Trinidad and Tobago - Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey - 2011

Publication date: 2011

Trinidad and Tobago Monitoring the Situation of Children & Women Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey 2011 Key Findings & Tables THIS PAGE REPRESENTS THE INSIDE FRONT COVER Trinidad and Tobago Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey 2011 Key Findings & Tables December, 2017 The Trinidad and Tobago Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey (MICS) was conducted from November to December 2011 by the Ministry of Social Development and Family Services and Central Statistical Office in collaboration with the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF), as part of the global MICS4 programme. Technical and financial support was provided by UNICEF. MICS provides up-to-date information on the situation of children and women and measures key indicators that allow countries to monitor progress towards the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and other internationally agreed upon commitments. Additional information on the global MICS project may be obtained from www.childinfo.org. Suggested citation: Ministry of Social Development and Family Services, Central Statistical Office and UNICEF. 2017. Trinidad and Tobago Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey 2011, Key Findings & Tables. Port of Spain, Trinidad and Tobago: Ministry of Social Development and Familyvices, Central Statistical Office and UNICEF. Contents List of Tables 4 List of Figures 7 Introduction 8 Sample and Survey Methodology 10 Trinidad and Tobago MICS at a Glance 13 APPENDICES 32 Appendix A. Sample Design 32 Appendix B. Data Tables 36 Sample and Survey Characteristics 36 Child Mortality 44 Nutrition 45 Child Health 56 Water and Sanitation 66 Reproductive Health 76 Child Development 95 Literacy and Education 100 Child Protection 109 HIV/AIDS and Sexual Behaviour 121 Access to Mass Media and Use of ICT 133 Appendix C. Estimates of Sampling Errors 135 Appendix D. Data Quality Tables 154 Appendix E. Questionnaires 166 4 TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO: MONITORING THE SITUATION OF CHILDREN & WOMEN List of Tables Table SD.1: Possible allocations of the sample in Trinidad and Tobago 33 Table SD.2: Sample allocation for Trinidad and Tobago 2011 MICS 33 Table HH.1: Results of household, women’s and under-5 interviews 36 Table HH.2: Household age distribution by sex 37 Table HH.3: Household composition 38 Table HH.4: Women’s background characteristics 39 Table HH.5: Under-5’s background characteristics 40 Table HH.6: Housing characteristics 41 Table HH.7: Household and personal assets 42 Table HH.8: Wealth quintiles 43 Table CM.1: Children ever born, children surviving and proportion dead 44 Table CM.2: Infant and under-5 mortality rates by background characteristics 44 Table NU.1: Low birth weight infants 45 Table NU.2: Nutritional status of children 46 Table NU.3: Initial breastfeeding 48 Table NU.4: Breastfeeding 49 Table NU.5: Duration of breastfeeding 50 Table NU.6: Age-appropriate breastfeeding 51 Table NU.7: Introduction of solid, semi-solid, or soft foods 52 Table NU.8: Infant and young child feeding (IYCF) practices 53 Table NU.9: Bottle feeding 54 Table NU.10: Iodized salt consumption 55 Table CH.1: Vaccinations in the first years of life 56 Table CH.2: Vaccinations by background characteristics 57 Table CH.3: Neonatal tetanus protection 58 Table CH.4: Feeding practices during diarrhoea 59 Table CH.5: Oral rehydration solutions, recommended homemade fluids 61 Table CH.6: Oral rehydration therapy with continued feeding and other treatments 62 Table CH.7: Care seeking for suspected pneumonia and antibiotic use during suspected pneumonia 63 Table CH.8: Knowledge of the two danger signs of pneumonia 64 Table CH.9: Solid fuel use 65 Table WS.1: Use of improved water sources 66 Table WS.2: Household water treatment 67 Table WS.3: Time to source of drinking water 68 5 Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey 2011: Key Findings & Tables Table WS.4: Person collecting water 69 Table WS.5: Types of sanitation facilities 70 Table WS.6: Use and sharing of sanitation facilities 71 Table WS.7: Drinking water and sanitation ladders 72 Table WS.8: Disposal of child’s faeces 73 Table WS.9: Water and soap at place for handwashing 74 Table WS.10: Availability of soap or other cleansing agent 75 Table RH.1: Fertility rates 76 Table RH.2: Adolescent birth rate and total fertility rate 77 Table RH.3: Early childbearing 78 Table RH.4: Trends in early childbearing 79 Table RH.5: Use of contraception 80 Table RH.6: Unmet need for contraception 82 Table RH.7: Antenatal care provider 83 Table RH.8: Number of antenatal care visits 84 Table RH.9: Content of antenatal care   85 Table RH.10: Assistance during delivery and caesarean section 86 Table RH.11: Place of delivery 87 Table RH.12: Post-partum stay in health facility 88 Table RH.13: Post-natal health checks for newborns 89 Table RH.14: Post-natal care visits for newborns within one week of birth 91 Table RH.15: Post-natal health checks for mothers 92 Table RH.16: Post-natal care visits for mothers within one week of birth 93 Table RH.17: Post-natal health checks for mothers and newborns 94 Table CD.1: Early childhood education 95 Table CD.2: Support for learning 96 Table CD.3: Learning materials 97 Table CD.4: Inadequate care 98 Table CD.5: Early child development index 99 Table ED.1: Literacy (young women) 100 Table ED.2: School readiness 101 Table ED.3: Primary school entry 102 Table ED.4: Primary school attendance 103 Table ED.5: Secondary school attendance 104 Table ED.6: Children reaching last Standard of primary school 105 Table ED.7: Primary school completion and transition to secondary school 106 6 TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO: MONITORING THE SITUATION OF CHILDREN & WOMEN Table ED.8: Education gender parity 107 Table ED.9: School attendance 108 Table CP.1: Birth registration 109 Table CP.2: Children’s involvement in economic activities and household chores 110 Table CP.3: Child labour and school attendance 112 Table CP.4: Child discipline 113 Table CP.5: Early marriage and polygyny 114 Table CP.6: Trends in early marriage 115 Table CP.7: Spousal age difference 116 Table CP.8: Attitudes toward domestic violence 118 Table CP.9: Children’s living arrangements and orphanhood 119 Table HA.1 Knowledge about HIV transmission, misconceptions about HIV, and comprehensive knowledge about HIV transmission 121 Table HA.2: Knowledge about HIV transmission, misconceptions about HIV/AIDS, and comprehensive knowledge about HIV transmission among young people 122 Table HA.3: Knowledge of mother-to-child HIV transmission 123 Table HA.4: Accepting attitudes toward people living with HIV Table HA.5: Knowledge of a place for HIV testing 125 Table HA.6: Knowledge of a place for HIV testing among sexually active young women 126 Table HA.7: HIV counselling and testing during antenatal care 127 Table HA.8: Sex with multiple partners 128 Table HA.9: Sex with multiple partners (young women) 129 Table HA.10: Sex with non-regular partners 130 Table HA.11: Key sexual behaviour indicators of risk of HIV infection (young women) 131 Table HA.12: School attendance of orphans and non-orphans 132 Table MT.1: Exposure to mass media 133 Table MT.2: Use of computers and internet 134 Table SE.1: Indicators selected for sampling error calculations 137 Table SE.2: Sampling errors: Total sample 138 Table SE.3: Sampling errors: Urban 140 Table SE.4: Sampling errors: Rural 142 Table SE.5: Sampling errors: North West 144 Table SE.6: Sampling errors: East 146 Table SE.7: Sampling errors: North Central 148 Table SE.8: Sampling errors: South West 150 Table SE.9: Sampling errors: Tobago 152 Table DQ.1: Age distribution of household population 155 7 Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey 2011: Key Findings & Tables Table DQ.2: Age distribution of eligible and interviewed women 156 Table DQ.3: Age distribution of under-5s in household and under-5 questionnaires 156 Table DQ.4: Women’s completion rates by socio-economic characteristics of households 157 Table DQ.5: Completion rates for under-5 questionnaires by socio-economic characteristics of households 158 Table DQ.6: Completeness of reporting 159 Table DQ.7A: Completeness of information for anthropometric indicators 160 Table DQ.7B: Completeness of information for anthropometric indicators 160 Table DQ.7C: Completeness of information for anthropometric indicators 160 Table DQ.8: Heaping in anthropometric measurements 161 Table DQ.9: Observation of women’s health cards 161 Table DQ.10: Observation of under-5s birth certificates 162 Table DQ.11: Observation of vaccination cards 162 Table DQ.12: Presence of mother in the household and the person interviewed for the under-5 questionnaire 163 Table DQ.13: Selection of children age 2-14 years for the child discipline module 163 Table DQ.14: School attendance by single age 164 Table DQ.15: Sex ratio at birth among children ever born and living 165 List of Figures Figure 1: Underweight, stunted, wasted and overweight children under age 5 (moderate and severe) 15 Figure 2: Vaccinations by age 12 months (measles, yellow fever and OPV3 by 18 months) 18 Figure 3: Use of improved water and sanitation in urban and rural areas 20 Figure 4: Use of contraception 21 Figure 5: Education indicators by sex 25 Figure 6: Child disciplining methods, children age 2-14 years 26 8 TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO: MONITORING THE SITUATION OF CHILDREN & WOMEN Introduction BACKGROUND The Trinidad and Tobago Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey (MICS) was conducted from November to December 2011 by the Ministry of Social Development and Family Services and Central Statistical Office in collaboration with the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF), as part of the global MICS4 programme. Technical and financial support was provided by UNICEF. The survey provides statistically sound and internationally comparable data essential for developing evidence- based policies and programmes for children and women in Trinidad and Tobago and for monitoring progress toward national goals and global commitments. Among the global commitments are those emanating from the World Fit for Children Declaration and Plan of Action, the goals of the United Nations General Assembly Special Session on HIV/AIDS, the Education for All Declaration and the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). The findings are also expected to be part of the baseline data on children and women for the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. This report presents the survey results on a wide range of indicators for understanding the children’s wellbeing, education, health and protection in Trinidad and Tobago. The data will inform the monitoring of national plans and policies related to children such as, the National Child Policy 2017-2022 and the Vision 2020 National Strategic Plan. It will provide useful insights for the draft National Gender Policy and Action Plan and the national health agenda. MICS data will be a valuable input for assessing the investment within the Social Sector towards the achievement of national priorities. 9 Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey 2011: Key Findings & Tables The evidence from MICS will also be instrumental in the longer term strategic planning for the inclusive socio-economic development of Trinidad and Tobago and will support policy and programme implementation to achieve the objectives of the government’s Medium Term Policy Framework, which guides the development of the country. SURVEY OBJECTIVES TThe 2011 Trinidad and Tobago MICS is the third survey of its kind supported by UNICEF and implemented collaboratively by the Ministry of Social Development and Family Services and Central Statistical Office. Its primary objectives are:  To provide up-to-date information for assessing the situation of children and women in Trinidad and Tobago;  To furnish data needed for monitoring progress towards goals established in the national development plans and internationally agreed upon commitments, as a basis for future action;  To collect disaggregated data for the identification of inequities and disparities, to allow for evidence based policy-making aimed at social inclusion of the most vulnerable  To contribute to the improvement of data and monitoring systems in Trinidad and Tobago and to strengthen technical expertise in the design, collection and analysis of data;  To validate data from other sources and the results of focused interventions. An Inter-Ministerial Research Council (IMRC) was established in 2009 to coordinate the social research agenda, promote institutionalization of the conduct of important surveys, such as the Survey of Living Conditions and the Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey, and to encourage the sharing of data across Ministries. The Council is chaired by the Ministry of Social Development and Family Services and has representation from senior research personnel from across the social sector, as well as the Tobago House of Assembly, the University community and the Civil Society. A group of the Council acted as the steering committee for the MICS project and provided technical oversight and some administrative responsibilities. The general coordination and management of the project was undertaken by the Social Investigations Division of the Ministry of Social Development and Family Services. 10 TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO: MONITORING THE SITUATION OF CHILDREN & WOMEN Sample and Survey Methodology Sample Design The sample for the 2011 Trinidad and Tobago Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey (MICS) was designed to provide estimates for a large number of indicators on the situation of children and women at the national level and for 5 Regional Health Authorities (regions): North West, North Central, South West, East, and Tobago. All enumeration districts (EDs) were defined as primary sampling units (PSUs). The regions were identified as the main sampling strata and the sample was selected in two stages. In each stratum, a specified number of primary sampling units were selected systematically with probability proportional to size. After a household listing was carried out within the selected enumeration areas, a systematic sample of 15 households was drawn in each sample enumeration district. Map 1: Regions of Trinidad and Tobago Note: The 5 regions are North West Regional Health Authority (NWRHA), North Central Regional Health Authority (NCRHA), South West Regional Health Authority (SWRHA), East Regional Health Authority (ERHA), and Tobago Regional Health Authority (THRA). Source: Ministry of Health, Trinidad and Tobago, 2015. 11 Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey 2011: Key Findings & Tables As in the case of 2006 MICS, the indicator on immunization was considered to be very important and DPT (diphtheria, pertussis and tetanus) coverage was selected as the key indicator. In order to estimate the value of this indicator with the desired level of precision, the sample size was estimated to be about 6,600 households. A total of 407 primary sampling units were selected, and 15 households were sampled in each selected PSU. A total of 6,020 households were found at these addresses, of which 5,573 were successfully interviewed. Sample weights are used for reporting the results at national and regional level. A more detailed description of the sample design can be found in Appendix A. Questionnaires Three sets of questionnaires were used in the survey: 1) a household questionnaire which was used to collect information on all de jure household members (usual residents), the household, and the dwelling; 2) a women’s questionnaire administered in each household to all women age 15-49 years; and 3) an under-5 questionnaire, administered to mothers (or caretakers) for all children under 5 living in the household. The questionnaires included the following modules: The Household Questionnaire included the following modules:  Household Listing Form  Education  Water and Sanitation  Household Characteristics  Child Labour  Child Discipline  Handwashing  Salt Iodization The Questionnaire for Individual Women was administered to all women age 15-49 years living in the households, and included the following modules:  Women’s Background  Access to Mass Media and Use of Information/ Communication Technology  Child Mortality  Desire for Last Birth  Maternal and Newborn Health  Post-natal Health Checks  Illness Symptoms  Contraception  Unmet Need  Attitudes Toward Domestic Violence  Marriage/Union  Sexual Behaviour  HIV/AIDS The Questionnaire for Children Under Five was administered to mothers (or caretakers) of children under 5 years of age1 living in households where interviews were conducted. Normally, the questionnaire was administered to mothers of under-5 children; in cases when the mother was not listed in the household roster, a primary caretaker for the child was identified and interviewed. The questionnaire included the following modules:  Age  Birth Registration  Early Childhood Development  Breastfeeding  Care of Illness  Immunization  Anthropometry The questionnaires are based on the MICS4 model questionnaire2. From the MICS4 model English version, the questionnaires were customized and pre- tested during the third quarter of 2011. Based on the results of the pre-test, modifications were made to the wording of the questionnaires. 1 The terms “children under 5”, “children age 0-4 years”, and “children age 0-59 months” are used interchangeably in this report. 2 The model MICS4 questionnaires can be found at http://mics.unicef.org/ tools?round=mics4. 12 TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO: MONITORING THE SITUATION OF CHILDREN & WOMEN In addition to the administration of questionnaires, fieldwork teams tested the salt used for cooking in the households for iodine content, observed the place for handwashing, and measured the weights and heights of children age under 5 years. Details and findings of these measurements are provided in the respective tables of the report. Training and Fieldwork Training for the fieldwork was conducted for 10 days between October 24th and November 4th, 2011. Training included lectures on interviewing techniques and the contents of the questionnaires, and mock interviews between trainees to gain practice in asking questions. Towards the end of the training period, trainees spent 5 days in practice interviewing in the following locations: Four Roads Tamana, Cedros, Point Fortin, Barrackpore, San Fernando, St. Augustine, Petit Bourg, California, Cocoyea, Princes Town, Mayaro and Edinburgh. The data were collected by 12 teams; each consisting of 4 interviewers, one editor and a supervisor. There was a field-co-ordinator overseeing the field work activities and reporting to a survey co-ordinator. Twenty six nurses were separately trained to perform the anthropometric measurements. The anthropometry training took place on December 1st, 2011. Given that some nurses dropped-out before the field work, some regions and teams were left without a trained measurer and had to rely on supervisors and other team members who were trained during the pre-test. Due to the challenges with recruiting the nurses, the anthropometry module was not completed at the same time as the other modules of the questionnaire. This resulted in a back log which continued to increase due to the shortage of nurses in some regions. This situation could not continue and the survey team had to temporarily stop the fieldwork and focus on reducing the number of children to be measured. Fieldwork began in November 2011 and concluded in December 2011. Data Processing Data were entered using the CSPro software. The data were entered on 10 microcomputers and carried out by 10 data entry operators. There were also a data processing supervisor, a data entry supervisor and 3 secondary editors to reinforce quality control standards. All questionnaires were double-entered and internal consistency checks were performed. Procedures and standard programs developed under the global MICS4 programme and adapted to the Trinidad and Tobago questionnaire were used throughout. Data processing began simultaneously with data collection on November 14th, 2011 and was completed in June 2012. According to the original schedule of activities, the completion date for data processing was January 13th, 2012. The delays in completion were mainly due to: incomplete questionnaires, discrepancies in the data, slow pace of some data entry operators, and non-adherence to the data processing process. Data were analysed using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) software program, Version 18. Model syntax and tabulation plans developed by UNICEF were customized and used for this purpose. 13 Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey 2011: Key Findings & Tables Trinidad and Tobago MICS at a Glance Survey implementation Sample frame - Updated 2009 PAHO Sampling Frame August-October 2011 Questionnaires Household Women (age 15-49) Children under five Interviewer training October-November 2011 Fieldwork November - December 2011 Survey sample Households ͳ Sampled ͳ Occupied ͳ Interviewed ͳ Response rate (Per cent) 6,628 6,020 5,573 92.6 Children under five ͳ Eligible ͳ Mothers/caretakers interviewed ͳ Response rate (Per cent) 1,224 1,199 98.0 Women ͳ Eligible for interviews ͳ Interviewed ͳ Response rate (Per cent) 4,424 4,123 93.2 Survey population Average household size 3.2 Percentage of population living in ͳ Urban areas ͳ Rural areas ͳ North West ͳ East ͳ North Central ͳ South West ͳ Tobago 57.4 42.6 23.5 7.6 38.2 26.6 4.1 Percentage of population under: ͳ Age 5 ͳ Age 18 6.7 24.6 Percentage of women age 15-49 years with at least one live birth in the last 2 years 9.7 Housing characteristics Household or personal assets Percentage of households with ͳ Electricity ͳ Finished floor ͳ Finished roofing ͳ Finished walls 97.5 82.6 99.4 91.9 Percentage of households that own ͳ A television ͳ A refrigerator ͳ Agricultural land ͳ Farm animals/livestock 96.0 95.3 10.9 4.9 Mean number of persons per room used for sleeping 1.52 Percentage of households where at least a member has or owns a ͳ Mobile phone ͳ Car or truck 96.3 55.8 14 TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO: MONITORING THE SITUATION OF CHILDREN & WOMEN Child mortality Early childhood mortality MICS Indicator Indicator Description Value A 1.2 MDG 4.2 Infant mortality rate Probability of dying between birth and the first birthday (32) 1.5 MDG 4.1 Under-five mortality rate Probability of dying between birth and the fifth birthday (36) A Indicator values are per 1,000 live births and refer approximately to 2004.9. The East Model was assumed to approximate the age pattern of mortality in Trinidad and Tobago and calculations are based on the Time Since First Birth (TSFB) version of the indirect children ever born/surviving method. ( ) Figures that are based on 250-499 unweighted exposed persons 15 Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey 2011: Key Findings & Tables Nutrition Nutritional status MICS Indicator Indicator Description Value 2.1a 2.1b MDG 1.8 Underweight prevalence (a) Moderate and severe (b) Severe Percentage of children under age 5 who fall below (a) minus two standard deviations (moderate and severe) (b) minus three standard deviations (severe) of the median weight for age of the WHO standard 5.5 1.9 2.2a 2.2b Stunting prevalence (a) Moderate and severe (b) Severe Percentage of children under age 5 who fall below (a) minus two standard deviations (moderate and severe) (b) minus three standard deviations (severe) of the median height for age of the WHO standard 11.0 5.1 2.3a 2.3b Wasting prevalence (a) Moderate and severe (b) Severe Percentage of children under age 5 who fall below (a) minus two standard deviations (moderate and severe) (b) minus three standard deviations (severe) of the median weight for height of the WHO standard 6.3 2.1 2.4 Overweight prevalence Percentage of children under age 5 who are above two standard deviations of the median weight for height of the WHO standard 11.5 Figure 1: Underweight, stunted, wasted and overweight children under age 5 (moderate and severe), Trinidad and Tobago, 2011 16 TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO: MONITORING THE SITUATION OF CHILDREN & WOMEN Breastfeeding and infant feeding MICS Indicator Indicator Description Value 2.5 Children ever breastfed Percentage of women with a live birth in the last 2 years who breastfed their last live-born child at any time 91.9 2.6 Early initiation of breastfeeding Percentage of women with a live birth in the last 2 years who put their last newborn to the breast within one hour of birth 46.3 2.7 Exclusive breastfeeding under 6 months Percentage of infants under 6 months of age who are exclusively breastfed3 21.5 2.8 Predominant breastfeeding under 6 months Percentage of infants under 6 months of age who received breast milk as the predominant source of nourishment4 during the previous day 30.7 2.9 Continued breastfeeding at 1 year Percentage of children age 12-15 months who received breast milk during the previous day 41.2 2.10 Continued breastfeeding at 2 years Percentage of children age 20-23 months who received breast milk during the previous day 28.2 2.11 Median duration of breastfeeding The age in months when 50 percent of children age 0-35 months did not receive breast milk during the previous day 8.1 2.12 Age-appropriate breastfeeding Percentage of children age 0-23 months appropriately fed5 during the previous day 28.3 2.13 Introduction of solid, semi- solid or soft foods Percentage of infants age 6-8 months who received solid, semi-solid or soft foods during the previous day 52.6 2.14 Milk feeding frequency for non-breastfed children Percentage of non-breastfed children age 6-23 months who received at least 2 milk feedings during the previous day 97.0 2.15 Minimum meal frequency Percentage of children age 6-23 months who received solid, semi-solid and soft foods (plus milk feeds for non-breastfed children) the minimum number of times6 or more during the previous day 70.1 2.18 Bottle feeding Percentage of children age 0-23 months who were fed with a bottle during the previous day 80.5 3 Infants receiving breast milk, and not receiving any other fluids or foods, with the exception of oral rehydration solution, vitamins, mineral supplements and medicines. 