Suriname - Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey - 2010

Publication date: 2010

Suriname Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey 2010 Surinam e 2010 M ultiple Indicator C luster Survey Monitoring the situation of children and women Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey 2010 United Nations Children’s Fund Government of Suriname Suriname   Su Mu 201   Fin Janu   rina ultiple 10  nal R uary, 2 ame  e Ind Repo 2013    icato ort   or Cluuster Surveey                                    The Suriname Multiple  Indicator Cluster Survey  (MICS) was carried out  in 2010 by  the Ministry of  Social Affairs  and Housing  in  collaboration with General Bureau of  Statistics  and  the  Institute  for  Social Research (IMWO) of the University of Suriname. Financial and technical support was provided  by the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF).  MICS  is an  international household  survey programme developed by UNICEF. The Suriname MICS  was conducted as part of the fourth global round of MICS surveys (MICS4). MICS provides up‐to‐date  information  on  the  situation  of  children  and  women  and  measures  key  indicators  that  allow  countries  to  monitor  progress  towards  the  Millennium  Development  Goals  (MDGs)  and  other  internationally agreed upon commitments. Additional  information on  the global MICS project may  be obtained from www.childinfo.org.   Cover photo: UN Suriname/2011/Pelu Vidal  Other photos: UN Suriname/2011/Pelu Vidal  Suggested  citation: Ministry of  Social Affairs  and Housing  and General Bureau of  Statistics, 2012.   Suriname Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey 2010, Final Report: Paramaribo, Suriname.  Printed by Suriprint n.v.         Suriname Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey 2010       Ministry of Social Affairs and Housing    United Nations Children’s Fund    General Bureau of Statistics    Institute for Social Research of the   Anton de Kom University of Suriname  January, 2013 Summary Table of Findings  iv   Suriname MICS4  Summary Table of Findings Multiple  Indicator Cluster Surveys  (MICS) and Millennium Development Goals  (MDG)  Indicators,  Suriname, 2010    Topic MICS4 Indicator Number MDG Indicator Number Indicator Value NUTRITION Nutritional  status    2.1a  2.1b  1.8  Underweight prevalence    Moderate and Severe (‐ 2 SD)    Severe (‐ 3 SD)    5.8  1.3    Percent  Percent    2.2a  2.2b    Stunting prevalence    Moderate and Severe (‐ 2 SD)    Severe (‐ 3 SD)    8.8  2.2    Percent  Percent     2.3a  2.3b    Wasting prevalence    Moderate and Severe (‐ 2 SD)    Severe (‐ 3 SD)    5.0   0.8    Percent  Percent  Breastfeeding  and infant  feeding  2.4    Children ever breastfed  90.4   Percent  2.5    Early initiation of breastfeeding  44.7  Percent  2.6    Exclusive breastfeeding under 6 months  2.8  Percent  2.7    Continued breastfeeding at 1 year  22.7  Percent  2.8    Continued breastfeeding at 2 years  14.9  Percent  2.9    Predominant breastfeeding under 6 months  18.4  Percent  2.10    Duration of breastfeeding  8.0  Months  2.11    Bottle feeding  71.9  Percent  2.12    Introduction of solid, semi‐solid or soft foods  47.0  Percent  2.13    Minimum meal frequency  64.3  Percent  2.14    Age‐appropriate breastfeeding  14.7  Percent  2.15    Milk feeding frequency for non‐breastfed children  80.6  Percent  Low birth  weight  2.18    Low‐birth weight infants  13.9  Percent  2.19    Infants weighed at birth  80.5  Percent  CHILD HEALTH Vaccinations  3.2    Polio  immunization  coverage  (18‐29  months  old  children, before age 12 months)  79.0  Percent  3.4  4.3  Measles  (MMR)  immunization  coverage  (18‐29 months  old children, before age 18 months)  73.9  Percent  3.6    Yellow  fever  immunization  coverage  (18‐29  months  old children, at any time before the survey) 1  64.0  Percent  Tetanus toxoid  3.7    Neonatal tetanus protection  36.4  Percent  Care of illness  3.8    Oral rehydration therapy with continued feeding  60.8  Percent  3.9    Care