Overview of Contraceptive and Condom Shipments- FY 2010

Publication date: 2012

FY 2010 Overview of Contraceptive and Condom Shipments March 2012 Recommended Citation U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID), March 2012. Overview of Contraceptive and Condom Shipments, FY 2010. Washington, DC: KMS Project for USAID Abstract The Overview of Contraceptive and Condom Shipments is an annual publication summarizing contraceptive and condom shipments sponsored by the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) by value and unit. Bonita M. Blackburn GH/PRH/CSL Tel: 202-712-1231 E-mail: bblackburn@usaid.gov Mark Rilling GH/PRH/CSL Tel: 202-712-0876 E-mail: mrilling@usaid.gov Ronald Reagan Building 1300 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW Washington, DC 20523-3600 CCreport.indd 1 4/5/2012 10:36:15 AM Overview of Contraceptive and Condom Shipments FY 2010 March 2012 CCreport.indd 2 4/5/2012 10:36:24 AM CCreport.indd 3 4/5/2012 10:36:24 AM TABLE OF CONTENTS Overview of Contraceptive and Condom Shipments.5 Worldwide Contraceptive and Condom Shipments .6 Contraceptive and Condom Shipments to Africa (AFR).9 Contraceptive and Condom Shipments to Asia .10 Contraceptive and Condom Shipments to Europe & Eurasia (E&E) .11 Contraceptive and Condom Shipments to Latin America/Caribbean (LAC).12 Contraceptive and Condom Shipments by Program Type .13 Trends in USAID Contraceptive and Condom Shipments.15 FIGURES Worldwide Contraceptive and Condom Shipments Figure 1 Trends in Worldwide Contraceptive & Condom Shipment Values, FY 2001–2010 .7 Contraceptive and Condom Shipments to Africa (AFR) Contraceptive and Condom Shipments to Asia Contraceptive and Condom Shipments to Europe & Eurasia (E&E) Contraceptive and Condom Shipments to Latin America/Caribbean (LAC) Program Type Figure 2 Contraceptive & Condom Shipment Values by Region, FY 2010 .7 Figure 3 Worldwide Contraceptive & Condom Shipment Values by Method, FY 2010.7 Figure 4 Trends in Contraceptive & Condom Shipment Values to AFR, FY 2001–2010 .9 Figure 5 Contraceptive & Condom Shipment Values to AFR: Major Receiving Countries, FY 2010 .9 Figure 6 Contraceptive & Condom Shipment Values to AFR by Method, FY 2010.9 Figure 7 Trends in Contraceptive & Condom Shipment Values to Asia, FY 2001–2010.10 Figure 8 Contraceptive & Condom Shipment Values to Asia: Major Receiving Countries, FY 2010 .10 Figure 9 Contraceptive & Condom Shipment Values to Asia by Method, FY 2010.10 Figure 10 Trends in Contraceptive & Condom Shipment Values to E&E, FY 2001–2010.11 Figure 11 Contraceptive & Condom Shipment Values to E&E: Major Receiving Countries, FY 2010.11 Figure 12 Contraceptive & Condom Shipment Values to E&E by Method, FY 2010 .11 Figure 13 Trends in Contraceptive & Condom Shipment Values to LAC, FY 2001–2010 .12 Figure 14 Contraceptive & Condom Shipment Values to LAC: Major Receiving Countries, FY 2010 .12 Figure 15 Contraceptive & Condom Shipment Values to LAC by Method, FY 2010.12 Figure 16 Contraceptive & Condom Shipments by Program Type: Worldwide, FY 2010.13 Figure 17 Contraceptive & Condom Shipments by Program Type: AFR, FY 2010 .13 Figure 18 Contraceptive & Condom Shipments by Program Type: Asia, FY 2010.13 FY 2010 3 CCreport.indd 4 4/5/2012 10:36:24 AM Figure 19 Contraceptive & Condom Shipments by Program Type: E&E, FY 2010.14 Figure 20 Contraceptive & Condom Shipments by Program Type: LAC, FY 2010.14 Trends in USAID Contraceptive and Condom Shipments Figure 21 Worldwide Male Condom Shipments, FY 2001–2010.15 Figure 22 Worldwide Female Condom Shipments, FY 2001–2010.15 Figure 23 Worldwide Oral Contraceptive Shipments, FY 2001–2010 .15 Figure 24 Worldwide Injectable Contraceptive Shipments, FY 2001–2010 .16 Figure 25 Worldwide Contraceptive Implant Shipments, FY 2001–2010.16 Figure 26 Worldwide Intrauterine Device Shipments, FY 2001–2010 .16 TABLES Table 1 Worldwide Contraceptive & Condom Shipments by Region and Method, FY 2010.17 Table 2 Value of Contraceptive & Condoms Shipped to AFR by Country, FY 2010.18 Table 3 Quantity of Contraceptive & Condoms Shipped to AFR by Country, FY 2010 .19 Table 4 Value of Contraceptive & Condoms Shipped to Asia by Country, FY 2010 .20 Table 5 Quantity of Contraceptive & Condoms Shipped to Asia by Country, FY 2010 .20 Table 6 Value of Contraceptive & Condoms Shipped to E&E by Country, FY 2010 .21 Table 7 Quantity of Contraceptive & Condoms Shipped to E&E by Country, FY 2010.21 Table 8 Value of Contraceptive & Condoms Shipped to LAC by Country, FY 2010.21 Table 9 Quantity of Contraceptive & Condoms Shipped to LAC by Country, FY 2010 .21 Table 10 Value of Contraceptive & Condom Shipments by Program Type, FY 2010 .22 4 Overview of Contraceptive and Condom Shipments CCreport.indd 5 4/5/2012 10:36:24 AM Overview of Contraceptive and Condom Shipments The U.S. Agency for International Development Commodity Fund (USAID) has provided commodities for family planning USAID has developed an operational plan for its HIV/ and reproductive health activities since the mid-1970s. AIDS expanded response strategy. One aspect of this Thanks to USAID and other international donors, the plan includes a Commodity Fund (CF) to f inance cen- use rates of contraceptives and condoms have increased trally male and female condoms for HIV/AIDS programs around the world. In f iscal year (FY) 2010, USAID con- and ensure their expedited delivery to countries. Since tinued to respond to the increasing need for foreign its inception in FY 2002, the annual funding