9 - -- - - ----- -- -·-····- ---·--·-!--- --·- - ·--- - --- - · ··- - --- - - --- -· r--·---- - - --- - 4 Did you seek advice or treatment for (NAME'S) illness outside the home? YES . . . NO . ~] DON'T !<NOW . . . . . :J GO TO Q. 6 YES . . . . . . . . NO. . . . . ~] DON'T KNOW. • . !J GOTOQ.6 YES . . . . . . 1 NO .9j DON'T !<NOW . GOTOQ. 6 - - -·-- - - - - - - --- --- ---- - --------1-- -- ---------- - - - -- - ---- -1 5 From where did you seek PUBLIC SECTOR care? Anywhere else? GOVT. HOSPITAU DO NOT READ CATEGORIES. ENCIRCLE ALL PROVIDERS MENTIONED: CL\NIC/CHHC A RURAL HEALTH UNIT I URBAN HEALTH CENTER . . . . B BARANGA Y HEALTH STATION . . . C COMMUNITY HEALTH WORKER . D OTHER runuc - - ·--·- - -- ·---· E (SI'ECIFY) PRIVATE SECTOR PVT. HOSPITAL/ CLINIC . . . . F PHARMACY . . . . G PRIVATE DOCTOR/ MIDWIFE/NURSE H . . SlORE I . INDUSTRY-BASED CLINIC J - - · ···· · · ··· · ·· BOY SCOUT/GIRL SCOUT K . -. -. --. JAYCEES l ··· ·· . . . OTHEf< PVT. M (SPECIFY) PUBLIC SECTOR GOVT. HOSPITAU CUNIC/CHHC . . . A RURAL HEALTH UNIT/ URBAN HEALTH CENTER . . . . . . B BARANGA Y HEALTH STATION . . . . . C COMMUNITY HEALTH wor~KER . . . o OTHER PUBLIC _____ _ _ E (SfOECIFY) PRIVATE SECTOR PVT. HOSPITAL/ CLINIC . . . . . F PHARMACY . . . G PRIVATE DOCTOR/ MIDWIFE/NURSE H . STORE I . INDUSTRY-BASED CLINIC J . ·· ···· . BOY SCOUT/GIRL SCOUT K ···· · · ·· JAYCEES l ··· ·· ·· ·· OTHER PVT. M (SPECIFY) PUBLIC SECTOR GOVT. HOSPIT AU CLINIC/CHHC A RURAL HEALTH UNIT/ URBAN HEALTH CENTER B BARANGA Y HEALTH ST.'\TION . . . C COMMUNITY HEALTH WORI<ER . . . . D OTHER PUIJLIC -- - -·-- . - ---··--- E (SPECIFY) PRIVATE SECTOR PVT. HOSPITAL/ CLINIC . . . F PHARMACY G PRIVATE DOCTOR/ MIDWIFE/NURSE H . . STORE I . . . · ·· ·· ·· INDUSTRY-BASED CLINIC J · ···· ···· · - . BOY SCOUT/GIRL SCOUT K ---- · · · · · JAYCEES L . OTHER PVT M (SPECIF Y) J. CARE OF COUGH AND WEIGHT MONITORING MODULE 1----·---------"C:.;H.::.I::::LD"'R'-"EN 0 - 4 YEARS OLD NO. QUESTION NAME: NAME: NAME: AGE D AGE D AGE D LINE NO. []] LINE NO. []] LINE NO []] LINE NO. OF [0_ LINE NO. OF []] LINE NO. OF []] ··----------·- . ·· ·-····· ·- · - CARETAI<ER CARETAKER CARETAKER rn·· -- . (2) ········- - - (3) - (~~ -----·- . ------- ------------· . - (5) ---- -------------- ASK Q. 6 ONLY ONCE FOR EACH MOTHER/CARETAKER 6 Someti111es. cllildre11 l1;we severe illnesses a11d should be taken imrnedi<1tely to a health facility. Wllnt symptoms would cRuse you to take your child to R health facility/professionRI health care pmvider right away? DO NOT READ CATEGORIES. KEEP ASKING FOR MORE SIGNS/ OR SYMPTOMS