seeking for suspected pneumonia  75.8  Percent  3.10    Antibiotic treatment of suspected pneumonia  71.2  Percent  Solid fuel use  3.11    Solid fuels  11.4  Percent  Malaria1  3.12    Household availability of insecticide‐treated nets (ITNs)  60.5  Percent  3.13    Households protected by a vector control method  60.9  Percent  3.14    Children under age 5 sleeping under any mosquito net  53.6  Percent  3.15  6.7  Children under age 5 sleeping under insecticide‐treated nets (ITNs)  43.4  Percent  3.16    Malaria diagnostics usage  14.9  Percent  3.17    Antimalarial treatment of children under 5 the same or next day   0.0  Percent  3.18  6.8  Antimalarial treatment of children under age 5   0.0  Percent  3.19    Pregnant  women  sleeping  under  insecticide‐treated  nets (ITNs)  50.5  Percent                                                                   1 Brokopondo and Sipaliwini only  Summary Table of Findings      Suriname MICS4  v WATER AND SANITATION Water and  sanitation  4.1  7.8  Use of improved drinking water sources  95.0  Percent  4.2    Water treatment  10.1  Percent  4.3  7.9  Use of improved sanitation facilities  80.2  Percent  4.4    Safe disposal of child's faeces  22.0  Percent  4.5    Place for handwashing  86.3  Percent  4.6    Availability of soap  96.2  Percent                          REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH   5.3  5.3  Contraceptive prevalence rate  47.6  Percent 5.4  5.6  Unmet need  16.9  Percent  Maternal and  newborn  health    5.5a  5.5b  5.5  Antenatal care coverage    At least once by skilled personnel    At least four times by any provider    94.9  66.8    Percent  Percent  5.6    Content of antenatal care  92.3  Percent      5.7  5.2  Skilled attendant at delivery  92.7  Percent  5.8    Institutional deliveries  92.3  Percent  5.9    Caesarean section  19.0  Percent  CHILD DEVELOPMENT Child  development  6.1    Support for learning  72.9  Percent  6.2    Father's support for learning  25.9  Percent  6.3    Learning materials: children’s books  25.0  Percent  6.4    Learning materials: playthings  58.8  Percent  6.5    Inadequate care  7.1   Percent  6.6    Early child development index  70.9  Percent  6.7    Attendance to early childhood education  34.3  Percent  EDUCATION Literacy and  education  7.1  2.3  Literacy rate among young women  92.1  Percent  7.2    School readiness  75.8  Percent  7.3    Net intake rate in primary education  87.2  Percent  7.4  2.1  Primary school net attendance ratio (adjusted)  95.4  Percent  7.5    Secondary school net attendance ratio (adjusted)  59.4  Percent  7.6  2.2  Children reaching last grade of primary  95.8  Percent  7.7    Primary completion rate  88.2  Percent  7.8    Transition rate to secondary school  79.2  Percent  7.9    Gender parity index (primary school)  1.02   Percent  7.10    Gender parity index (secondary school)  1.24  Percent  CHILD PROTECTION Birth registration  8.1    Birth registration  98.9  Percent  Child labour  8.2    Child labor  9.6  Percent  8.3    School attendance among child laborers  94.2  Percent  8.4    Child labour among students  9.4  Percent  Child discipline  8.5    Violent discipline  86.1  Percent  Early marriage  and Polygyny  8.6    Marriage before age 15  5.4  Percent  8.7    Marriage before age 18  23.0  Percent  8.8    Young women age 15‐19 currently married or in union  11.8  Percent  8.9    Polygyny  3.9  Percent    8.10a  8.10b    Spousal age difference     Women age 15‐19    Women age 20‐24    14.7  17.1    Percent   Percent  Domestic violence  8.14    Attitudes towards domestic violence  12.5  Percent  HIV/AIDS, SEXUAL BEHAVIOUR, AND ORPHANED AND VULNERABLE CHILDREN HIV/AIDS  knowledge and  attitudes  9.1    Comprehensive knowledge about HIV prevention  42.5  Percent  9.2  6.3  Comprehensive  knowledge  about  HIV  prevention  among young people  41.9  Percent  9.3    Knowledge of mother‐to‐child transmission of HIV  51.8  Percent  9.4    Accepting attitude towards people living with HIV  21.1  Percent  9.5    Women who know where to be