4 Infants receiving breast milk and certain fluids (water and water-based drinks, fruit juice, ritual fluids, oral rehydration solution, drops, vitamins, minerals, and medicines), but do not receive anything else (in particular, non-human milk and food-based fluids). 5 Infants age 0-5 months who are exclusively breastfed, and children age 6-23 months who are breastfed and ate solid, semi-solid or soft foods. 6 Breastfeeding children: Solid, semi-solid, or soft foods, two times for infants age 6-8 months, and three times for children 9-23 months; Non-breastfeeding children: Solid, semi-solid, or soft foods, or milk feeds, four times for children age 6-23 months. 17 Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey 2011: Key Findings & Tables Salt iodization MICS Indicator Indicator Description Value 2.19 Iodized salt consumption Percentage of households with salt testing 15 parts per million or more of iodide/iodate 47.4 Low-birthweight MICS Indicator Indicator Description Value 2.20 Low-birth weight infants Percentage of most recent live births in the last 2 years weighing below 2,500 grams at birth 16.0 2.21 Infants weighed at birth Percentage of most recent live births in the last 2 years who were weighed at birth 87.8 18 TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO: MONITORING THE SITUATION OF CHILDREN & WOMEN Child health Vaccinations MICS Indicator Indicator Description Value 3.2 Polio immunization coverage Percentage of children age 18-29 months who received the third dose of polio vaccine (OPV3) by 18 months 92.6 3.3 Diphtheria, pertussis and tetanus (DPT) immunization coverage Percentage of children age 18-29 months who received the third dose of DPT vaccine (DPT3) by their first birthday 64.0 3.4 MDG 4.3 Measles immunization coverage Percentage of children age 18-29 months who received measles vaccine by 18 months 87.5 3.5 Hepatitis B immunization coverage Percentage of children age 18-29 months who received the third dose of Hepatitis B vaccine (HepB3) by their first birthday 58.5 3.7 Yellow fever immunization coverage Percentage of children age 18-29 months who received yellow fever vaccine by 18 months 86.2 3.8 Full immunization coverage Percentage of children age 18-29 months who received all7 vaccinations recommended in the national immunization schedule by their first birthday (by 18 months for measles, yellow fever and OPV3) 44.3 Figure 2: Vaccinations by age 12 months (measles, yellow fever and OPV3 by 18 months), Trinidad and Tobago, 2011 7 Full vaccination includes the following: DPT1-3 (alone or from Pentavalent), HepB1-3 (alone or from Pentavalent) and Polio1-2 by age 12 months in the national immunization schedule. Measles, yellow fever and Polio3 by 18 months. 19 Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey 2011: Key Findings & Tables Tetanus toxoid MICS Indicator Indicator Description Value 3.9 Neonatal tetanus protection Percentage of women age 15-49 years with a live birth in the last 2 years who were given at least two doses of tetanus toxoid vaccine within the appropriate interval prior to the most recent birth 15.8 Diarrhoea MICS Indicator Indicator Description Value - Children with diarrhoea Percentage of children under age 5 with diarrhoea in the last 2 weeks 5.3 - Diarrhoea treatment with oral rehydration therapy (ORT) Percentage of children under age 5 with diarrhoea in the last 2 weeks who received ORT (ORS packet, pre-packaged ORS fluid, recommended homemade fluid or increased fluids) during the episode of diarrhoea 60.3 3.12 Diarrhoea treatment with oral rehydration therapy (ORT) and continued feeding Percentage of children under age 5 with diarrhoea in the last 2 weeks who received ORT (ORS packet, pre-packaged ORS fluid, recommended homemade fluid or increased fluids) and continued feeding during the episode of diarrhoea 39.8 Acute Respiratory Infection (ARI) symptoms MICS Indicator Indicator Description Value - Children with ARI symptoms Percentage of children under age 5 with ARI symptoms in the last 2 weeks 4.1 3.13 Care-seeking for children with ARI symptoms Percentage of children under age 5 with ARI symptoms in the last 2 weeks for whom advice or treatment was sought from a health facility or provider 80.3 3.14 Antibiotic treatment for children with ARI symptoms Percentage of children under age 5 with ARI symptoms in the last 2 weeks who received antibiotics 32.2 Solid fuel use MICS Indicator Indicator Description Value 3.15 Use of solid fuels for cooking Percentage of household members in households that use solid fuels as the primary source of domestic energy to cook 0.0 20 TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO: MONITORING THE SITUATION OF CHILDREN & WOMEN Water and sanitation Water and sanitation MICS Indicator Indicator Description Value 4.1 MDG 7.8 Use of improved drinking water sources Percentage of household members using improved sources of drinking water 98.7 4.2 Water treatment Percentage of household members in households using unimproved drinking water who use an appropriate treatment method 29.7 4.3 MDG 7.9 Use of improved sanitation Percentage of household members using improved sanitation facilities which are not shared 94.2 4.4 Safe disposal of child’s faeces Percentage of children age 0-2 years whose last stools were disposed of safely 17.5 4.5 Place for handwashing Percentage of households with a specific place for hand washing where water and soap or other cleansing agent are present 94.6 4.6 Availability of soap or other cleansing agent Percentage of households with soap or other cleansing agent 96.6 Figure 3: Use of improved water and sanitation in urban and rural areas, Trinidad and Tobago, 2011 Percentage of household members using an improved water source Percentage of household members using an improved sanita on facility which is not shared 21 Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey 2011: Key Findings & Tables Reproductive health Contraception and unmet need MICS Indicator Indicator Description Value - Total fertility rate Total fertility rateA for women age 15-49 years 1.7 5.1 MDG 5.4 Adolescent birth rate Age-specific fertility rateA for women age 15-19 years 32 5.2 Early childbearing Percentage of women age 20-24 years who had at least one live birth before age 18 6.3 5.3 MDG 5.3 Contraceptive prevalence rate Percentage of women age 15-49 years currently married or in union who are using (or whose partner is using) a (modern or traditional) contraceptive method 40.3 5.4 MDG 5.6 Unmet need Percentage of women age 15-49 years who are currently married or in union who are fecund and want to space their births or limit the number of children they have and who are not currently using contraception 24.3 A The age-specific fertility rate is defined as the number of live births to women in a specific age group during a specified period, divided by the average number of women in that age group during the same period, expressed per 1,000 women. The age-specific fertility rate for women age 15-19 years is also termed as the adolescent birth rate. The total fertility rate (TFR) is calculated by summing the age-specific fertility rates calculated for each of the 5-year age groups of women, from age 15 through to age 49. The TFR denotes the average number of children to which a woman will have given birth by the end of her reproductive years (by age 50) if current fertility rates prevailed. Figure 4: Use of contraception, Trinidad and Tobago, 2011 Percentage of household members using an improved water source Percentage of household members using an improved sanita on facility which is not shared Modern methods 37.6 Traditional methods 2.7 Female steril ization 7.9 Periodic abstinence 1.0 Male steril ization 0.1 Withdrawal 0.9 IUD 1.7 Other 0.8 Injectables 2.7 Implants 0.4 Any method 40.3 Pill 11.0 Male condom 13.2 No method 59.7 Female condom 0.5 Diaphragm/Foam/Jelly 0.1 LAM 0.0 22 TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO: MONITORING THE SITUATION OF CHILDREN & WOMEN Maternal and newborn health MICS Indicator Indicator Description Value 5.5a 5.5b MDG 5.5 MDG 5.5 Antenatal care coverage Percentage of women age 15-49 years with a live birth in the last 2 years who were attended during their last pregnancy that led to a live birth (a) at least once by skilled health personnel (b)at least four times by any provider 95.1 87.3 5.6 Content of antenatal care Percentage of women age 15-49 years with a live birth in the last 2 years who had their blood pressure measured and gave urine and blood samples during the last pregnancy that led to a live birth 97.7 5.7 MDG 5.2 Skilled attendant at delivery Percentage of women age 15-49 years with a live birth in the last 2 years who were attended by skilled health personnel during their most recent live birth 98.4 5.8 Institutional deliveries Percentage of women age 15-49 years with a live birth in the last 2 years whose most recent live birth was delivered in a health facility 97.9 5.9 Caesarean section Percentage of women age 15-49 years whose most recent live birth in the last 2 years was delivered by caesarean section 22.1 Post-natal health checks MICS Indicator Indicator Description Value 5.10 Post-partum stay in health facility Percentage of women age 15-49 years who stayed in the health facility for 12 hours or more after the delivery of their most recent live birth in the last 2 years 97.6 5.11 Post-natal health check for the newborn Percentage of last live births in the last 2 years who received a health check while in facility or at home following delivery, or a post-natal care visit within 2 days after delivery 96.3 5.12 Post-natal health check for the mother Percentage of women age 15-49 years who received a health check while in facility or at home following delivery, or a post-natal care visit within 2 days after delivery of their most recent live birth in the last 2 years 92.0 23 Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey 2011: Key Findings & Tables Child development Child development MICS Indicator Indicator Description Value 6.1 Attendance to early childhood education Percentage of children age 36-59 months who are attending an early childhood education programme 84.5 6.2 Support for learning Percentage of children age 36-59 months with whom an adult has engaged in four or more activities to promote learning and school readiness in the last 3 days 95.7 6.3 Father’s support for learning Percentage of children age 36-59 months whose biological father has engaged in one or more activities to promote learning and school readiness in the last 3 days 56.5 6.5 Availability of children’s books Percentage of children under age 5 who have three or more children’s books 76.2 6.6 Availability of playthings Percentage of children under age 5 who play with two or more types of playthings 76.3 6.7 Inadequate care Percentage of children under age 5 left alone or in the care of another child younger than 10 years of age for more than one hour at least once in the last week 1.5 6.8 Early child development index Percentage of children age 36-59 months who are developmentally on track in at least three of the following four domains: literacy-numeracy, physical, social-emotional, and learning 91.3 24 TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO: MONITORING THE SITUATION OF CHILDREN & WOMEN Literacy and education Literacy and education8 MICS Indicator Indicator Description Value 7.1 MDG 2.3 Literacy rate among young people Percentage of young women age 15-24 years who are able to read a short simple statement about everyday life or who attended secondary or higher education 99.0 7.2 School readiness Percentage of children in first grade of primary school who attended pre-school during the previous school year 84.8 7.3 Net intake rate in primary education Percentage of children of school-entry age who enter the first grade of primary school 84.5 7.4 MDG 2.1 Primary school net attendance ratio (adjusted) Percentage of children of primary school age currently attending primary or secondary school 98.7 7.5 Secondary school net attendance ratio (adjusted) Percentage of children of secondary school age currently attending secondary school or higher 87.5 7.6 MDG 2.2 Children reaching last grade of primary Percentage of children entering the first grade of primary school who eventually reach last grade 99.2 7.7 Primary completion rateA Number of children attending the last grade of primary school (excluding repeaters) divided by number of children of primary school completion age (age appropriate to final grade of primary school) 105.8 7.8 Transition rate to secondary school Number of children attending the last grade of primary school during the previous school year who are in the first grade of secondary school during the current school year divided by number of children attending the last grade of primary school during the previous school year 87.7 7.9 MDG 3.1 Gender parity index (primary school) Primary school net attendance ratio (adjusted) for girls divided by primary school net attendance ratio (adjusted) for boys 1.00 7.10 MDG 3.1 Gender parity index (secondary school) Secondary school net attendance ratio (adjusted) for girls divided by secondary school net attendance ratio (adjusted) for boys 1.01 A The value of the indicator is greater than 100 percent due to some of the children entering the last grade of primary school for the first time, being younger or older than the primary school graduation age. 8 Education indicators, wherever applicable, are based on information on reported school attendance (at any time during the school year), as a proxy for enrolment. 25 Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey 2011: Key Findings & Tables Figure 5: Education indicators by sex, Trinidad and Tobago, 2011                               School readiness 83 87 Net intake rate in primary education Primary school completion rate Transition rate to secondary school 82 88 102 111 87 88 Attendance to early childhood education Primary school attendance Secondary school attendance 85 84 99 99 87 88 Children reaching last grade of primary 98 100 Boys Girls Note: All indicator values are in per cent                     26 TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO: MONITORING THE SITUATION OF CHILDREN & WOMEN Child protection Birth registration MICS Indicator Indicator Description Value 8.1 Birth registration Percentage of children under age 5 whose births are reported registered 96.5 Child labour MICS Indicator Indicator Description Value 8.2 Child labour Percentage of children age 5-14 years who are involved in child labour9 2.3 Child discipline MICS Indicator Indicator Description Value 8.3 Violent discipline Percentage of children age 2-14 years who experienced psychological aggression or physical punishment during the last one month 76.7 Figure 6: Child disciplining methods, children age 2-14 years, Trinidad and Tobago, 2011 9 A child is considered to be involved in child labour activities at the moment of the survey if during the week preceding the survey he/she performed the following activities: (a) children 5-11 years of age did at least one hour of economic activity or at least 28 hours of domestic chores per week, and (b) children 12-14 years of age did at least 14 hours of economic activity or at least 28 hours of domestic chores per week. 27 Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey 2011: Key Findings & Tables Early marriage and polygyny MICS Indicator Indicator Description Value 8.4 Marriage before age 15 Percentage of Women age 15-49 years who were first married or in union before age 15 2.8 8.5 Marriage before age 18 Percentage of Women age 20-49 years who were first married or in union before age 18 12.4 8.6 Young women age 15-19 years currently married or in union Percentage of young women age 15-19 years who are married or in union 4.4 8.7 Polygyny Percentage of women age 15-49 years who are in a polygynous union 2.1 8.8a 8.8b Spousal age difference Percentage of young women who are married or in union and whose spouse is 10 or more years older, (a) among women age 15-19 years, (b) among women age 20-24 years (36.3) 15.7 Attitudes towards domestic violence MICS Indicator Indicator Description Value 8.12 Attitudes towards domestic violence Percentage of women age 15-49 years who state that a husband is justified in hitting or beating his wife in at least one of the following circumstances: (1) she goes out without telling him, (2) she neglects the children, (3) she argues with him, (4) she refuses sex with him, (5) she burns the food 3.7 Children’s living arrangements MICS Indicator Indicator Description Value 8.13 Children’s living arrangements Percentage of children age 0-17 years living with neither biological parent 6.6 8.14 Prevalence of children with one or both parents dead Percentage of children age 0-17 years with one or both biological parents dead 5.9 28 TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO: MONITORING THE SITUATION OF CHILDREN & WOMEN HIV/AIDS and sexual behaviour HIV/AIDS knowledge and attitudes MICS Indicator Indicator Description Value - Have heard of AIDS Percentage of women age 15-49 years who have heard of AIDS 99.7 9.1 MDG 6.3 Knowledge about HIV prevention among young people Percentage of young women age 15-24 years who correctly identify ways of preventing the sexual transmission of HIV10, and who reject major misconceptions about HIV transmission11 60.2 9.2 Knowledge of mother-to- child transmission of HIV Percentage of women age 15-49 years who correctly identify all three means12 of mother-to-child transmission of HIV 49.5 9.3 Accepting attitudes towards people living with HIV Percentage of women age 15-49 years expressing accepting attitudes on all four questions13 toward people living with HIV 17.4 HIV testing MICS Indicator Indicator Description Value 9.4 People who know where to be tested for HIV Percentage of women age 15-49 years who state knowledge of a place to be tested for HIV 92.4 9.5 People who have been tested for HIV and know the results Percentage of women age 15-49 years who have been tested for HIV in the last 12 months and who know their results 19.9 9.6 Sexually active young people who have been tested for HIV and know the results Percentage of young women age 15-24 years who have had sex in the last 12 months, who have been tested for HIV in the last 12 months and who know their results 36.0 9.7 HIV counselling during antenatal care Percentage of women age 15-49 years who had a live birth in the last 2 years and received antenatal care during the pregnancy of their most recent birth, reporting that they received counselling on HIV during antenatal care 66.8 9.8 HIV testing during antenatal care Percentage of women age 15-49 years who had a live birth in the last 2 years and received antenatal care during the pregnancy of their most recent birth, reporting that they were offered and accepted an HIV test during antenatal care and received their results 80.9 10 Using condoms and limiting sex to one faithful, uninfected partner. 11 The two most common misconceptions about HIV transmission are included in the indicator calculation: i) mosquito bites and ii) sharing food with someone with AIDS. 12 Transmission during pregnancy, during delivery, and by breastfeeding. 13 People (1) who think that a female teacher who is HIV-positive and is not sick should be allowed to continue teaching, (2) who would buy fresh vegetables from a shopkeeper or vendor who is HIV-positive, (3) who would not want to keep secret that a family member is HIV-positive, and (4) who would be willing to care for a family member with AIDS in own home. 29 Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey 2011: Key Findings & Tables Sexual behaviour MICS Indicator Indicator Description Value 9.9 Young people who have never had sex Percentage of never married young women age 15-24 years who have never had sex 62.5 9.10 Sex before age 15 among young people Percentage of young women age 15-24 years who had sexual intercourse before age 15 3.7 9.11 Age-mixing among sexual partners Percentage of women age 15-24 years who had sex in the last 12 months with a partner who was 10 or more years older 12.6 9.12 Multiple sexual partnerships Percentage of women age 15-49 years who had sexual intercourse with more than one partner in the last 12 months 2.9 9.13 Condom use at last sex among people with multiple sexual partnerships Percentage of women age 15-49 years who report having had more than one sexual partner in the last 12 months who also reported that a condom was used the last time they had sex 44.2 9.14 Sex with non-regular partners Percentage of sexually active young women age 15-24 years who had sex with a non-marital, non-cohabitating partner in the last 12 months 66.0 9.15 MDG 6.2 Condom use with non- regular partners Percentage of young women age 15-24 years reporting the use of a condom during the last sexual intercourse with a non- marital, non-cohabiting sex partner in the last 12 months 59.2 30 TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO: MONITORING THE SITUATION OF CHILDREN & WOMEN Access to mass media and ICT Access to mass media MICS Indicator Indicator Description Value 10.1 Exposure to mass media Percentage of women age 15-49 years who, at least once a week, read a newspaper or magazine, listen to the radio, and watch television 75.1 Use of information/communication technology MICS Indicator Indicator Description Value 10.2 Use of computers Percentage of young women age 15-24 years who used a computer during the last 12 months 93.0 10.3 Use of internet Percentage of young women age 15-24 years who used the internet during the last 12 months 90.7 31 Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey 2011: Key Findings & Tables APPENDICES 31 32 TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO: MONITORING THE SITUATION OF CHILDREN & WOMEN Appendix A. Sample Design The major features of the sample design are described in this appendix. Sample design features include target sample size, sample allocation, sampling frame and listing, choice of domains, sampling stages, stratification, and the calculation of sample weights. The primary objective of the sample design for the Trinidad and Tobago MICS was to produce statistically reliable estimates of most indicators, at the national level and for the five regions of the country: North West, North Central, South West, East, and Tobago. A multi-stage, stratified cluster sampling approach was used for the selection of the survey sample. Sample Size and Sample Allocation The sample size for the Trinidad and Tobago 2011 MICS was calculated as 6,600 households. For the calculation of the sample size, the key indicator used was DPT (diphtheria, pertussis and tetanus) immunization coverage. The following formula was used to estimate the required sample size for this indicator: where  n is the required sample size, expressed as number of households  4 is a factor to achieve the 95 percent level of confidence  r is the predicted or anticipated value of the indicator, expressed in the form of a proportion  1.1 is the factor necessary to raise the sample size by 10 per cent for the expected non-response  f is the shortened symbol for deff (design effect)  0.12r is the margin of error to be tolerated at the 95 percent level of confidence, defined as 12 per cent of r (relative margin of error of r)  p is the proportion of the total population upon which the indicator, r, is based  n is the average household size (number of persons per household). For each of the five regions, namely, North West, North Central, South West, East and Tobago, the calculation of n was based on r (DPT coverage) that was assumed to be 72.9 percent, 70.3 percent, 87 percent, 94.5 percent and 77.8 percent respectively, based on the values found in Trinidad and Tobago 2006 MICS. The choice of the DPT immunization rate as the key indicator for estimating sample size was made after examining the likely sample sizes that would be needed for this and other possible key variables such as those relating to HIV. To calculate n (the required