UNTIL THE CAP.ET i\I<EH CANNOT RECALL ANY ADDITIONAL SYMPTOMS. ENCIRCLE ALL SYMPTOMS MENTIONED. C/1/LlJ NO I /\llLE ·1 0 Dl~lt~l< OR nm=.AS ITEF:Il 1\ CI·IILIJ GET litH~ SICI<ER B . CHILD DEVELOrS II FEVER c CHILD HAS FAST BREATHING ____ 0 CHILD H/\S DIFf'ICULT BREATHIN'; E CHILD liAS IJLOOD IN STOOL . . . ·· · · · · -·· --- F CHILD IS DRINI\ING POORLY _ G SEVERECOUGH H HIGH FEllER. _ . I OTHER _______ J (SPECIFY) FOR CHILDREN 0 TO 1 YEAR OLD ONLY 7 Is (NAME) being monthly since birth? 8 Where is (NAME) regularly? weighed -- weighed YES . . NO . . . . . !J GO TO NEXT CHILD 0 TO 4 YRS. OLD -- HOME OWN HOME 11 . . OTHER HOME 12 . . PUBLIC SECTOR GOVT HOSPITAL 21 . . HEALTH CENTER/ RHU/BHS 22 . . HEALTH & NUTRITION WEIGHING POST 23 OTHER PUBLIC 24 (SPECIFY} PRIVATE MEDICAL SECTOR PVT. HOSPITAL/ CLINIC 31 . OTHER PRIVATE MEDICAL 32 (SPECIFY} OTHER 96 (S PECIFY) CHILll NUT ABLE 10 DRINI< OR 11RE/\STFF:Eil 1\ CHILD GETTING SICI<ER B CHILO DEVELOPS A FEVER c CHILD HAS FAST BREATHING . . . . D CHILD HAS DIFFICULT BREATHING . E CHILD HAS BLOOD IN STOOL . . F CHILD IS DRINKING POORLY G CHILl ) NOr /\OLE ru DRINK OR BREIISl FEED CHILD GET TING SICKER CHILD DEl/CLOPS A FEVER CHILD HAS FAST BREATHING . CHILD HAS DIFFICULT 1\ B c D BREATHING . . . E CHILD HAS BlOOD IN STOOL . F CHILD IS DRINKI~IG POORLY _ G SEVERE COUGH . H SEVERE COUGH. _ . H HIGH FEVER. _ . . . . OTHER---- J !SPECIFY) YES . . . . . NO _ . . !J GO TO NEXT CHILD 0 TO 4 YRS . OLD HOME OWN HOME 11 . . . OTHER HOME 12 . . PUBLIC SECTOR GOVT. HOSPITAL 21 . HEALTH CENTER/ RHUIBHS 22 . . . . HEALTH & NUTRITION WEIGHING POST 23 OTHER PUBLIC 24 (SPECIFY} PRIVATE MEDICAL SECTOR PVT. HOSPITAL/ CLINIC 31 . . . . OTHER PRIVATE MEDI CAL 32 (SPECIFY} OTHER 96 (SPECIFY) HIGH FEVER _ . _I OTHER ____ J (SPECIFY) YES NO . . . . . . . . . . J GO TO NEXT CHILD 0 TO 4 YRS. OLD HOME OWN HOME 11 . . . . . . . OTHER HOME 12 . PUBLIC SECTOR GOVT HOSPITAL 21 HEALTH CENTER/ RHU/BHS 22 . . . . HEALTH & NUTRITION WE IGHING POST 23 . OTHER PUBLIC 24 (SPECIF\') PRIVATE MEDICAL SECTOR PVT. HOSPITAL! CLINIC 31 . . . . . . . . . . . OTHER PRIVATE MEDICAL 32 (SPECIFY} OTHER 96 (SPECIFY) K. VITAMIN A MODULE CHILDREN 1 - 4 YEARS OLD NO. AGE NAME:------== NAME:-----== NAME:-----== DAGE DAGE D QUESTION LINE NO. 'iii rn LINE NO. rn LINE NO rn LINE NO. OF rn LINE NO. OF rn LINE NO. OF rn CARETAKER CARETAKER CARETAKER . ~[2) '' '- . -- --- . - - --- - . (3) _______ ------'-=(4°1:-:-)- =='---j-= (5) Has (NAME) ever taken a Vitmnin A capsule (supplement) like this one? SHOW CAPSULE OR DISPEI~SER YES . . . . . . . . 