tested for HIV  85.0  Percent  9.6    Women who have been tested for HIV and know the results  20.3  Percent  9.7    Sexually active young women who have been tested for HIV and know the results  33.4  Percent  9.8    HIV counseling during antenatal care  49.3  Percent  9.9    HIV testing during antenatal care  79.5  Percent  Sexual  behaviour  9.10    Young women who have never had sex  54.7  Percent  9.11    Sex before age 15 among young women  9.6   Percent  Summary Table of Findings  vi   Suriname MICS4  9.12    Age‐mixing among sexual partners  15.0  Percent  9.13    Sex with multiple partners  2.5  Percent  9.14    Condom use during sex with multiple partners  37.2  Percent  9.15    Sex with non‐regular partners  58.8  Percent  9.16  6.2  Condom use with non‐regular partners  55.5  Percent              Orphaned  children  9.17    Children’s living arrangements  7.9  Percent  9.18    Prevalence of children with at least one parent dead  4.6  Percent  9.20  6.4  School attendance of non‐orphans  96.9  Percent  ACCESS TO MASS MEDIA AND USE OF INFORMATION/COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY Access to Mass  Media  MT.1    Exposure to mass media  66.4  Percent  Use of  Information  and  Communication  Technology  MT.2    Use  of  computer  in  the  past  12  months  –  persons  15‐24 years  59.8  Percent  MT.3    Use of  the  internet  in  the past 12 months – persons 15‐24 years  48.5  Percent  Table of Contents      Suriname MICS4  vii Table of Contents Summary Table of Findings . iv Table of Contents . vii List of Tables . x List of Figures . xiii List of Abbreviations . xiv Foreword .xv Executive Summary . xvi   1.Introduction . 1 Background . 1 Survey Objectives . 3 2.Sample and Survey Methodology . 4 Sample Design . 4 Questionnaires . 5 Training and Fieldwork . 7 Data Processing . 7 3.Sample Coverage and the Characteristics of Households and Respondents . 8 Sample Coverage . 8 Characteristics of Households . 8 Characteristics of Female Respondents 15‐49 Years of Age and Children Under‐5 . 13 Children’s Living Arrangements and Orphans . 17 4.Nutrition . 20 Nutritional Status . 21 Breastfeeding and Infant and Young Child Feeding . 23 Low Birth Weight . 36 5.Child Health . 38 Immunization . 39 Neonatal Tetanus Protection . 42 Oral Rehydration Treatment . 44 Care Seeking and Antibiotic Treatment of Pneumonia . 52 Solid Fuel Use . 57 Malaria . 60 6.Water and Sanitation . 70 Table of Contents  viii   Suriname MICS4  Use of Improved Water Sources . 71 Use of Improved Sanitation Facilities . 80 Handwashing . 87 7.Reproductive Health . 94 Contraception . 95 Unmet Need . 99 Antenatal Care . 102 Assistance at Delivery . 106 Place of Delivery . 109 8.Child Development . 111 Early Childhood Education and Learning . 112 Early Childhood Development . 119 9.Literacy and Education . 121 Literacy among Young Women . 122 School Readiness . 122 Primary and Secondary School Participation . 125 10.Child Protection . 135 Birth Registration . 136 Child Labour . 136 Child Discipline . 137 Early Marriage and Polygyny . 143 Attitudes toward Domestic Violence . 150 11.HIV/AIDS and Sexual Behaviour . 152 Knowledge about HIV Transmission and Misconceptions about HIV/AIDS . 153 Accepting Attitudes toward People Living with HIV/AIDS . 160 Knowledge of a Place for HIV Testing, Counselling and Testing during Antenatal Care . 160 Sexual Behaviour Related to HIV Transmission . 165 12.Access to Mass Media and Use of Information/Communication Technology . 171 Access to Mass Media . 172 Use of Information/Communication Technology . 174 Appendix A. Sample Design . 178 Sample Size and Sample Allocation . 178 Sampling Frame and Sample Design . 179 Selection of Clusters . 179 Listing Activities . 180 Selection of Households . 181 Calculation of Sample Weights . 182 Appendix B. List of Personnel Involved in the Survey . 184 Table of Contents      Suriname MICS4  ix MICS Technical Committee . 184 MICS Fieldwork Coordination: General Bureau of Statistics . 184 MICS Fieldworkers . 185 MICS Data Processing Coordination: Institute for Social Science Research . 