sample size) the r values for DPT for each region were used, p (percentage of children age 18-29 months in the total population) was taken as 3 percent, average household size was taken as 3.4 persons, and the expected response rate was assumed to be 90%. The standard MICS default value of 1.5 was used for the design effect deff, since there was some doubt about the credibility of the very low deff values obtained for DPT in Trinidad and Tobago 2006 MICS. Given uncertainties that prevailed with respect to the required sample size, the sampling consultant recommended a sample size of 6,600 households for Trinidad and Tobago 2011 MICS, which is slightly larger than the sample size used in Trinidad and Tobago 2006 MICS. 33 Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey 2011: Key Findings & Tables A number of possible allocation principles were considered for determining the number of sampling units to be enumerated in each of the five regions. These included proportional allocation, square root allocation, cube root allocation and equal allocation. Because Trinidad and Tobago 2006 MICS had relied on proportional allocation resulting in sample sizes that were too small to yield reliable estimates in the Eastern region and in Tobago, 2011 MICS relied on disproportionate allocation based on the threealternative allocation principles – a square root allocation, a cube root allocation and an equal allocation. All possible allocations for the sample used for the Trinidad and Tobago 2011 MICS are shown in Table SD.1. Having considered each of these options, the survey team deemed the cube root allocation as the most appropriate as it was expected to yield sufficiently reliable estimates for each of the five regions especially Tobago. Table SD.1: Possible allocations of the sample in Trinidad and Tobago Region Households Proportional allocation Square root Square root allocation Cube root Cube root allocation Equal allocation North West 75,731 1,645 275.2 1,568 42.3 1,505 1,320 North Central 109,719 2,383 331.2 1,887 47.9 1,703 1,320 South West 82,458 1,791 287.2 1,636 43.5 1,548 1,320 Eastern 23,358 507 152.8 871 28.6 1,017 1,320 Tobago 12,605 274 112.3 640 23.3 828 1,320 Total 303,871 6,600 (1,158.7) 6,600 (185.6) 6,600 6,600 Based on the allocation of households as sampling units within the five regions, Table SD.2 provides a corresponding allocation of enumeration districts (EDs) to facilitate fieldwork activities based on the selection of 15 households per ED. Table SD.2: Sample allocation for Trinidad and Tobago 2011 MICS Region No. of EDs No. of households North West 100 1,500 North Central 114 1,710 South West 103 1,545 Eastern 68 1,020 Tobago 55 825 Total 440 6,600 Sampling Frame and Selection of Clusters The survey team examined the possible sampling frames at CSO. One option was a sampling frame based on the old administrative regions consisting of counties and wards, and a table of equivalence that links the former structure to a new set of administrative regions consisting primarily of regional corporations, two cities, three boroughs and the island of Tobago with its seven parishes. The survey team also discussed about using a sampling frame that was developed to undertake work done for the Pan- American Health Organization (PAHO) and which was based on an automatic system for sample selection. It was prepared in December 2009 and consisted of a listing of all the EDs by region, along with their size estimates. The PAHO frame was considered ideal for 34 TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO: MONITORING THE SITUATION OF CHILDREN & WOMEN Trinidad and Tobago 2011 MICS and was used for the selection of clusters. Separate lists of enumeration districts have been prepared for Trinidad and for Tobago. The lists for Trinidad had to be disaggregated to reflect the four health regions on the island. The lists had to be cleaned as a number of EDs had no measure of size to the extent that it was appropriate to insert the latest available figure, from either the 2000 census or some more recent survey. A few EDs were extremely small and had to be combined with neighboring EDs before the sample was drawn. In contrast, some other EDs were very large, and had to be segmented, either in the frame before drawing the sample or in the field if a large ED was selected. The enumeration districts were defined as primary sampling units (PSUs), and were selected from each of the sampling strata by using systematic pps (probability proportional to size) sampling procedures, based on the number of households in each enumeration district. The first stage of sampling was thus completed by selecting the required number of enumeration districts from each of the five regions. Listing Activities and Selection of Households Lists of households were prepared by the listing teams in the field for each enumeration district. The households were then sequentially numbered at the Central Statistical Office from 1 to the total number of households in each ED, and a selection of 15 households in each ED was carried out using random systematic selection procedures. Calculation of Sample Weights The Trinidad and Tobago MICS sample is not self- weighting, since different sampling fractions (based on a cube root allocation) were used for each region. For this reason, sample weights were calculated and these were used in the subsequent analyses of the survey data. The major component of the weight is the reciprocal of the sampling fraction employed in selecting the number of sample households in that particular sampling stratum (h) and PSU (i): The term fhi, the sampling fraction for the i-th sample PSU in the h-th stratum, is the product of probabilities of selection at every stage in each sampling stratum: where pshi is the probability of selection of the sampling unit at stage s for the i-th sample PSU in the h-th sampling stratum. Since the estimated number of households in each ED (PSU) in the sampling frame used for the first stage selection and the updated number of households in the ED from the listing were different, individual sampling fractions for households in each sample enumeration area (cluster) were calculated. The second stage probability in this formula refers to the proportion of the sample ED that is listed, in the case of a large sample ED that is segmented; for the remaining sample EDs this probability is 1. The sampling fractions for households in each enumeration district (cluster) therefore included the first stage probability of selection of the ED in that particular sampling stratum, any second stage probability, and the last stage probability of selection of a household in the sampled ED (cluster). 35 Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey 2011: Key Findings & Tables A second component in the calculation of sample weights takes into account the level of non-response for the household and individual interviews. The adjustment for household non-response is equal to the inverse value of: RRh = Number of interviewed households in stratum h/ Number of occupied households listed in stratum h After the completion of the fieldwork, response rates were calculated for each sampling stratum. These were used to adjust the sample weights calculated for each cluster within the stratum. Response rates in the Trinidad and Tobago Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey are shown in Table HH.1 in this report. Similarly, the adjustment for non-response at the individual level (women and under-5 children) for each stratum is equal to the inverse value of: RRh = Completed women’s (or under-5’s) questionnaires in stratum h / Eligible women (or under-5s) in stratum h The non-response adjustment factors for women’s and under-5’s questionnaires were applied to the adjusted household weights. Numbers of eligible women and under-5 children were obtained from the roster of household members in the Household Questionnaire for households where interviews were completed. The design weights for the households were calculated by multiplying the above factors for each ED. These weights were then standardized (or normalized), one purpose of which is to make the weighted sum of the interviewed sample units equal the total sample size at the national level. Normalization is achieved by dividing the full sample weights (adjusted for nonresponse) by the average of these weights across all households at the national level. This is performed by multiplying the sample weights by a constant factor equal to the unweighted number of households at the national level divided by the weighted total number of households (using the full sample weights adjusted for nonresponse). A similar standardization procedure was followed in obtaining standardized weights for the women’s and under-5’s questionnaires. Normalized sample weights were appended to all data sets and analyses were performed by weighting each household, woman or under-5 with these sample weights. 36 TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO: MONITORING THE SITUATION OF CHILDREN & WOMEN Appendix B. Data Tables Sample and Survey Characteristics Table HH.1: Results of household, women’s and under-5 interviews Number of households, women, and children under 5 by interview results, and household, women’s and under-5’s response rates, Trinidad and Tobago, 2011 Total Area Region Urban Rural North West East North Central South West Tobago Households Sampled 6,628 3,164 3,464 1,509 1,023 1,717 1,550 829 Occupied 6,020 2,841 3,179 1,323 925 1,602 1,450 720 Interviewed 5,573 2,559 3,014 1,205 901 1,446 1,386 635 Household response rate 92.6 90.1 94.8 91.1 97.4 90.3 95.6 88.2 Women Eligible 4,424 1,979 2,445 925 732 1,186 1,131 450 Interviewed 4,123 1,818 2,305 856 710 1,079 1,099 379 Women’s response rate 93.2 91.9 94.3 92.5 97.0 91.0 97.2 84.2 Women’s overall response rate 86.3 82.7 89.4 84.3 94.5 82.1 92.9 74.3 Children under 5 Eligible 1,224 550 674 258 231 299 289 147 Mothers/caretakers interviewed 1,199 538 661 253 231 290 288 137 Under-5’s response rate 98.0 97.8 98.1 98.1 100.0 97.0 99.7 93.2 Under-5’s overall response rate 90.7 88.1 93.0 89.3 97.4 87.5 95.3 82.2 37 Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey 2011: Key Findings & Tables Table HH.2: Household age distribution by sex Percent and frequency distribution of the household population by five-year age groups, dependency age groups, and by child (age 0-17 years) and adult populations (age 18 or more), by sex, Trinidad and Tobago, 2011 Total Males Females Number Percent Number Percent Number Percent Total 17,883 100.0 8,925 100.0 8,958 100.0 Age 0-4 1,191 6.7 581 6.5 610 6.8 5-9 1,191 6.7 602 6.8 589 6.6 10-14 1,246 7.0 658 7.4 588 6.6 15-19 1,258 7.0 664 7.4 594 6.6 20-24 1,352 7.6 673 7.5 679 7.6 25-29 1,567 8.8 802 9.0 765 8.5 30-34 1,306 7.3 667 7.5 640 7.1 35-39 1,173 6.6 585 6.6 588 6.6 40-44 1,080 6.0 561 6.3 518 5.8 45-49 1,302 7.3 636 7.1 666 7.4 50-54 1,264 7.1 615 6.9 648 7.2 55-59 1,080 6.0 553 6.2 527 5.9 60-64 853 4.8 408 4.6 445 5.0 65-69 756 4.2 362 4.1 394 4.4 70-74 482 2.7 229 2.6 252 2.8 75-79 329 1.8 141 1.6 188 2.1 80-84 223 1.2 92 1.0 131 1.5 85+ 200 1.1 80 0.9 119 1.3 Missing/DK 30 0.2 15 0.2 15 0.2 Dependency age groups 0-14 3,628 20.3 1,841 20.6 1,787 19.9 15-64 12,236 68.4 6,164 69.1 6,071 67.8 65+ 1990 11.1 904 10.1 1,086 12.1 Missing/DK 30 0.2 15 0.2 15 0.2 Child and adult populations Children age 0-17 years 4,402 24.6 2,249 25.2 2154 24.0 Adults age 18+ years 13,451 75.2 6,661 74.6 6790 75.8 Missing/DK 30 0.2 15 0.2 15 0.2 38 TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO: MONITORING THE SITUATION OF CHILDREN & WOMEN Table HH.3: Household composition Percent and frequency distribution of households by selected characteristics, Trinidad and Tobago, 2011 Weighted percent Number of households Weighted Unweighted Total 100.0 5,573 5,573 Sex of household head Male 67.1 3,740 3,760 Female 32.9 1,833 1,813 Region North West 24.6 1,374 1,205 East 7.3 409 901 North Central 37.7 2,102 1,446 South West 25.9 1,445 1,386 Tobago 4.4 243 635 Area Urban 58.7 3,270 2,559 Rural 41.3 2,303 3,014 Number of household members 1 19.2 1,071 1,097 2 21.7 1,210 1,201 3 19.5 1,086 1,068 4 18.5 1,029 1,037 5 10.6 588 570 6 5.6 310 319 7 2.6 145 148 8 1.1 61 61 9 0.7 38 38 10+ 0.6 35 34 Education of household head None 1.5 82 84 Primary 40.4 2,250 2,396 Secondary+ 57.5 3,205 3,059 Not Stated 0.6 35 34 Ethnicity of household head African 38.4 2,140 2,289 Indian 37.9 2,110 2,001 Mixed 21.7 1,210 1,191 Other/Not stated 2.0 112 92 Mean household size 3.2 5,573 5,573 39 Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey 2011: Key Findings & Tables Table HH.4: Women’s background characteristics Percent and frequency distribution of women age 15-49 years by selected characteristics, Trinidad and Tobago, 2011 Weighted percent Number of women Weighted Unweighted Total 100.0 4,123 4,123 Region North West 23.3 961 856 East 8.1 333 710 North Central 36.7 1,514 1,079 South West 28.7 1,184 1,099 Tobago 3.2 131 379 Area Urban 55.5 2,289 1,818 Rural 44.5 1,834 2,305 Age 15-19 13.3 550 559 20-24 15.4 633 632 25-29 16.9 699 697 30-34 14.3 591 596 35-39 13.0 537 549 40-44 11.9 493 484 45-49 15.1 621 606 Marital/Union status Currently married/in union 49.1 2,023 2,041 Widowed 1.0 42 43 Divorced 2.4 97 93 Separated 5.7 235 239 Never married/in union 41.7 1,718 1,698 Missing 0.2 8 9 Motherhood and recent births Never gave birth 58.4 2,406 2,444 Ever gave birth 41.6 1,717 1,679 Gave birth in last two years 9.7 401 410 No birth in last two years 90.3 3,722 3,713 Education None 0.4 18 17 Primary 12.0 494 538 Secondary+ 87.5 3,609 3,566 Missing/DK 0.0 2 2 Wealth index quintile Poorest 17.8 733 829 Second 19.2 791 836 Middle 21.0 865 861 Fourth 21.5 885 842 Richest 20.6 850 755 Ethnicity of household head African 34.9 1,440 1,523 Indian 41.6 1,716 1,628 Mixed 22.0 908 926 Other/Not stated 1.4 60 46 40 TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO: MONITORING THE SITUATION OF CHILDREN & WOMEN Table HH.5: Under-5’s background characteristics Percent and frequency distribution of children under five years of age by selected characteristics, Trinidad and Tobago, 2011 Weighted percent Number of under-5 children Weighted Unweighted Total 100.0 1,199 1,199 Sex Male 48.8 585 584 Female 51.2 614 615 Region North West 24.5 293 253 East 9.2 110 231 North Central 35.4 424 290 South West 26.7 321 288 Tobago 4.3 51 137 Area Urban 58.4 700 538 Rural 41.6 499 661 Age 0-5 months 8.6 103 105 6-11 months 9.3 111 111 12-23 months 17.0 204 200 24-35 months 21.5 258 256 36-47 months 23.8 286 286 48-59 months 19.8 238 241 Mother’s educationa None 0.3 4 3 Primary 13.4 161 186 Secondary+ 86.1 1,033 1,009 Missing/DK 0.1 1 1 Wealth index quintile Poorest 26.7 320 347 Second 20.1 241 257 Middle 23.0 275 265 Fourth 17.2 207 192 Richest 13.0 156 138 Ethnicity of household head African 39.7 476 501 Indian 34.9 418 391 Mixed 24.6 295 298 Other/Not stated 0.8 10 9 a In this table and throughout the report, mother’s education refers to educational attainment of mothers as well as caretakers of children under 5, who are the respondents to the under-5 questionnaire if the mother is deceased or is living elsewhere. 41 Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey 2011: Key Findings & Tables Table HH.6: Housing characteristics Percent distribution of households by selected housing characteristics, according to area of residence and regions, Trinidad and Tobago, 2011 Total Area Region Urban Rural North West East North Central South West Tobago Electricity Yes 97.5 98.4 96.1 97.8 93.3 98.3 97.0 98.5 No 2.5 1.6 3.9 2.2 6.7 1.7 3.0 1.5 Missing/DK 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 Flooring Natural floor 0.4 0.2 0.7 0.4 1.2 0.3 0.5 0.0 Rudimentary floor 12.4 10.2 15.4 9.9 18.5 11.4 14.9 9.1 Finished floor 82.6 84.6 79.8 84.3 69.8 84.2 81.0 90.1 Other 4.5 4.9 4.0 5.3 10.3 4.0 3.6 0.7 Missing/DK 0.0 0.0 0.1 0.0 0.2 0.0 0.0 0.1 Roof Natural roofing 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.1 0.0 0.0 Rudimentary roofing 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.2 0.3 0.2 0.3 Finished roofing 99.4 99.3 99.6 99.1 99.6 99.4 99.7 99.6 Other 0.3 0.4 0.1 0.5 0.1 0.2 0.1 0.2 Missing/DK 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.1 0.0 0.0 0.0 Exterior walls Natural walls 0.3 0.4 0.1 0.2 0.1 0.5 0.1 0.0 Rudimentary walls 7.4 4.6 11.5 3.7 18.1 6.1 9.6 8.5 Finished walls 91.9 94.8 87.9 95.9 79.8 93.0 90.2 91.3 Other 0.4 0.3 0.5 0.2 1.8 0.3 0.2 0.1 Missing/DK 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.1 0.0 0.0 0.0 Rooms used for sleeping 1 28.2 26.9 29.9 26.9 29.6 28.5 28.7 27.1 2 34.0 35.0 32.5 37.4 34.7 33.0 32.2 33.3 3 or more 37.7 37.9 37.3 35.6 35.4 38.5 38.8 39.3 Missing/DK 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.3 0.1 0.2 0.3 Total 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 Number of households 5,573 3,270 2,303 1,374 409 2,102 1,445 243 Mean number of persons per room used for sleeping 1.52 1.48 1.58 1.48 1.62 1.53 1.53 1.40 42 TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO: MONITORING THE SITUATION OF CHILDREN & WOMEN Table HH.7: Household and personal assets Percentage of households by ownership of selected household and personal assets, and percent distribution by ownership of dwelling, according to area of residence and regions, Trinidad and Tobago, 2011 Total Area Region Urban Rural North West East North Central South West Tobago Percentage of households that own a Radio 91.1 90.7 91.7 89.3 90.3 90.1 94.4 91.4 Television 96.0 97.0 94.6 96.1 91.6 97.1 95.7 96.0 Non-mobile telephone 51.6 56.8 44.1 55.8 31.1 55.4 46.4 60.0 Refrigerator 95.3 96.6 93.5 96.2 90.4 96.5 94.1 96.4 Stove 99.1 99.3 98.8 98.8 98.6 99.4 99.0 99.0 Washing Machine 86.3 87.7 84.2 85.4 79.0 87.3 87.1 89.3 Clothes Dryer 19.7 23.9 13.8 20.8 11.3 21.8 18.5 16.8 Water Heater (Tank/Canister) 25.8 30.2 19.4 29.9 11.7 28.1 22.5 24.6 Microwave Oven 76.1 79.1 71.8 76.1 64.9 79.3 74.8 74.3 Air Condition Unit 23.9 27.0 19.6 20.8 12.7 27.9 25.7 16.1 Internet Service 40.1 47.1 30.3 44.7 24.2 44.6 34.4 37.1 Cable/Direct TV 57.2 64.0 47.5 61.0 45.8 60.1 50.7 68.1 DVD Player 75.3 77.3 72.5 76.2 70.2 75.4 76.4 72.2 A cutlass or gilpin 83.8 78.8 91.0 77.8 96.0 81.1 89.6 86.7 A brushing cutlass 35.0 24.0 50.7 20.1 47.0 28.5 54.5 39.8 A lawn mower 7.3 8.1 6.1 5.2 1.9 9.1 8.5 5.9 Percentage of households that own Agricultural land 10.9 5.5 18.5 6.6 16.2 10.2 13.9 14.0 Farm animals/Livestock 4.9 2.2 8.8 2.0 5.8 4.9 6.2 12.4 Percentage of households where at least one member owns or has a Mobile telephone 96.3 96.3 96.3 96.3 96.9 95.4 97.7 94.6 Computer 53.3 58.1 46.4 55.3 38.1 58.0 49.9 47.4 Sewing Machine 34.8 36.9 31.8 34.2 28.9 36.4 35.3 31.6 Stereo or radio with CD Player 69.5 71.9 66.0 72.5 60.3 69.1 69.2 72.3 Boat for fishing 0.6 0.5 0.9 0.6 0.4 0.5 0.7 2.5 Boat for pleasure 0.5 0.5 0.4 1.1 0.3 0.2 0.2 0.9 MP3 Player 16.1 18.1 13.4 15.2 11.2 19.7 13.7 13.2 IPod 11.8 14.6 7.7 12.9 5.3 13.8 10.1 8.7 Car or truck 55.8 55.4 56.4 49.6 46.5 61.6 57.7 46.5 Bank account 92.5 92.9 91.9 92.0 90.5 93.6 91.8 93.8 Ownership of dwelling Owned by a household member 79.1 75.7 84.0 72.3 86.9 79.9 83.6 70.7 Not owned 20.6 24.0 15.8 27.3 12.9 19.8 16.2 29.3 Rented 13.7 17.9 7.6 22.3 6.3 11.9 9.5 17.1 Other 7.0 6.1 8.2 5.0 6.5 7.9 6.7 12.2 Missing/DK 0.2 0.3 0.2 0.4 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.0 Total 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 Number of households 5,573 3,270 2,303 1,374 409 2,102 1,445 243 43 Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey 2011: Key Findings & Tables Table HH.8: Wealth quintiles Percent distribution of the household population by wealth index quintile, according to area of residence and regions, Trinidad and Tobago, 2011 Wealth index quintiles14 Total Number of household membersPoorest Second Middle Fourth Richest Total 20.0 20.0 20.0 20.0 20.0 100.0 17,883 Area Urban 16.6 17.1 19.2 22.6 24.5 100.0 10,259 Rural 24.5 23.9 21.0 16.5 14.0 100.0 7,624 Region North West 19.2 18.9 19.6 21.0 21.3 100.0 4,199 East 38.1 24.3 14.6 12.9 10.1 100.0 1,355 North Central 14.2 20.4 19.6 23.0 22.8 100.0 6,838 South West 24.1 19.2 21.7 16.7 18.2 100.0 4,752 Tobago 17.6 20.3 25.1 20.3 16.6 100.0 739 14 The wealth index is a composite indicator of wealth. To construct the wealth index, principal components analysis is performed by using information on the ownership of consumer goods, dwelling characteristics, water and sanitation, and other characteristics that are related to the household’s wealth, to generate weights (factor scores) for each of the items used. First, initial factor scores are calculated for the total sample. Then, separate factor scores are calculated for households in urban and rural areas. Finally, the urban and rural factor scores are regressed on the initial factor scores to obtain the combined, final factor scores for the total sample. This is carried out to minimize the urban bias in the wealth index values. Each household in the total sample is then assigned a wealth score based on the assets owned by that household and on the final factor scores obtained as described above. The survey household population is then ranked according to the wealth score of the household they are living in, and is finally divided into 5 equal parts (quintiles) from lowest (poorest) to highest (richest). In the 2011-12 Trinidad and Tobago MICS, the following assets were used in these calculations: source of drinking water; type of sanitation facility; sharing of sanitation facilities; number of rooms used for sleeping; main material of dwelling floor, roof and exterior walls; type of household fuel; presence in the household of electricity, radio, television, non-mobile telephone, refrigerator, stove, washing machine, clothes dryer, water heater, microwave oven, air condition unit, internet service, cable/direct TV, DVD player, cutglass, brushing cutglass, lawn mower; presence in the household of a mobile phone, computer, sewing machine, stereo/radio CD, boat for fishing, boat for pleasure, car/truck, MP3 player, IPOD; and possession of a bank account. The wealth index is assumed to capture the underlying long-term wealth through information on the household assets, and is intended to produce a ranking of households by wealth, from poorest to richest. The wealth index does not provide information on absolute poverty, current income or expenditure levels. The wealth scores calculated are applicable for only the particular data set they are based on. Further information on the construction of the wealth index can be found in Filmer, D and Pritchett, L. 2001. Estimating wealth effects without expenditure data – or tears: An application to educational enrolments in states of India. Demography 38(1): 115-132; Rutstein, SO and Johnson, K. 2004. The DHS Wealth Index. DHS Comparative Reports No. 6; and Rutstein, SO. 2008. The DHS Wealth Index: Approaches for Rural and Urban Areas. DHS Working Papers No. 60. 44 TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO: MONITORING THE SITUATION OF CHILDREN & WOMEN Child Mortality Table CM.1: Children ever born, children surviving and proportion dead Mean and total numbers of children ever born, children surviving and proportion dead by time since first birth, Trinidad and Tobago, 2011 Children ever born Children surviving Proportion dead Number of women age 15- 49 yearsMean Total Mean Total Total 2.094 4,354 2.014 4,187 0.038 2,079 Time since first birth 0-4 1.244 634 1.206 615 0.030 509 5-9 1.827 734 1.763 709 0.035 402 10-14 2.254 1,035 2.178 1,000 0.034 459 15-19 2.606 947 2.501 908 0.040 363 20-24 2.910 1,004 2.769 956 0.049 345 Table CM.2: Infant and under-5 mortality rates by background characteristics Indirect estimates of infant and under-five mortality rates by selected background characteristics, time since first birth version, East model, Trinidad and Tobago, 2011 Infant mortality rate1 Under-five mortality rate2 Total (32) (36) Sex Male (35) (39) Female (29) (33) 1 MICS indicator 1.2; MDG indicator 4.2 - Infant mortality rate 2 MICS indicator 1.5; MDG indicator 4.1 - Under-five mortality rate Rates refer to 2004.9. The East Model was assumed to approximate the age pattern of mortality in Trinidad and Tobago. ( ) Figures that are based on 250-499 unweighted exposed persons 45 Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey 2011: Key Findings & Tables Nutrition Table NU.1: Low birth weight infants Percentage of last-born children in the 2 years preceding the survey that are estimated to have weighed below 2500 grams at birth and percentage of live births weighed at birth, Trinidad and Tobago, 2011 Percentage of live births: Number of last live- born children in the last two years Below 2,500 grams1 Weighed at birth2 Total 16.0 87.8 401 Region North West 16.8 78.9 107 East 16.8 84.5 36 North Central 15.1 91.1 129 South West 14.6 92.7 115 Tobago (26.2) (93.8) 15 Area Urban 15.9 88.1 253 Rural 16.1 87.3 148 Mother’s education Primary (13.9) (76.2) 36 Secondary+ 16.2 88.9 365 Wealth index quintile Poorest 16.9 85.1 117 Second 20.2 94.5 69 Middle 14.6 83.5 89 Fourth 15.4 92.1 80 Richest (11.0) (85.4) 46 Ethnicity of household head African 17.4 85.8 170 Indian 16.4 88.8 136 Mixed 12.9 89.6 93 Other/Not stated (*) (*) 3 1 MICS indicator 2.20 - Low-birthweight infants 2 MICS indicator 2.21 - Infants weighed at birth ( ) Figures that are based on 25-49 unweighted cases (*) Figures that are based on fewer than 25 unweighted cases 46 TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO: MONITORING THE SITUATION OF CHILDREN & WOMEN Ta bl e N U .2 : N ut ri ti on al s ta tu s of c hi ld re n Pe rc en ta ge o f c hi ld re n un de r ag e 5 by n ut ri ti on al s ta tu s ac co rd in g to t hr ee a nt hr op om et ri c in di ce s: w ei gh t fo r ag e, h ei gh t fo r ag e, a nd w ei gh t fo r he ig ht , T ri ni da d an d To ba go , 2 01 1 W ei gh t fo r ag e H ei gh t fo r ag e W ei gh t fo r he ig ht N um be r of ch ild re n % b el ow -2 s d1 % b el ow -3 s d2 M ea n Z- Sc or e (S D ) N um be r of ch ild re n % b el ow -2 s d3 % b el ow -3 s d4 M ea n Z- Sc or e (S D ) N um be r of ch ild re n % b el ow -2 s d5 % b el ow -3 s d6 % a bo ve +2 s d7 M ea n Z- Sc or e (S D ) To ta l 5. 