for the CF assistance by providing family planning and reproductive has ranged from $10.1 million to $31.8 million. In FY health commodities to Missions in four of the Agency’s 2010, the funding allocated to the CF totaled $31.3 mil- f ive regions: Africa, Asia, Europe and Eurasia (E&E), and lion. Male condoms represented 70% of the value of Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC). There were condom shipments paid for by the CF in FY 2010; female no condom or contraceptive shipments requested by condoms made up 30%. USAID Missions in the Middle East region in FY 2010. In support of this worldwide effort, a centralized system (the Central Contraceptive Procurement Project) was created in 1990 to provide contraceptives and condoms needed in USAID’s f ield programs. The Commodities Security and Logistics (CSL) Division of USAID’s Off ice of Population and Reproductive Health is tasked with administering this system. The Division works with country programs and other donors to provide tech- nical leadership; ensure commodities are available to those who choose to use them; support a program for improved supply chain design and logistics management in developing countries; and maintain a database on USAID commodity assistance. USAID Missions determine the quantities and types of contraceptives and condoms required for their program- ming and place orders for these commodities with the CSL division. This report provides details of data gath- ered in FY 2010 on those contraceptive and condom shipments. The data are broken down by USAID region and country, the program types of recipient organiza- tions, and trends over the past 10 years. It provides details on both the values and quantities of shipments in FY 2010; a discussion of quantities follows the values dis- cussion. It should be noted that one-year f luctuations in contraceptive and condom shipments at the regional and country levels are not necessarily the result of program- matic shifts. In fact, variations in country supply plans and shipment schedules from one year to the next most often account for these f luctuations. FY 2010 5 CCreport.indd 6 4/5/2012 10:36:24 AM Worldwide Contraceptive and Condom Shipments In FY 2010, the value of USAID contraceptive and con- Between FY 2001 and FY 2010, worldwide contraceptive dom shipments worldwide totaled $72 million, and and condom shipments showed increasing trends (Figure shipments reached 42 countries in USAID’s regions of 1). For condoms alone (male and female), total shipment Africa, Asia, E&E, and LAC. Six countries that requested values showed an increasing trend line over the past 10 contraceptive and condom shipments in FY 2010 had not years (FY 2001 to FY 2010). While there is considerable requested them in FY 2009; 13 countries that requested variation year to year, there is a 200% increase from FY shipments in FY 2009 did not request them in FY 2010. 2001 to FY 2010, despite the decrease of 10% between FY 2009 and FY 2010 due to the price reduction men- The value of USAID contraceptive and condom shipments tioned above. worldwide decreased by 10% from FY 2009 to FY 2010, due mainly to decreased shipments of female condoms Contraceptive shipment values have increased by 124% and oral contraceptives. Overall, the value of contraceptive over the past 10 years, despite an overall decrease of 10% implant shipments increased by 55%; intrauterine devices between FY 2009 and FY 2010 due primarily to a 35% (IUDs) increased by 128%; and male condoms, despite decrease in oral contraceptive shipments related to ven- the reduction in price from $.037 to $.027 per condom, dor production capacity and country product registration increased by 15%. There was an insignificant decrease in issues, and a decrease in male and female condom ship- injectable contraceptive shipment values from FY 2009 ment values. The value of implant and IUD shipments con- to FY 2010 (2%) (which continued to remain low due to tinued to increase in FY 2010, while value of injectables the voluntary recall by Pfizer of Depo-Provera in 2009), shipments decreased by less than 2%. a 35% decrease for oral cycles related to vendor capac- ity and continued developing country product registration For worldwide distribution by method in FY 2010, male issues, and a 54% decrease for female condoms due to condoms (31% of total value), injectables (29%), and oral decreased orders from countries who had ordered large contraceptives (19%) remained the three methods with quantities in FY 2009, Zimbabwe in particular. the largest shares; these shares compare with FY 2009 shares of 24% for male condoms, 27% for injectables, and When comparing the year-to-year change in regional 26% for oral contraceptives (Figure 3). Of these top three distribution values of condoms and contraceptives, E&E methods, only male condoms showed a shipment value and LAC showed increases while Asia and Africa showed increase (15% from an FY 2009 value of $19.2 million to decreases. LAC showed an overall increase of 34% ($2.8 an FY 2010 value of $22.1 million). Implants increased million to $3.8 million), with increased shipment values from $6.0 million to $9.36 million (13% of total ship- for implants and male condoms and decreased shipment ment values in FY 2010) and became the fourth largest values female condoms, IUDs, and orals. E&E increased shipment value by method. The increase results primarily by nearly 4,000% ($100 thousand to $3.8 million), due from increased orders from sub-Saharan