186 Appendix C. Estimates of Sampling Errors . 187 Appendix D. Data Quality Tables . 205 Appendix E. Suriname MICS4 Indicators: Numerators and Denominators . 218 Appendix F. Questionnaires . 226 List of Tables  x   Suriname MICS4  List of Tables Table HH.1: Results of household, women's, and under‐5 interviews . 9  Table HH.2: Household age distribution by sex . 10  Table HH.3: Household composition . 12  Table HH.4: Women's background characteristics . 14  Table HH.5: Under‐5's background characteristics . 16  Table HH.6: Children's living arrangements and orphanhood . 18    Table NU.1: Nutritional status of children . 24  Table NU.2: Initial breastfeeding . 26  Table NU.3: Breastfeeding . 28  Table NU.4: Duration of breastfeeding . 31  Table NU.5: Age‐appropriate breastfeeding . 32  Table NU.6: Introduction of solid, semi‐solid or soft foods . 33  Table NU.7: Minimum meal frequency . 34  Table NU.8: Bottle feeding . 35  Table NU.9: Low birth weight infants. 37    Table CH.1: Vaccinations in first year of life . 40  Table CH.2: Vaccinations by background characteristics . 41  Table CH.3: Neonatal tetanus protection . 43  Table CH.4: Oral rehydration solutions and recommended homemade fluids . 47  Table CH.5: Feeding practices during diarrhoea . 49  Table CH.6: Oral rehydration therapy with continued feeding and other treatments . 51  Table CH.7: Care seeking for suspected pneumonia and antibiotic use during suspected pneumonia . 53  Table CH.8: Knowledge of the two danger signs of pneumonia . 55  Table CH.9: Solid fuel use . 58  Table CH.10: Solid fuel use by place of cooking . 60  Table CH.11: Household availability of  insecticide treated nets and protection by a vector control method  . 62  Table CH.12: Children sleeping under mosquito nets . 63  Table CH.13: Pregnant women sleeping under mosquito nets . 65  Table CH.14: Anti‐malarial treatment of children with anti‐malarial drugs . 67  Table CH.15: Malaria diagnostics usage . 69    Table WS.1: Use of improved water sources . 74  Table WS.2: Household water treatment . 76  Table WS.3: Time to source of drinking water . 79  Table WS.4: Person collecting water . 80  Table WS.5: Types of sanitation facilities . 82  Table WS.6: Use and sharing of sanitation facilities . 84  Table WS.7: Disposal of child's feces. 86  Table WS.8: Drinking water and sanitation ladders . 88  Table WS.9: Water and soap at place for handwashing . 90  Table WS.10: Availability of soap . 92    Table RH.1: Use of contraception . 97  Table RH.2: Unmet need for contraception . 101  Table RH.3: Antenatal care coverage . 103  Table RH.4: Number of antenatal care visits . 104  Table RH.5: Content of antenatal care . 105  Table RH.6: Assistance during delivery . 107  List of Tables      Suriname MICS4  xi Table RH.7: Place of delivery . 110    Table CD.1: Early childhood education . 113  Table CD.2: Support for learning . 114  Table CD.3: Learning materials . 117  Table CD.4: Inadequate care . 118  Table CD.5: Early child development index . 120    Table ED.1: Literacy among young women . 123  Table ED.2: School readiness . 124  Table ED.3: Primary school entry . 126  Table ED.4: Primary school attendance . 127  Table ED.5: Secondary school attendance . 129  Table ED.6: Children reaching last grade of primary school . 132  Table ED.7: Primary school completion and transition to secondary school . 133  Table ED.8: Education gender parity . 134    Table CP.1: Birth registration . 138  Table CP.2: Child labour . 139  Table CP.3: Child labour and school attendance . 141  Table CP.4: Child discipline . 142  Table CP.5: Early marriage and Polygyny . 145  Table CP.6: Trends in early marriage . 147  Table CP.7: Spousal age difference . 148  Table CP.8: Attitudes toward domestic violence . 151    Table  HA.1:  Knowledge  about  HIV  transmission,  misconceptions  about  HIV/AIDS,  and  comprehensive  knowledge about HIV transmission . 155  Table  HA.2:  Knowledge  about  HIV  transmission,  misconceptions  about  HIV/AIDS,  and  comprehensive  knowledge about HIV transmission among young women . 