5 1. 9 0. 0 1, 08 7 11 .0 5. 1 -0 .2 1, 06 9 6. 3 2. 1 11 .5 0. 1 1, 05 3 Se x M al e 7. 0 2. 8 -0 .1 53 4 13 .8 6. 7 -0 .3 52 5 5. 7 2. 0 13 .1 0. 2 51 5 Fe m al e 4. 1 1. 1 0. 0 55 3 8. 2 3. 6 -0 .2 54 4 7. 0 2. 2 9. 9 0. 1 53 8 A re a U rb an 3. 9 .9 0. 1 62 9 10 .4 4. 8 -0 .2 62 1 4. 2 1. 3 11 .8 0. 2 60 8 Ru ra l 7. 7 3. 3 -0 .3 45 8 11 .7 5. 5 -0 .4 44 8 9. 2 3. 1 11 .1 -0 .1 44 6 Re gi on N or th W es t 5. 2 1. 6 0. 1 27 3 9. 5 1. 8 -0 .1 27 1 1. 8 0. 0 9. 3 0. 3 26 4 Ea st 5. 2 2. 4 0. 0 10 0 9. 6 1. 4 -0 .3 10 0 5. 3 1. 5 10 .2 0. 3 97 N or th C en tr al 6. 1 2. 3 -0 .1 37 4 8. 9 3. 9 -0 .2 37 0 6. 2 2. 0 10 .9 0. 0 36 2 So ut h W es t 5. 3 1. 6 -0 .2 29 4 15 .9 11 .3 -0 .4 28 2 11 .0 4. 4 14 .5 0. 0 28 4 To ba go 4. 3 1. 7 0. 0 47 9. 0 4. 1 -0 .1 46 6. 8 2. 1 11 .6 0. 0 46 A ge 0 – 5 m on th s 8. 6 4. 8 -0 .2 92 12 .1 3. 2 -0 .2 84 9. 4 4. 0 8. 7 0. 2 79 6 – 11 m on th s 10 .6 1. 0 -0 .2 93 15 .5 4. 3 -0 .4 96 1. 7 0. 0 9. 9 0. 1 92 12 – 2 3 m on th s 6. 7 2. 7 -0 .1 18 3 22 .9 11 .6 -0 .8 18 0 6. 6 3. 7 14 .8 0. 3 18 1 24 – 3 5 m on th s 5. 6 1. 2 -0 .1 23 5 12 .6 7. 0 -0 .4 23 1 7. 5 1. 7 11 .3 0. 1 23 4 36 – 4 7 m on th s 2. 8 1. 0 0. 1 25 6 5. 5 2. 9 -0 .1 25 5 4. 5 1. 5 10 .7 0. 1 25 0 48 – 5 9 m on th s 4. 2 2. 4 0. 1 22 6 3. 6 1. 4 0. 2 22 4 7. 9 2. 1 11 .3 -0 .1 21 8 M ot he r’ s ed uc ati on N on e (* ) (* ) (* ) 4 (* ) (* ) (* ) 4 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 4 Pr im ar y 5. 9 2. 8 0. 0 14 1 7. 0 2. 6 -0 .2 14 0 4. 4 0. 3 13 .3 0. 2 13 4 Se co nd ar y+ 5. 5 1. 8 0. 0 94 1 11 .6 5. 5 -0 .3 92 4 6. 6 2. 4 11 .2 0. 1 91 4 M is si ng /D K (* ) (* ) (* ) 1 (* ) (* ) (* ) 1 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 1 W ea lt h in de x qu in ti le Po or es t 7. 0 1. 8 -0 .1 29 4 10 .9 4. 3 -0 .3 29 1 7. 0 1. 9 10 .1 0. 1 28 5 Se co nd 4. 6 1. 0 -0 .1 21 9 9. 4 4. 8 -0 .2 21 6 5. 4 1. 8 9. 2 0. 0 21 5 47 Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey 2011: Key Findings & Tables Ta bl e N U .2 : N ut ri ti on al s ta tu s of c hi ld re n Pe rc en ta ge o f c hi ld re n un de r ag e 5 by n ut ri ti on al s ta tu s ac co rd in g to t hr ee a nt hr op om et ri c in di ce s: w ei gh t fo r ag e, h ei gh t fo r ag e, a nd w ei gh t fo r he ig ht , T ri ni da d an d To ba go , 2 01 1 W ei gh t fo r ag e H ei gh t fo r ag e W ei gh t fo r he ig ht N um be r of ch ild re n % b el ow -2 s d1 % b el ow -3 s d2 M ea n Z- Sc or e (S D ) N um be r of ch ild re n % b el ow -2 s d3 % b el ow -3 s d4 M ea n Z- Sc or e (S D ) N um be r of ch ild re n % b el ow -2 s d5 % b el ow -3 s d6 % a bo ve +2 s d7 M ea n Z- Sc or e (S D ) M id dl e 8. 7 3. 4 0. 0 24 7 12 .7 6. 9 -0 .2 24 0 7. 5 2. 3 13 .3 0. 1 23 7 Fo ur th 2. 1 0. 6 0. 1 18 7 7. 3 3. 9 -0 .1 18 6 5. 0 2. 4 13 .8 0. 2 18 0 Ri ch es t 2. 7 2. 7 0. 0 14 0 15 .5 5. 8 -0 .3 13 6 6. 0 2. 2 11 .5 0. 2 13 6 Et hn ic it y of h ou se ho ld h ea d A fr ic an 4. 1 1. 8 0. 2 43 3 11 .6 4. 6 -0 .2 43 0 4. 8 2. 3 12 .8 0. 3 42 4 In di an 8. 4 2. 9 -0 .4 37 4 12 .2 7. 1 -0 .5 36 4 10 .3 2. 9 11 .3 -0 .2 35 9 M ix ed 3. 8 0. 9 0. 1 27 4 8. 4 3. 3 0. 0 27 0 3. 5 0. 7 9. 4 0. 1 26 7 O th er /N ot s ta te d (* ) (* ) (* ) 5 (* ) (* ) (* ) 5 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 4 1 M IC S in di ca to r 2. 1a a nd M D G in di ca to r 1. 8 - U nd er w ei gh t pr ev al en ce (m od er at e an d se ve re ) 2 M IC S in di ca to r 2. 1b - U nd er w ei gh t pr ev al en ce (s ev er e) 3 M IC S in di ca to r 2. 2a - St un ti ng p re va le nc e (m od er at e an d se ve re ) 4 M IC S in di ca to r 2. 2b - St un ti ng p re va le nc e (s ev er e) 5 M IC S in di ca to r 2. 3a - W as ti ng p re va le nc e (m od er at e an d se ve re ) 6 M IC S in di ca to r 2. 3b - W as ti ng p re va le nc e (s ev er e) 7 M IC S in di ca to r 2. 4 - O ve rw ei gh t pr ev al en ce Th e he ig ht /l en gt h m ea su re m en ts a re h ea pe d an d re su lt s sh ou ld b e co ns id er ed w it h ca uti on . F ur th er a na ly si s is n ee de d to d et er m in e th e im pa ct . (* ) F ig ur es t ha t ar e ba se d on fe w er t ha n 25 u nw ei gh te d ca se s 48 TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO: MONITORING THE SITUATION OF CHILDREN & WOMEN Table NU.3: Initial breastfeeding Percentage of last-born children in the 2 years preceding the survey who were ever breastfed, percentage who were breastfed within one hour of birth and within one day of birth, and percentage who received a prelacteal feed, Trinidad and Tobago, 2011 Percentage who were ever breastfed1 Percentage who were first breastfed: Percentage who received a prelacteal feed Number of last- born children in the two years preceding the survey Within one hour of birth2 Within one day of birth Total 91.9 46.3 73.8 33.2 401 Region North West 93.7 49.0 74.2 26.4 107 East 92.2 51.8 75.4 24.8 36 North Central 93.7 42.6 69.9 42.2 129 South West 87.3 45.9 75.2 34.3 115 Tobago (98.0) (48.3) (89.9) (14.7) 15 Area Urban 91.2 47.8 75.1 34.0 253 Rural 93.1 43.7 71.6 31.6 148 Months since last birth 0-11 months 95.7 50.2 80.5 35.4 188 12-23 months 90.2 45.3 70.7 29.0 188 Assistance at delivery Skilled attendant 93.3 47.0 75.0 33.7 395 Other/Missing (*) (*) (*) (*) 6 Place of delivery Home (*) (*) (*) (*) 0 Health facility: Public 93.8 49.8 77.6 29.6 349 Private (93.7) (26.7) (57.9) (68.8) 43 Other/DK/Missing (*) (*) (*) (*) 8 Mother’s education Primary (89.2) (50.6) (76.4) (18.1) 36 Secondary+ 92.2 45.9 73.5 34.6 365 Wealth index quintile Poorest 91.0 43.3 76.0 28.0 117 Second 95.1 51.7 79.1 26.9 69 Middle 89.0 44.5 73.8 27.1 89 Fourth 93.7 55.1 71.6 42.1 80 Richest (91.7) (33.8) (64.2) (51.7) 46 Ethnicity of household head African 93.0 48.2 75.5 31.9 170 Indian 86.0 44.3 65.8 28.7 136 Mixed 98.2 45.5 82.1 41.4 93 Other/Not stated (*) (*) (*) (*) 3 1 MICS indicator 2.5 - Children ever breastfed 2 MICS indicator 2.6 - Early initiation of breastfeeding ( ) Figures that are based on 25-49 unweighted cases (*) Figures that are based on fewer than 25 unweighted cases 49 Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey 2011: Key Findings & Tables Table NU.4: Breastfeeding Percentage of living children according to breastfeeding status at selected age groups, Trinidad and Tobago, 2011 Children age 0-5 months Children age 12-15 months Children age 20-23 months Percent exclusively breastfed1 Percent predominantly breastfed2 Number of children Percent breastfed (Continued breastfeeding at 1 year)3 Number of children Percent breastfed (Continued breastfeeding at 2 years)4 Number of children Total 21.5 30.7 103 41.2 60 28.2 82 Sex Male 24.6 26.8 49 (47.2) 34 (35.2) 39 Female 18.6 34.2 54 (33.2) 26 (21.8) 43 Region North West (*) (*) 25 (*) 19 (*) 16 East (8.4) (20.4) 12 (*) 4 (*) 7 North Central (32.4) (36.7) 37 (*) 18 (*) 32 South West (*) (*) 24 (*) 16 (*) 24 Tobago (*) (*) 5 (*) 3 (*) 4 Area Urban 26.8 36.5 66 (40.6) 44 (21.7) 50 Rural 12.0 20.5 37 (*) 17 (38.1) 33 Mother’s education Primary (*) (*) 6 (*) 10 (*) 9 Secondary+ 22.4 31.8 97 (42.1) 51 29.9 73 Wealth index quintile Poorest (21.5) (33.8) 36 (*) 18 (*) 14 Second (*) (*) 20 (*) 12 (*) 17 Middle (*) (*) 17 (*) 10 (*) 20 Fourth (*) (*) 20 (*) 9 (*) 21 Richest (*) (*) 11 (*) 10 (*) 11 Ethnicity of household head African (19.7) (35.7) 48 (45.4) 32 (43.4) 30 Indian (19.5) (23.0) 28 (*) 16 (19.3) 33 Mixed (29.1) (32.6) 25 (*) 13 (*) 20 Other/Not stated (*) (*) 2 - 0 - 0 1 MICS indicator 2.7 - Exclusive breastfeeding under 6 months 2 MICS indicator 2.8 - Predominant breastfeeding under 6 months 3 MICS indicator 2.9 - Continued breastfeeding at 1 year 4 MICS indicator 2.10 - Continued breastfeeding at 2 years ( ) Figures that are based on 25-49 unweighted cases (*) Figures that are based on fewer than 25 unweighted cases “-“ denotes zero unweighted cases 50 TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO: MONITORING THE SITUATION OF CHILDREN & WOMEN Table NU.5: Duration of breastfeeding Median duration of any breastfeeding, exclusive breastfeeding, and predominant breastfeeding among children age 0-35 months, Trinidad and Tobago, 2011 Median duration (in months) of: Number of children age 0-35 monthsAny breastfeeding1 Exclusive breastfeeding Predominant breastfeeding Median 8.1 0.7 0.8 676 Sex Male 7.7 0.7 0.8 332 Female 8.6 0.6 0.7 344 Region North West 11.9 0.6 1.1 175 East 11.8 0.5 0.7 62 North Central 7.4 1.2 1.3 234 South West 7.3 0.5 0.5 179 Tobago 14.7 0.5 2.6 27 Area Urban 7.4 0.9 1.3 403 Rural 8.5 0.5 0.6 272 Mother’s education Secondary+ 10.2 0.5 0.6 79 Wealth index quintile Poorest 15.9 0.6 0.6 182 Second 9.1 0.6 0.7 144 Middle 7.5 0.6 1.8 150 Fourth 7.8 1.9 1.9 119 Richest 5.0 0.7 0.9 82 Ethnicity of household head African 10.5 0.6 1.0 270 Indian 5.6 0.7 0.7 247 Mixed 13.7 1.1 1.5 154 Other/Not stated (*) (*) (*) 6 Mean 13.4 1.2 2.1 676 1 MICS indicator 2.11 - Duration of breastfeeding (*) Figures that are based on fewer than 25 unweighted cases 51 Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey 2011: Key Findings & Tables Table NU.6: Age-appropriate breastfeeding Percentage of children age 0-23 months who were appropriately breastfed during the previous day, Trinidad and Tobago, 2011 Children age 0-5 months Children age 6-23 months Children age 0-23 months Percent exclusively breastfed1 Number of children Percent currently breastfeeding and receiving solid, semi-solid or soft foods Number of children Percent appropriately breastfed2 Number of children Total 21.5 103 30.6 315 28.3 418 Sex Male 24.6 49 33.8 159 31.6 207 Female 18.6 54 27.3 157 25.1 211 Region North West (*) 25 36.8 85 32.1 110 East (8.4) 12 40.0 27 30.5 39 North Central (32.4) 37 19.6 109 22.8 146 South West (*) 24 34.8 82 30.9 106 Tobago (*) 5 (35.9) 13 (30.2) 18 Area Urban 26.8 66 29.2 201 28.6 266 Rural 12.0 37 33.0 114 27.9 152 Mother’s education None - 0 - 0 - 0 Primary (*) 6 (23.1) 36 20.8 42 Secondary+ 22.4 97 31.6 279 29.2 376 Wealth index quintile Poorest (21.5) 36 40.1 81 34.4 116 Second (*) 20 32.7 61 28.1 81 Middle (*) 17 27.6 69 24.8 86 Fourth (*) 20 23.7 67 27.0 87 Richest (*) 11 (24.4) 37 (22.8) 48 Ethnicity of household head African (19.7) 48 36.4 139 32.1 187 Indian (19.5) 28 21.2 104 20.9 132 Mixed (29.1) 25 33.0 72 32.0 96 Other/Not stated (*) 2 (*) 0 (*) 3 1 MICS indicator 2.7 - Exclusive breastfeeding under 6 months 2 MICS indicator 2.12 - Age-appropriate breastfeeding ( ) Figures that are based on 25-49 unweighted cases (*) Figures that are based on fewer than 25 unweighted cases “-“ denotes zero unweighted cases 52 TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO: MONITORING THE SITUATION OF CHILDREN & WOMEN Table NU.7: Introduction of solid, semi-solid, or soft foods Percentage of infants age 6-8 months who received solid, semi-solid or soft foods during the previous day, Trinidad and Tobago, 2011 Currently breastfeeding Currently not breastfeeding All Percent receiving solid, semi-solid or soft foods Number of children age 6-8 months Percent receiving solid, semi-solid or soft foods Number of children age 6-8 months Percent receiving solid, semi-solid or soft foods1 Number of children age 6-8 months Total (46.3) 30 (*) 24 52.6 54 Sex Male (*) 12 (*) 13 (45.9) 25 Female (*) 18 (*) 11 (58.6) 28 Area Urban (*) 17 (*) 16 (54.4) 33 Rural (*) 13 (*) 8 (49.7) 21 1 MICS indicator 2.13 - Introduction of solid, semi-solid or soft foods ( ) Figures that are based on 25-49 unweighted cases (*) Figures that are based on fewer than 25 unweighted cases 53 Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey 2011: Key Findings & Tables Table NU.8: Infant and young child feeding (IYCF) practices Percentage of children age 6-23 months who received solid, semi-solid, or soft foods (and milk feeds for non-breastfeeding children) the minimum number of times or more during the previous day, according to breastfeeding status, Trinidad and Tobago, 2011 Currently breastfeeding Currently not breastfeeding All Percent receiving solid, semi-solid and soft foods the minimum number of timesb Number of children age 6-23 months Percent receiving at least 2 milk feeds1 Percent receiving solid, semi-solid and soft foods or milk feeds 4 times or moreb Number of children age 6-23 months Percent with minimum meal frequency2, b Number of children age 6-23 months Total 30.7 123 97.0 95.2 193 70.1 315 Sex Male 34.8 67 98.4 96.2 91 70.2 159 Female 25.8 55 95.8 94.3 101 70.0 157 Age 6-8 months (22.2) 30 (*) (*) 24 57.0 54 9-11 months (36.5) 24 (98.6) (98.6) 34 73.2 58 12-17 months (30.7) 37 100.0 97.3 58 71.5 95 18-23 months (34.3) 32 93.2 90.6 76 73.8 109 Region North West (21.1) 38 (100.0) (96.6) 47 62.7 85 East (32.0) 13 (96.7) (96.7) 14 65.0 27 North Central (*) 34 93.1 91.0 75 70.2 109 South West (53.4) 31 (100.0) (100.0) 51 82.5 82 Tobago (*) 7 (*) (*) 6 (51.1) 13 Area Urban 25.2 73 97.1 93.1 127 68.2 201 Rural 38.9 49 97.0 99.3 65 73.4 114 Mother’s education Primary (*) 14 (100.0) (93.0) 23 (66.8) 36 Secondary+ 31.6 109 96.7 95.5 170 70.6 279 Wealth index quintile Poorest (33.2) 42 (98.8) (95.0) 39 63.1 81 Second (*) 23 (92.3) (92.1) 39 76.9 61 Middle (21.8) 24 (95.0) (90.5) 45 66.3 69 Fourth (*) 24 (100.0) (100.0) 43 73.2 67 Richest (*) 10 (*) (*) 27 (75.8) 37 Ethnicity of household head African 24.5 66 96.0 93.3 74 60.8 139 Indian (45.5) 25 96.5 96.5 79 84.1 104 Mixed (31.8) 32 (100.0) (96.0) 40 67.7 72 Other/Not stated - 0 (*) (*) 0 (*) 0 1 MICS indicator 2.14 - Milk feeding frequency for non-breastfed children 2 MICS indicator 2.15 - Minimum meal frequency b Minimum meal frequency among currently breastfeeding children is defined as children who also received solid, semi-solid, or soft foods 2 times or more daily for children age 6-8 months and 3 times or more daily for children age 9-23 months. For non-breastfeeding children age 6-23 months it is defined as receiving solid, semi-solid or soft foods, or milk feeds, at least 4 times. ( ) Figures that are based on 25-49 unweighted cases (*) Figures that are based on fewer than 25 unweighted cases “-“ denotes zero unweighted cases 54 TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO: MONITORING THE SITUATION OF CHILDREN & WOMEN Table NU.9: Bottle feeding Percentage of children age 0-23 months who were fed with a bottle with a nipple during the previous day, Trinidad and Tobago, 2011 Percentage of children age 0-23 months fed with a bottle with a nipple1 Number of children age 0-23 months Total 80.5 418 Sex Male 79.4 207 Female 81.6 211 Age 0-5 months 68.6 103 6-11 months 91.3 111 12-23 months 80.7 204 Region North West 85.6 110 East 79.0 39 North Central 76.1 146 South West 85.3 106 Tobago (60.0) 18 Area Urban 79.8 266 Rural 81.7 152 Mother’s education Primary 87.1 42 Secondary 79.8 376 Wealth index quintile Poorest 77.8 116 Second 79.0 81 Middle 85.2 86 Fourth 77.1 87 Richest (87.4) 48 Ethnicity of household head African 78.2 187 Indian 85.4 132 Mixed 78.4 96 Other/Not stated (*) 3 1 MICS indicator 2.18 - Bottle feeding ( ) Figures that are based on 25-49 unweighted cases (*) Figures that are based on fewer than 25 unweighted cases 55 Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey 2011: Key Findings & Tables Table NU.10: Iodized salt consumption Percent distribution of households by consumption of iodized salt, Trinidad and Tobago, 2011 Percentage of households in which salt was tested Number of households Percent of households with: Total Number of households in which salt was tested or with no saltNo salt Salt test result Not iodized 0 PPM >0 and <15 PPM 15+ PPM1 Total 87.3 5,573 6.7 30.7 15.2 47.4 100.0 5,215 Region North West 81.5 1,374 11.2 27.8 16.0 45.0 100.0 1,261 East 92.1 409 2.5 29.1 13.3 55.2 100.0 387 North Central 87.2 2,102 7.1 29.8 15.1 48.0 100.0 1,972 South West 92.8 1,445 3.0 36.3 15.3 45.4 100.0 1,382 Tobago 81.0 243 7.9 23.2 14.3 54.6 100.0 214 Area Urban 85.1 3,270 8.5 29.6 15.2 46.6 100.0 3,041 Rural 90.6 2,303 4.0 32.3 15.1 48.6 100.0 2,174 Wealth index quintile Poorest 81.6 1,333 10.9 31.8 15.3 42.0 100.0 1,220 Second 87.5 1,145 6.4 32.2 15.5 45.9 100.0 1,070 Middle 89.6 1,071 5.2 31.9 15.3 47.6 100.0 1,013 Fourth 90.4 985 5.2 27.2 14.7 53.0 100.0 939 Richest 89.4 1,039 4.5 29.9 15.1 50.5 100.0 972 1 MICS indicator 2.19 - Iodized salt consumption The salt used for cooking was tested for iodine content by using salt test kits for testing the presence of potassium iodide and potassium iodate. 56 TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO: MONITORING THE SITUATION OF CHILDREN & WOMEN Child Health Table CH.1: Vaccinations in the first years of life Percentage of children age 18-29 months immunized against childhood diseases at any time before the survey and before the first birthday (and by 18 months for measles, yellow fever and Polio 3), Trinidad and Tobago, 2011 Vaccinated at any time before the survey according to: Vaccinated by 12 months of ageaVaccination card Mother’s report Either Antigen Polio 1 82.1 15.4 97.5 97.5 2 82.1 14.4 96.6 96.6 31 80.7 12.6 93.3 92.6 DPT or Pentavalent 1 59.6 14.2 73.9 69.7 2 56.4 12.5 68.9 67.9 32 55.6 9.6 65.3 64.0 HepB or Pentavalent 1 53.0 13.1 66.1 65.2 2 52.5 10.4 62.9 62.9 33 51.9 8.8 60.7 58.5 Yellow fever4 76.7 13.5 90.2 86.2 Measles5 78.5 12.9 91.4 87.5 Pneumococcal 1 8.7 3.2 11.9 5.8 2 3.8 0.5 4.3 2.8 3 1.9 0.0 1.9 1.2 Fully vaccinated6, b 47.0 7.7 54.7 44.3 No vaccinations 0.0 2.4 2.4 2.4 Number of children age 18-29 months 242 242 242 242 1 MICS indicator 3.2 - Polio immunization coverage 2 MICS indicator 3.3 - Diphtheria, pertussis and tetanus (DPT) immunization coverage 3 MICS indicator 3.5 - Hepatitis B immunization coverage 4 MICS indicator 3.7 - Yellow fever immunization coverage 5 MICS indicator 3.4; MDG indicator 4.3 - Measles immunization coverage 6 MICS indicator 3.8 - Full immunization coverage a By 18 months for measles, yellow fever and Polio 3 b Includes: Measles, DPT1-3 (alone or from Pentavalent), Polio 1-3, HepB1-3 (alone or from Pentavalent) and yellow fever as per the vaccination schedule in Trinidad and Tobago 57 Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey 2011: Key Findings & Tables Ta bl e CH .2 : V ac ci na ti on s by b ac kg ro un d ch ar ac te ri sti cs Pe rc en ta ge o f c hi ld re n ag e 18 -2 9 m on th s cu rr en tl y va cc in at ed a ga in st v ac ci ne p re ve nt ab le c hi ld ho od d is ea se s, T ri ni da d an d To ba go , 2 01 1 Pe rc en ta ge o f c hi ld re n w ho r ec ei ve d: Pe rc en ta ge w it h va cc in ati on ca rd s ee n N um be r of ch ild re n ag e 18 -2 9 m on th s Po lio D PT o r Pe nt aa M ea sl es H ep B o r Pe nt aa Pn eu m oc oc ca l Ye llo w fe ve r N on e Fu llb 1 2 3 1 2 3 1 2 3 1 2 3 To ta l 97 .5 96 .6 93 .3 73 .9 68 .9 65 .3 91 .4 66 .1 62 .9 60 .7 12 .7 4. 5 2. 0 90 .2 2. 4 54 .7 82 .1 24 2 Se x M al e 96 .5 96 .5 93 .3 70 .3 69 .0 65 .9 88 .7 63 .9 61 .7 61 .3 9. 0 2. 5 1. 5 91 .2 3. 2 55 .0 79 .4 11 9 Fe m al e 98 .4 96 .6 93 .2 77 .4 68 .8 64 .6 94 .0 68 .2 64 .1 60 .0 16 .1 6. 4 2. 5 89 .2 1. 6 54 .5 84 .8 12 4 Re gi on N or th W es t 95 .9 95 .9 94 .4 82 .3 80 .4 78 .5 90 .6 73 .9 73 .9 72 .4 7. 3 2. 4 0. 0 88 .7 4. 1 67 .1 72 .4 57 Ea st (9 7. 9) (9 7. 9) (9 5. 8) (8 3. 0) (8 3. 0) (8 3. 0) (9 3. 8) (7 8. 7) (7 8. 7) (7 8. 7) (9 .3 ) (0 .0 ) (0 .0 ) (9 1. 5) (2 .1 ) (7 4. 3) (8 6. 8) 22 N or th Ce nt ra l 98 .3 95 .6 92 .2 74 .0 67 .9 64 .6 90 .8 64 .8 61 .5 58 .1 16 .9 7. 2 5. 4 89 .3 1. 7 51 .8 87 .8 86 So ut h W es t 98 .0 98 .0 93 .8 64 .1 55 .7 50 .0 91 .9 57 .2 49 .9 48 .5 13 .7 4. 7 0. 0 92 .7 2. 0 42 .3 82 .8 70 To ba go (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 8 A re a U rb an 96 .0 94 .3 92 .6 75 .1 69 .3 66 .1 90 .2 67 .7 64 .8 61 .9 11 .0 5. 0 1. 3 90 .6 4. 0 57 .5 79 .8 13 2 Ru ra l 99 .2 99 .2 94 .0 72 .3 68 .4 64 .2 92 .9 64 .3 60 .6 59 .1 14 .6 4. 0 2. 9 89 .7 0. 4 51 .3 84 .9 11 0 M ot he r’ s ed uc ati on Pr im ar y (9 6. 7) (9 6. 7) (9 5. 3) (6 9. 4) (6 9. 4) (6 0. 5) (9 2. 6) (6 1. 9) (6 1. 9) (5 3. 0) (4 .6 ) (0 .0 ) (0 .0 ) (8 9. 8) (3 .3 ) (5 1. 1) (7 6. 0) 33 Se co nd ar y+ 97 .6 96 .5 92 .9 74 .5 68 .8 66 .0 91 .2 66 .8 63 .1 61 .9 13 .9 5. 2 2. 3 90 .2 2. 2 55 .3 83 .1 20 9 W ea lt h in de x qu in ti le Po or es t 94 .7 94 .7 91 .7 70 .7 64 .1 60 .9 87 .9 59 .3 58 .7 55 .3 5. 3 0. 0 0. 0 87 .9 5. 3 46 .6 78 .0 57 Se co nd 10 0. 0 10 0. 0 99 .2 67 .7 65 .6 62 .3 91 .8 64 .9 64 .0 61 .3 6. 8 0. 0 0. 0 88 .4 0. 0 55 .5 81 .2 55 M id dl e 95 .8 95 .8 94 .3 65 .6 64 .1 61 .2 91 .5 57 .6 56 .1 56 .1 7. 1 0. 0 0. 0 89 .0 4. 2 53 .1 88 .9 63 Fo ur th (1 00 .0 ) (9 4. 1) (8 8. 5) (9 2. 8) (8 0. 9) (7 5. 3) (8 9. 4) (9 2. 8) (8 0. 9) (7 5. 3) (2 3. 4) (7 .8 ) (3 .8 ) (9 1. 5) (0 .0 ) (6 9. 1) (7 7. 3) 38 Ri ch es t (9 8. 6) (9 8. 6) (8 9. 2) (8 5. 2) (7 9. 7) (7 5. 4) (1 00 .0 ) (6 4. 5) (6 0. 2) (6 0. 2) (3 5. 7) (2 7. 3) (1 1. 7) (9 8. 6) (0 .0 ) (5 3. 4) (8 3. 5) 29 Et hn ic it y of h ou se ho ld he ad A fr ic an 97 .1 97 .1 92 .8 77 .3 73 .3 70 .1 89 .6 70 .2 69 .1 67 .3 9. 2 1. 5 0. 0 91 .7 2. 9 62 .8 75 .5 89 In di an 10 0. 0 10 0. 0 96 .3 76 .4 71 .5 65 .7 94 .5 67 .3 64 .3 60 .3 14 .6 7. 9 4. 7 92 .6 0. 0 53 .8 89 .2 10 0 M ix ed 93 .3 89 .0 89 .0 64 .1 57 .1 57 .1 89 .4 57 .7 50 .6 50 .6 14 .4 2. 9 0. 0 83 .7 5. 9 43 .5 79 .5 53 O th er /N ot st at ed (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 0 a I nc lu de s Pe nt av al en t fr om c ar d or D PT /H ep B/ H ib r ep or te d by m ot he r b I nc lu de s: M ea sl es , D PT 1- 3 (a lo ne o r fr om P en ta va le nt ), P ol io 1 -3 , H ep B1 -3 (a lo ne o r fr om P en ta va le nt ) a nd y el lo w fe ve r as p er t he v ac ci na ti on s ch ed ul e in T ri ni da d an d To ba go ( ) F ig ur es th at a re b as ed o n 25 -4 9 un w ei gh te d ca se s (* ) F ig ur es th at a re b as ed o n fe w er th an 2 5 un w ei gh te d ca se s 58 TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO: MONITORING THE SITUATION OF CHILDREN & WOMEN Table CH.3: Neonatal tetanus protection Percentage of women age 15-49 years with a live birth in the last 2 years protected against neonatal tetanus, Trinidad and Tobago, 2011 Percentage of women who received at least 2 doses during last pregnancy Percentage of women who did not receive two or more doses during last pregnancy but received: Protected against tetanus1 Number of women with a live birth in the last 2 years 2 doses, the last within prior 3 years 3 doses, the last within prior 5 years 4 doses, the last within prior 10 years 5 or more doses during lifetime Total 0.5 15.0 0.4 0.0 0.0 15.8 401 Area Urban 0.0 15.3 0.5 0.0 0.0 15.8 253 Rural 1.3 14.4 0.2 0.0 0.0 15.9 148 Region North West 0.0 22.4 0.0 0.0 0.0 22.4 107 East 1.3 26.5 0.0 0.0 0.0 27.7 36 North Central 1.1 5.0 0.9 0.0 0.0 7.0 129 South West 0.0 16.3 0.0 0.0 0.0 16.3 115 Tobago (0.0) (10.5) (2.3) (0.0) (0.0) (12.9) 15 Education Primary (0.0) (10.3) (0.0) (0.0) (0.0) (10.3) 36 Secondary+ 0.5 15.5 0.4 0.0 0.0 16.4 365 Wealth index quintile Poorest 0.0 11.6 1.0 0.0 0.0 12.6 117 Second 0.7 17.9 0.0 0.0 0.0 18.6 69 Middle 1.6 16.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 17.6 89 Fourth 0.0 15.9 0.0 0.0 0.0 15.9 80 Richest (0.0) (15.7) (0.7) (0.0) (0.0) (16.4) 46 Ethnicity of household head African 0.0 14.3 0.9 0.0 0.0 15.2 170 Indian 1.0 11.3 0.0 0.0 0.0 12.3 136 Mixed 0.5 22.2 0.0 0.0 0.0 22.7 93 Other/Not stated (*) (*) (*) (*) (*) (*) 3 1 MICS indicator 3.9 - Neonatal tetanus protection ( ) Figures that are based on 25-49 unweighted cases (*) Figures that are based on fewer than 25 unweighted cases 59 Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey 2011: Key Findings & Tables Ta bl e CH .4 : F ee di ng p ra cti ce s du ri ng d ia rr ho ea Pe rc en t di st ri bu ti on o f c hi ld re n ag e 0- 59 m on th s w it h di ar rh oe a in t he la st t w o w ee ks b y am ou nt o f l iq ui ds a nd fo od g iv en d ur in g ep is od e of d ia rr ho ea , T ri ni da d an d To ba go , 2 01 1 H ad di ar rh oe a in la st 2 w ee ks N um be r of ch ild re n ag e 0- 59 m on th s D ri nk in g pr ac ti ce s du ri ng d ia rr ho ea Ea ti ng p ra cti ce s du ri ng d ia rr ho ea N um be r of c hi ld re n ag e 0- 59 m on th s w it h di ar rh oe a in th e la st tw o w ee ks Ch ild w as g iv en t o dr in k: To ta l Ch ild w as g iv en t o ea t: To ta l M uc h le ss So m ew ha t le ss A bo ut th e sa m e M or e M is si ng / D K M uc h le ss So m ew ha t le ss A bo ut th e sa m e M or e St op pe d fo od H ad ne ve r be en gi ve n fo od M is si ng / D K To ta l 5. 3 1, 19 9 8. 9 10 .2 53 .0 23 .5 4. 5 10 0. 0 14 .1 12 .5 52 .2 2. 5 3. 1 11 .1 4. 5 10 0. 0 64 Se x M al e 7. 2 58 5 (8 .2 ) (7 .6 ) (5 6. 7) (2 4. 4) (3 .3 ) 10 0. 0 (1 5. 0) (1 3. 8) (5 0. 3) (2 .6 ) (4 .7 ) (1 0. 5) (3 .3 ) 10 0. 0 42 Fe m al e 3. 5 61 4 (1 0. 3) (1 5. 4) (4 5. 6) (2 1. 8) (6 .9 ) 10 0. 0 (1 2. 6) (1 0. 1) (5 5. 