Africa. Female to increases in shipment value for all commodities except condoms and IUDs rounded out the method mix with 8% injectables. Asia showed a decrease of 22% ($14.2 million and 1%, respectively, of the total shipment value. to $11.0 million), due to decreased shipment values for implants, female condoms, injectables, and orals. Africa The distribution by method to the five USAID regions was showed an overall decrease of 15% in all methods (from marked by the following trends, changes, and new devel- $62.3 million in FY 2009 to $53.3 million in FY 2010). opments: Consistent with USAID’s efforts to shift increasing resourc- Male Condoms es to regions with the greatest need, Africa continued Missions in all USAID regions, except the Middle East, to spend the largest portion of their Family Planning and requested male condom shipments in FY 2010. Africa Reproductive Health budget on contraceptive and con- continued to request the largest percentage, with 53% dom shipments, followed by Asia, then LAC and E&E, of the total male condom shipment value. Despite a 6% which spent approximately the same amount (Figure 2). increase in the quantity shipped, Africa showed a decrease 6 Overview of Contraceptive and Condom Shipments CCreport.indd 7 4/5/2012 10:36:24 AM of 24% (approximately a $3.5 million decrease) in male condoms from FY 2009 to FY 2010. The remaining regions showed increases in male condom shipment values from FY 2009 to FY 2010: LAC increased by 96% (approximately $1 million); Asia increased by 112% (approximately $3.0 million); and E&E showed an increase of 6,600% (from $40 thousand to $2.7 million). The Middle East region requested no shipments in FY 2010. Female Condoms In FY 2010, Missions in the E&E region joined those in Africa, Asia, and LAC in requesting female condoms. The value of shipments of female condoms decreased in Africa, Asia, and LAC due to the large orders that had been placed in FY 2009 covering much of the in-country need in FY 2010. In Africa, a large increase in female con- dom shipments was seen in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). Countries requesting shipments in FY 2010 that had not in FY 2009 include Ghana, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, and Zambia. Liberia, Senegal, and Tanzania requested no shipments in FY 2010 but had in FY 2009. In Asia, the value of female condom shipments decreased overall (80% decrease), with China, Myanmar, and Vietnam requesting shipments. In LAC, Haiti and Trinidad and Tobago continued to request shipments, with Bolivia and El Salvador requesting no shipments in FY 2010. As in previous years, the USAID Missions in the Middle East region did not request any female condom shipments. Oral Contraceptives Missions in all USAID regions except E&E saw decreases in the shipment value of oral contraceptives in FY 2010. Shipments to E&E increased by 744% from the FY 2009 value of $60 thousand to $510 thousand in FY 2010. The value of shipments to Missions in the Africa, Asia, and LAC regions decreased by 33%, 47%, and 30%, respectively. Despite this trend, Mozambique, Nigeria, Rwanda, Senegal, Tanzania, and Togo requested increased shipments of oral contraceptives in FY 2010. Kenya and Sudan requested oral shipments in FY 2010 but not in FY 2009, while Ghana, Guinea, Malawi, Mali, Niger, and Zambia did not request shipments in FY 2010. Asia showed a 47% decrease from FY 2009 due most significantly to reduced orders from Afghanistan and Bangladesh; however, Pakistan requested $1.8 million worth of oral shipments in FY 2010. LAC showed a 30% decrease from FY 2009, due to the fact that only Haiti requested shipments in FY 2010, while Bolivia, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, and Honduras had requested ship- Figure 1 NOTE: Condom shipment values include both male and female condoms. Trends in Worldwide Contraceptive & Condom Shipment Values, FY 2001-2010 Figure 2 Contraceptive & Condom Shipment Values by Region, FY 2010 Figure 3 Worldwide Contraceptive & Condom Shipment Values by Method, FY 2010 Source for figures: USAID | DELIVER PROJECT website: http://deliver.jsi.com FY 2010 7 CCreport.indd 8 4/5/2012 10:36:25 AM ments in FY 2009. The Middle East was the only region sand, while Asia’s shipment increased by 6,000% in FY whose Missions did not request any oral contraceptive 2010 to a value of $278,315, all to the Philippines. LAC shipments in FY 2010. showed an 85% decrease when compared to FY 2009, with shipments sent only to Peru. The Ukraine was the Injectables only E&E country to request shipments, with a value The injectables shipment value in FY 2010 showed a slight of $161,267. decrease of 2% from FY 2009. Missions in Africa, Asia, E&E, and LAC requested injectable shipments in FY 2010 (valued at 91%, 5%, .03%, and 4% of the total, respective- ly). Only Africa showed a significant increase in injectable shipment values from FY 2009 (12% or approximately $2 million). The African countries with the largest increases were Ghana, Tanzania, and Zambia. Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Madagascar, and Mozambique showed significant decreases, while Angola, Benin, Guinea, and Niger did not request injectable contraceptives in FY 2010. Shipments to Asia decreased from $3.5 million in FY 2009 to $1 million in FY 2010, despite the addition of shipments to Pakistan, as a result of no shipments to Afghanistan or Bangladesh. LAC showed a 1% increase due to an increase in shipments to Haiti; Bolivia and El Salvador requested no injectables in FY 2010. Missions in the Middle East region requested no injectable shipments in FY 2010. Implants The upward trend in implant shipment value (a 55% increase from FY 2009) continues due to increased orders from sub-Saharan Africa, most notably in Malawi, Nigeria, Rwanda, Tanzania, and Zimbabwe. LAC joined Africa and Asia in requesting implant shipments this year, with a distribution of 3%, 95%, and 2% by value, respectively. In Africa, DRC, Ghana, Sudan, Tanzania, and Togo joined the list of countries requesting implants, while in Asia, a 47% decrease in shipment value was seen in Nepal, the only country in the region to request implants in both FY 2009 and FY 2010. E&E and the Middle East requested no implant shipments in FY 2009. IUDs In FY 2010, IUD shipments continued on the upward trend, showing a considerable gain of 127% when com- pared with the FY 2009 shipment value ($270 thousand in FY 2009 and $600 thousand in FY 2010). This increase was due to large volume shipments to the Philippines and Ukraine. Missions in all USAID regions except the Middle East requested IUD shipments in FY 2010. Africa’s IUD shipments decreased by 25% in FY 2010 to $158 thou- 8 Overview of Contraceptive and Condom Shipments CCreport.indd 9 4/5/2012 10:36:25 AM Twenty-three countries in the Africa region requested contraceptive and condom shipments in FY 2010, five fewer countries than in FY 2009. Botswana, Cameroon, Cote d’Ivoire, Guinea, and Niger requested shipments in FY 2009 but did not in FY 2010. The total value of contraceptive and condom shipments to all African countries for FY 2010 was $53 million, a decrease of 15% from $62 million in FY 2009 (Figure 4). Shipments of implants and injectables showed increases in value from FY 2009 to FY 2010, while shipment val- ues of female condoms, male condoms, orals, and IUDs decreased. Figure 5 shows the five countries with the largest ship- ment values in FY 2010: Zimbabwe, Ethiopia, Uganda, Tanzania, and Malawi. The value of shipments to these five countries constituted 49% of the total value of con- traceptives and condoms shipped to Missions in the Africa region. Malawi replaced Zambia in the list of top five countries requesting shipments based on shipment value. Figure 6 shows that in FY 2010 injectable shipments to Missions in the Africa region, valued at $19 million (an increase of $2 million from FY 2009), had the largest share (35%) of the total value of contraceptive and condom shipments among all methods. Male condoms represented the next largest percentage of the total shipment value (22%), followed by implants (17%), oral contraceptives (16%), female condoms (9%), and finally IUDs, at less than 1% of the total Africa shipment value. IUDs continued to have the lowest share of distribution by method. Contraceptive and Condom Shipments to Africa (AFR) 20 08 20 09 20 10 20 01 20 02 20 03 20 04 20 05 20 06 20 07 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 U S$ m illi on s Trend Line Condoms Contraceptives Total Figure 4 NOTE: Condom shipment values include both male and female condoms. Trends in Contraceptive & Condom Shipment Values to AFR, FY 2001-2010 Figure 5 Contraceptive & Condom Shipment Values to AFR: Major Receiving Countries, FY 2010 Figure 6 Contraceptive & Condom Shipment Values to AFR by Method, FY 2010 Source for figures: USAID | DELIVER PROJECT website: http://deliver.jsi.com FY 2010 9 CCreport.indd 10 4/5/2012 10:36:26 AM The total value of contraceptive and condom shipments to Asia was $11 million in FY 2010, a 22% decrease from the FY 2009 value of $14.2 million. Eleven countries in the Asia region requested contracep- tive and condom shipments in FY 2010; this is equal to the number that requested shipments in FY 2009. Papua New Guinea, Pakistan, and the Philippines requested shipments in FY 2010 but did not in FY 2009; Indonesia, Kyrgyzstan, and Tajikistan did not request shipments in FY 2010. Bangladesh, Nepal, Myanmar, Pakistan, and Vietnam accounted for 95% of the value of contraceptive and con- dom shipments in Asia for FY 2010 (Figure 8). Pakistan surpassed Bangladesh to request the largest portion of shipments, with 41% of the total distribution. Bangladesh showed a reduction in shipment values of 71% overall, due to large orders placed in 2009 and an effort on the part of the Government of Bangladesh to procure 14 mil- lion vials of injectables themselves. Vietnam saw a large increase in value of male condom shipments. Nepal saw a considerable increase in the value of injectables, male condoms, and orals shipments; however, there was a 47% decrease in the value of implant shipments. The total shipment value for Myanmar increased by 122%, due to increased orders for male condoms and the re-addition of female condoms. As shown in Figure 9, male condoms overtook oral contraceptives to account for the largest share of regional shipment value in FY 2010, followed by oral contraceptives, injectables, IUDs, implants, and female condoms. Compared with FY 2009, value increases occurred in male condoms and IUDs, while declines occurred in injectables, implants, female condoms, and oral contraceptives. Contraceptive and Condom Shipments to Asia Figure 7 Trends in Contraceptive & Condom Shipment Values to Asia, FY 2001-2010 Figure 8 Contraceptive & Condom Shipment Values to Asia: Major Receiving Countries, FY 2010 Figure 9 Contraceptive & Condom Shipment Values to Asia by Method, FY 2010 Source for figures: USAID | DELIVER PROJECT website: http://deliver.jsi.com 10 Overview of Contraceptive and Condom Shipments CCreport.indd 11 4/5/2012 10:36:27 AM In FY 2010, one country in the E&E region (Ukraine) requested condom and/or contraceptive shipments. Georgia did not request shipments as it had in FY 2009. The total value of shipments in FY 2010 was $3.8 million, up from $100,000 in FY 2009, a 3,700% increase. As seen in Figure 10, there has been a gradual upward trend in shipments to the region over the past decade. Figure 12 shows that in FY 2010 male condoms con- stituted the largest share of Europe & Eurasia shipment values at $2.6 million or 70%. Oral contraceptives and female condoms made up 13% and 11% of the shipments, respectively, and IUDs and injectables round out the method share at 4% and 2% each. Contraceptive and Condom Shipments to Europe & Eurasia (E&E) Figure 10 Trends in Contraceptive & Condom Shipment Values to E&E, FY 2001-2010 Figure 11 Contraceptive & Condom Shipment Values to E&E: Major Receiving Countries, FY 2010 Figure 12 Contraceptive & Condom Shipment Values to E&E by Method, FY 2010 Source for figures: USAID | DELIVER PROJECT website: http://deliver.jsi.com FY 2010 11 CCreport.indd 12 4/5/2012 10:36:28 AM Five countries in USAID’s LAC region requested contra- ceptive and condom shipments in FY 2010, down from seven in FY 2009. The total value of contraceptive and condom shipments in FY 2010 was $3.8 million, up 34% from the FY 2009 value of $2.8 million. Contraceptive and condom shipment values to the region continued on a downward trend, despite the increase from FY 2009 to FY 2010 (Figure 13). Three countries in the LAC region (Figure 14) contribut- ed to 89% of the total FY 2010 contraceptive and con- dom shipment value. These countries and their shares were Haiti (58%), Peru (17%), and Dominican Republic (14%). Bolivia, El Salvador, and Honduras requested shipments in 2009 but not in 2010. In FY 2009, both Bolivia and El Salvador were in the top five LAC coun- tries requesting shipments but requested no shipments in FY 2010. Figure 15 shows the method mix for shipment values to the LAC region in FY 2010. Male condoms (53%), inject- ables (21%), and oral contraceptives (13%) continued to account for the largest shares of contraceptive and con- dom shipments, followed by implants (8%), female con- doms (5%), and IUDs (0.2%). Between FY 2009 and FY 2010, male condoms, injectables, and implants showed an increase in shipment value. Other methods in this region showed the following decreases by value: female con- doms, 34%; oral contraceptives, 30%; and IUDs, 85%. Contraceptive and Condom Shipments to Latin America/Caribbean (LAC) Figure 13 Trends in Contraceptive & Condom Shipment Values to LAC, FY 2001-2010 Figure 14 Contraceptive & Condom Shipment Values to LAC: Major Receiving Countries, FY 2010 Figure 15 Contraceptive & Condom Shipment Values to LAC by Method, FY 2010 Source for figures: USAID | DELIVER PROJECT website: http://deliver.jsi.com 12 Overview of Contraceptive and Condom Shipments CCreport.indd 13 4/5/2012 10:36:29 AM For FY 2010, governmental/parastatal programs overtook social marketing as the type of programs receiving the larg- est distribution of condom and contraceptive shipments, with social marketing programs and nongovernmental organization (NGO) programs – in that order – round- ing out the top three recipients (Figure 16). Showing a 96% decrease in FY 2010, the research program still had less than 1% of the total value of worldwide USAID con- traceptive and condom shipments. There continued to be no shipments to disaster relief or Public International Organization (PIO) programs in FY 2010.2 The value of shipments to NGO and social marketing programs decreased by 28% and 38%, respectively, due to programs ordering on a two-year cycle, as well as shifts in funding and demand. The value of shipments to governmental/ parastatal programs increased by 42%. In the Africa region, governmental/parastatal programs (57%) surpassed social marketing programs (35%) for the largest percentage of the region’s program type distribu- tion in FY 2010 (Figure 17). NGOs were third in shipment value among the program types at 8%. The value of ship- ments to NGOs and social marketing programs decreased by 51% and 36%, respectively, while the value of shipments to governmental/parastatal programs increased by 25%. In the Asia region, social marketing programs dominated the program type with 54% of the total value, despite the decrease of 43% in shipment values. Governmental/ parastatal programs followed closely with 44% of the total value, an 867% increase from FY 2009. NGO programs had 2% of shipment values, and research programs had 0.3% (Figure 18). In the E&E region, all $3.8 million of the contraceptive and condom shipments in FY 2009 went to NGO programs (Figure 19). This continued the trend from the previous five years, when NGOs received 100% of the shipment values to the region. Contraceptive and Condom Shipments by Program Type1 Figure 16 Contraceptive & Condom Shipments by Program Type: Worldwide, FY 2010 Figure 17 Contraceptive & Condom Shipments by Program Type: AFR, FY 2010 Figure 18 Contraceptive & Condom Shipments by Program Type: Asia, FY 2010 Source for figures: USAID | DELIVER PROJECT website: http://deliver.jsi.com 1 Before FY 2008, USAID reported on the relative value shipped to pro- grams by their category, referred to as “affiliation.” Beginning with the FY 2009 report, USAID uses the term “program type” for this classifica- tion and includes the program type of PIO. 2 PIOs are international organizations that are designated by executive order as organizations entitled to enjoy the privileges, exemptions, and immunities conferred by the International Organizations Immunities Act. FY 2010 13 CCreport.indd 14 4/5/2012 10:36:30 AM For the LAC region, governmental/parastatal, at 52%, received the largest share, followed by social marketing programs at 30% and NGO programs at 19% (Figure 20). The governmental/parastatal share represented an increase of 51% over FY 2009 values, while the value of NGO ship- ments increased by 257%. Shipments to social marketing programs saw a decrease in value of more than 38% from FY 2009 as USAID continued to focus on transitioning family planning efforts in country to host government-led programming. Overview of Contraceptive and Condom Shipments14 Figure 19 Contraceptive & Condom Shipments by Program Type: E&E, FY 2010 Figure 20 Contraceptive & Condom Shipments by Program Type: LAC, FY 2010 Source for figures: USAID | DELIVER PROJECT website: http://deliver.jsi.com CCreport.indd 15 4/5/2012 10:36:30 AM The total value of worldwide USAID contraceptive and condom shipments decreased by about 10% between FY 2009 and FY 2010, falling from $79.5 million to $71.9 million. Male Condoms Over the past decade, there has been a gradual world- wide upward trend in shipments of male condoms, includ- ing a significant increase from FY 2009 to FY 2010 (Figure 25). In FY 2010, 674.5 million condoms were shipped, compared with 415.9 million in FY 2009. By value, male condom shipments increased from $19.2 million in FY 2009 to $22.1 million in FY 2010, a 15% increase despite a lower unit cost under new condom contracts. The data illustrates a steady increase in levels beginning in FY 2002 and increasing more significantly in FY 2007 and FY 2010. This increase is largely due to the establishment of the Commodity Fund, which in FY 2002 began paying for condom shipments centrally for Mission HIV/AIDS programs in non-focus countries. The majority of condom shipments continued to go to Africa in response to the HIV/AIDS epidemic. Female Condoms Since FY 2004, there has been an increase in female con- dom shipments. In FY 2010, there was a 37% decrease in shipments, from 13.9 million to 8.8 million pieces, compared to FY 2009 (Figure 22). This was due to large orders that had been placed in FY 2009 covering much of the in-country need in FY 2010. Oral Contraceptives At 41.7 million cycles and a value of $13.3 million, oral contraceptives (Figure 23) continued the downward trend in shipments that began in FY 2008. This decrease is due in large part to a shift to a new manufacturer and the dif- ficulty and time required to register new products in coun- tries. In addition, the Bangladesh Mission, having ordered between $6 million and $8 million of oral contraceptives annually in recent years, continued to transition support for their social marketing programs and placed significantly smaller orders. The Africa region was the largest recipient of oral contraceptives, with 27 million cycles, followed by Asia with 11.4 million cycles. All regions showed decreases in oral cycle shipments from FY 2009 to FY 2010. Missions in the Middle East region requested no oral contraceptive shipments in either year. Trends in USAID Contraceptive and Condom Shipments Figure 22 Worldwide Female Condom Shipments, FY 2001–2010 Figure 21 Worldwide Male Condom Shipments, FY 2001–2010 Figure 23 Worldwide Oral Contraceptive Shipments, FY 2001–2010 FY 2010 15 CCreport.indd 16 4/5/2012 10:36:31 AM Injectables Over the past decade, there was a gradual worldwide upward trend in shipments of injectables (Figure 24), although in FY 2010 they showed a slight decrease from FY 2009 quantities, as a continued aftereffect of the 2009 voluntary recall by Pfizer of Depo-Provera, resulting in many orders requested in FY 2010 not shipping until FY 2011. The Africa region remained the largest recipient of injectables, with shipments of 16.3 million doses, an increase of 10% from FY 2009. The Asia region had a significant decrease in shipment quantities of 70% from FY 2009 due to lack of orders from the Afghanistan and Bangladesh Missions in FY 2010, which had ordered large shipments in FY 2009 that covered their needs for FY 2010. The LAC region had an increase of 6.5% in FY 2010 as a result of an order from Haiti. E&E requested 57,600 injectables in FY 2010. Implants Figure 25 shows a significant increase in shipments over the past four years, with an FY 2010 quantity of 413,800 sets, an increase of 58% from FY 2009. Africa remained the primary recipient of implants, requesting 95% of the total shipped in FY 2010. In the Asia region, Nepal remained the only country to request implant shipments, decreasing its FY 2009 shipment amount from 15,800 to 8,500 in FY 2010. Missions in the Middle East and E&E regions have not requested any implant shipments since FY 2007 while LAC, which did not request shipments in FY 2009, requested 14,200 units for Haiti in FY 2010. IUDs In FY 2010, the number of IUD units distributed world- wide showed an increase after reversing a four-year decline in FY 2009 (Figure 26). Worldwide shipments in FY 2010 totaled 995,100 units, compared with 421,200 units in FY 2009, a 136% increase. IUD shipments to Africa decreased from 337,200 units in FY 2009 to 250,800 units in FY 2010. In Asia, shipments increased from 7,200 units in