1 NO ~l DON'T KNOW :=1 GO TO NEXT CHILO 1 TO 4 YRS . OLD YES . . ___ 1 YES . . . 1 NO _ ~2 NO ~l DON'T KNOW 9 DON'T KNOW . :J GO TO NEXT CHILD GO TO NEXT CHILD 1 TO 4 YRS. OLD 1 TO 4 YRS. OLD ------- ----------·- --------- --- ----------- r-------- ----------+--- ----- --t------ -----1 2 How rnany months ago rlid (NAME) take the last capsule? 3 Where did (NAME) qet this last capsule? MONHISIIGO rn MONTHS /\GO rn MONTHS AGO rn DK . . ··- . . 99 OK . . . . 99 01( ····· · ··· . 99 --------------------- --- - --- --- - ------ - ---- --- PUBLIC SECTOR PUBLIC SECTOR PUBLIC SECTOR GOVEnNMF:NT HOSPITAL . . . . ___ 1 RURAL/URBAN HEALTH CENTER __ _ . . 2 BARANG/1 Y HEALTH STATION . . . . . 3 BARANGAYSUPPLY/ SERVICE POINT OFFICER/BHW . . __ 4 OTHER PUBLIC --·----::-==-=--5 (SPECIFY) PRIVATE MEDICAL SECTOR PRIVATE HOSPITAL/ CLINIC . . . . . 6 PRIVATE DOCTOR 7 PRIVATE NURSE/ MIDWIFE . . 8 PHARMACY . . . 9 STORE . . . . . . 10 NGO . _. __ 11 INDUSTRY-BASED CLINIC 12 GOVERNMENT HOSPITAL 1 RURAL/URBAN HEALTH CENTER_ . . .2 BARAN GAY HEALTH STATION ____ __ 3 BARANGAYSUPPL Y/ SERVICE POINT OFFICER/BHW_ . __ 4 OTHER PUBLIC - - -;-;;:==-=--5 (SPECIFY) PRIVATE MEDICAL ·SECTOR PRIVATE HOSPITAL/ CLINIC . 6 PRIVATE DOCTOR __ 7 PRIVATE NURSE/ MIDWIFE 8 PHARMACY . . . 9 STORE NGO 10 11 INDUSTRY-BAS ED CLINIC . . . . . 12 GOVERNMENT HOSPITAL __ . . 1 RURAL/URBAN HEALTH CENTER __ __ . . 2 BARANGAY HEALTH STATION_ . . . . . 3 BARANGAYSUPPL Y/ SERVICE POINT OFFICER/BHW . . . 4 OTHER PUBLIC -----;-;;:==-=-- 5 (SPECIFY) PRIVATE MEDICAL SECTOR PRIVATE HOSPITAL/ CLINIC _ . . . . ____ 6 PRIVATE DOCTOR 7 PRIVATE NURSE/ MIDWIFE ___ ___ . __ 8 PHARMACY STORE . - 9 . . . 10 NGO . . 11 INDUSTRY -BASED CLINIC 12 OTHER PRIVATE OTHER PRIVATE OTHER PRIVATE MEDICAL MEDICAL MEDICAL -----co==:-::-- 13 13 13 (SPECIFY) (SPECIFY) (SPECIFY) OTHER SOURCE OTHER SOURCE OTHER SOURCE PUERICUL TURE CENTER . . . 14 CHURCH . . . 15 FRIEND/RELATIVE . 16 OTHEr< -::==c::- 17 (SPECIFY) PUERICUL TURE CENTER._ __ ____ _ 14 CHURCH __ 15 FRIEND/RELATIVE __ 16 OTHER 17 (SPECIFY) PUERICUL TURE CENTER_ . _____ 14 CHURCH . . . . 15 FRIEND/RELATIVE 16 OTHER --o:=::=-::--17 (SPECIFY) L. BIRTH REGISTRATION AND ANTIHELMINTHICS MODULE CHILDREN 0 - 6 YEARS OLD NO. QUESTION NAME: NAME: NAME: AGE D AGE D AGE D LINE NO. [[] LINE NO. [[] LINE NO [[] LINE NO. OF [[] LINE NO. OF [[] LINE NO. OF [[] CARETAKER CARETAKER CARETAKER (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) Now, I would like to ask you some questions about the birth registration of each child 0- 6 years old in your care. Now, I want to ask you about (NAME). 