8) (2 .3 ) (0 .0 ) (1 2. 3) (6 .9 ) 10 0. 0 21 Re gi on N or th W es t 7. 4 29 3 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 10 0. 0 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 10 0. 0 22 Ea st 5. 3 11 0 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 10 0. 0 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 10 0. 0 6 N or th C en tr al 5. 0 42 4 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 10 0. 0 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 10 0. 0 21 So ut h W es t 3. 8 32 1 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 10 0. 0 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 10 0. 0 12 To ba go 5. 6 51 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 10 0. 0 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 10 0. 0 3 A re a U rb an 5. 0 70 0 (1 3. 9) (1 0. 6) (5 5. 3) (1 6. 3) (3 .9 ) 10 0. 0 (9 .6 ) (1 6. 0) (4 8. 3) (3 .1 ) (0 .0 ) (1 9. 2) (3 .9 ) 10 0. 0 35 Ru ra l 5. 7 49 9 (2 .6 ) (9 .7 ) (5 0. 0) (3 2. 4) (5 .2 ) 10 0. 0 (1 9. 8) (8 .2 ) (5 7. 0) (1 .7 ) (6 .9 ) (1 .0 ) (5 .2 ) 10 0. 0 28 A ge 0 -1 1 m on th s 6. 5 21 4 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 10 0. 0 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 10 0. 0 14 12 -2 3 m on th s 4. 7 20 4 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 10 0. 0 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 10 0. 0 10 24 -3 5 m on th s 7. 4 25 8 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 10 0. 0 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 10 0. 0 19 36 -4 7 m on th s 4. 3 28 6 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 10 0. 0 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 10 0. 0 12 48 -5 9 m on th s 3. 7 23 8 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 10 0. 0 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 10 0. 0 9 M ot he r’ s ed uc ati on N on e (* ) 4 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 0 Pr im ar y 4. 7 16 1 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 10 0. 0 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 10 0. 0 8 Se co nd ar y+ 5. 4 1, 03 3 7. 3 10 .1 52 .2 25 .3 5. 1 10 0. 0 12 .6 12 .7 54 .2 2. 8 3. 5 9. 0 5. 1 10 0. 0 56 W ea lt h in de x qu in ti le Po or es t 6. 0 32 0 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 10 0. 0 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 10 0. 0 19 Se co nd 5. 2 24 1 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 10 0. 0 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 10 0. 0 13 60 TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO: MONITORING THE SITUATION OF CHILDREN & WOMEN Ta bl e CH .4 : F ee di ng p ra cti ce s du ri ng d ia rr ho ea Pe rc en t di st ri bu ti on o f c hi ld re n ag e 0- 59 m on th s w it h di ar rh oe a in t he la st t w o w ee ks b y am ou nt o f l iq ui ds a nd fo od g iv en d ur in g ep is od e of d ia rr ho ea , T ri ni da d an d To ba go , 2 01 1 H ad di ar rh oe a in la st 2 w ee ks N um be r of ch ild re n ag e 0- 59 m on th s D ri nk in g pr ac ti ce s du ri ng d ia rr ho ea Ea ti ng p ra cti ce s du ri ng d ia rr ho ea N um be r of c hi ld re n ag e 0- 59 m on th s w it h di ar rh oe a in th e la st tw o w ee ks Ch ild w as g iv en t o dr in k: To ta l Ch ild w as g iv en t o ea t: To ta l M uc h le ss So m ew ha t le ss A bo ut th e sa m e M or e M is si ng / D K M uc h le ss So m ew ha t le ss A bo ut th e sa m e M or e St op pe d fo od H ad ne ve r be en gi ve n fo od M is si ng / D K M id dl e 5. 4 27 5 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 10 0. 0 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 10 0. 0 15 Fo ur th 3. 6 20 7 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 10 0. 0 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 10 0. 0 8 Ri ch es t 5. 9 15 6 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 10 0. 0 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 10 0. 0 9 Et hn ic it y of ho us eh ol d he ad A fr ic an 7. 1 47 6 (1 5. 3) (7 .1 ) (5 7. 3) (1 6. 3) (4 .0 ) 10 0. 0 (1 6. 2) (9 .1 ) (5 2. 8) (3 .2 ) (1 .5 ) (1 3. 2) (4 .0 ) 10 0. 0 34 In di an 3. 4 41 8 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 10 0. 0 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 10 0. 0 14 M ix ed 5. 3 29 5 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 10 0. 0 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 10 0. 0 16 O th er /N ot s ta te d (* ) 10 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 0 ( ) F ig ur es t ha t ar e ba se d on 2 5- 49 u nw ei gh te d ca se s (* ) F ig ur es t ha t ar e ba se d on fe w er t ha n 25 u nw ei gh te d ca se s “- “ de no te s ze ro u nw ei gh te d ca se s N ot e: 1 c as e of m is si ng ‘M ot he r’ s ed uc ati on ’ n ot s ho w n 61 Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey 2011: Key Findings & Tables Table CH.5: Oral rehydration solutions, recommended homemade fluids Percentage of children age 0-59 months with diarrhoea in the last two weeks, and treatment with oral rehydration solutions and recommended homemade fluids, Trinidad and Tobago, 2011 Had diarrhoea in last two weeks Number of children age 0-59 months Percentage of children with diarrhoea who received: Number of children aged 0-59 months with diarrhoea ORS Any recommended homemade fluid ORS or any recommended homemade fluid Total 5.3 1,199 45.4 30.4 51.6 64 Sex Male 7.2 585 (47.2) (38.1) (55.4) 42 Female 3.5 614 (42.0) (15.2) (44.1) 21 Area Urban 5.0 700 (53.7) (28.8) (57.2) 35 Rural 5.7 499 (35.2) (32.4) (44.6) 28 ( ) Figures that are based on 25-49 unweighted cases 62 TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO: MONITORING THE SITUATION OF CHILDREN & WOMEN Ta bl e CH .6 : O ra l r eh yd ra ti on t he ra py w it h co nti nu ed fe ed in g an d ot he r tr ea tm en ts Pe rc en ta ge o f c hi ld re n ag e 0- 59 m on th s w it h di ar rh oe a in t he la st t w o w ee ks w ho r ec ei ve d or al r eh yd ra ti on t he ra py w it h co nti nu ed fe ed in g, a nd p er ce nt ag e of c hi ld re n w it h di ar rh oe a w ho r ec ei ve d ot he r tr ea tm en ts , T ri ni da d an d To ba go , 2 01 1 C hi ld re n w it h di ar rh oe a w ho w er e gi ve n: N ot gi ve n an y tr ea tm en t or d ru g N um be r of ch ild re n ag e 0- 59 m on th s w it h di ar rh oe a in th e la st t w o w ee ks O RS o r in cr ea se d flu id s O RT (O RS o r re co m m en de d ho m em ad e flu id s or in cr ea se d flu id s) O RT w it h co nti nu ed fe ed in g1 O th er t re at m en ts Pi ll or s yr up In je cti on In tr a- ve no us H om e re m ed y, he rb al m ed ic in e O th er Anti- biotic Anti-motility Zinc Other Unknown Anti- biotic Non-antibiotic Unknown To ta l 54 .1 60 .3 39 .8 8. 8 0. 0 0. 0 1. 7 0. 0 0. 0 0. 0 0. 0 0. 0 8. 0 0. 0 37 .3 64 Se x M al e (5 3. 2) (6 1. 4) (3 8. 0) (1 0. 4) (0 .0 ) (0 .0 ) (0 .0 ) (0 .0 ) (0 .0 ) (0 .0 ) (0 .0 ) (0 .0 ) (1 2. 1) (0 .0 ) (3 7. 5) 42 Fe m al e (5 5. 8) (5 8. 0) (4 3. 3) (5 .4 ) (0 .0 ) (0 .0 ) (5 .1 ) (0 .0 ) (0 .0 ) (0 .0 ) (0 .0 ) (0 .0 ) (0 .0 ) (0 .0 ) (3 6. 9) 21 A re a U rb an (6 0. 7) (6 4. 2) (4 8. 9) (6 .4 ) (0 .0 ) (0 .0 ) (3 .1 ) (0 .0 ) (0 .0 ) (0 .0 ) (0 .0 ) (0 .0 ) (8 .0 ) (0 .0 ) (3 2. 7) 35 Ru ra l (4 5. 9) (5 5. 3) (2 8. 5) (1 1. 7) (0 .0 ) (0 .0 ) (0 .0 ) (0 .0 ) (0 .0 ) (0 .0 ) (0 .0 ) (0 .0 ) (8 .1 ) (0 .0 ) (4 3. 1) 28 M ot he r’ s ed uc ati on N on e - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 0 Pr im ar y (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 8 Se co nd ar y+ 51 .3 58 .3 42 .2 9. 1 0. 0 0. 0 1. 9 0. 0 0. 0 0. 0 0. 0 0. 0 6. 3 0. 0 39 .7 56 Et hn ic it y of h ou se ho ld h ea d A fr ic an (5 6. 8) (5 8. 2) (3 7. 8) (7 .4 ) (0 .0 ) (0 .0 ) (3 .2 ) (0 .0 ) (0 .0 ) (0 .0 ) (0 .0 ) (0 .0 ) (7 .3 ) (0 .0 ) (3 7. 3) 34 In di an (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 14 M ix ed (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 16 O th er /N ot s ta te d - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 0 1 M IC S in di ca to r 3. 12 - D ia rr ho ea t re at m en t w it h or al r eh yd ra ti on t he ra py (O R T) a nd c on ti nu ed fe ed in g ( ) F ig ur es t ha t ar e ba se d on 2 5- 49 u nw ei gh te d ca se s (* ) F ig ur es t ha t ar e ba se d on fe w er t ha n 25 u nw ei gh te d ca se s “- “ de no te s ze ro u nw ei gh te d ca se s 63 Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey 2011: Key Findings & Tables Ta bl e CH .7 : C ar e se ek in g fo r su sp ec te d pn eu m on ia a nd a nti bi oti c us e du ri ng s us pe ct ed p ne um on ia Pe rc en ta ge o f c hi ld re n ag e 0- 59 m on th s w it h su sp ec te d pn eu m on ia in t he la st t w o w ee ks w ho w er e ta ke n to a h ea lt h pr ov id er a nd p er ce nt ag e of c hi ld re n w ho w er e gi ve n an ti bi oti cs , T ri ni da d an d To ba go , 2 01 1 H ad su sp ec te d pn eu m on ia in th e la st tw o w ee ks N um be r of ch ild re n ag e 0- 59 m on th s Ch ild re n w it h su sp ec te d pn eu m on ia w ho w er e ta ke n to : A ny ap pr op ri at e pr ov id er 1 Pe rc en ta ge of c hi ld re n w it h su sp ec te d pn eu m on ia w ho r ec ei ve d an ti bi oti cs in th e la st t w o w ee ks 2 N um be r of c hi ld re n ag e 0- 59 m on th s w it h su sp ec te d pn eu m on ia in th e la st tw o w ee ks Pu bl ic s ou rc es Pr iv at e so ur ce s O th er s ou rc e G ov t. ho sp ita l G ov t. he al th ce nt re V ill ag e he al th w or ke r M ob ile / ou tr ea ch cl in ic Pr iv at e ho sp ita l/ cl in ic Pr iv at e ph ys ic ia n Pr iv at e ph ar m ac y M ob ile cl in ic Re la ti ve or fr ie nd Sh op Tr ad . Pr ac ti - ti on er To ta l 4. 1 1, 19 9 24 .8 35 .4 0. 0 0. 0 5. 2 26 .0 4. 0 0. 0 0. 0 0. 0 0. 0 80 .3 32 .2 49 Se x M al e 3. 7 58 5 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 22 Fe m al e 4. 4 61 4 (1 7. 0) (2 4. 0) (0 .0 ) (0 .0 ) (4 .3 ) (3 5. 0) (7 .3 ) (0 .0 ) (0 .0 ) (0 .0 ) (0 .0 ) (7 4. 3) (3 9. 0) 27 Re gi on N or th W es t 3. 2 29 3 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 9 Ea st 7. 7 11 0 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 8 N or th C en tr al 3. 4 42 4 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 15 So ut h W es t 4. 7 32 1 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 15 To ba go 2. 8 51 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 1 A re a U rb an 4. 2 70 0 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 29 Ru ra l 3. 9 49 9 (3 4. 0) (3 1. 2) (0 .0 ) (0 .0 ) (7 .1 ) (1 7. 8) (1 0. 1) (0 .0 ) (0 .0 ) (0 .0 ) (0 .0 ) (8 2. 7) (1 8. 9) 19 A ge 0- 11 m on th s 4. 9 21 4 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 11 12 -2 3 m on th s 3. 0 20 4 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 6 24 -3 5 m on th s 4. 4 25 8 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 11 36 -4 7 m on th s 4. 5 28 6 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 13 48 -5 9 m on th s 3. 4 23 8 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 8 M ot he r’ s ed uc ati on N on e (* ) 4 - - - - - - - - - - - - - 0 Pr im ar y 3. 6 16 1 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 6 Se co nd ar y+ 4. 2 1, 03 3 (2 6. 0) (3 2. 7) (0 .0 ) (0 .0 ) (5 .9 ) (2 5. 6) (4 .6 ) (0 .0 ) (0 .0 ) (0 .0 ) (0 .0 ) (7 7. 7) (2 6. 9) 43 W ea lt h in de x qu in ti le Po or es t 4. 5 32 0 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 14 Se co nd 3. 6 24 1 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 9 M id dl e 4. 6 27 5 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 13 Fo ur th 2. 0 20 7 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 4 Ri ch es t 5. 6 15 6 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 9 Et hn ic it y of h ou se ho ld h ea d A fr ic an 4. 2 47 6 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 20 In di an 3. 0 41 8 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 13 M ix ed 5. 5 29 5 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 16 O th er /N ot st at ed (0 .0 ) 10 - - - - - - - - - - - - - 0 1 M IC S in di ca to r 3. 13 - Ca re -s ee ki ng fo r ch ild re n w it h ac ut e re sp ir at or y in fe cti on (A R I) s ym pt om s 2 M IC S in di ca to r 3. 14 - A nti bi oti c tr ea tm en t fo r ch ild re n w it h A R I s ym pt om s ( ) F ig ur es t ha t ar e ba se d on 2 5- 49 u nw ei gh te d ca se s (* ) F ig ur es t ha t ar e ba se d on fe w er t ha n 25 u nw ei gh te d ca se s “- “ de no te s ze ro u nw ei gh te d ca se s N ot e: 1 c as e of m is si ng ‘M ot he r’ s ed uc ati on ’ n ot s ho w n 64 TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO: MONITORING THE SITUATION OF CHILDREN & WOMEN Ta bl e CH .8 : K no w le dg e of t he t w o da ng er s ig ns o f p ne um on ia Pe rc en ta ge o f m ot he rs a nd c ar et ak er s of c hi ld re n ag e 0- 59 m on th s by s ym pt om s th at w ou ld c au se t he m t o ta ke t he c hi ld im m ed ia te ly t o a he al th fa ci lit y, a nd p er ce nt ag e of m ot he rs w ho r ec og ni ze fa st a nd d iffi cu lt b re at hi ng a s si gn s fo r se ek in g ca re im m ed ia te ly , T ri ni da d an d To ba go , 2 01 1 Pe rc en ta ge o f m ot he rs /c ar et ak er s w ho t hi nk t ha t a ch ild s ho ul d be t ak en im m ed ia te ly t o a he al th fa ci lit y if t he c hi ld : M ot he rs /c ar et ak er s w ho r ec og ni ze th e tw o da ng er s ig ns o f p ne um on ia (f as t an d di ffi cu lt b re at hi ng ) N um be r of m ot he rs /c ar et ak er s of c hi ld re n ag e 0- 59 m on th s Is n ot a bl e to d ri nk o r br ea stf ee d Be co m es si ck er D ev el op s a fe ve r H as fa st br ea th in g H as d iffi cu lt br ea th in g H as b lo od in st oo l Is d ri nk in g po or ly H as o th er sy m pt om s To ta l 46 .2 66 .5 82 .4 62 .9 75 .1 64 .3 46 .2 22 .1 59 .4 92 7 Re gi on N or th W es t 35 .0 56 .8 76 .6 54 .8 70 .5 54 .5 33 .4 26 .7 52 .0 23 2 Ea st 57 .2 75 .6 89 .8 80 .4 85 .6 87 .5 65 .0 27 .0 77 .1 82 N or th C en tr al 37 .5 56 .9 79 .0 50 .9 66 .6 54 .2 37 .3 23 .2 45 .1 31 8 So ut h W es t 61 .1 82 .2 89 .2 76 .9 85 .4 76 .1 61 .5 14 .8 75 .1 26 1 To ba go 61 .9 80 .6 82 .7 80 .7 82 .4 79 .4 54 .3 22 .7 78 .4 34 A re a U rb an 43 .9 66 .7 79 .2 58 .7 73 .6 61 .8 43 .3 19 .4 55 .3 54 4 Ru ra l 49 .3 66 .2 86 .9 68 .9 77 .3 68 .0 50 .4 25 .8 65 .1 38 3 Ed uc ati on Pr im ar y 39 .5 64 .5 77 .8 65 .4 71 .7 59 .9 44 .3 17 .2 61 .8 10 4 Se co nd ar y+ 47 .1 66 .9 82 .9 62 .7 75 .7 65 .0 46 .5 22 .7 59 .1 82 2 W ea lt h in de x qu in ti le Po or es t 50 .4 64 .9 80 .1 69 .6 82 .1 69 .8 46 .9 16 .5 66 .1 22 9 Se co nd 53 .0 68 .5 85 .4 71 .2 78 .2 69 .4 54 .1 28 .7 65 .5 18 7 M id dl e 41 .5 68 .0 82 .4 62 .2 72 .6 64 .0 43 .9 19 .4 58 .5 21 3 Fo ur th 42 .3 65 .4 79 .8 55 .4 71 .7 61 .2 45 .5 22 .7 53 .7 17 2 Ri ch es t 41 .6 65 .7 85 .3 49 .9 66 .9 51 .8 38 .0 26 .1 47 .1 12 6 Et hn ic it y of h ou se ho ld h ea d A fr ic an 51 .1 70 .6 80 .5 66 .4 77 .9 68 .0 51 .0 21 .6 64 .0 35 1 In di an 42 .7 64 .3 83 .8 61 .7 72 .6 61 .7 44 .8 19 .7 57 .8 33 7 M ix ed 44 .7 63 .2 83 .3 60 .1 75 .8 63 .4 41 .7 27 .0 55 .1 23 1 O th er /N ot s ta te d (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 9 (* ) F ig ur es t ha t ar e ba se d on fe w er t ha n 25 u nw ei gh te d ca se s N ot e: 1 c as e of m is si ng ‘E du ca ti on ’ n ot s ho w n 65 Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey 2011: Key Findings & Tables Table CH.9: Solid fuel use Percent distribution of household members according to type of cooking fuel used by the household, and percentage of household members living in households using solid fuels for cooking, Trinidad and Tobago, 2011 Percentage of household members in households mainly using: Number of household membersElectricity Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG) Natural Gas Kerosene Wood Other fuel Total Solid fuels for cooking1 Total 5.8 91.2 2.8 0.1 0.0 0.0 100.0 0.0 17,883 Region North West 8.4 89.4 2.1 0.1 0.0 0.0 100.0 0.0 4,199 East 3.7 95.7 0.3 0.2 0.0 0.1 100.0 0.0 1,355 North Central 5.1 88.9 5.9 0.1 0.0 0.0 100.0 0.0 6,838 South West 5.0 94.6 0.2 0.0 0.0 0.1 100.0 0.0 4,752 Tobago 7.7 92.2 0.1 0.0 0.0 0.0 100.0 0.0 739 Area Urban 7.8 88.0 4.1 0.1 0.0 0.0 100.0 0.0 10,259 Rural 3.2 95.5 1.1 0.1 0.0 0.1 100.0 0.0 7,624 Education of household head None 2.9 96.2 1.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 100.0 0.0 288 Primary 2.5 95.1 2.1 0.1 0.0 0.1 100.0 0.0 7,368 Secondary+ 8.3 88.1 3.4 0.1 0.0 0.0 100.0 0.0 10,100 Missing/DK 7.3 92.7 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 100.0 0.0 127 Wealth index quintiles Poorest 1.1 97.0 1.3 0.3 0.1 0.2 100.0 0.1 3,575 Second 1.6 95.9 2.5 0.0 0.0 0.0 100.0 0.0 3,578 Middle 2.6 94.3 3.0 0.1 0.0 0.0 100.0 0.0 3,577 Fourth 5.8 90.7 3.5 0.0 0.0 0.0 100.0 0.0 3,573 Richest 18.1 77.9 3.9 0.0 0.0 0.0 100.0 0.0 3,580 Ethnicity of household head African 5.9 91.8 2.1 0.2 0.0 0.0 100.0 0.0 6,555 Indian 3.8 93.0 3.1 0.0 0.0 0.1 100.0 0.0 7,058 Mixed 6.9 89.9 3.1 0.1 0.0 0.0 100.0 0.0 3,947 Other/Not stated 38.1 53.6 8.3 0.0 0.0 0.0 100.0 0.0 323 1 MICS indicator 3.15 - Use of solid fuels for cooking 66 TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO: MONITORING THE SITUATION OF CHILDREN & WOMEN W at er a nd S an ita tio n Ta bl e W S. 1: U se o f i m pr ov ed w at er s ou rc es Pe rc en t di st ri bu ti on o f h ou se ho ld p op ul ati on a cc or di ng t o m ai n so ur ce o f d ri nk in g w at er a nd p er ce nt ag e of h ou se ho ld p op ul ati on u si ng im pr ov ed d ri nk in g w at er s ou rc es , T ri ni da d an d To ba go , 2 01 1 M ai n so ur ce o f d ri nk in g w at er To ta l Pe rc en ta ge us in g im pr ov ed so ur ce s of dr in ki ng w at er 1 N um be r of ho us eh ol d m em be rs Im pr ov ed s ou rc es U ni m pr ov ed s ou rc es Pi pe d w at er Pr ot ec te d sp ri ng Ra in -w at er co lle cti on Bo tt le d w at er a U np ro - te ct ed sp ri ng Ta nk er tr uc k Ca rt w it h sm al l t an k/ dr um Su rf ac e w at er Bo tt le d w at er a O th er M is si ng In to dw el lin g In to y ar d/ pl ot To ne ig h- bo ur Pu bl ic ta p/ st an d- pi pe To ta l 76 .0 2. 6 1. 6 1. 6 0. 5 5. 3 11 .1 0. 4 0. 4 0. 0 0. 1 0. 3 0. 1 0. 0 10 0. 0 98 .7 17 ,8 83 Re gi on N or th W es t 73 .0 2. 8 2. 5 3. 0 1. 6 5. 0 9. 3 1. 3 0. 4 0. 0 0. 2 0. 6 0. 2 0. 1 10 0. 0 97 .3 4, 19 9 Ea st 63 .0 2. 6 0. 7 1. 5 0. 1 25 .6 5. 1 0. 2 0. 8 0. 0 0. 1 0. 3 0. 0 0. 0 10 0. 0 98 .6 1, 35 5 N or th C en tr al 79 .7 1. 1 0. 8 0. 8 0. 2 1. 0 16 .1 0. 1 0. 0 0. 0 0. 1 0. 0 0. 0 0. 0 10 0. 0 99 .7 6, 83 8 So ut h W es t 76 .9 4. 8 2. 5 1. 7 0. 0 6. 0 6. 8 0. 1 0. 9 0. 0 0. 0 0. 2 0. 1 0. 1 10 0. 0 98 .6 4, 75 2 To ba go 77 .1 0. 5 0. 3 0. 4 0. 9 5. 4 13 .2 0. 7 0. 1 0. 0 0. 0 1. 3 0. 0 0. 0 10 0. 0 97 .8 73 9 A re a U rb an 79 .1 2. 0 1. 7 1. 6 0. 6 1. 7 12 .4 0. 3 0. 2 0. 0 0. 1 0. 2 0. 1 0. 0 10 0. 0 99 .1 10 ,2 59 Ru ra l 71 .8 3. 4 1. 5 1. 6 0. 5 10 .2 9. 3 0. 6 0. 7 0. 0 0. 1 0. 3 0. 0 0. 0 10 0. 0 98 .2 7, 62 4 Ed uc ati on o f h ou se ho ld h ea d N on e 75 .8 5. 5 0. 7 1. 2 0. 0 4. 8 6. 2 3. 2 1. 3 0. 0 0. 0 0. 0 1. 3 0. 0 10 0. 0 94 .2 28 8 Pr im ar y 76 .7 3. 4 1. 9 1. 9 0. 4 7. 1 7. 3 0. 4 0. 3 0. 0 0. 1 0. 4 0. 0 0. 0 10 0. 0 98 .7 7, 36 8 Se co nd ar y+ 75 .5 1. 8 1. 4 1. 4 0. 6 4. 1 13 .9 0. 3 0. 4 0. 0 0. 1 0. 2 0. 1 0. 1 10 0. 0 98 .8 10 ,1 00 M is si ng /D K 79 .9 4. 7 0. 0 0. 0 0. 0 2. 5 12 .9 0. 0 0. 0 0. 0 0. 0 0. 0 0. 0 0. 0 10 0. 0 10 0. 0 12 7 W ea lt h in de x qu in ti le Po or es t 55 .6 8. 7 6. 3 6. 3 0. 9 16 .1 3. 0 1. 2 1. 0 0. 0 0. 3 0. 4 0. 2 0. 0 10 0. 0 96 .9 3, 57 5 Se co nd 81 .3 1. 8 1. 2 0. 6 1. 1 5. 6 6. 7 0. 8 0. 5 0. 0 0. 0 0. 1 0. 0 0. 1 10 0. 0 98 .5 3, 57 8 M id dl e 81 .9 1. 4 0. 6 0. 9 0. 2 2. 8 11 .1 0. 2 0. 3 0. 0 0. 0 0. 3 0. 2 0. 0 10 0. 0 99 .0 3, 57 7 Fo ur th 83 .5 0. 6 0. 0 0. 1 0. 4 1. 9 13 .1 0. 0 0. 2 0. 0 0. 0 0. 2 0. 0 0. 0 10 0. 0 99 .7 3, 57 3 Ri ch es t 77 .6 0. 2 0. 0 0. 0 0. 0 0. 2 21 .4 0. 0 0. 0 0. 0 0. 1 0. 4 0. 0 0. 1 10 0. 0 99 .4 3, 58 0 Et hn ic it y of h ou se ho ld h ea d A fr ic an 75 .5 3. 2 2. 5 2. 6 1. 0 5. 0 9. 0 0. 3 0. 3 0. 0 0. 2 0. 3 0. 1 0. 0 10 0. 0 98 .8 6, 55 5 In di an 76 .3 2. 1 0. 8 0. 9 0. 2 5. 1 13 .5 0. 1 0. 5 0. 0 0. 1 0. 3 0. 1 0. 0 10 0. 0 98 .9 7, 05 8 M ix ed 76 .6 2. 2 1. 8 1. 3 0. 5 6. 3 9. 4 1. 3 0. 3 0. 0 0. 1 0. 3 0. 1 0. 0 10 0. 0 98 .0 3, 94 7 O th er /N ot s ta te d 73 .1 2. 0 0. 0 0. 0 0. 0 4. 8 20 .1 0. 0 0. 0 0. 0 0. 0 0. 0 0. 0 0. 0 10 0. 0 10 0. 0 32 3 1 M IC S in di ca to r 4. 1; M D G in di ca to r 7. 8 - U se o f i m pr ov ed d ri nk in g w at er s ou rc es a H ou se ho ld s us in g bo tt le d w at er a s th e m ai n so ur ce o f d ri nk in g w at er a re c la ss ifi ed in to im pr ov ed o r un im pr ov ed d ri nk in g w at er u se rs a cc or di ng t o th e w at er s ou rc e us ed fo r ot he r pu rp os es s uc h as c oo ki ng a nd h an dw as hi ng . 67 Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey 2011: Key Findings & Tables Ta bl e W S. 2: H ou se ho ld w at er t re at m en t Pe rc en ta ge o f h ou se ho ld p op ul ati on b y dr in ki ng w at er t re at m en t m et ho d us ed in t he h ou se ho ld , a nd fo r ho us eh ol d m em be rs li vi ng in h ou se ho ld s w he re a n un im pr ov ed d ri nk in g w at er s ou rc e is u se d, t he p er ce nt ag e w ho a re u si ng an a pp ro pr ia te tr ea tm en t m et ho d, T ri ni da d an d To ba go , 2 01 1 W at er t re at m en t m et ho d us ed in t he h ou se ho ld N um be r of ho us eh ol d m em be rs Pe rc en ta ge o f h ou se ho ld m em be rs in ho us eh ol ds u si ng u ni m pr ov ed d ri nk in g w at er s ou rc es a nd u si ng a n ap pr op ri at e w at er t re at m en t m et ho d1 N um be r of h ou se ho ld m em be rs in h ou se ho ld s us in g un im pr ov ed dr in ki ng w at er s ou rc es N on e Bo il A dd bl ea ch / ch lo ri ne St ra in th ro ug h a cl ot h U se w at er fil te r Le t i t st an d an d se tt le O th er D on ’t kn ow To ta l 64 .0 17 .3 3. 5 0. 3 14 .1 2. 0 0. 3 0. 2 17 ,8 83 29 .7 23 3 Re gi on N or th W es t 58 .4 20 .4 2. 9 1. 0 17 .9 1. 8 0. 2 0. 3 4, 19 9 43 .6 11 5 Ea st 69 .2 11 .7 6. 7 0. 3 8. 9 4. 4 0. 3 0. 3 1, 35 5 (1 3. 9) 19 N or th C en tr al 62 .9 17 .6 3. 4 0. 1 15 .1 2. 2 0. 3 0. 1 6, 83 8 (* ) 17 So ut h W es t 69 .3 14 .9 3. 4 0. 0 11 .5 1. 4 0. 4 0. 1 4, 75 2 5. 4 65 To ba go 63 .4 22 .3 2. 7 0. 1 10 .2 2. 3 0. 1 0. 2 73 9 (3 1. 2) 16 A re a U rb an 59 .2 19 .9 2. 4 0. 2 18 .1 1. 8 0. 2 0. 1 10 ,2 59 52 .9 95 Ru ra l 70 .6 13 .7 5. 0 0. 5 8. 7 2. 4 0. 4 0. 2 7, 62 4 13 .5 13 7 Ed uc ati on o f h ou se ho ld h ea d N on e 69 .0 13 .3 5. 0 0. 0 10 .3 1. 6 0. 0 0. 8 28 8 (* ) 17 Pr im ar y 67 .2 17 .7 4. 4 0. 4 8. 1 3. 0 0. 3 0. 2 7, 36 8 38 .4 99 Se co nd ar y+ 61 .4 17 .1 2. 8 0. 3 18 .7 1. 4 0. 3 0. 1 10 ,1 00 26 .5 11 7 M is si ng /D K 79 .6 12 .5 0. 0 0. 0 8. 0 0. 0 0. 0 0. 0 12 7 - 0 W ea lt h in de x qu in ti le Po or es t 70 .2 18 .8 7. 2 0. 6 2. 2 2. 7 0. 1 0. 2 3, 57 5 31 .9 11 2 Se co nd 71 .7 19 .2 3. 7 0. 4 4. 5 2. 4 0. 4 0. 0 3, 57 8 8. 6 53 M id dl e 69 .8 17 .5 2. 5 0. 3 8. 3 1. 8 0. 3 0. 2 3, 57 7 (3 9. 4) 35 Fo ur th 58 .5 18 .1 2. 4 0. 2 20 .0 2. 5 0. 6 0. 1 3, 57 3 (* ) 12 Ri ch es t 50 .1 12 .9 1. 7 0. 1 35 .7 0. 8 0. 0 0. 3 3, 58 0 (* ) 20 Et hn ic it y of h ou se ho ld h ea d A fr ic an 63 .7 20 .8 3. 1 0. 3 11 .8 1. 4 0. 2 0. 3 6, 55 5 34 .1 79 In di an 68 .1 13 .0 3. 5 0. 1 13 .7 2. 7 0. 6 0. 1 7, 05 8 23 .6 76 M ix ed 58 .2 19 .3 4. 3 0. 8 17 .6 2. 0 0. 1 0. 1 3, 94 7 31 .2 78 O th er /N ot s ta te d 52 .5 15 .8 2. 9 0. 0 28 .8 0. 6 0. 0 0. 0 32 3 - 0 1 M IC S in di ca to r 4. 2 - W at er t re at m en t ( ) F ig ur es t ha t ar e ba se d on 2 5- 49 u nw ei gh te d ca se s (* ) F ig ur es t ha t ar e ba se d on fe w er t ha n 25 u nw ei gh te d ca se s “- “ de no te s ze ro u nw ei gh te d ca se s 68 TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO: MONITORING THE SITUATION OF CHILDREN & WOMEN Table WS.3: Time to source of drinking water Percent distribution of household population according to time to go to source of drinking water, get water and return, for users of improved and unimproved drinking water sources, Trinidad and Tobago, 2011 Time to source of drinking water Users of improved drinking water sources Users of unimproved drinking water sources Total Number of household members Water on premises Less than 30 minutes 30 minutes or more Missing/ DK Water on premises Less than 30 minutes 30 minutes or more Missing/ DK Total 97.0 1.1 0.4 0.2 0.7 0.3 0.1 0.2 100.0 17,883 Region North West 93.4 2.3 0.9 0.6 1.5 0.6 0.0 0.6 100.0 4,199 East 97.1 1.2 0.2 0.0 0.9 0.3 0.2 0.0 100.0 1,355 North Central 99.1 0.3 0.2 0.1 0.2 0.1 0.0 0.0 100.0 6,838 South West 97.4 1.2 0.0 0.1 0.8 0.2 0.2 0.1 100.0 4,752 Tobago 96.0 0.8 0.7 0.3 0.1 0.5 1.3 0.3 100.0 739 Area Urban 97.4 1.0 0.4 0.3 0.5 0.2 0.0 0.2 100.0 10,259 Rural 96.5 1.3 0.3 0.2 1.0 0.3 0.3 0.2 100.0 7,624 Education of household head None 92.0 1.5 0.0 0.6 4.5 1.3 0.0 0.0 100.0 288 Primary 96.6 1.4 0.5 0.1 0.8 0.3 0.1 0.2 100.0 7,368 Secondary+ 97.4 0.9 0.3 0.3 0.6 0.2 0.2 0.2 100.0 10,100 Missing/DK 100.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 100.0 127 Wealth index quintile Poorest 91.1 3.7 1.2 0.8 1.4 1.1 0.4 0.2 100.0 3,575 Second 97.2 1.0 0.3 0.1 1.1 0.0 0.1 0.3 100.0 3,578 Middle 98.3 0.5 0.1 0.2 0.7 0.0 0.1 0.1 100.0 3,577 Fourth 99.2 0.3 0.2 0.0 0.3 0.0 0.0 0.0 100.0 3,573 Richest 99.3 0.1 0.0 0.0 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.3 100.0 3,580 Ethnicity of household head African 95.9 1.9 0.6 0.5 0.6 0.3 0.2 0.1 100.0 6,555 Indian 98.1 0.5 0.2 0.1 0.6 0.2 0.2 0.1 100.0 7,058 Mixed 96.7 1.0 0.3 0.0 1.2 0.3 0.1 0.3 100.0 3,947 Other/Not stated 100.