FY 2009 to 437,100 units in FY 2010, with shipments requested by Bangladesh and the Philippines. The LAC region showed decreases in IUD shipments from FY 2009 to FY 2010. Missions in the Middle East region requested no shipments in either year. Figure 25 Worldwide Contraceptive Implant Shipments, FY 2001–2010 Figure 26 Worldwide Intrauterine Device Shipments, FY 2001–2010 Figure 24 Worldwide Injectable Contraceptive Shipments, FY 2001–2010 16 Overview of Contraceptive and Condom Shipments CCreport.indd 17 4/5/2012 10:36:31 AM W or ld w id e C on tr ac ep tiv e & C on do m S hi pm en ts b y Re gi on a nd M et ho d, F Y 20 10 Ta bl e Ta bl e 1 R eg io n M al e C on do m s IU D s O ra ls Im pl an ts In je ct ab le s Fe m al e C on do m s To ta l Af ric a As ia Eu ro pe & E ur as ia La tin A m er ic a/ C ar ib be an Va lu e Q ua nt ity Va lu e Q ua nt ity Va lu e Q ua nt ity Va lu e Q ua nt ity $1 1, 91 5, 12 7 35 5, 15 2, 00 0 $5 ,7 18 ,0 49 19 3, 62 9, 00 0 $2 ,6 59 ,7 31 62 ,6 01 ,0 00 $2 ,0 06 ,4 06 63 ,1 08 ,0 00 $1 77 ,6 04 25 0, 80 0 $2 53 ,5 07 44 4, 30 0 $1 61 ,2 67 28 8, 00 0 $7 ,0 91 12 ,0 00 $8 ,7 50 ,6 89 26 ,9 66 ,8 80 $3 ,6 35 ,7 76 11 ,4 08 ,1 60 $5 10 ,3 35 1, 78 6, 32 0 $5 00 ,4 53 1, 51 0, 32 0 $8 ,8 57 ,5 71 39 1, 10 0 $1 89 ,5 55 8, 50 0 $0 0 $3 16 ,7 95 14 ,2 00 $1 9, 00 5, 61 5 16 ,3 52 ,8 00 $1 ,0 56 ,4 47 93 9, 20 0 $6 7, 79 8 57 ,6 00 $7 82 ,1 11 68 3, 60 0 $4 ,8 66 ,0 81 7, 82 2, 00 0 $1 55 ,9 77 24 5, 00 0 $4 18 ,5 08 45 0, 00 0 $1 88 ,2 82 24 6, 00 0 $5 3, 57 2, 68 7 $1 1, 00 9, 31 1 $3 ,8 17 ,6 39 $3 ,8 01 ,1 38 To ta l Va lu e $2 2, 29 9, 31 3 $5 99 ,4 69 $1 3, 39 7, 25 3 $9 ,3 63 ,9 21 $2 0, 91 1, 97 1 $5 ,6 28 ,8 48 $7 2, 20 0, 77 5 Q ua nt ity 67 4, 49 0, 00 0 99 5, 10 0 41 ,6 71 ,6 80 41 3, 80 0 18 ,0 33 ,2 00 8, 76 3, 00 0 FY 2010 17 So ur ce fo r fig ur es : U SA ID | D EL IV ER P RO JE C T w eb sit e: h ttp :// de liv er .js i.c om CCreport.indd 18 4/5/2012 10:36:31 AM Ta bl e Ta bl e 2 Va lu e of C on tr ac ep tiv e & C on do m s Sh ip pe d to A FR b y C ou nt ry , F Y 20 10 C ou nt ry M al e C on do m s IU D s O ra ls Im pl an ts In je ct ab le s Fe m al e C on do m s To ta l An go la 10 9, 02 6 - 49 ,4 25 - - - 15 8, 45 1 Be ni n - 3, 91 9 10 7, 43 0 46 ,0 58 - 9, 60 1 16 7, 00 8 Bu rk in a Fa so - - - 29 6, 09 6 - - 29 6, 09 6 C on go , D em oc ra tic R ep ub lic o f 1, 08 7, 45 9 - 12 2, 33 3 11 3, 73 1 48 8, 59 5 1, 10 4, 81 8 2, 91 6, 93 6 Et hi op ia 1, 60 8, 43 7 7, 32 1 35 0, 63 9 90 2, 72 6 2, 21 5, 76 4 - 5, 08 4, 88 7 G ha na 39 4, 26 7 10 ,7 51 33 5, 40 6 1 ,6 61 ,2 80 27 ,5 88 2, 42 9, 29 2 Ke ny a - - 16 7, 47 9 - 3, 10 8, 62 0 - 3, 27 6, 09 9 Li be ria 98 ,9 56 - 13 0, 42 0 - 15 4, 48 7 - 38 3, 86 3 M ad ag as ca r 36 4, 10 1 27 ,6 27 50 9, 47 5 - 1, 09 3, 28 4 30 ,4 08 2, 02 4, 89 5 M al aw i 76 1, 10 1 - - 1, 23 2, 38 3 1 ,3 05 ,0 05 1, 84 3, 84 4 5, 14 2, 33 3 M al i 82 ,7 35 5, 08 2 - 38 1, 66 6 27 5, 01 3 44 ,5 59 78 9, 05 5 M oz am bi qu e 25 9, 14 2 - 37 8, 97 0 - 12 5, 72 0 - 76 3, 83 2 N ig er ia 11 5, 39 6 63 ,3 20 2, 01 7, 11 2 53 4, 57 8 2, 24 3, 99 0 - 4, 97 4, 39 6 R w an da 46 4, 98 9 - 34 3, 13 0 1, 07 5, 45 9 1, 55 1, 84 7 - 3, 43 5, 42 5 Se ne ga l 29 8, 50 4 - 38 2, 06 0 42 0, 22 3 30 4, 07 1 - 1, 40 4, 85 8 Si er ra L eo ne - - 25 ,6 39 - 12 2, 38 8 - 14 8, 02 7 So ut h Af ric a 69 7, 97 5 - - - - 18 0, 12 9 87 8, 10 4 Su da n - 10 ,0 91 32 7, 97 7 31 ,6 82 93 ,1 21 - 46 2, 87 1 Ta nz an ia 48 9, 51 2 41 ,1 27 3, 63 2, 80 8 1 ,1 15 ,4 81 22 2, 84 6 5, 50 1, 77 4 To go - - 67 ,0 42 29 0, 94 6 48 ,4 55 - 40 6, 44 3 U ga nd a 1, 48 3, 47 8 8, 36 6 13 8, 75 0 72 7, 63 7 3, 22 0, 88 7 - 5, 57 9, 11 8 Za m bi a 70 5, 79 7 50 5, 10 4 77 0, 24 2 36 6, 15 9 2, 34 7, 30 2 Zi m ba bw e 2, 89 4, 25 2 - - 84 8, 39 5 - 1, 25 8, 97 5 5, 00 1, 62 2 To ta l 11 ,9 15 ,1 27 17 7, 60 4 8, 75 0, 68 9 8, 85 7, 57 1 19 ,0 05 ,6 15 4, 86 6, 08 1 53 ,5 72 ,6 87 So ur ce fo r fig ur es : U SA ID | D EL IV ER P RO JE C T w eb sit e: h ttp :// de liv er .js i.c om 18 Overview of Contraceptive and Condom Shipments CCreport.indd 19 4/5/2012 10:36:31 AM Q ua nt ity o f C on tr ac ep tiv e & C on do m s Sh ip pe d to A FR b y C ou nt ry , F Y 20 10 Ta bl e Ta bl e Ta bl e 3 C ou nt ry M al e C on do m s IU D U ni ts O ra l C yc le s Im pl an t S et s In je ct ab le D os es Fe m al e C on do m s An go la Be ni n Bu rk in a Fa so C on go , D em oc ra tic R ep ub lic o f Et hi op ia G ha na Ke ny a Li be ria M ad ag as ca r M al aw i M al i M oz am bi qu e N ig er ia R w an da Se ne ga l Si er ra L eo ne So ut h Af ric a Su da n Ta nz an ia To go U ga nd a Za m bi a Zi m ba bw e 3 ,0 00 ,0 00 - - 27 ,0 03 ,0 00 47 ,7 57 ,0 00 11 ,7 21 ,0 00 - 3, 37 5, 00 0 12 ,0 90 ,0 00 25 ,0 02 ,0 00 1, 84 2, 00 0 6, 84 0, 00 0 3, 27 3, 00 0 12 ,3 00 ,0 00 9, 55 5, 00 0 - 20 ,0 01 ,0 00 15 ,5 46 ,0 00 - 47 ,5 74 ,0 00 21 ,0 03 ,0 00 87 ,2 70 ,0 00 - 3, 00 0 - 10 ,2 00 15 ,6 00 - 33 ,6 00 - 4, 80 0 - 10 0, 20 0 - - - - 10 ,2 00 60 ,9 00 - 12 ,3 00 - - 10 4, 40 0 27 6, 24 0 - 30 6, 96 0 1, 15 0, 56 0 - 50 6, 88 0 40 5, 12 0 1, 42 6, 80 0 - - 1, 18 3, 68 0 6, 13 2, 48 0 97 4, 88 0 1, 21 2, 24 0 62 ,6 40 - 89 7, 84 0 11 ,7 22 ,8 00 18 0, 00 0 42 3, 36 0 - - - 2, 00 0 13 ,1 00 5, 00 0 40 ,0 00 15 ,0 00 - - - 54 ,4 00 16 ,8 00 - 23 ,6 00 47 ,5 00 18 ,6 00 - - 1, 20 0 50 ,0 00 13 ,0 00 30 ,4 00 22 ,5 00 38 ,0 00 - - - 47 3, 20 0 2, 00 0, 00 0 1, 45 0, 00 0 2, 70 0, 00 0 11 8, 40 0 97 0, 40 0 1, 09 2, 00 0 22 6, 80 0 10 7, 60 0 1, 85 9, 60 0 1, 35 4, 00 0 24 3, 20 0 99 ,6 00 - 72 ,0 00 17 7, 20 0 40 ,0 00 2, 70 1, 