157  Table HA.3: Knowledge of mother‐to‐child HIV transmission . 159  Table HA.4: Accepting attitudes toward people living with HIV/AIDS . 161  Table HA.5: Knowledge of a place for HIV testing . 162  Table HA.6: Knowledge of a place for HIV testing among sexually active young women . 163  Table HA.7: HIV counselling and testing during antenatal care . 164  Table HA.8: Sexual behaviour that increases the risk of HIV infection . 166  Table HA.9: Sex with multiple partners . 167  Table HA.10: Sex with multiple partners among young women . 168  Table HA.11: Sex with non‐regular partners . 170    Table MT.1: Exposure to mass media . 173  Table MT.2: Use of computers and internet . 175    176  Table MT.3: Cell phone ownership and use . 177    Table A1.1: Distribution of population and households by stratum and district, and MICS4 sample design  and outcome . 179  Table A1.2: Stratification of the population in Suriname in 2004 by strata . 180  Table A1.3: Projections of the population by district . 181  Table A1.4: Weights to be applied to the household, women, and child data . 183    Table SE.1: Indicators selected for sampling error calculations . 188  Table SE.2: Sampling errors: Total sample . 190  Table SE.3: Sampling errors: Urban . 191  Table SE.4: Sampling errors: Rural coastal . 192  List of Tables  xii   Suriname MICS4  Table SE.5: Sampling errors: Rural interior . 193  Table SE.6: Sampling errors: Total rural . 194  Table SE.7: Sampling errors: Paramaribo . 195  Table SE.8: Sampling errors: Wanica . 196  Table SE.9: Sampling errors: Nickerie . 197  Table SE.10: Sampling errors: Coronie . 198  Table SE.11: Sampling errors: Saramacca . 199  Table SE.12: Sampling errors: Commewijne . 200  Table SE.13: Sampling errors: Marowijne . 201  Table SE.14: Sampling errors: Para . 202  Table SE.15: Sampling errors: Brokopondo . 203  Table SE.16: Sampling errors: Sipaliwini . 204    Table DQ.1: Age distribution of household population . 205  Table DQ.2: Age distribution of eligible and interviewed women . 206  Table DQ.3: Age distribution of under‐5s in household and under‐5 questionnaires . 207  Table DQ.4: Women's completion rates by socio‐economic characteristics of households . 208  Table DQ.5: Completion rates for under‐5 questionnaires by socio‐economic characteristics of households  . 209  Table DQ.6: Completeness of reporting . 210  Table DQ.7: Completeness of information for anthropometric indicators. 211  Table DQ.8: Heaping in anthropometric measurements . 212  Table DQ.10: Observation of women's health cards . 213  Table DQ.11: Observation of under‐5s birth certificates . 214  Table DQ.12: Observation of vaccination cards . 215  Table  DQ.13:  Presence  of  mother  in  the  household  and  the  person  interviewed  for  the  under‐5  questionnaire . 215  Table DQ.14: Selection of children age 2‐14 years for the child discipline module . 216  Table DQ.15: School attendance by single age . 217  List of Tables      Suriname MICS4  xiii List of Figures Figure HH.1: Age and sex distribution of household population, Suriname, 2010 . 11  Figure NU.1: Percentage of children under age 5 . 22  Figure NU.2: Percentage of mothers who  started breastfeeding within one hour  and within one day of  birth, Suriname, 2010 . 27  Figure NU.3: Infant feeding patterns by age, Suriname 2010 . 29  Figure CH.1: Percentage of children aged 18‐29 months who  received  the  recommended vaccinations at  any time before the survey, Suriname, 2010. 42  Figure CH.2: Percentage of women with a live birth in the last 2 years who are protected against neonatal  tetanus, Suriname, 2010 . 44  Figure CH.3: Percentage of children under age 5 with diarrhoea who received ORS or recommended home  fluids, Suriname, 2010 . 45  Figure CH.4: Treatment of diarrhoea, Suriname, 2010. 46  Figure WS.1: Percent distribution of household members by source of drinking water Suriname, 2010 . 72  Figure  HA.1:  Percentage  of  women  who  have  comprehensive  knowledge  of  HIV/AIDS  transmission,  Suriname, 2010 . 