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 100.0 323 69 Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey 2011: Key Findings & Tables Table WS.4: Person collecting water Percentage of households without drinking water on premises, and percent distribution of households without drinking water on premises according to the person usually collecting drinking water used in the household, Trinidad and Tobago, 2011 Percentage of households without drinking water on premises Number of households Person usually collecting drinking water Number of households without drinking water on premises Adult woman (age 15+ years) Adult man (age 15+ years) Male child under age 15 Don’t Know Missing Total Total 2.4 5,573 22.7 65.8 1.0 4.6 5.9 100.0 135 Region North West 5.1 1,374 21.9 62.8 1.3 4.5 9.4 100.0 70 East 2.3 409 (*) (*) (*) (*) (*) 100.0 9 North Central 0.8 2,102 (*) (*) (*) (*) (*) 100.0 18 South West 1.9 1,445 (19.5) (77.4) (0.0) (0.0) (3.1) 100.0 28 Tobago 4.1 243 (*) (*) (*) (*) (*) 100.0 10 Area Urban 2.2 3,270 23.4 63.2 0.0 8.1 5.3 100.0 71 Rural 2.8 2,303 21.9 68.7 2.2 0.7 6.5 100.0 64 Education of household head None 3.5 82 (*) (*) (*) (*) (*) 100.0 3 Primary 2.9 2,250 18.6 72.1 0.7 5.5 3.1 100.0 66 Secondary+ 2.1 3,205 27.2 59.2 1.4 3.2 8.9 100.0 66 Missing/DK (0.0) 35 - - - - - - 0 Wealth index quintile Poorest 6.8 1,333 21.2 68.8 1.5 4.5 3.9 100.0 91 Second 1.7 1,145 (*) (*) (*) (*) (*) 100.0 20 Middle 1.0 1,071 (*) (*) (*) (*) (*) 100.0 11 Fourth 0.6 985 (*) (*) (*) (*) (*) 100.0 6 Richest 0.7 1,039 (*) (*) (*) (*) (*) 100.0 7 Ethnicity of household head African 3.8 2,140 23.5 67.3 0.6 3.9 4.7 100.0 80 Indian 1.2 2,110 (16.9) (69.4) (3.6) (5.0) (5.1) 100.0 26 Mixed 2.4 1,210 (25.7) (58.1) (0.0) (6.2) (9.9) 100.0 29 Other/Not stated 0.0 112 - - - - - - 0 ( ) Figures that are based on 25-49 unweighted cases (*) Figures that are based on fewer than 25 unweighted cases “-“ denotes zero unweighted cases 70 TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO: MONITORING THE SITUATION OF CHILDREN & WOMEN Ta bl e W S. 5: T yp es o f s an it ati on fa ci liti es Pe rc en t di st ri bu ti on o f h ou se ho ld p op ul ati on a cc or di ng t o ty pe o f t oi le t fa ci lit y us ed b y th e ho us eh ol d, T ri ni da d an d To ba go , 2 01 1 Ty pe o f t oi le t fa ci lit y us ed b y ho us eh ol d O pe n de fe ca ti on (n o fa ci lit y, bu sh , fi el d) To ta l N um be r of ho us eh ol d m em be rs Im pr ov ed s an it ati on fa ci lit y U ni m pr ov ed s an it ati on fa ci lit y Fl us h/ Po ur fl us h to : Ve nti la te d im pr ov ed pi t l at ri ne Pi t la tr in e w it h sl ab Fl us h/ Po ur flu sh t o so m ew he re el se Pi t l at ri ne w it ho ut sl ab / op en p it Bu ck et O th er M is si ng Pi pe d se w er sy st em Se pti c ta nk U nk no w n pl ac e/ no t su re /D K w he re To ta l 19 .4 70 .6 0. 4 2. 4 6. 1 0. 0 0. 8 0. 0 0. 0 0. 1 0. 1 10 0. 0 17 ,8 83 Re gi on N or th W es t 38 .5 51 .5 0. 9 0. 9 5. 1 0. 0 2. 9 0. 0 0. 0 0. 1 0. 2 10 0. 0 4, 19 9 Ea st 1. 6 75 .8 0. 0 5. 8 16 .6 0. 0 0. 0 0. 0 0. 2 0. 0 0. 0 10 0. 0 1, 35 5 N or th C en tr al 17 .7 75 .8 0. 4 1. 5 4. 1 0. 1 0. 1 0. 0 0. 0 0. 2 0. 0 10 0. 0 6, 83 8 So ut h W es t 12 .7 75 .6 0. 2 3. 6 7. 4 0. 0 0. 4 0. 0 0. 0 0. 1 0. 1 10 0. 0 4, 75 2 To ba go 3. 5 88 .9 0. 0 4. 5 2. 9 0. 1 0. 0 0. 0 0. 0 0. 0 0. 1 10 0. 0 73 9 A re a U rb an 31 .8 61 .1 0. 7 1. 1 3. 7 0. 1 1. 2 0. 0 0. 0 0. 2 0. 1 10 0. 0 10 ,2 59 Ru ra l 2. 8 83 .3 0. 0 4. 1 9. 3 0. 0 0. 4 0. 0 0. 1 0. 0 0. 0 10 0. 0 7, 62 4 Ed uc ati on o f h ou se ho ld he ad N on e 4. 9 83 .0 0. 0 0. 1 12 .0 0. 0 0. 0 0. 0 0. 0 0. 0 0. 0 10 0. 0 28 8 Pr im ar y 13 .8 72 .8 0. 0 3. 4 8. 8 0. 0 1. 1 0. 0 0. 1 0. 0 0. 0 10 0. 0 7, 36 8 Se co nd ar y+ 23 .7 68 .9 0. 6 1. 7 4. 0 0. 1 0. 7 0. 0 0. 0 0. 2 0. 1 10 0. 0 10 ,1 00 M is si ng /D K 40 .7 43 .4 10 .2 0. 0 5. 8 0. 0 0. 0 0. 0 0. 0 0. 0 0. 0 10 0. 0 12 7 W ea lt h in de x qu in ti le Po or es t 11 .2 46 .1 0. 2 10 .4 27 .7 0. 0 3. 9 0. 0 0. 2 0. 0 0. 3 10 0. 0 3, 57 5 Se co nd 15 .1 80 .3 0. 2 1. 3 2. 4 0. 1 0. 4 0. 0 0. 0 0. 1 0. 0 10 0. 0 3, 57 8 M id dl e 18 .1 81 .0 0. 3 0. 2 0. 4 0. 0 0. 0 0. 0 0. 0 0. 0 0. 0 10 0. 0 3, 57 7 Fo ur th 21 .8 77 .0 0. 7 0. 0 0. 0 0. 1 0. 0 0. 0 0. 0 0. 4 0. 0 10 0. 0 3, 57 3 Ri ch es t 31 .0 68 .3 0. 6 0. 0 0. 0 0. 0 0. 0 0. 0 0. 0 0. 1 0. 0 10 0. 0 3, 58 0 Et hn ic it y of h ou se ho ld he ad A fr ic an 24 .2 64 .5 0. 2 3. 2 6. 4 0. 1 1. 1 0. 0 0. 1 0. 3 0. 0 10 0. 0 6, 55 5 In di an 9. 8 81 .6 0. 2 2. 1 5. 6 0. 0 0. 6 0. 0 0. 0 0. 0 0. 0 10 0. 0 7, 05 8 M ix ed 27 .0 62 .4 0. 9 1. 6 6. 9 0. 0 1. 0 0. 0 0. 1 0. 0 0. 2 10 0. 0 3, 94 7 O th er /N ot s ta te d 41 .7 53 .2 3. 5 0. 3 1. 3 0. 0 0. 0 0. 0 0. 0 0. 0 0. 0 10 0. 0 32 3 71 Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey 2011: Key Findings & Tables Ta bl e W S. 6: U se a nd s ha ri ng o f s an it ati on fa ci liti es Pe rc en t di st ri bu ti on o f h ou se ho ld p op ul ati on b y us e of p ri va te a nd p ub lic s an it ati on fa ci liti es a nd u se o f s ha re d fa ci liti es , b y us er s of im pr ov ed a nd u ni m pr ov ed s an it ati on fa ci liti es , T ri ni da d an d To ba go , 20 11 U se rs o f i m pr ov ed s an it ati on fa ci liti es U se rs o f u ni m pr ov ed s an it ati on fa ci liti es O pe n de fe ca ti on (n o fa ci lit y, b us h, fie ld ) To ta l N um be r of ho us eh ol d m em be rs N ot sh ar ed 1 Pu bl ic fa ci lit y Sh ar ed b y M is si ng /D K N ot sh ar ed Pu bl ic fa ci lit y Sh ar ed b y 5 ho us eh ol ds or le ss M or e th an 5 ho us eh ol ds 5 ho us eh ol ds or le ss To ta l 94 .2 0. 3 4. 2 0. 0 0. 1 0. 9 0. 0 0. 1 0. 1 10 0. 0 17 ,8 83 Re gi on N or th W es t 91 .7 0. 5 4. 3 0. 2 0. 2 2. 6 0. 0 0. 4 0. 2 10 0. 0 4, 19 9 Ea st 97 .1 0. 2 2. 4 0. 0 0. 1 0. 2 0. 0 0. 1 0. 0 10 0. 0 1, 35 5 N or th C en tr al 94 .2 0. 5 4. 8 0. 0 0. 0 0. 5 0. 0 0. 0 0. 0 10 0. 0 6, 83 8 So ut h W es t 95 .5 0. 0 3. 7 0. 0 0. 2 0. 5 0. 0 0. 0 0. 1 10 0. 0 4, 75 2 To ba go 94 .8 0. 0 5. 0 0. 0 0. 0 0. 1 0. 0 0. 0 0. 1 10 0. 0 73 9 A re a U rb an 93 .2 0. 6 4. 4 0. 1 0. 2 1. 3 0. 0 0. 2 0. 1 10 0. 0 10 ,2 59 Ru ra l 95 .6 0. 0 3. 9 0. 0 0. 0 0. 4 0. 0 0. 0 0. 0 10 0. 0 7, 62 4 Ed uc ati on o f h ou se ho ld he ad N on e 84 .6 0. 0 12 .2 0. 0 3. 2 0. 0 0. 0 0. 0 0. 0 10 0. 0 28 8 Pr im ar y 94 .0 0. 4 4. 4 0. 0 0. 0 1. 0 0. 0 0. 1 0. 0 10 0. 0 7, 36 8 Se co nd ar y+ 94 .7 0. 3 3. 8 0. 1 0. 1 0. 9 0. 0 0. 1 0. 1 10 0. 0 10 ,1 00 M is si ng /D K 92 .4 0. 0 7. 6 0. 0 0. 0 0. 0 0. 0 0. 0 0. 0 10 0. 0 12 7 W ea lt h in de x qu in ti le Po or es t 85 .0 1. 0 9. 4 0. 0 0. 3 3. 5 0. 0 0. 6 0. 3 10 0. 0 3, 57 5 Se co nd 93 .4 0. 2 5. 7 0. 1 0. 0 0. 6 0. 0 0. 0 0. 0 10 0. 0 3, 57 8 M id dl e 96 .3 0. 0 3. 7 0. 0 0. 0 0. 0 0. 0 0. 0 0. 0 10 0. 0 3, 57 7 Fo ur th 97 .0 0. 4 1. 9 0. 1 0. 0 0. 5 0. 0 0. 0 0. 0 10 0. 0 3, 57 3 Ri ch es t 99 .3 0. 1 0. 3 0. 0 0. 2 0. 1 0. 0 0. 0 0. 0 10 0. 0 3, 58 0 Et hn ic it y of h ou se ho ld he ad A fr ic an 93 .2 0. 8 4. 4 0. 0 0. 0 1. 4 0. 0 0. 2 0. 0 10 0. 0 6, 55 5 In di an 95 .1 0. 0 4. 1 0. 0 0. 1 0. 6 0. 0 0. 1 0. 0 10 0. 0 7, 05 8 M ix ed 94 .7 0. 0 3. 9 0. 2 0. 0 1. 0 0. 0 0. 1 0. 2 10 0. 0 3, 94 7 O th er /N ot s ta te d 90 .6 2. 2 4. 9 0. 0 2. 3 0. 0 0. 0 0. 0 0. 0 10 0. 0 32 3 1 M IC S in di ca to r 4. 3; M D G in di ca to r 7. 9 - U se o f i m pr ov ed s an it ati on 72 TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO: MONITORING THE SITUATION OF CHILDREN & WOMEN Ta bl e W S. 7: D ri nk in g w at er a nd s an it ati on la dd er s Pe rc en ta ge o f h ou se ho ld p op ul ati on b y dr in ki ng w at er a nd s an it ati on la dd er s, T ri ni da d an d To ba go , 2 01 1 Pe rc en ta ge o f h ou se ho ld p op ul ati on u si ng : N um be r of ho us eh ol d m em be rs Im pr ov ed d ri nk in g w at er 1, a U ni m pr ov ed dr in ki ng w at er To ta l Im pr ov ed sa ni ta ti on 2 U ni m pr ov ed s an it ati on To ta l Im pr ov ed dr in ki ng w at er so ur ce s an d im pr ov ed sa ni ta ti on Pi pe d in to dw el lin g, p lo t or y ar d O th er im pr ov ed Sh ar ed im pr ov ed fa ci liti es U ni m pr ov ed fa ci liti es O pe n de fe ca ti on To ta l 89 .4 9. 3 1. 3 10 0. 0 94 .2 4. 7 1. 1 0. 1 10 0. 0 93 .1 17 ,8 83 Re gi on N or th W es t 84 .7 12 .5 2. 7 10 0. 0 91 .7 5. 1 3. 0 0. 2 10 0. 0 89 .3 4, 19 9 Ea st 70 .2 28 .4 1. 4 10 0. 0 97 .1 2. 6 0. 2 0. 0 10 0. 0 95 .9 1, 35 5 N or th C en tr al 96 .6 3. 1 0. 3 10 0. 0 94 .2 5. 3 0. 5 0. 0 10 0. 0 93 .9 6, 83 8 So ut h W es t 88 .2 10 .4 1. 4 10 0. 0 95 .5 3. 9 0. 5 0. 1 10 0. 0 94 .5 4, 75 2 To ba go 90 .4 7. 4 2. 2 10 0. 0 94 .8 5. 0 0. 1 0. 1 10 0. 0 92 .7 73 9 A re a U rb an 93 .4 5. 7 0. 9 10 0. 0 93 .2 5. 2 1. 5 0. 1 10 0. 0 92 .4 10 ,2 59 Ru ra l 84 .0 14 .2 1. 8 10 0. 0 95 .6 3. 9 0. 5 0. 0 10 0. 0 94 .0 7, 62 4 Ed uc ati on o f h ou se ho ld he ad N on e 86 .9 7. 3 5. 8 10 0. 0 84 .6 15 .4 0. 0 0. 0 10 0. 0 80 .0 28 8 Pr im ar y 87 .2 11 .4 1. 3 10 0. 0 94 .0 4. 8 1. 2 0. 0 10 0. 0 92 .9 7, 36 8 Se co nd ar y+ 90 .9 8. 0 1. 2 10 0. 0 94 .7 4. 2 1. 0 0. 1 10 0. 0 93 .6 10 ,1 00 M is si ng /D K 97 .5 2. 5 0. 0 10 0. 0 92 .4 7. 6 0. 0 0. 0 10 0. 0 92 .4 12 7 W ea lt h in de x qu in ti le Po or es t 67 .1 29 .8 3. 1 10 0. 0 85 .0 10 .6 4. 1 0. 3 10 0. 0 82 .5 3, 57 5 Se co nd 89 .6 9. 0 1. 5 10 0. 0 93 .4 6. 0 0. 6 0. 0 10 0. 0 92 .1 3, 57 8 M id dl e 94 .2 4. 8 1. 0 10 0. 0 96 .3 3. 7 0. 0 0. 0 10 0. 0 95 .4 3, 57 7 Fo ur th 97 .1 2. 6 0. 3 10 0. 0 97 .0 2. 4 0. 5 0. 0 10 0. 0 96 .7 3, 57 3 Ri ch es t 98 .9 0. 6 0. 6 10 0. 0 99 .3 0. 6 0. 1 0. 0 10 0. 0 98 .8 3, 58 0 Et hn ic it y of h ou se ho ld he ad A fr ic an 87 .5 11 .3 1. 2 10 0. 0 93 .2 5. 2 1. 6 0. 0 10 0. 0 92 .1 6, 55 5 In di an 91 .6 7. 3 1. 1 10 0. 0 95 .1 4. 3 0. 7 0. 0 10 0. 0 94 .1 7, 05 8 M ix ed 87 .9 10 .2 2. 0 10 0. 0 94 .7 4. 1 1. 1 0. 2 10 0. 0 93 .1 3, 94 7 O th er /N ot s ta te d 95 .2 4. 8 0. 0 10 0. 0 90 .6 9. 4 0. 0 0. 0 10 0. 0 90 .6 32 3 1 M IC S in di ca to r 4. 1; M D G in di ca to r 7. 8 - U se o f i m pr ov ed d ri nk in g w at er s ou rc es 2 M IC S in di ca to r 4. 3; M D G in di ca to r 7. 9 - U se o f i m pr ov ed s an it ati on a Th os e in di ca ti ng b ott le d w at er a s th e m ai n so ur ce o f d ri nk in g w at er a re d is tr ib ut ed a cc or di ng t o th e w at er s ou rc e us ed fo r ot he r pu rp os es s uc h as c oo ki ng a nd h an dw as hi ng . 73 Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey 2011: Key Findings & Tables Table WS.8: Disposal of child’s faeces Percent distribution of children age 0-2 years according to place of disposal of child’s faeces, and the percentage of children age 0-2 years whose stools were disposed of safely the last time the child passed stools, Trinidad and Tobago, 2011 Place of disposal of child’s faeces Percentage of children whose last stools were disposed of safely1 Number of children age 0-2 years Child used toilet/ latrine Put/ rinsed into toilet or latrine Thrown into garbage Buried Don’t Know Missing Total Total 10.7 6.7 81.5 0.3 0.4 0.4 100.0 17.5 673 Type of sanitation facility used by household members Improved 11.0 6.9 81.0 0.4 0.4 0.4 100.0 17.8 659 Unimproved (*) (*) (*) (*) (*) (*) 100.0 (*) 14 Open defecation (*) (*) (*) (*) (*) (*) 100.0 (*) 1 Region North West 12.5 6.1 80.1 0.6 0.6 0.0 100.0 18.7 174 East 8.4 8.4 83.2 0.0 0.0 0.0 100.0 16.8 62 North Central 12.5 8.3 78.7 0.5 0.0 0.0 100.0 20.8 234 South West 6.5 4.8 86.5 0.0 0.8 1.3 100.0 11.3 177 Tobago 16.8 5.9 77.3 0.0 0.0 0.0 100.0 22.7 27 Area Urban 11.5 4.9 82.3 0.3 0.6 0.4 100.0 16.4 401 Rural 9.6 9.5 80.1 0.5 0.0 0.3 100.0 19.1 272 Mother’s education Primary 16.5 8.6 74.8 0.0 0.0 0.0 100.0 25.2 79 Secondary+ 10.0 6.5 82.3 0.4 0.4 0.4 100.0 16.4 594 Wealth index quintile Poorest 9.9 7.6 80.4 0.0 0.8 1.3 100.0 17.5 182 Second 11.2 9.4 77.9 0.8 0.8 0.0 100.0 20.6 144 Middle 12.6 8.0 78.5 0.8 0.0 0.0 100.0 20.6 149 Fourth 6.9 1.2 91.9 0.0 0.0 0.0 100.0 8.1 117 Richest 13.8 5.6 80.5 0.0 0.0 0.0 100.0 19.5 82 Ethnicity of household head African 10.4 4.6 84.2 0.5 0.4 0.0 100.0 15.0 269 Indian 10.7 9.3 79.1 0.0 0.0 1.0 100.0 20.0 247 Mixed 11.8 6.6 79.9 0.7 1.0 0.0 100.0 18.4 152 Other/Not stated (*) (*) (*) (*) (*) (*) 100.0 (*) 6 1 MICS indicator 4.4 - Safe disposal of child’s faeces (*) Figures that are based on fewer than 25 unweighted cases 74 TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO: MONITORING THE SITUATION OF CHILDREN & WOMEN Ta bl e W S. 9: W at er a nd s oa p at p la ce fo r ha nd w as hi ng Pe rc en ta ge o f h ou se ho ld s w he re p la ce fo r ha nd w as hi ng w as o bs er ve d an d pe rc en t di st ri bu ti on o f h ou se ho ld s by a va ila bi lit y of w at er a nd s oa p at p la ce fo r ha nd w as hi ng , T ri ni da d an d To ba go , 2 01 1 Pe rc en ta ge o f ho us eh ol ds w he re p la ce fo r ha nd w as hi ng w as ob se rv ed Pe rc en ta ge o f h ou se ho ld s w he re p la ce fo r ha nd w as hi ng w as n ot o bs er ve d To ta l N um be r of ho us eh ol d Pe rc en t di st ri bu ti on o f h ou se ho ld s w he re p la ce fo r ha nd w as hi ng w as o bs er ve d, w he re : To ta l N um be r of ho us eh ol d w he re p la ce fo r ha nd w as hi ng w as o bs er ve d N ot in d w el lin g/ pl ot /y ar d N o pe rm is si on to s ee O th er re as on s M is si ng W at er a nd so ap a re av ai la bl e1 W at er is av ai la bl e, s oa p is n ot a va ila bl e W at er is n ot av ai la bl e, s oa p is a va ila bl e W at er a nd so ap a re n ot av ai la bl e To ta l 85 .4 2. 0 8. 8 3. 7 0. 0 10 0. 0 5, 57 3 94 .6 1. 7 3. 4 0. 3 10 0. 0 4, 76 0 Re gi on N or th W es t 85 .5 2. 5 8. 1 3. 9 0. 0 10 0. 0 1, 37 4 92 .0 2. 5 4. 7 0. 7 10 0. 0 1, 17 5 Ea st 65 .1 4. 6 22 .9 7. 2 0. 2 10 0. 0 40 9 94 .0 2. 5 3. 5 0. 0 10 0. 0 26 6 N or th C en tr al 85 .8 1. 4 8. 4 4. 4 0. 0 10 0. 0 2, 10 2 94 .5 1. 6 3. 6 0. 2 10 0. 0 1, 80 4 So ut h W es t 94 .2 1. 5 3. 5 0. 8 0. 1 10 0. 0 1, 44 5 97 .2 0. 5 2. 1 0. 1 10 0. 0 1, 36 1 To ba go 63 .3 2. 2 25 .4 9. 1 0. 0 10 0. 0 24 3 93 .2 5. 3 1. 3 0. 2 10 0. 0 15 4 A re a U rb an 87 .0 1. 7 7. 5 3. 7 0. 0 10 0. 0 3, 27 0 94 .6 1. 5 3. 6 0. 3 10 0. 0 2, 84 5 Ru ra l 83 .2 2. 3 10 .7 3. 8 0. 1 10 0. 0 2, 30 3 94 .6 1. 9 3. 1 0. 3 10 0. 0 1, 91 5 Ed uc ati on o f h ou se ho ld he ad N on e 85 .5 0. 0 11 .4 3. 1 0. 0 10 0. 0 82 92 .9 4. 3 2. 8 0. 0 10 0. 0 70 Pr im ar y 85 .3 2. 7 8. 6 3. 4 0. 0 10 0. 0 2, 25 0 93 .4 2. 2 3. 9 0. 4 10 0. 0 1, 91 9 Se co nd ar y+ 85 .6 1. 6 8. 9 3. 9 0. 0 10 0. 0 3, 20 5 95 .5 1. 3 3. 1 0. 2 10 0. 0 2, 74 4 M is si ng /D K (7 4. 0) (1 .2 ) (1 1. 8) (1 2. 9) (0 .0 ) 10 0. 0 35 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 10 0. 0 26 W ea lt h in de x qu in ti le s Po or es t 80 .2 5. 8 9. 5 4. 4 0. 0 10 0. 0 1, 33 3 87 .4 4. 6 6. 7 1. 3 10 0. 0 1, 06 9 Se co nd 88 .2 1. 2 7. 0 3. 7 0. 0 10 0. 0 1, 14 5 93 .7 1. 8 4. 5 0. 0 10 0. 0 1, 00 9 M id dl e 87 .4 0. 7 9. 2 2. 7 0. 0 10 0. 0 1, 07 1 97 .3 0. 8 1. 9 0. 0 10 0. 0 93 6 Fo ur th 87 .9 0. 4 7. 4 4. 2 0. 1 10 0. 0 98 5 97 .6 0. 5 2. 0 0. 0 10 0. 0 86 6 Ri ch es t 84 .7 0. 8 11 .1 3. 5 0. 0 10 0. 0 1, 03 9 98 .6 0. 2 1. 2 0. 0 10 0. 0 87 9 Et hn ic it y of h ou se ho ld h ea d A fr ic an 83 .4 2. 1 10 .3 4. 2 0. 0 10 0. 0 2, 14 0 93 .5 2. 0 4. 1 0. 5 10 0. 0 1, 78 5 In di an 88 .9 1. 7 6. 8 2. 5 0. 0 10 0. 0 2, 11 0 95 .5 1. 6 2. 8 0. 1 10 0. 0 1, 87 5 M ix ed 84 .0 2. 2 8. 5 5. 2 0. 0 10 0. 0 1, 21 0 94 .6 1. 5 3. 6 0. 3 10 0. 0 1, 01 7 O th er /N ot s ta te d 74 .4 1. 0 23 .0 1. 6 0. 0 10 0. 0 11 2 99 .5 0. 5 0. 0 0. 0 10 0. 0 83 1 M IC S in di ca to r 4. 5 - P la ce fo r ha nd w as hi ng ( ) F ig ur es t ha t ar e ba se d on 2 5- 49 u nw ei gh te d ca se s (* ) F ig ur es t ha t ar e ba se d on fe w er t ha n 25 u nw ei gh te d ca se s 75 Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey 2011: Key Findings & Tables Ta bl e W S. 10 : A va ila bi lit y of s oa p or o th er c le an si ng a ge nt P er ce nt d is tri bu tio n of h ou se ho ld s by a va ila bi lit y of s oa p in th e dw el lin g, T rin id ad a nd T ob ag o, 2 01 1 Pl ac e fo r ha nd w as hi ng o bs er ve d To ta l Pl ac e fo r ha nd w as hi ng n ot o bs er ve d To ta l Pe rc en ta ge o f ho us eh ol ds w it h so ap or o th er c le an si ng ag en t an yw he re in th e dw el lin g1 N um be r of ho us eh ol ds So ap o r ot he r cl ea ns in g ag en t ob se rv ed So ap o r ot he r cl ea ns in g ag en t no t ob se rv ed a t pl ac e fo r ha nd w as hi ng So ap o r ot he r cl ea ns in g ag en t sh ow n N o so ap or o th er cl ea ns in g ag en t i n ho us eh ol d N ot a bl e/ D oe s no t w an t to s ho w so ap o r ot he r cl ea ns in g ag en t M is si ng So ap o r ot he r cl ea ns in g ag en t sh ow n N o so ap o r ot he r cl ea ns in g ag en t i n ho us eh ol d N ot a bl e/ D oe s no t w an t to s ho w s oa p or ot he r cl ea ns in g ag en t To ta l 98 .0 1. 3 0. 4 0. 3 10 0. 0 80 .3 4. 6 15 .0 0. 1 10 0. 0 96 .6 5, 57 3 Re gi on N or th W es t 96 .7 2. 1 0. 5 0. 6 10 0. 0 68 .9 5. 9 25 .2 0. 0 10 0. 0 94 .5 1, 37 4 Ea st 97 .5 1. 3 1. 2 0. 0 10 0. 0 93 .9 4. 2 1. 6 0. 3 10 0. 0 97 .1 40 9 N or th C en tr al 98 .2 1. 4 0. 2 0. 2 10 0. 0 87 .2 2. 9 9. 9 0. 0 10 0. 0 97 .8 2, 10 2 So ut h W es t 99 .4 0. 4 0. 2 0. 1 10 0. 0 67 .4 8. 0 24 .6 0. 0 10 0. 0 97 .8 1, 44 5 To ba go 94 .4 2. 7 1. 6 1. 3 10 0. 0 73 .0 4. 9 22 .1 0. 0 10 0. 0 88 .3 24 3 A re a U rb an 98 .2 1. 2 0. 3 0. 3 10 0. 0 77 .7 4. 2 18 .1 0. 0 10 0. 0 96 .6 3, 27 0 Ru ra l 97 .8 1. 4 0. 5 0. 3 10 0. 0 83 .1 5. 1 11 .7 0. 1 10 0. 0 96 .5 2, 30 3 Ed uc ati on o f h ou se ho ld h ea d N on e 95 .7 2. 1 2. 1 0. 0 10 0. 0 76 .2 8. 9 14 .8 0. 0 10 0. 0 94 .7 82 Pr im ar y 97 .3 1. 7 0. 5 0. 4 10 0. 0 78 .9 6. 1 14 .8 0. 1 10 0. 0 96 .1 2, 25 0 Se co nd ar y+ 98 .5 1. 0 0. 2 0. 2 10 0. 0 81 .4 3. 4 15 .2 0. 0 10 0. 0 96 .9 3, 20 5 M is si ng /D K (9 8. 7) (1 .3 ) (0 .0 ) (0 .0 ) 10 0. 0 (7 9. 3) (5 .5 ) (1 5. 1) (0 .0 ) 10 0. 0 94 .6 35 W ea lt h in de x qu in ti le Po or es t 94 .1 4. 0 1. 1 0. 8 10 0. 0 79 .3 8. 1 12 .5 0. 2 10 0. 0 94 .4 1, 33 3 Se co nd 98 .2 1. 2 0. 3 0. 3 10 0. 0 80 .8 3. 2 15 .9 0. 0 10 0. 0 97 .2 1, 14 5 M id dl e 99 .2 0. 3 0. 3 0. 2 10 0. 0 79 .2 4. 5 16 .3 0. 0 10 0. 0 97 .0 1, 07 1 Fo ur th 99 .5 0. 3 0. 1 0. 0 10 0. 0 80 .6 4. 0 15 .4 0. 0 10 0. 0 97 .5 98 5 Ri ch es t 99 .8 0. 2 0. 0 0. 0 10 0. 0 82 .2 0. 6 17 .2 0. 0 10 0. 0 97 .3 1, 03 9 Et hn ic it y of h ou se ho ld h ea d A fr ic an 97 .5 1. 5 0. 4 0. 5 10 0. 0 77 .0 6. 2 16 .7 0. 1 10 0. 0 95 .4 2, 14 0 In di an 98 .3 1. 3 0. 3 0. 1 10 0. 0 83 .5 2. 6 13 .9 0. 0 10 0. 0 97 .8 2, 11 0 M ix ed 98 .2 1. 1 0. 5 0. 1 10 0. 0 81 .8 4. 7 13 .5 0. 0 10 0. 0 96 .5 1, 21 0 O th er /N ot s ta te d 99 .5 0. 0 0. 0 0. 5 10 0. 0 85 .5 0. 0 14 .5 0. 0 10 0. 0 95 .9 11 2 1 M IC S in di ca to r 4. 6 - A va ila bi lit y of s oa p or o th er c le an si ng a ge nt ( ) F ig ur es t ha t ar e ba se d on 2 5- 49 u nw ei gh te d ca se s 76 TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO: MONITORING THE SITUATION OF CHILDREN & WOMEN Reproductive Health Table RH.1: Fertility rates Adolescent birth rate, age-specific and total fertility rates, the general fertility rate, and the crude birth rate for the one-year period preceding the survey, by area, Trinidad and Tobago, 2011 Urban Rural Total Age 15-191 40 21 32 20-24 83 92 87 25-29 90 81 86 30-34 91 48 73 35-39 (54) 27 41 40-44 (18) 4 12 45-49 (3) 2 3 TFRa (1.9) 1.4 1.7 GFRb 56.3 43.0 50.4 CBRc 13.8 10.7 12.5 1 MICS indicator 5.1; MDG indicator 5.4 - Adolescent birth rate a TFR: Total fertility rate expressed per woman age 15-49 years b GFR: General fertility rate expressed per 1,000 women age 15-49 years c CBR: Crude birth rate expressed per 1,000 population ( ) Figures that are based on 125-249 unweighted person-years of exposure 77 Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey 2011: Key Findings & Tables Table RH.2: Adolescent birth rate and total fertility rate Adolescent birth rates and total fertility rates for the one-year period preceding the survey, Trinidad and Tobago, 2011 Adolescent birth rate1 (Age-specific fertility rate for women age 15-19) Total fertility rate Total 32 1.7 Region North West (*) (*) East (*) (*) North Central (12) (1.4) South West (45) (*) Tobago (*) (*) Area Urban 40 (1.9) Rural 21 1.4 Education None (*) (*) Primary (*) (*) Secondary+ 32 1.7 Wealth index quintile Poorest 40% 43 (2.1) Richest 60% 24 1.4 Ethnicity of household head African (53) (1.9) Indian (20) (1.2) Mixed (18) (*) Other (*) (*) 1 MICS indicator 5.1; MDG indicator 5.4 - Adolescent birth rate ( ) Figures that are based on 125-249 unweighted person-years of exposure (*) Figures that are based on fewer than 125 unweighted person-years of exposure 78 TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO: MONITORING THE SITUATION OF CHILDREN & WOMEN Table RH.3: Early childbearing Percentage of women age 15-19 who have had a live birth or who are pregnant with the first child, percentage of women age 15-19 who have begun childbearing before age 15, and the percentage of women age 20-24 who have had a live birth before age 18, Trinidad and Tobago, 2011 Percentage of women age 15-19 who: Number of women age 15-19 Percentage of women age 20-24 who have had a live birth before age 181 Number of women age 20-24 Have had a live birth Are pregnant with first child Have begun childbearing Have had a live birth before age 15 Total 5.7 1.0 6.7 0.2 550 6.3 633 Region North West 6.9 1.7 8.6 0.7 131 5.7 154 East 5.8 2.5 8.3 0.7 54 12.1 54 North Central 5.6 0.8 6.4 0.0 187 6.6 223 South West 3.7 0.0 3.7 0.0 161 4.5 188 Tobago 15.7 1.8 17.5 0.0 17 (12.5) 14 Area Urban 7.5 1.1 8.6 0.3 321 4.6 347 Rural 3.2 0.7 3.9 0.2 229 8.5 286 Education None (*) (*) (*) (*) 2 (*) 0 Primary (*) (*) (*) (*) 10 (*) 14 Secondary+ 5.7 1.0 6.6 0.3 539 5.5 618 Wealth index quintile Poorest 9.3 1.7 11.0 1.2 116 15.6 118 Second 7.4 0.7 8.0 0.0 115 10.8 133 Middle 7.3 1.4 8.7 0.0 102 4.6 127 Fourth 4.5 1.0 5.5 0.0 106 0.3 136 Richest 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 111 1.0 118 Ethnicity of household head African 8.7 1.4 10.0 0.0 212 5.8 233 Indian 4.0 0.2 4.2 0.0 193 5.6 263 Mixed 3.9 1.4 5.4 1.0 134 9.0 132 Other/Not stated (*) (*) (*) (*) 11 (*) 5 1 MICS indicator 5.2 - Early childbearing ( ) Figures that are based on 25-49 unweighted cases (*) Figures that are based on fewer than 25 unweighted cases 79 Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey 2011: Key Findings & Tables Ta bl e R H .4 : T re nd s in e ar ly c hi ld be ar in g Pe rc en ta ge o f w om en w ho h av e ha d a liv e bi rt h by a ge 1 5 an d 18 , b y ag e gr ou ps , T ri ni da d an d To ba go , 2 01 1 U rb an R ur al A ll Pe rc en ta ge of w om en w it h a liv e bi rt h be fo re ag e 15 N um be r of w om en ag e 15 - 49 y ea rs Pe rc en ta ge of w om en w it h a liv e bi rt h be fo re ag e 18 N um be r of w om en ag e 20 -4 9 ye ar s Pe rc en ta ge o f w om en w it h a liv e bi rt h be fo re a ge 1 5 N um be r of w om en ag e 15 -4 9 ye ar s Pe rc en ta ge o f w om en w it h a liv e bi rt h be fo re a ge 1 8 N um be r of w om en ag e 20 -4 9 ye ar s Pe rc en ta ge of w om en w it h a liv e bi rt h be fo re ag e 15 N um be r of w om en ag e 15 -4 9 ye ar s Pe rc en ta ge of w om en w it h a liv e bi rt h be fo re ag e 18 N um be r of w om en ag e 20 - 49 y ea rs To ta l 0. 7 2, 28 9 8. 2 1, 96 8 0. 8 1, 83 4 9. 8 1, 60 5 0. 8 4, 12 3 8. 9 3, 57 3 A ge 15 -1 9 0. 3 32 1 na na 0. 2 22 9 na na 0. 2 55 0 na na 20 -2 4 0. 2 34 7 4. 6 34 7 1. 1 28 6 8. 5 28 6 0. 6 63 3 6. 3 63 3 25 -2 9 1. 5 38 0 7. 3 38 0 0. 5 31 9 6. 9 31 9 1. 0 69 9 7. 1 69 9 30 -3 4 0. 7 33 9 7. 6 33 9 0. 9 25 1 7. 7 25 1 0. 8 59 1 7. 7 59 1 35 -3 9 0. 9 28 1 10 .7 28 1 1. 4 25 6 11 .7 25 6 1. 1 53 7 11 .2 53 7 40 -4 4 0. 5 28 4 8. 6 28 4 1. 6 20 9 12 .2 20 9 1. 0 49 3 10 .1 49 3 45 -4 9 0. 7 33 7 11 .5 33 7 0. 2 28 4 12 .5 28 4 0. 4 62 1 11 .9 62 1 na : n ot a pp lic ab le 80 TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO: MONITORING THE SITUATION OF CHILDREN & WOMEN Ta bl e R H .5 : U se o f c on tr ac ep ti on Pe rc en ta ge o f w om en a ge 1 5- 49 y ea rs c ur re nt ly m ar ri ed o r in u ni on w ho a re u si ng (o r w ho se p ar tn er is u si ng ) a c on tr ac ep ti ve m et ho d, T ri ni da d an d To ba go , 2 01 1 Pe rc en t of w om en (c ur re nt ly m ar ri ed o r in u ni on ) w ho a re u si ng : A ny m od er n m et ho d A ny tr ad iti on al m et ho d A ny m et ho d1 N um be r of w om en cu rr en tl y m ar ri ed o r in u ni on Not using any method Female sterilization Male sterilization IUD Injectables Implants Pill Male condom Female condom Diaphragm /foam/jelly Lactational amenorrhoea method (LAM) Periodic abstinence/ Rhythm Withdrawal Other To ta l 59 .7 7. 9 0. 1 1. 7 2. 7 0. 4 11 .0 13 .2 0. 5 0. 1 0. 0 1. 0 0. 9 0. 8 37 .6 2. 7 40 .3 2, 02 3 Re gi on N or th W es t 50 .1 8. 3 0. 0 1. 8 4. 9 0. 7 11 .1 17 .7 0. 8 0. 0 0. 0 2. 2 1. 5 0. 9 45 .3 4. 6 49 .9 42 3 Ea st 55 .5 7. 0 0. 0 4. 5 5. 5 0. 0 10 .5 13 .4 0. 3 0. 5 0. 3 0. 5 0. 8 1. 3 41 .7 2. 8 44 .5 17 9 N or th Ce nt ra l 58 .3 9. 2 0. 2 1. 1 2. 0 0. 6 12 .0 13 .4 0. 9 0. 0 0. 0 0. 7 1. 0 0. 6 39 .5 2. 2 41 .7 75 3 So ut h W es t 68 .6 6. 8 0. 0 1. 4 1. 2 0. 2 9. 8 9. 9 0. 0 0. 0 0. 0 0. 6 0. 5 1. 0 29 .3 2. 1 31 .4 60 7 To ba go 67 .2 3. 4 0. 0 2. 3 3. 5 0. 0 9. 7 11 .2 0. 0 0. 6 0. 0 0. 8 0. 6 0. 8 30 .7 2. 2 32 .8 61 A re a U rb an 57 .4 7. 6 0. 1 1. 8 3. 0 0. 5 12 .2 13 .4 0. 8 0. 0 0. 0 1. 2 1. 1 0. 7 39 .5 3. 1 42 .6 1, 05 8 Ru ra l 62 .2 8. 3 0. 0 1. 5 2. 5 0. 2 9. 7 13 .0 0. 2 0. 1 0. 0 0. 7 0. 6 1. 0 35 .5 2. 3 37 .8 96 5 A ge 1 5- 19 (4 4. 3) (0 .0 ) (0 .0 ) (0 .0 ) (9 .3 ) (0 .0 ) (1 3. 2) (3 0. 4) (0 .0 ) (0 .0 ) (0 .0 ) (0 .0 ) (0 .0 ) (2 .8 ) (5 2. 9) (2 .8 ) (5 5. 7) 33 20 -2 4 62 .1 1. 