60 0 66 7, 20 0 - - 11 ,0 00 - 1, 81 7, 00 0 - 40 ,0 00 - - 44 ,0 00 3, 00 0, 00 0 60 ,0 00 - - - - - 25 0, 00 0 - - - - 60 0, 00 0 2, 00 0, 00 0 To ta l 3 55 ,1 52 ,0 00 25 0, 80 0 26 ,9 66 ,8 80 39 1, 10 0 16 ,3 52 ,8 00 7, 82 2, 00 0 FY 2010 19 So ur ce fo r fig ur es : U SA ID | D EL IV ER P RO JE C T w eb sit e: h ttp :// de liv er .js i.c om CCreport.indd 20 4/5/2012 10:36:32 AM Ta bl e Ta bl e 4 Va lu e of C on tr ac ep tiv e & C on do m s Sh ip pe d to A sia b y C ou nt ry , F Y 20 10 C ou nt ry M al e C on do m s IU D s O ra ls Im pl an ts In je ct ab le s Fe m al e C on do m s To ta l Af gh an is ta n Ba ng la de sh C hi na La os M ya nm ar N ep al Pa ki st an Pa pu a N ew G ui ne a Ph ilip pi ne s Th ai la nd Vi et na m - 55 3, 21 5 33 ,1 12 85 ,2 66 82 7, 00 1 1, 01 7, 79 8 2, 31 7, 45 8 29 ,6 74 - 79 ,6 19 77 4, 90 6 - 61 ,5 19 - - - - - - 19 1, 98 8 - - 12 9, 87 0 1, 44 9, 38 5 - - - 24 5, 96 9 1, 81 0, 55 2 - - - - - - - - - 18 9, 55 5 - - - - - - - - - - 64 2, 65 4 41 3, 79 3 - - - - - - 3, 55 2 - 12 0, 24 5 - - - - - 32 ,1 80 12 9, 87 0 2, 06 4, 11 9 36 ,6 64 85 ,2 66 94 7, 24 6 2, 09 5, 97 6 4, 54 1, 80 3 29 ,6 74 19 1, 98 8 79 ,6 19 80 7, 08 6 To ta l 5 ,7 18 ,0 49 25 3, 50 7 3, 63 5, 77 6 18 9, 55 5 1, 05 6, 44 7 15 5, 97 7 11 ,0 09 ,3 11 Ta bl e 5 C ou nt ry M al e C on do m s IU D U ni ts O ra l C yc le s Im pl an t S et s In je ct ab le D os es Fe m al e C on do m s Af gh an is ta n - - 36 0, 00 0 - - - Ba ng la de sh 18 ,8 10 ,0 00 94 ,2 00 4, 43 6, 40 0 - - - C hi na 73 2, 00 0 - - - - 5, 00 0 La os 1, 27 2, 00 0 - - - - - M ya nm ar 24 ,9 99 ,0 00 - - - - 20 0, 00 0 N ep al 34 ,5 00 ,0 00 - 73 4, 40 0 8, 50 0 56 5, 20 0 - Pa ki st an 8 5, 24 5, 00 0 - 5, 87 7, 36 0 - 37 4, 00 0 - Pa pu a N ew G ui ne a 6 00 ,0 00 - - - - - Ph ilip pi ne s - 35 0, 10 0 - - - - Th ai la nd 1, 47 0, 00 0 - - - - - Vi et na m 26 ,0 01 ,0 00 - - - - 40 ,0 00 To ta l 1 93 ,6 29 ,0 00 44 4, 30 0 11 ,4 08 ,1 60 8, 50 0 93 9, 20 0 24 5, 00 0 Q ua nt ity o f C on tr ac ep tiv e & C on do m s Sh ip pe d to A sia b y C ou nt ry , F Y 20 10 So ur ce fo r fig ur es : U SA ID | D EL IV ER P RO JE C T w eb sit e: h ttp :// de liv er .js i.c om 20 Overview of Contraceptive and Condom Shipments CCreport.indd 21 4/5/2012 10:36:32 AM Va lu e of C on tr ac ep tiv e & C on do m s Sh ip pe d to E & E by C ou nt ry , F Y 20 10 Ta bl e Ta bl e 6 Ta bl e 7 Ta bl e 8 Ta bl e 9 C ou nt ry M al e C on do m s IU D s O ra ls Im pl an ts In je ct ab le s Fe m al e C on do m s To ta l U kr ai ne 2, 65 9, 73 1 16 1, 26 7 51 0, 33 5 - 67 ,7 98 41 8, 50 8 3, 81 7, 63 9 To ta l 2 ,6 59 ,7 31 16 1, 26 7 51 0, 33 5 - 67 ,7 98 41 8, 50 8 3, 81 7, 63 9 Q ua nt ity o f C on tr ac ep tiv e & C on do m s Sh ip pe d to E & E by C ou nt ry , F Y 20 10 C ou nt ry M al e C on do m s IU D U ni ts O ra l C yc le s Im pl an t S et s In je ct ab le D os es Fe m al e C on do m s U kr ai ne 62 ,6 01 ,0 00 28 8, 00 0 1, 78 6, 32 0 - 57 ,6 00 45 0, 00 0 To ta l 62 ,6 01 ,0 00 28 8, 00 0 1, 78 6, 32 0 - 57 ,6 00 45 0, 00 0 Va lu e of C on tr ac ep tiv e & C on do m s Sh ip pe d to L A C b y C ou nt ry , F Y 20 10 C ou nt ry M al e C on do m s IU D s O ra ls Im pl an ts In je ct ab le s Fe m al e C on do m s To ta l D om in ic an R ep ub lic H ai ti N ic ar ag ua Pa ra gu ay Pe ru Tr in id ad a nd T ob ag o 53 5, 49 1 80 7, 19 5 - - 63 1, 35 8 32 ,3 62 - - - - 7, 09 1 - - 50 0, 45 3 - - - - - 31 6, 79 5 - - - - - 47 1, 18 0 31 0, 93 1 - - - - 10 0, 56 2 - - - 87 ,7 20 18 8, 28 2 53 5, 49 1 2, 19 6, 18 5 31 0, 93 1 63 8, 44 9 12 0, 08 2 3, 80 1, 13 8 To ta l 2 ,0 06 ,4 06 7, 09 1 50 0, 45 3 31 6, 79 5 78 2, 11 1 Q ua nt ity o f C on tr ac ep tiv e & C on do m s Sh ip pe d to L A C b y C ou nt ry , F Y 20 10 C ou nt ry M al e C on do m s IU D U ni ts O ra l C yc le s Im pl an t S et s In je ct ab le D os es Fe m al e C on do m s D om in ic an R ep ub lic H ai ti N ic ar ag ua Pa ra gu ay Pe ru Tr in id ad a nd T ob ag o 16 ,3 05 ,0 00 26 ,0 01 ,0 00 - - 20 ,0 01 ,0 00 80 1, 00 0 - - - - 12 ,0 00 - 1, 51 0, 32 0 - - - - - 14 ,2 00 - - - - - 40 8, 00 0 27 5, 60 0 - - - - 14 6, 00 0 - - - 10 0, 00 0 To ta l 6 3, 10 8, 00 0 12 ,0 00 1, 51 0, 32 0 14 ,2 00 68 3, 60 0 24 6, 00 0 FY 2011 21 So ur ce fo r fig ur es : U SA ID | D EL IV ER P RO JE C T w eb sit e: h ttp :// de liv er .js i.c om CCreport.indd 22 4/5/2012 10:36:32 AM Table 10 Value of Contraceptive and Condom Shipments by Program Type, FY 2010 Region Africa Affiliation Governmental/Parastatal NGO Social Marketing Research Total Africa Governmental/Parastatal Value 30,514,650 4,151,497 18,906,539 - 53,572,686 4,835,523Asia NGO 165,275 Social Marketing 5,977,363 Research 31,151 Total Asia NGO Total Europe & Eurasia Governmental/Parastatal NGO Social Marketing Total Latin America/Caribbean Governmental/Parastatal NGO Social Marketing Research Total 11,009,311 3,817,639Europe & Eurasia Latin America/Caribbean 3,817,639 1,967,057 713,976 1,120,105 3,801,137 37,317,230 8,848,386 26,004,007 31,151 Worldwide 72,200,774 NOTE: Regional and worldwide totals may not be the same as in other tables due to rounding. Source for figures: USAID | DELIVER PROJECT website: http://deliver.jsi.com 22 Overview of Contraceptive and Condom Shipments CCreport.indd 23 4/5/2012 10:36:32 AM CCreport.indd 24 4/5/2012 10:36:32 AM U.S. Agency for International Development 1300 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW Washington, DC 20523 Tel: (202) 712-0000 Fax: (202) 216-3524 www.usaid.gov

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