1 In what month and year was MONTH DAY YEAR MONTH DAY YEAR MONTH DAY YEAR (NAME) born? rn rn I I I I IITJ ITJI I I I I rnrn I I I I I --- ----------- ----- ---· ~------·---- IF THE PRESENCE OF BIRTH CERTIFICATE WAS ALREADY ASKED IN MATERNAL AND llfFAIH HEALnt MODULE, DO NOT ASK THIS QUESTION ANYMORE, JUST ENCIRCLE THE APPROPRIATE CODE. -· 2 Does (NAME) have a birth YES. SEEN . J YES, SEENG~~~-~-~ J YES, SEENG·~·~;~-~- J certificale? May I see it? IF CERTIFICATE IS GOTOQ. 6 PRESENTED, VERIFY THE YES, NOT SEEN. 2 YES. NOT SEEN YES, NOT SEEN REPORTED BIRTHDATE. ---·- 2 ------- 2 IF NO BIRTH CERTIFICATE IS NO -- ------------- . 3 NO ·····- ······- . 3 NO ·--·-·-···-·· --------·- 3 PRESENTED, TRY TO VERIFY THE DATE USING ANOTHER DON'TI<NOW ·····- 9 DON'T KNOW ---····· 9 DON'T KNOW -------··· 9 DOCUMENT (HEALTH CARD, ETC.) CORRECT THE STATED AGE AND HIE DATE OF BIRTH, IF NECESSARY. --·- ---------------~------·-·---~---- ----------------------- --------~ ------------ 3 Has (NAME'S) birth been YES . :J YES . . -~~;~~:-~ j YES ---.-.-- . - . J registered? GOTOQ. 6 GOTOQ.6 NO 2 NO 2 NO 2 . ----·-····· . . . ·····-- ·············-- DON'T KNOW . :J DON'T KNOW . :J DON'T KN~: -~~- ~-- ~ . :J GOTOQ. 5 GOTOQ. 5 1--------~-- 4 Why is (NAME'S) birth not COSTS TOO MUCH . A COSTS TOO MUCH ---- A COSTS TOO MUCH . A registered? MUST TRAVEL MUST TRAVEL MUST TRAVEL TOO FAR B TOO FAR B TOO FAR B . . . . . . DID NOT KNOW IT DID NOT KNOW IT DID NOT KNOW 11 SHOULD BE SHOULD BE SHOULD BE REGISTERED c REGISTERED c REGISTERED c . . . . LATE, AND DID NOT LATE. AND DID NOT LATE, AND DID NOT WI\NT TO WANT TO WANT TO PAY FINE D PAY FINE D PAY FINE D ·········· . ········· . . . . DOES NOT KNOW DOES NOT KNOW DOES NOT KNOW WHERE TO WHERE TO WHERE TO REGISTER E REGISTER E REGISTER E . . ·········· ···-· ····· OTHER F OTHER F OTHER F (SPECIFY) (SPECIFY) (SPECIFY) DON'T KNOW G DON'T KNOW G DON'T KI,OW G . . ··········· . . ASK Q. 5 ONLY ONCE FOR EACH MOTHER/CARETAKER 5 Do you know llow to register YES . . . . 1 YES ············· ·········· 1 YES " . . . . . 1 your child's birth? NO 2 NO 2 NO 2 . . . ················ · ···· . . . . CHILDREN 2 TO 6 YEARS OLD ONLY 6 Did (NAME) receive YES . ····· · ·· . 1 YES ··············· ··· . 1 YES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 antihelminthics (deworming) NO 2 NO 2 NO 2 medicine during the past six - . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . " . --··· · ·· . . . months?

View the publication

You are currently offline. Some pages or content may fail to load.