4 0. 0 0. 8 2. 6 0. 7 17 .2 12 .9 0. 9 0. 0 0. 0 0. 7 0. 6 0. 0 36 .5 1. 4 37 .9 19 4 25 -2 9 57 .9 2. 5 0. 0 0. 5 5. 9 0. 2 15 .0 15 .8 0. 0 0. 0 0. 0 1. 4 0. 4 0. 4 39 .9 2. 2 42 .1 34 3 30 -3 4 56 .8 4. 8 0. 0 2. 3 3. 0 1. 1 14 .6 13 .2 1. 5 0. 1 0. 0 0. 3 1. 2 1. 0 40 .7 2. 6 43 .2 37 1 35 -3 9 57 .2 9. 7 0. 0 1. 9 2. 6 0. 0 9. 6 15 .7 0. 7 0. 3 0. 0 0. 9 0. 6 0. 9 40 .4 2. 4 42 .8 35 2 40 -4 4 58 .8 11 .7 0. 0 2. 6 1. 5 0. 6 8. 0 13 .4 0. 3 0. 0 0. 1 1. 3 1. 0 0. 6 38 .2 3. 0 41 .2 32 3 45 -4 9 66 .8 14 .7 0. 3 1. 8 0. 4 0. 0 4. 6 7. 3 0. 0 0. 0 0. 0 1. 2 1. 4 1. 5 29 .1 4. 1 33 .2 40 7 N um be r of li vi ng c hi ld re n 0 81 .4 0. 4 0. 0 0. 0 0. 5 0. 0 7. 0 9. 4 0. 4 0. 0 0. 0 0. 8 0. 0 0. 0 17 .8 0. 8 18 .6 31 5 1 61 .7 1. 2 0. 0 1. 8 3. 3 0. 1 15 .6 14 .4 0. 7 0. 0 0. 0 0. 2 0. 2 0. 7 37 .1 1. 2 38 .3 53 2 2 52 .4 8. 8 0. 0 1. 8 3. 0 0. 8 13 .0 15 .2 0. 7 0. 2 0. 0 1. 6 1. 2 1. 2 43 .5 4. 1 47 .6 62 2 3 56 .9 13 .4 0. 4 1. 8 2. 1 0. 7 8. 4 12 .5 0. 0 0. 1 0. 0 0. 6 2. 2 0. 8 39 .5 3. 6 43 .1 31 7 4+ 49 .3 23 .2 0. 0 3. 1 4. 5 0. 0 4. 2 11 .2 0. 6 0. 0 0. 2 1. 6 1. 0 1. 2 46 .7 4. 0 50 .7 23 7 Ed uc ati on N on e (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 10 Pr im ar y 63 .5 11 .6 0. 0 0. 9 1. 6 0. 7 5. 7 13 .3 0. 5 0. 1 0. 0 0. 1 1. 5 0. 6 34 .2 2. 2 36 .5 33 1 Se co nd ar y+ 59 .0 7. 1 0. 1 1. 8 2. 9 0. 4 12 .1 13 .2 0. 5 0. 0 0. 0 1. 1 0. 8 0. 9 38 .2 2. 8 41 .0 1, 68 1 M is si ng /D K (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 1 W ea lt h in de x qu in ti le Po or es t 60 .4 10 .2 0. 0 0. 4 3. 9 0. 4 7. 8 13 .2 0. 9 0. 0 0. 1 0. 8 1. 0 0. 9 36 .9 2. 7 39 .6 37 5 81 Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey 2011: Key Findings & Tables Ta bl e R H .5 : U se o f c on tr ac ep ti on Pe rc en ta ge o f w om en a ge 1 5- 49 y ea rs c ur re nt ly m ar ri ed o r in u ni on w ho a re u si ng (o r w ho se p ar tn er is u si ng ) a c on tr ac ep ti ve m et ho d, T ri ni da d an d To ba go , 2 01 1 Pe rc en t of w om en (c ur re nt ly m ar ri ed o r in u ni on ) w ho a re u si ng : A ny m od er n m et ho d A ny tr ad iti on al m et ho d A ny m et ho d1 N um be r of w om en cu rr en tl y m ar ri ed o r in u ni on Not using any method Female sterilization Male sterilization IUD Injectables Implants Pill Male condom Female condom Diaphragm /foam/jelly Lactational amenorrhoea method (LAM) Periodic abstinence/ Rhythm Withdrawal Other Se co nd 61 .4 6. 0 0. 0 0. 9 3. 6 0. 0 11 .1 13 .7 0. 0 0. 1 0. 0 1. 3 1. 2 0. 8 35 .4 3. 3 38 .6 37 9 M id dl e 61 .1 8. 1 0. 0 1. 0 3. 6 0. 6 10 .7 12 .0 0. 5 0. 1 0. 0 0. 6 0. 5 1. 0 36 .7 2. 2 38 .9 42 6 Fo ur th 58 .0 5. 8 0. 0 1. 7 1. 0 0. 9 12 .7 15 .8 0. 8 0. 1 0. 0 1. 5 0. 8 0. 8 38 .8 3. 2 42 .0 42 9 Ri ch es t 57 .9 9. 7 0. 3 4. 2 1. 8 0. 0 12 .3 11 .2 0. 4 0. 0 0. 0 0. 5 1. 1 0. 7 39 .8 2. 3 42 .1 41 4 Et hn ic it y of h ou se ho ld h ea d A fr ic an 59 .0 7. 5 0. 0 1. 5 3. 9 0. 3 11 .2 12 .5 0. 2 0. 1 0. 0 1. 6 1. 2 1. 0 37 .2 3. 8 41 .0 61 4 In di an 62 .0 8. 3 0. 0 1. 2 1. 7 0. 2 11 .8 12 .1 0. 7 0. 0 0. 0 0. 3 0. 8 0. 9 36 .0 2. 0 38 .0 96 9 M ix ed 55 .0 8. 1 0. 3 2. 3 3. 8 1. 0 9. 0 16 .8 0. 7 0. 1 0. 0 1. 6 0. 8 0. 6 42 .0 3. 0 45 .0 40 8 O th er /N ot st at ed (6 4. 6) (3 .2 ) (0 .0 ) (1 2. 4) (0 .0 ) (0 .0 ) (7 .6 ) (1 2. 2) (0 .0 ) (0 .0 ) (0 .0 ) (0 .0 ) (0 .0 ) (0 .0 ) (3 5. 4) (0 .0 ) (3 5. 4) 32 1 M IC S in di ca to r 5. 3; M D G in di ca to r 5. 3 - C on tr ac ep ti ve p re va le nc e ra te ( ) F ig ur es t ha t ar e ba se d on 2 5- 49 u nw ei gh te d ca se s (* ) F ig ur es t ha t ar e ba se d on fe w er t ha n 25 u nw ei gh te d ca se s 82 TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO: MONITORING THE SITUATION OF CHILDREN & WOMEN Table RH.6: Unmet need for contraception Percentage of women aged 15-49 years currently married or in union with an unmet need for family planning and percentage of demand for contraception satisfied, Trinidad and Tobago, 2011 Met need for contraception Unmet need for contraception Number of women currently married or in union Percentage of demand for contraception satisfied Number of women currently married or in union with need for contraception For spacing For limiting Total For spacing For limiting Total1 Total 14.0 26.6 40.5 10.8 13.5 24.3 2,023 62.5 1,312 Region North West 19.2 31.0 50.2 10.5 11.0 21.5 423 70.0 303 East 18.7 26.1 44.8 9.0 13.3 22.3 179 66.7 120 North Central 14.2 28.0 42.1 9.2 13.9 23.1 753 64.6 491 South West 8.2 23.1 31.4 12.9 14.7 27.6 607 53.2 358 Tobago 18.5 14.8 33.4 19.2 12.6 31.8 61 51.2 39 Area Urban 16.7 26.3 43.0 11.3 13.5 24.8 1,058 63.4 717 Rural 11.0 26.9 37.9 10.3 13.5 23.8 965 61.4 595 Age 15-19 (46.6) (9.1) (55.7) (23.4) (7.2) (30.6) 33 (64.5) 29 20-24 26.7 11.9 38.6 30.9 8.0 38.9 194 49.8 151 25-29 25.5 16.9 42.4 19.5 11.5 31.1 343 57.7 252 30-34 18.8 24.6 43.4 12.8 12.2 25.0 371 63.5 253 35-39 10.2 32.6 42.8 7.0 16.3 23.4 352 64.7 233 40-44 4.6 37.1 41.7 2.8 16.9 19.8 323 67.9 198 45-49 1.8 31.5 33.3 0.8 14.2 15.0 407 69.0 196 Education None (*) (*) (*) (*) (*) (*) 10 (*) 6 Primary 7.1 29.4 36.5 5.5 18.6 24.1 331 60.2 201 Secondary+ 15.4 25.9 41.3 11.9 12.5 24.4 1,681 62.9 1,104 Wealth index quintiles Poorest 13.2 26.9 40.1 16.0 15.2 31.2 375 56.2 267 Second 15.1 23.7 38.8 10.3 13.4 23.7 379 62.1 237 Middle 11.8 27.3 39.1 11.1 13.8 24.9 426 61.1 272 Fourth 18.0 24.3 42.4 9.6 14.5 24.1 429 63.7 286 Richest 11.6 30.5 42.1 7.8 10.5 18.3 414 69.8 250 Ethnicity of household head African 17.6 23.8 41.4 14.0 13.8 27.8 614 59.8 425 Indian 11.5 26.5 38.0 9.0 13.2 22.2 969 63.2 584 Mixed 14.5 31.1 45.6 10.3 14.4 24.6 408 64.9 286 Other/Not stated (10.9) (24.5) (35.4) (14.6) (2.6) (17.2) 32 (*) 17 1 MICS indicator 5.4; MDG indicator 5.6 - Unmet need ( ) Figures that are based on 25-49 unweighted cases (*) Figures that are based on fewer than 25 unweighted cases Note: 1 case of missing ‘Education’ not shown 83 Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey 2011: Key Findings & Tables Table RH.7: Antenatal care provider Percent distribution of women aged 15-49 who gave birth in the two years preceding the survey by type of personnel providing antenatal care, Trinidad and Tobago, 2011 Provider of antenatal carea Total At least once by skilled personnel1, b Number of women who gave birth in the preceding two yearsDoctor Nurse / Midwife Community health worker No antenatal care received Total 85.7 9.4 2.8 2.0 100.0 95.1 401 Region North West 75.0 17.6 5.4 2.1 100.0 92.6 107 East 91.1 3.8 1.1 4.0 100.0 94.9 36 North Central 93.1 6.0 0.0 0.8 100.0 99.2 129 South West 86.4 6.5 4.6 2.5 100.0 92.9 115 Tobago (80.2) (16.2) (0.0) (3.6) 100.0 (96.4) 15 Area Urban 84.3 9.6 4.0 2.2 100.0 93.9 253 Rural 88.2 9.1 0.9 1.8 100.0 97.3 148 Mother’s age at birth Less than 20 (82.0) (9.7) (6.5) (1.8) 100.0 (91.7) 43 20-34 85.9 9.7 2.3 2.1 100.0 95.6 303 35-49 87.5 7.8 2.8 1.9 100.0 95.3 55 Education Primary (85.6) (9.0) (2.7) (2.7) 100.0 (94.6) 36 Secondary+ 85.8 9.4 2.9 2.0 100.0 95.2 365 Wealth index quintile Poorest 77.9 11.7 6.5 3.9 100.0 89.6 117 Second 87.9 10.1 2.0 0.0 100.0 98.0 69 Middle 87.1 8.4 2.6 1.9 100.0 95.5 89 Fourth 91.9 8.1 0.0 0.0 100.0 100.0 80 Richest (89.1) (6.7) (.0) (4.2) 100.0 (95.8) 46 Ethnicity of household head African 82.5 10.9 3.8 2.8 100.0 93.5 170 Indian 90.2 6.9 1.1 1.8 100.0 97.1 136 Mixed 85.6 9.5 3.8 1.0 100.0 95.1 93 Other/Not stated (*) (*) (*) (*) 100.0 (*) 3 1 MICS indicator 5.5a; MDG indicator 5.5 - Antenatal care coverage a Only the most qualified provider is considered in cases where more than one provider was reported b Skilled providers include Medical doctor and Nurse/Midwife ( ) Figures that are based on 25-49 unweighted cases (*) Figures that are based on fewer than 25 unweighted cases 84 TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO: MONITORING THE SITUATION OF CHILDREN & WOMEN Table RH.8: Number of antenatal care visits Percentage of women who had a live birth during the two years preceding the survey by number of antenatal care visits by any provider, Trinidad and Tobago, 2011 Percent distribution of women who had: Total Number of women with a live birth in the preceding two years No antenatal care visits Two visits Three visits 4 or more visits1 Missing/DK Total 2.0 0.4 1.0 87.3 9.3 100.0 401 Region North West 2.1 0.0 0.7 82.5 14.7 100.0 107 East 4.0 1.3 0.0 89.6 5.2 100.0 36 North Central 0.8 1.0 1.0 87.2 10.0 100.0 129 South West 2.5 0.0 1.2 91.8 4.5 100.0 115 Tobago (3.6) (0.0) (3.4) (81.2) (11.8) 100.0 15 Area Urban 2.2 0.5 0.8 83.9 12.6 100.0 253 Rural 1.8 0.3 1.2 93.1 3.7 100.0 148 Mother’s age at birth Less than 20 (1.8) (4.0) (3.2) (80.6) (10.4) 100.0 43 20-34 2.1 0.0 0.8 87.5 9.6 100.0 303 35-49 1.9 0.0 0.0 91.2 6.9 100.0 55 Education Primary (2.7) (0.0) (0.0) (88.1) (9.2) 100.0 36 Secondary+ 2.0 0.5 1.1 87.2 9.3 100.0 365 Wealth index quintile Poorest 3.9 0.0 1.5 85.8 8.9 100.0 117 Second 0.0 0.7 2.0 87.8 9.5 100.0 69 Middle 1.9 0.0 0.0 85.2 12.9 100.0 89 Fourth 0.0 1.6 0.9 86.8 10.7 100.0 80 Richest (4.2) (0.0) (0.0) (95.0) (0.7) 100.0 46 Ethnicity of household head African 2.8 0.0 1.1 80.9 15.2 100.0 170 Indian 1.8 0.9 0.9 92.3 4.1 100.0 136 Mixed 1.0 0.5 0.8 91.2 6.5 100.0 93 Other/Not stated (*) (*) (*) (*) (*) 100.0 3 1 MICS indicator 5.5b; MDG indicator 5.5 - Antenatal care coverage ( ) Figures that are based on 25-49 unweighted cases (*) Figures that are based on fewer than 25 unweighted cases 85 Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey 2011: Key Findings & Tables Table RH.9: Content of antenatal care Percentage of women age 15-49 years who had their blood pressure measured, urine sample taken, and blood sample taken as part of antenatal care, Trinidad and Tobago, 2011 Percentage of women who, during the pregnancy of their last birth, had: Blood pressure measured, urine specimen and blood test taken1 Number of women who gave birth in two years preceding survey Blood pressure measured Urine sample taken Blood sample taken Total 98.0 98.0 97.7 97.7 401 Region North West 97.9 97.9 97.9 97.9 107 East 96.0 96.0 96.0 96.0 36 North Central 99.2 99.2 98.2 98.2 129 South West 97.5 97.5 97.5 97.5 115 Tobago (96.4) (96.4) (96.4) (96.4) 15 Area Urban 97.8 97.8 97.3 97.3 253 Rural 98.2 98.2 98.2 98.2 148 Mother’s age at birth Less than 20 (98.2) (98.2) (98.2) (98.2) 43 20-34 97.9 97.9 97.5 97.5 303 35-49 98.1 98.1 98.1 98.1 55 Education Primary (97.3) (97.3) (97.3) (97.3) 36 Secondary+ 98.0 98.0 97.7 97.7 365 Wealth index quintile Poorest 96.1 96.1 96.1 96.1 117 Second 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 69 Middle 98.1 98.1 98.1 98.1 89 Fourth 100.0 100.0 98.5 98.5 80 Richest (95.8) (95.8) (95.8) (95.8) 46 Ethnicity of household head African 97.2 97.2 97.2 97.2 170 Indian 98.2 98.2 97.3 97.3 136 Mixed 99.0 99.0 99.0 99.0 93 Other/Not stated (*) (*) (*) (*) 3 1 MICS indicator 5.6 - Content of antenatal care ( ) Figures that are based on 25-49 unweighted cases (*) Figures that are based on fewer than 25 unweighted cases 86 TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO: MONITORING THE SITUATION OF CHILDREN & WOMEN Table RH.10: Assistance during delivery and caesarean section Percent distribution of women age 15-49 who had a live birth in the two years preceding the survey by person assisting at delivery and percentage of births delivered by C-section, Trinidad and Tobago, 2011 Person assisting at delivery Total Delivery assisted by any skilled attendant1, a Percent delivered by C-section2 Number of women who gave birth in preceding two years Medical doctor Nurse / Midwife Auxiliary midwife Other/ missing No attendant Total 48.9 49.1 0.4 1.2 0.4 100.0 98.4 22.1 401 Region North West 34.5 64.4 0.0 0.0 1.0 100.0 99.0 19.3 107 East 42.7 53.3 0.0 2.7 1.3 100.0 96.0 12.7 36 North Central 58.7 39.4 1.1 0.8 0.0 100.0 99.2 23.5 129 South West 55.7 41.8 0.0 2.5 0.0 100.0 97.5 26.6 115 Tobago (27.9) (70.1) (2.0) (0.0) (0.0) 100.0 (100.0) (18.8) 15 Area Urban 46.9 51.5 0.0 1.2 0.4 100.0 98.4 23.8 253 Rural 52.3 45.0 1.1 1.3 0.3 100.0 98.4 19.2 148 Mother’s age at birth Less than 20 (31.8) (66.3) (0.7) (1.2) (0.0) 100.0 (98.8) (7.1) 43 20-34 50.6 47.3 0.5 1.1 0.5 100.0 98.4 20.4 303 35-49 52.8 45.3 0.0 1.9 0.0 100.0 98.1 43.6 55 Place of delivery Public sector health facility 44.5 55.0 0.5 0.0 0.0 100.0 100.0 18.7 349 Private sector health facility (89.2) (10.8) (0.0) (0.0) (0.0) 100.0 (100.0) (54.1) 43 Home (*) (*) (*) (*) (*) 100.0 (*) (*) 0 Other (*) (*) (*) (*) (*) 100.0 (*) (*) 1 Missing/DK (*) (*) (*) (*) (*) 100.0 (*) (*) 7 Education Primary (46.3) (51.0) (0.0) (1.4) (1.3) 100.0 (97.3) (11.7) 36 Secondary+ 49.1 48.9 0.5 1.2 0.3 100.0 98.5 23.1 365 Wealth index quintile Poorest 43.8 52.4 1.2 1.3 1.3 100.0 97.3 22.6 117 Second 52.4 47.6 0.0 0.0 0.0 100.0 100.0 16.3 69 Middle 49.6 48.5 0.3 1.6 0.0 100.0 98.4 23.2 89 Fourth 44.3 55.7 0.0 0.0 0.0 100.0 100.0 15.9 80 Richest (62.9) (32.9) (0.0) (4.2) (0.0) 100.0 (95.8) (38.3) 46 Ethnicity of household head African 41.9 56.2 0.2 1.2 0.7 100.0 98.2 20.3 170 Indian 59.0 39.2 0.0 1.8 0.0 100.0 98.2 25.8 136 Mixed 48.4 49.0 1.5 0.6 0.5 100.0 99.0 20.8 93 Other/Not stated (*) (*) (*) (*) (*) 100.0 (*) (*) 3 1 MICS indicator 5.7; MDG indicator 5.2 - Skilled attendant at delivery 2 MICS indicator 5.9 - Caesarean section a Skilled attendants include Medical doctor and Nurse/Midwife. ( ) Figures that are based on 25-49 unweighted cases (*) Figures that are based on fewer than 25 unweighted cases 87 Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey 2011: Key Findings & Tables Table RH.11: Place of delivery Percent distribution of women age 15-49 with a birth in two years preceding the survey by place of delivery, Trinidad and Tobago, 2011 Place of delivery Total Delivered in health facility1 Number of women who gave birth in preceding two years Public sector health facility Private sector health facility Home Other Missing Total 87.1 10.8 0.1 0.2 1.8 100.0 97.9 401 Region North West 93.8 4.1 0.0 0.0 2.1 100.0 97.9 107 East 93.4 2.6 1.3 0.0 2.7 100.0 96.0 36 North Central 80.7 18.5 0.0 0.0 0.8 100.0 99.2 129 South West 84.4 12.3 0.0 0.8 2.5 100.0 96.7 115 Tobago (100.0) (0.0) (0.0) (0.0) (0.0) 100.0 (100.0) 15 Area Urban 88.7 9.2 0.0 0.0 2.1 100.0 97.9 253 Rural 84.3 13.5 0.3 0.6 1.3 100.0 97.8 148 Mother’s age at birth Less than 20 (98.8) (0.0) (0.0) (0.0) (1.2) 100.0 (98.8) 43 20-34 86.3 11.4 0.2 0.3 1.8 100.0 97.7 303 35-49 82.5 15.6 0.0 0.0 1.9 100.0 98.1 55 Percent of women who had: None (*) (*) (*) (*) (*) 100.0 (*) 8 1-3 visits (*) (*) (*) (*) (*) 100.0 (*) 6 4+ visits 87.4 12.3 0.0 0.3 0.0 100.0 99.7 350 Missing/DK (100.0) (0.0) (0.0) (0.0) (0.0) 100.0 (100.0) 37 Education Primary (97.3) (0.0) (1.3) (0.0) (1.4) 100.0 (97.3) 36 Secondary+ 86.1 11.8 0.0 0.3 1.8 100.0 97.9 365 Wealth index quintile Poorest 95.6 0.8 0.4 0.0 3.2 100.0 96.4 117 Second 98.7 1.3 0.0 0.0 0.0 100.0 100.0 69 Middle 90.9 7.5 0.0 0.0 1.6 100.0 98.4 89 Fourth 82.1 16.8 0.0 1.2 0.0 100.0 98.8 80 Richest (49.8) (45.9) (0.0) (0.0) (4.2) 100.0 (95.8) 46 Ethnicity of household head African 93.6 4.0 0.0 0.0 2.5 100.0 97.5 170 Indian 75.2 22.3 0.0 0.7 1.8 100.0 97.5 136 Mixed 92.3 6.7 0.5 0.0 0.6 100.0 99.0 93 Other/Not stated (*) (*) (*) (*) (*) 100.0 (*) 3 1 MICS indicator 5.8 - Institutional deliveries ( ) Figures that are based on 25-49 unweighted cases (*) Figures that are based on fewer than 25 unweighted cases 88 TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO: MONITORING THE SITUATION OF CHILDREN & WOMEN Table RH.12: Post-partum stay in health facility Percent distribution of women age 15-49 years who gave birth in a health facility in the two years preceding the survey by duration of stay in health facility following their last live birth, Trinidad and Tobago, 2011 Duration of stay in health facility Total 12 hours or more1 Number of women who gave birth in a health facility in the preceding two years Less than 6 hours 6-11 hours 12-23 hours 1-2 days 3 days or more DK/ Missing Total 1.4 0.8 2.7 66.5 28.4 0.2 100.0 97.6 393 Region North West 2.2 1.5 1.0 60.7 34.5 0.0 100.0 96.3 105 East 1.3 0.0 3.0 74.3 18.9 2.4 100.0 96.2 35 North Central 0.0 1.1 6.1 69.2 23.6 0.0 100.0 98.9 128 South West 2.0 0.0 0.8 69.8 27.4 0.0 100.0 98.0 111 Tobago (3.4) (0.0) (0.0) (39.6) (57.0) (0.0) 100.0 (96.6) 15 Area Urban 1.4 1.2 1.4 65.2 30.7 0.0 100.0 97.4 248 Rural 1.3 0.0 5.0 68.6 24.5 0.6 100.0 98.1 145 Mother’s age at birth Less than 20 (2.9) (0.0) (2.4) (60.9) (33.8) (0.0) 100.0 (97.1) 43 20-34 1.4 1.0 3.3 68.5 25.5 0.3 100.0 97.3 296 35-49 0.0 0.0 0.0 59.8 40.2 0.0 100.0 100.0 54 Type of health facility Public 1.3 0.5 2.2 68.5 27.3 0.2 100.0 98.0 349 Private (2.1) (3.2) (6.9) (50.1) (37.7) (0.0) 100.0 (94.7) 43 Type of delivery C-section 0.0 0.0 1.0 37.1 61.9 0.0 100.0 100.0 89 Vaginal birth 1.8 1.0 3.2 75.1 18.7 0.3 100.0 96.9 304 Education Primary (0.0) (4.6) (6.3) (75.2) (13.8) (0.0) 100.0 (95.4) 35 Secondary+ 1.5 0.4 2.4 65.6 29.8 0.2 100.0 97.9 358 Wealth index quintiles Poorest 2.0 0.0 1.2 71.3 24.7 0.8 100.0 97.3 113 Second 1.3 2.3 6.6 60.1 29.6 0.0 100.0 96.4 69 Middle 1.4 1.6 3.2 68.2 25.7 0.0 100.0 97.0 87 Fourth 1.4 0.0 1.9 65.9 30.8 0.0 100.0 98.6 79 Richest (0.0) (0.0) (1.2) (61.6) (37.1) (0.0) 100.0 (100.0) 44 Ethnicity of household head African 1.1 1.0 2.0 65.0 30.6 0.3 100.0 97.7 166 Indian 1.1 1.0 3.2 71.5 23.2 0.0 100.0 97.9 132 Mixed 2.5 0.0 3.5 62.4 31.3 0.4 100.0 97.1 92 Other/Not stated (*) (*) (*) (*) (*) (*) 100.0 (*) 3 1 MICS indicator 5.10 - Post-partum stay in health facility ( ) Figures that are based on 25-49 unweighted cases (*) Figures that are based on fewer than 25 unweighted cases 89 Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey 2011: Key Findings & Tables Table RH.13: Post-natal health checks for newborns Percentage of women age 15-49 years with a live birth in the last two years whose last live birth received health checks while in facility or at home following birth, percent distribution whose last live birth received post-natal care (PNC) visits from any health provider after birth, by timing of visit, and percentage who received post-natal health checks, Trinidad and Tobago, 2011 Health check following birth while in facility or at homea PNC visit for newbornsb Total Post-natal health check for the newborn1, c Number of last live births in the last two years Same day 1 day following birth 2 days following birth 3-6 days following birth After the first week following birth No post- natal care visit Missing/ DK Total 96.1 14.1 1.4 0.5 3.9 39.8 35.3 4.9 100.0 96.3 401 Region North West 96.8 19.9 3.7 0.0 3.1 27.3 39.5 6.5 100.0 96.8 107 East 96.0 10.3 0.0 1.3 4.0 61.1 23.3 0.0 100.0 96.0 36 North Central 99.2 7.7 0.0 0.0 3.0 45.9 37.2 6.2 100.0 99.2 129 South West 91.5 18.5 1.2 0.8 2.5 37.1 35.9 4.0 100.0 92.3 115 Tobago (100.0) (3.4) (2.9) (4.9) (30.6) (45.5) (12.7) (0.0) 100.0 (100.0) 15 Area Urban 96.2 12.0 1.7 0.3 2.4 37.2 39.8 6.6 100.0 96.2 253 Rural 95.9 17.8 1.0 0.9 6.6 44.2 27.5 2.0 100.0 96.5 148 Mother’s age at birth Less than 20 (96.7) (8.6) (2.2) (0.0) (0.9) (41.6) (43.4) (3.2) 100.0 (98.8) 43 20-34 96.8 14.9 1.6 0.5 3.4 39.6 35.5 4.6 100.0 96.8 303 35-49 91.7 14.5 0.0 1.3 9.4 39.6 27.3 7.8 100.0 91.7 55 Place of delivery Public sector health facility 98.5 12.5 1.7 0.6 4.5 40.2 35.4 5.2 100.0 98.7 349 Private sector health facility (95.8) (30.5) (0.0) (0.0) (0.0) (44.4) (21.6) (3.4) 100.0 (95.8) 43 Home (*) (*) (*) (*) (*) (*) (*) (*) 100.0 (*) 0 Other (*) (*) (*) (*) (*) (*) (*) (*) 100.0 (*) 1 Missing/DK (*) (*) (*) (*) (*) (*) (*) (*) 100.0 (*) 7 Education Primary (97.3) (11.7) (1.2) (0.0) (6.0) (44.0) (37.1) (0.0) 100.0 (97.3) 36 Secondary+ 96.0 14.4 1.5 0.6 3.7 39.4 35.1 5.3 100.0 96.2 365 Wealth index quintiles Poorest 96.4 15.0 2.5 0.4 3.5 34.6 37.9 6.1 100.0 96.4 117 Second 98.0 12.5 0.6 2.0 7.5 42.2 29.9 5.2 100.0 98.0 69 Middle 95.0 20.1 2.7 0.0 4.6 42.2 27.7 2.7 100.0 96.0 89 Fourth 97.7 10.2 0.0 0.0 1.3 41.3 39.2 8.0 100.0 97.7 80 Richest (91.8) (9.7) (0.0) (0.6) (3.1) (42.2) (44.5) (0.0) 100.0 (91.8) 46 90 TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO: MONITORING THE SITUATION OF CHILDREN & WOMEN Health check following birth while in facility or at homea PNC visit for newbornsb Total Post-natal health check for the newborn1, c Number of last live births in the last two years Same day 1 day following birth 2 days following birth 3-6 days following birth After the first week following birth No post- natal care visit Missing/ DK Ethnicity of household head African 95.8 11.6 1.1 0.3 5.9 37.0 39.4 4.9 100.0 95.8 170 Indian 95.1 17.9 0.0 1.0 1.0 42.4 33.3 4.3 100.0 95.8 136 Mixed 98.0 13.8 4.2 0.3 4.8 39.3 31.8 5.8 100.0 98.0 93 Other/Not stated (*) (*) (*) (*) (*) (*) (*) (*) 100.0 (*) 3 1 MICS indicator 5.11 - Post-natal health check for the newborn a Health checks by any health provider following facility births (before discharge from facility) or following home births (before departure of provider from home). b Post-natal care visits (PNC) refer to a separate visit by any health provider to check on the health of the newborn and provide preventive care services. PNC visits do not include health checks following birth while in facility or at home (see note a above). c Post-natal health checks include any health check performed while in the health facility or at home following birth (see note a above), as well as PNC visits (see note b above) within two days of delivery. ( ) Figures that are based on 25-49 unweighted cases (*) Figures that are based on fewer than 25 unweighted cases 91 Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey 2011: Key Findings & Tables Table RH.14: Post-natal care visits for newborns within one week of birth Percent distribution of women age 15-49 years with a live birth in the last two years whose last live birth received a post-natal care (PNC) visit within one week of birth, by location and provider of the first PNC visit, Trinidad and Tobago, 2011 Location of first PNC visit for newborns Provider of first PNC visit for newborns Number of last live births in the last two years with a PNC visit within the first week of lifeHome Public sector Private sector Total Doctor/ nurse/ midwife Community health worker Total Total 28.0 57.2 14.9 100.0 98.6 1.4 100.0 80 Region North West (7.8) (84.4) (7.8) 100.0 (100.0) (0.0) 100.0 28 East (*) (*) (*) 100.0 (*) (*) 100.0 6 North Central (*) (*) (*) 100.0 (*) (*) 100.0 14 South West (29.8) (39.1) (31.2) 100.0 (100.0) (0.0) 100.0 26 Tobago (*) (*) (*) 100.0 (*) (*) 100.0 6 Mother’s age at birth Less than 20 (*) (*) (*) 100.0 (*) (*) 100.0 5 20-34 23.5 62.4 14.2 100.0 98.8 1.2 100.0 62 35-49 (*) (*) (*) 100.0 (*) (*) 100.0 14 Place of delivery Public sector health facility 33.5 66.5 0.0 100.0 98.3 1.7 100.0 67 Private sector health facility (*) (*) (*) 100.0 (*) (*) 100.0 13 Education Primary (*) (*) (*) 100.0 (*) (*) 100.0 7 Secondary+ 27.6 56.1 16.2 100.0 99.0 1.0 100.0 74 Wealth index quintiles Poorest 40% (35.3) (60.2) (4.5) 100.0 (98.2) (1.8) 100.0 41 Richest 60% (20.5) (54.0) (25.5) 100.0 (99.1) (0.9) 100.0 40 Ethnicity of household head African (40.3) (55.3) (4.4) 100.0 (96.5) (3.5) 100.0 32 Indian (14.9) (52.4) (32.6) 100.0 (100.0) (0.0) 100.0 27 Mixed (*) (*) (*) 100.0 (*) (*) 100.0 21 ( ) Figures that are based on 25-49 unweighted cases (*) Figures that are based on fewer than 25 unweighted cases 92 TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO: MONITORING THE SITUATION OF CHILDREN & WOMEN Ta bl e R H .1 5: P os t- na ta l h ea lt h ch ec ks fo r m ot he rs Pe rc en ta ge o f w om en a ge 1 5- 49 y ea rs w it h a liv e bi rt h in t he la st t w o ye ar s w ho r ec ei ve d he al th c he ck s w hi le in fa ci lit y or a t ho m e fo llo w in g bi rt h, p er ce nt d is tr ib uti on w ho r ec ei ve d po st -n at al c ar e (P N C) v is it s fr om a ny h ea lt h pr ov id er a ft er b ir th a t th e ti m e of la st b ir th , b y ti m in g of v is it , a nd p er ce nt ag e w ho r ec ei ve d po st n at al h ea lt h ch ec ks , T ri ni da d an d To ba go , 2 01 1 H ea lth c he ck fo llo w in g bi rt h w hi le in fa ci lit y or a t h om ea PN C vi si t fo r m ot he rs b To ta l Po st -n at al he al th c he ck fo r th e m ot he r1 , c N um be r of w om en w ho g av e bi rt h in t he t w o ye ar s pr ec ed in g th e su rv ey Sa m e da y 1 da y fo llo w in g bi rt h 2 da ys fo llo w in g bi rt h 3- 6 da ys fo llo w in g bi rt h A ft er t he fi rs t w ee k fo llo w in g bi rt h N o po st - na ta l c ar e vi si t M is si ng /D K To ta l 92 .0 5. 8 0. 7 0. 8 5. 0 35 .1 50 .6 2. 0 10 0. 0 92 .0 40 1 Re gi on N or th W es t 92 .1 10 .8 2. 2 1. 1 4. 3 30 .2 48 .3 3. 1 10 0. 0 92 .1 10 7 Ea st 92 .1 1. 3 1. 4 0. 0 5. 3 53 .6 37 .3 1. 1 10 0. 0 92 .1 36 N or th C en tr al 93 .5 2. 1 0. 0 0. 0 3. 1 33 .8 58 .6 2. 4 10 0. 0 93 .5 12 9 So ut h W es t 89 .4 6. 7 0. 0 0. 8 4. 9 36 .1 50 .2 1. 2 10 0. 0 89 .4 11 5 To ba go (9 7. 6) (5 .8 ) (0 .0 ) (7 .7 ) (2 5. 8) (2 8. 1) (3 2. 7) (0 .0 ) 10 0. 0 (9 7. 6) 15 M ot he r’ s ag e at b ir th Le ss th an 2 0 (8 9. 9) (2 .1 ) (0 .0 ) (0 .9 ) (0 .0 ) (3 3. 0) (5 8. 1) (5 .8 ) 10 0. 0 (8 9. 9) 43 20 -3 4 92 .0 5. 9 0. 5 0. 8 4. 9 37 .4 48 .6 1. 9 10 0. 0 92 .0 30 3 35 -4 9 93 .4 8. 1 2. 4 0. 5 9. 2 24 .0 55 .7 0. 0 10 0. 0 93 .4 55 Pl ac e of d el iv er y Pu bl ic s ec to r he al th fa ci lit y 94 .2 5. 1 0. 8 0. 9 5. 4 34 .6 50 .8 2. 3 10 0. 0 94 .2 34 9 Pr iv at e se ct or h ea lt h fa ci lit y (9 2. 3) (1 2. 4) (0 .0 ) (0 .0 ) (2 .1 ) (4 6. 2) (3 9. 2) (0 .0 ) 10 0. 0 (9 2. 3) 43 H om e (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 10 0. 0 (* ) 0 O th er (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 10 0. 0 (* ) 1 M is si ng /D K (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 10 0. 0 (* ) 7 Ty pe o f d el iv er y Va gi na l b ir th 92 .7 5. 9 0. 5 1. 0 5. 2 33 .3 51 .9 2. 3 10 0. 0 92 .7 31 2 C- se cti on 89 .6 5. 5 1. 5 0. 3 4. 1 41 .3 46 .0 1. 2 10 0. 0 89 .6 89 Ed uc ati on Pr im ar y (8 5. 2) (0 .0 ) (0 .0 ) (0 .0 ) (6 .0 ) (3 3. 0) (6 1. 0) (0 .0 ) 10 0. 0 (8 5. 2) 36 Se co nd ar y+ 92 .7 6. 4 0. 8 0. 9 4. 9 35 .3 49 .6 2. 2 10 0. 0 92 .7 36 5 W ea lt h in de x qu in ti le s Po or es t 92 .7 1. 6 0. 4 0. 3 4. 9 35 .1 56 .3 1. 3 10 0. 0 92 .7 11 7 Se co nd 91 .1 8. 5 0. 0 2. 0 6. 8 38 .1 41 .0 3. 6 10 0. 0 91 .1 69 M id dl e 94 .7 11 .5 1. 2 1. 3 6. 1 31 .1 44 .0 4. 7 10 0. 0 94 .7 89 Fo ur th 91 .1 3. 2 0. 0 0. 0 2. 2 34 .3 60 .3 0. 0 10 0. 0 91 .1 80 Ri ch es t (8 7. 8) (6 .0 ) (2 .9 ) (0 .6 ) (4 .9 ) (3 9. 4) (4 6. 2) (0 .0 ) 10 0. 0 (8 7. 8) 46 Et hn ic it y of h ou se ho ld h ea d A fr ic an 92 .5 5. 4 0. 3 0. 5 5. 6 31 .8 52 .8 3. 5 10 0. 0 92 .5 17 0 In di an 90 .9 5. 6 0. 0 0. 7 2. 4 39 .6 50 .3 1. 4 10 0. 0 90 .9 13 6 M ix ed 94 .0 7. 0 2. 5 1. 6 7. 6 32 .4 48 .5 0. 4 10 0. 0 94 .0 93 O th er /N ot s ta te d (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 10 0. 0 (* ) 3 1 M IC S in di ca to r 5. 12 - Po st -n at al h ea lt h ch ec k fo r th e m ot he r a H ea lt h ch ec ks b y an y he al th p ro vi de r fo llo w in g fa ci lit y bi rt hs (b ef or e di sc ha rg e fr om fa ci lit y) o r fo llo w in g ho m e bi rt hs (b ef or e de pa rt ur e of p ro vi de r fr om h om e) . b P os t- na ta l c ar e vi si ts (P N C) r ef er t o a se pa ra te v is it b y an y he al th p ro vi de r to c he ck o n th e he al th o f t he m ot he r an d pr ov id e pr ev en ti ve c ar e se rv ic es . P N C vi si ts d o no t in cl ud e he al th c he ck s fo llo w in g bi rt h w hi le in fa ci lit y or a t ho m e (s ee n ot e a ab ov e) . c P os t- na ta l h ea lt h ch ec ks in cl ud e an y he al th c he ck p er fo rm ed w hi le in t he h ea lt h fa ci lit y or a t ho m e fo llo w in g bi rt h (s ee n ot e a ab ov e) , a s w el l a s PN C vi si ts (s ee n ot e b ab ov e) w it hi n tw o da ys o f d el iv er y. ( ) F ig ur es t ha t ar e ba se d on 2 5- 49 u nw ei gh te d ca se s (* ) F ig ur es t ha t ar e ba se d on fe w er t ha n 25 u nw ei gh te d ca se s 93 Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey 2011: Key Findings & Tables Table RH.16: Post-natal care visits for mothers within one week of birth Percentage of women age 15-49 years who gave birth in the preceding 2 years and received a PNC visit within one week of birth, by location and provider of the first PNC visit, Trinidad and Tobago, 2011 Location of first PNC visit for mothers Provider of first PNC visit for mothers Number of women with a live birth in the last two years who received a PNC visit within one week of birth Home Public Sector Private sector Total Doctor/ nurse/ midwife Community health worker Total Total 39.1 50.3 10.5 100.0 96.9 3.1 100.0 49 Area Urban (25.8) (65.6) (8.6) 100.0 (100.0) (0.0) 100.0 28 Rural (57.0) (29.8) (13.2) 100.0 (92.8) (7.2) 100.0 21 Mother’s age at birth Less than 20 (*) (*) (*) 100.0 (*) (*) 100.0 1 20-34 (41.6) (46.8) (11.6) 100.0 (96.9) (3.1) 100.0 37 35-49 (*) (*) (*) 100.0 (*) (*) 100.0 11 Place of birth Public sector health facility 42.7 54.9 2.4 100.0 96.5 3.5 100.0 43 Private sector health facility (*) (*) (*) 100.0 (*) (*) 100.0 6 Type of delivery Vaginal birth 43.8 48.8 7.4 100.0 96.1 3.9 100.0 39 C-section (*) (*) (*) 100.0 (*) (*) 100.0 10 Education Primary (*) (*) (*) 100.0 (*) (*) 100.0 2 Secondary+ 36.4 52.6 11.0 100.0 97.6 2.4 100.0 47 Wealth index quintiles Poorest 40% (61.2) (34.3) (4.5) 100.0 (96.3) (3.7) 100.0 20 Richest 60% (23.5) (61.7) (14.8) 100.0 (97.4) (2.6) 100.0 29 ( ) Figures that are based on 25-49 unweighted cases (*) Figures that are based on fewer than 25 unweighted cases 94 TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO: MONITORING THE SITUATION OF CHILDREN & WOMEN Table RH.17: Post-natal health checks for mothers and newborns Percent distribution of women age 15-49 years with a live birth in the last two years by post-natal health checks for the mother and newborn, within two days of the most recent birth, Trinidad and Tobago, 2011 Post-natal health checks within two days of birth for: Total Number of women with a live birth in the last two years Both mothers and newborns Mothers only Newborns only Neither mother nor newborn DK/Missing Total 90.6 0.2 4.6 3.4 1.2 100.0 401 Region North West 90.1 0.0 4.7 3.2 2.1 100.0 107 East 92.1 0.0 3.9 4.0 0.0 100.0 36 North Central 92.6 0.0 5.7 0.8 0.9 100.0 129 South West 87.4 0.8 3.7 6.9 1.2 100.0 115 Tobago (97.6) (0.0) (2.4) (0.0) (.0) 100.0 15 Area Urban 89.9 0.0 4.4 3.8 1.9 100.0 253 Rural 91.7 0.6 4.8 2.8 0.0 100.0 148 Mother’s age at birth Less than 20 (86.6) (0.0) (9.0) (1.2) (3.2) 100.0 43 20-34 90.9 0.0 4.8 3.2 1.1 100.0 303 35-49 91.7 1.7 0.0 6.6 0.0 100.0 55 Place of delivery Public sector health facility 92.6 0.3 4.8 1.0 1.4 100.0 349 Private sector health facility (92.3) (0.0) (3.5) (4.2) (0.0) 100.0 43 Home (*) (*) (*) (*) (*) 100.0 0 Other (*) (*) (*) (*) (*) 100.0 1 Missing/DK (*) (*) (*) (*) (*) 100.0 7 Type of delivery Vaginal birth 91.2 0.3 4.3 3.0 1.2 100.0 312 C-section 88.4 0.0 5.4 5.0 1.2 100.0 89 Education Primary (85.2) (0.0) (12.1) (2.7) (0.0) 100.0 36 Secondary+ 91.1 0.3 3.8 3.5 1.3 100.0 365 Wealth index quintiles Poorest 91.7 0.0 3.7 3.6 1.0 100.0 117 Second 87.5 0.0 6.9 2.0 3.6 100.0 69 Middle 92.4 1.0 2.4 2.9 1.3 100.0 89 Fourth 91.1 0.0 6.6 2.3 0.0 100.0 80 Richest (87.8) (0.0) (4.0) (8.2) (0.0) 100.0 46 Ethnicity of household head African 89.7 0.0 3.3 4.2 2.8 100.0 170 Indian 90.9 0.0 4.9 4.2 0.0 100.0 136 Mixed 93.0 1.0 5.0 1.0 0.0 100.0 93 Other/Not stated (*) (*) (*) (*) (*) 100.0 3 ( ) Figures that are based on 25-49 unweighted cases (*) Figures that are based on fewer than 25 unweighted cases 95 Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey 2011: Key Findings & Tables Child Development Table CD.1: Early childhood education Percentage of children age 36-59 months who are attending an organized early childhood education programme, Trinidad and Tobago, 2011 Percentage of children age 36-59 months attending early childhood education1 Number of children age 36-59 months Total 84.5 523 Sex Male 85.3 253 Female 83.7 270 Region North West 83.1 118 East 78.6 48 North Central 89.5 190 South West 79.9 142 Tobago 90.6 25 Area Urban 84.2 296 Rural 84.9 227 Age of child 36-47 months 76.6 286 48-59 months 94.0 238 Mother’s education None (*) 4 Primary 82.1 82 Secondary+ 85.2 436 Wealth index quintile Poorest 71.7 138 Second 92.2 98 Middle 90.4 125 Fourth 81.1 88 Richest 92.5 74 Ethnicity of household head African 83.9 206 Indian 84.2 171 Mixed 86.2 141 Other/Not stated (*) 4 1 MICS indicator 6.1 - Attendance to early childhood education (*) Figures that are based on fewer than 25 unweighted cases Note: 1 case of missing ‘Mother’s education’ not shown 96 TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO: MONITORING THE SITUATION OF CHILDREN & WOMEN Table CD.2: Support for learning Percentage of children age 36-59 months with whom an adult household member engaged in activities that promote learning and school readiness during the last three days, Trinidad and Tobago, 2011 Percentage of children aged 36-59 months Mean number of activities Percentage of children not living with their natural father Number of children aged 36-59 months With whom adult household members engaged in four or more activities1 With whom the father engaged in one or more activities2 Any adult household member engaged with the child The father engaged with the child Total 95.7 56.5 5.6 2.4 36.7 523 Sex Male 94.9 60.0 5.5 2.4 34.9 253 Female 96.4 53.2 5.6 2.3 38.4 270 Region North West 96.1 40.0 5.5 1.5 51.4 118 East 96.9 60.9 5.6 2.7 36.2 48 North Central 93.7 61.2 5.4 2.5 31.2 190 South West 98.1 66.3 5.9 3.0 29.4 142 Tobago 92.9 33.8 5.5 1.6 51.0 25 Area Urban 94.7 53.9 5.5 2.1 38.9 296 Rural 97.0 60.0 5.7 2.7 33.7 227 Age 36-47 months 96.6 54.0 5.6 2.3 36.3 286 48-59 months 94.6 59.6 5.6 2.5 37.1 238 Mother’s educationa None (*) (*) (*) (*) (*) 4 Primary 92.2 59.7 5.5 2.4 34.4 82 Secondary+ 96.4 56.3 5.6 2.4 36.7 436 Father’s education None (*) (*) (*) (*) (*) 0 Primary 96.2 65.3 5.3 2.5 0.0 46 Secondary+ 95.7 84.8 5.7 3.7 0.0 283 Father not in the household 95.7 na 5.5 na 100.0 192 Wealth index quintiles Poorest 93.7 58.1 5.5 2.2 34.4 138 Second 91.4 54.7 5.5 2.3 38.5 98 Middle 98.9 46.0 5.7 2.0 46.3 125 Fourth 95.4 62.6 5.6 2.6 39.0 88 Richest 100.0 66.3 5.8 3.1 19.7 74 Ethnicity of household head African 96.4 47.2 5.6 1.9 45.5 206 Indian 96.7 74.0 5.7 3.4 22.7 171 Mixed 93.3 48.1 5.4 1.8 41.3 141 Other/Not stated (*) (*) (*) (*) (*) 4 1 MICS indicator 6.2 - Support for learning 2 MICS Indicator 6.3 - Father’s support for learning na: not applicable a The background characteristic “Mother’s education” refers to the education level of the respondent to the Questionnaire for Children Under Five, and covers both mothers and primary caretakers, who are interviewed when the mother is not listed in the same household. Note: 1 case of missing ‘Mother’s education’ and 2 cases of missing ‘Father’s education” are not shown 97 Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey 2011: Key Findings & Tables Table CD.3: Learning materials Percentage of children under age 5 by numbers of children’s books present in the household, and by playthings that child plays with, Trinidad and Tobago, 2011 Percentage of children living in households that have for the child: Percentage of children who play with: Number of children under age 5 3 or more children’s books1 10 or more children’s books Homemade toys Toys from a shop/ manufactured toys Household objects/ objects found outside Two or more types of playthings2 Total 76.2 52.7 43.2 93.0 72.2 76.3 1,199 Sex Male 74.3 51.6 44.5 92.9 71.5 75.6 585 Female 78.0 53.9 42.1 93.0 72.9 77.0 614 Region North West 74.4 46.3 46.3 93.8 75.7 81.4 293 East 78.1 45.7 59.3 94.4 75.4 81.1 110 North Central 77.7 58.2 37.7 92.7 68.2 71.9 424 South West 74.3 52.6 45.1 92.5 75.1 78.4 321 Tobago 81.7 60.0 26.0 91.0 59.9 61.3 51 Area Urban 72.8 50.9 44.3 92.0 71.9 76.9 700 Rural 81.0 55.3 41.8 94.3 72.6 75.6 499 Age 0-23 months 52.9 28.7 32.7 82.9 53.0 58.9 418 24-59 months 88.7 65.6 48.9 98.4 82.5 85.7 781 Mother’s education None (*) (*) (*) (*) (*) (*) 4 Primary 75.3 41.1 45.9 93.9 74.2 76.8 161 Secondary+ 76.4 54.8 42.6 92.8 71.8 76.2 1,033 Wealth index quintiles Poorest 63.4 35.2 42.9 89.2 72.1 75.3 320 Second 77.4 46.8 44.0 94.0 72.5 76.6 241 Middle 79.0 57.8 45.1 94.8 71.7 76.8 275 Fourth 78.0 58.7 39.9 92.2 69.0 72.8 207 Richest 93.3 81.1 43.8 97.0 77.2 81.8 156 Ethnicity of household head African 71.4 45.0 38.8 91.7 70.5 74.6 476 Indian 79.4 55.3 45.1 94.1 72.8 76.5 418 Mixed 78.9 61.7 47.7 93.2 74.1 78.9 295 Other/Not stated (*) (*) (*) (*) (*) (*) 10 1 MICS indicator 6.5 - Availability of children’s books 2 MICS indicator 6.6 - Availability of playthings (*) Figures that are based on fewer than 25 unweighted cases Note: 1 case of missing ‘Mother’s education’ not shown 98 TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO: MONITORING THE SITUATION OF CHILDREN & WOMEN Table CD.4: Inadequate care Percentage of children under age 5 left alone or left in the care of another child younger than 10 years for more than one hour at least once during the past week, Trinidad and Tobago, 2011 Percentage of children under age 5: Left alone in the past week Left in the care of another child younger than 10 years of age in the past week Left with inadequate care in the past week1 Number of children under age 5 Total 1.3 0.8 1.5 1,199 Sex Male 1.2 1.5 1.7 585 Female 1.4 0.2 1.4 614 Region North West 1.2 1.6 1.6 293 East 2.5 0.4 2.9 110 North Central 1.0 0.3 1.0 424 South West 1.5 1.1 1.8 321 Tobago 0.8 0.0 0.8 51 Area Urban 0.9 1.1 1.1 700 Rural 1.9 0.5 2.2 499 Age 0-23 months 0.3 0.3 0.6 418 24-59 months 1.9 1.1 2.0 781 Mother’s education None (*) (*) (*) 4 Primary 1.0 0.7 1.0 161 Secondary+ 1.4 0.9 1.6 1,033 Wealth index quintiles Poorest 3.1 1.3 3.1 320 Second 0.0 0.0 0.0 241 Middle 1.7 1.5 2.3 275 Fourth 0.2 0.4 0.7 207 Richest 0.7 0.7 0.7 156 Ethnicity of household head African 1.2 1.2 1.7 476 Indian 1.0 0.5 1.1 418 Mixed 2.0 0.8 2.0 295 Other/Not stated (*) (*) (*) 10 1 MICS indicator 6.7 - Inadequate care (*) Figures that are based on fewer than 25 unweighted cases Note: 1 case of missing ‘Mother’s education’ not shown 99 Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey 2011: Key Findings & Tables Table CD.5: Early child development index Percentage of children age 36-59 months who are developmentally on track in literacy-numeracy, physical, social-emotional, and learning domains, and the early child development index score, Trinidad and Tobago, 2011 Percentage of children age 36-59 months who are developmentally on track for indicated domains Early child development index score1 Number of children age 36-59 months Literacy- numeracy Physical Social- Emotional Learning Total 78.9 98.4 78.2 97.0 91.3 523 Sex Male 76.4 99.1 77.0 95.7 89.1 253 Female 81.1 97.8 79.2 98.2 93.3 270 Region North West 74.2 96.9 74.2 98.1 92.1 118 East 76.4 100.0 86.4 99.0 94.1 48 North Central 81.6 99.3 76.0 94.7 89.1 190 South West 79.2 97.7 80.2 98.1 91.6 142 Tobago 82.6 100.0 85.9 98.3 96.8 25 Area Urban 77.1 97.7 75.1 96.8 89.9 296 Rural 81.1 99.4 82.1 97.2 93.1 227 Age 36-47 months 70.7 98.7 72.6 96.2 87.0 286 48-59 months 88.6 98.1 84.9 97.9 96.4 238 Attendance to early childhood education Attending 84.4 99.4 79.4 98.2 94.1 442 Not attending 48.5 93.3 71.4 90.0 75.7 81 Mother’s education None (*) (*) (*) (*) (*) 4 Primary 81.2 100.0 71.5 96.7 89.2 82 Secondary+ 78.6 98.1 79.7 97.0 91.7 436 Wealth index quintiles Poorest 69.8 94.9 78.3 97.0 90.0 138 Second 77.3 100.0 78.2 95.9 87.1 98 Middle 82.8 99.0 72.0 97.2 93.0 125 Fourth 80.9 100.0 86.9 96.7 94.4 88 Richest 88.6 100.0 77.7 98.2 92.7 74 Ethnicity of household head African 76.7 97.9 75.6 96.1 90.6 206 Indian 81.6 99.2 82.8 96.8 91.7 171 Mixed 79.0 98.3 75.6 98.3 91.4 141 Other/Not stated (*) (*) (*) (*) (*) 4 1 MICS indicator 6.8 - Early child development index (*) Figures that are based on fewer than 25 unweighted cases Note: 1 case of missing ‘Mother’s education’ not shown 100 TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO: MONITORING THE SITUATION OF CHILDREN & WOMEN Literacy and Education Table ED.1: Literacy (young women) Percentage of women age 15-24 years who are literate, Trinidad and Tobago, 2011 Percentage literate1 Percentage not known Number of women age 15-24 years Total 99.0 0.0 1,183 Region North West 99.1 0.0 285 East 96.1 0.0 108 North Central 99.4 0.0 410 South West 99.2 0.0 348 Tobago 100.0 0.0 32 Area Urban 99.6 0.0 669 Rural 98.2 0.0 515 Education None (*) (*) 2 Primary (55.2) (0.0) 24 Secondary+ 100.0 0.0 1,157 Age 15-19 98.8 0.0 550 20-24 99.1 0.0 633 Wealth index quintile Poorest 95.9 0.0 235 Second 99.2 0.0 248 Middle 99.8 0.0 230 Fourth 100.0 0.0 242 Richest 100.0 0.0 229 Ethnicity of household head African 99.0 0.0 446 Indian 99.1 0.0 456 Mixed 98.7 0.0 266 Other/Not stated (*) (*) 15 1 MICS indicator 7.1; MDG indicator 2.3 - Literacy rate among young women ( ) Figures that are based on 25-49 unweighted cases (*) Figures that are based on fewer than 25 unweighted cases 101 Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey 2011: Key Findings & Tables Table ED.2: School readiness Percentage of children attending first grade of primary school who attended pre-school the previous year, Trinidad and Tobago, 2011 Percentage of children attending first grade who attended preschool in previous year1 Number of children attending first grade of primary school Total 84.8 295 Sex Male 82.7 160 Female 87.3 136 Region North West 86.3 71 East 73.2 28 North Central 87.6 104 South West 82.0 77 Tobago (94.1) 15 Area Urban 83.1 161 Rural 86.8 135 Mother’s education None (*) 0 Primary 75.4 62 Secondary+ 87.3 233 Wealth index quintile Poorest 82.7 78 Second 85.1 65 Middle 87.9 72 Fourth (88.4) 40 Richest (79.3) 40 Ethnicity of household head African 90.5 116 Indian 89.8 102 Mixed 71.2 71 Other/Not stated (*) 6 1 MICS indicator 7.2 - School readiness ( ) Figures that are based on 25-49 unweighted cases (*) Figures that are based on fewer than 25 unweighted cases 102 TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO: MONITORING THE SITUATION OF CHILDREN & WOMEN Table ED.3: Primary school entry Percentage of children of primary school entry age entering grade 1 (net intake rate), Trinidad and Tobago, 2011 Percentage of children of primary school entry age entering grade 11 Number of children of primary school entry age Total 84.5 265 Sex Male 81.7 142 Female 87.8 123 Region North West 86.3 57 East (79.6) 20 North Central 82.6 113 South West 88.7 57 Tobago (83.1) 17 Area Urban 83.1 146 Rural 86.3 119 Mother’s education Primary 86.6 57 Secondary+ 83.9 207 Wealth index quintile Poorest 78.9 64 Second 90.2 52 Middle 92.5 51 Fourth (77.0) 54 Richest (86.2) 43 Ethnicity of household head African 83.5 107 Indian 90.2 81 Mixed 80.0 77 1 MICS indicator 7.3 - Net intake rate in primary education ( ) Figures that are based on 25-49 unweighted cases Note: 1 case of missing ‘Mother’s education’ not shown 103 Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey 2011: Key Findings & Tables Table ED.4: Primary school attendance Percentage of children of primary school age attending primary or secondary school (Net attendance ratio), Trinidad and Tobago, 2011 Male Female Total Net attendance ratio (adjusted) Number of children Net attendance ratio (adjusted) Number of children Net attendance ratio (adjusted)1 Number of children Total 98.5 643 99.0 601 98.7 1,244 Area Urban 98.2 342 98.7 328 98.4 670 Rural 98.8 302 99.2 273 99.0 575 Age at beginning of school year 7 98.7 142 99.6 123 99.1 265 8 99.6 114 97.7 133 98.6 247 9 97.3 120 100.0 106 98.6 226 10 99.0 126 97.8 129 98.4 255 11 97.8 142 100.0 109 98.8 251 Mother’s education None (*) 4 (*) 4 (*) 8 Primary 97.6 152 98.6 143 98.1 295 Secondary+ 98.9 486 99.0 453 99.0 939 Missing/DK (*) 1 (*) 1 (*) 2 Wealth index quintile Poorest 97.3 132 98.3 143 97.8 276 Second 100.0 126 98.9 136 99.4 262 Middle 97.1 136 99.3 111 98.1 247 Fourth 98.9 127 100.0 111 99.4 238 Richest 99.3 122 98.5 101 98.9 223 Ethnicity of household head African 98.7 237 98.4 220 98.5 457 Indian 98.0 243 100.0 209 98.9 452 Mixed 98.9 158 98.2 154 98.6 312 Other/Not stated (*) 5 (*) 18 (*) 24 1 MICS indicator 7.4; MDG indicator 2.1 - Primary school net attendance ratio (adjusted) (*) Figures that are based on fewer than 25 unweighted cases 104 TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO: MONITORING THE SITUATION OF CHILDREN & WOMEN Table ED.5: Secondary school attendance Percentage of children of secondary school age attending secondary school or higher (adjusted net attendance ratio), and percentage of children attending primary school, Trinidad and Tobago, 2011 Male Female Total Net attendance ratio (adjusted) Percentage of children attending primary school Number of children Net attendance ratio (adjusted) Percentage of children attending primary school Number of children Net attendance ratio (adjusted)1 Percentage of children attending primary school Number of children Total 87.1 9.0 663 88.0 7.6 587 87.5 8.3 1,250 Area Urban 88.1 7.8 370 89.3 6.1 339 88.7 7.0 709 Rural 85.9 10.5 292 86.1 9.7 248 86.0 10.1 540 Age at beginning of school year 12 61.5 35.5 132 66.1 31.4 113 63.6 33.6 245 13 89.4 8.1 119 93.8 5.4 122 91.6 6.8 241 14 97.3 2.1 143 93.0 1.7 113 95.4 1.9 256 15 93.8 0.0 123 94.6 0.4 119 94.2 0.2 241 16 93.1 0.0 145 91.3 0.0 121 92.3 0.0 266 Mother’s education None (*) (*) 4 (*) (*) 4 (*) (*) 8 Primary 80.6 10.3 185 81.7 13.7 158 81.1 11.9 342 Secondary+ 89.9 8.5 474 90.7 5.4 424 90.3 7.1 898 Cannot be determineda - - 0 (*) (*) 2 (*) (*) 2 Wealth index quintile Poorest 76.1 16.0 147 74.0 16.0 124 75.1 16.0 271 Second 90.0 6.9 130 88.4 8.4 120 89.2 7.6 249 Middle 87.1 8.8 139 93.2 5.5 103 89.7 7.4 242 Fourth 89.1 8.6 131 89.4 5.2 134 89.3 6.9 264 Richest 95.9 3.2 116 96.8 1.7 106 96.3 2.5 223 Ethnicity of household head African 85.9 11.0 233 85.1 9.7 221 85.5 10.3 454 Indian 88.7 5.9 264 90.2 4.4 204 89.4 5.3 467 Mixed 86.6 11.3 152 89.8 8.7 151 88.2 10.1 303 Other/Not stated (*) (*) 14 (*) (*) 11 (*) (*) 25 1 MICS indicator 7.5 - Secondary school net attendance ratio (adjusted) a Children age 15 or higher at the time of the interview whose mothers were not living in the household (*) Figures that are based on fewer than 25 unweighted cases “-“ denotes zero unweighted cases 105 Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey 2011: Key Findings & Tables Table ED.6: Children reaching last Standard of primary school Percentage of children entering Standard 1 of primary school who eventually reach Standard 5 of primary school (Survival rate to last Standard of primary school), Trinidad and Tobago, 2011 Percent attending Standard 1 last year who are in Standard 2 this year Percent attending Standard 2 last year who are attending Standard 3 this year Percent attending Standard 3 last year who are attending Standard 4 this year Percent attending Standard 4 last year who are attending Standard 5 this year Percent who reach Standard 5 of those who enter Standard 11 Total 99.6 100.0 99.5 100.0 99.2 Sex Male 99.3 100.0 99.1 100.0 98.3 Female 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 Area Urban 99.3 100.0 99.1 100.0 98.4 Rural 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 Mother’s education None 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 Primary 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 Secondary+ 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 Missing/DK 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 Wealth index quintile Poorest 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 Second 100.0 100.0 97.6 100.0 97.6 Middle 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 Fourth 98.5 100.0 100.0 100.0 98.5 Richest 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 Ethnicity of household head African 99.0 100.0 98.7 100.0 97.8 Indian 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 Mixed 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 Other/Not stated 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1 MICS indicator 7.6; MDG indicator 2.2 - Children reaching last grade of primary 106 TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO: MONITORING THE SITUATION OF CHILDREN & WOMEN Table ED.7: Primary school completion and transition to secondary school Primary school completion rates and transition rate to secondary school, Trinidad and Tobago, 2011 Primary school completion rate1A Number of children of primary school completion age Transition rate to secondary school2 Number of children who were in standard 5 the previous year Total 105.8 251 87.7 205 Sex Male 102.0 142 87.3 109 Female 110.9 109 88.2 96 Area Urban 92.2 143 84.4 114 Rural 123.8 109 91.9 92 Mother’s education None (*) 4 - 0 Primary 118.3 63 86.7 65 Secondary+ 102.0 184 88.9 140 Wealth index quintile Poorest 118.4 52 (91.7) 40 Second 104.6 56 (87.0) 42 Middle (108.7) 53 (86.9) 49 Fourth (106.6) 44 (84.3) 34 Richest (89.2) 46 (88.4) 41 Ethnicity of household head African 90.2 97 78.0 66 Indian 111.6 95 92.4 74 Mixed 121.5 53 91.6 60 Other/Not stated (*) 6 (*) 5 1 MICS indicator 7.7 - Primary completion rate 2 MICS indicator 7.8 - Transition rate to secondary school AThe value of the indicator is greater than 100 percent due to some of the children entering the last grade of primary school for the first time, being younger or older than the primary school graduation age. (*) Figures that are based on fewer than 25 unweighted cases “-“ denotes zero unweighted cases 107 Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey 2011: Key Findings & Tables Table ED.8: Education gender parity Ratio of adjusted net attendance ratios of girls to boys, in primary and secondary school, Trinidad and Tobago, 2011 Primary school Secondary school Primary school adjusted net attendance ratio (NAR), girls Primary school adjusted net attendance ratio (NAR), boys Gender parity index (GPI) for primary school adjusted NAR1 Secondary school adjusted net attendance ratio (NAR), girls Secondary school adjusted net attendance ratio (NAR), boys Gender parity index (GPI) for secondary school adjusted NAR2 Total 99.0 98.5 1.00 88.0 86.8 1.01 Area Urban 98.7 98.2 1.01 89.3 87.6 1.02 Rural 99.2 98.8 1.00 86.1 85.9 1.00 Mother’s education None 100.0 73.8 1.35 77.1 64.8 1.19 Primary 98.6 97.6 1.01 81.7 80.6 1.01 Secondary+ 99.0 98.9 1.00 90.7 89.4 1.01 Cannot be determineda na na na - - - Wealth index quintile Poorest 98.3 97.3 1.01 74.0 76.1 0.97 Second 98.9 100.0 0.99 88.4 90.0 0.98 Middle 99.3 97.1 1.02 93.2 87.1 1.07 Fourth 100.0 98.9 1.01 89.4 89.1 1.00 Richest 98.5 99.3 0.99 96.8 94.1 1.03 Ethnicity of household head African 98.4 98.7 1.00 85.1 85.9 0.99 Indian 100.0 98.0 1.02 90.2 87.9 1.03 Mixed 98.2 98.9 0.99 89.8 86.6 1.04 Other/Not stated 100.0 100.0 1.00 79.0 85.1 0.93 1 MICS indicator 7.9; MDG indicator 3.1 - Gender parity index (primary school) 2 MICS indicator 7.10; MDG indicator 3.1 - Gender par

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