154  Figure HA.2: Sexual behaviour that increases risk of HIV infection, Suriname, 2010 . 165  Figure MT.1: Cell phone use by purpose, Suriname, 2010 . 176  Figure DQ.1: Number of household population by single ages, Suriname, 2010 . 206        List of Abbreviations  xiv   Suriname MICS4  List of Abbreviations AIDS  Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome  ANC  Antenatal Care  CEDAW  Convention on the Elimination of all Forms of Discrimination Against Women  CRC  Convention on the Rights of the Child  CSPro  Census and Survey Processing System  DPT  Diphtheria Pertussis Tetanus  ECDI  Early Childhood Development Index  EPI  Expanded Programme on Immunization  GBS  General Bureau of Statistics  GPI  Gender Parity Index  HIV  Human Immunodeficiency Virus  ITN  Insecticide Treated Net  IUD  Intrauterine Device  LAM  Lactational Amenorrhea Method  LPG  Liquified Petroleum Gas  MDG  Millennium Development Goals  MICS  Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey  MMR  Mumps, Measles and Rubella  MoH  Ministry of Health  NAR  Net Attendance Rate  ORS  Oral Rehydration Salts  ORT  Oral Rehydration Treatment  PLOS  Ministry of Planning and Development Co‐operation  RHF  Recommended Home Fluid  SOZAVO  Ministry of Social Affairs and Housing  SPSS  Statistical Package for Social Sciences  STIs  Sexually Transmitted Infections  UNAIDS  United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS  UNDAP  United Nations Development Plan  UNDP  United Nations Development Programme  UNFPA  United Nations Population Fund  UNGASS  United Nations General Assembly Special Session on HIV/AIDS  UNICEF  United Nations Children’s Fund  WFFC  World Fit for Children  WHO  World Health Organization  WSC  World Summit for Children Foreword      Suriname MICS4  xv Foreword With the support of United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF), the fourth round of the Multiple Indicators  Cluster Survey (MICS) commenced in 2010 in Suriname. This survey follows up on the MICS3 in Suriname,  conducted  in 2006 by the General Bureau of Statistics  in collaboration with the Ministry of Social Affairs  and Housing  (SOZAVO)  and  the Ministry  of  Planning  and Development  Cooperation  (PLOS).  The  survey  provides valuable information on the situation of children and women in Suriname, and is based to a great  extent on  the need  to monitor progress  towards goals and  targets emanating  from  recent  international  agreements: the Millennium Declaration, adopted by all 191 United Nations Member States in September  2000, and  the Plan of Action of A World Fit For Children, adopted by 189 Member States at  the United  Nations Special Session on Children  in May 2002. Both of these commitments build upon promises made  by  the  international  community  at  the  1990  World  Summit  for  Children.  The  MICS3  data  were  subsequently used for reporting on the progress towards Millennium Development Goals. In signing these  international  agreements,  governments  committed  themselves  to  improve  conditions  for  their  children  and to monitor progress towards that end. UNICEF was assigned a supporting role in this task.  The Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey (MICS) facilitates the collection, preparation and analysis of national  data that constitute an in‐depth and up‐to‐date set of statistics on the well‐being of children in Suriname.  The data can be used as an  input  for national planning and exercise  that permit efforts  to monitor and  evaluate the achievement of the Millennium Development Goals.  This report  is the third MICS report for Suriname based on the fourth round of MICS. The first Suriname  MICS report was based on data collected  in 2000 while the second was based on data collected  in 2006.  This third report of the MICS has been informed by the fourth round of MICS which was executed in 2010.   The Ministry of Social Affairs and Housing wishes to acknowledge all contributed towards the Finalization  of  the Suriname MICS4 Report. Sincerest appreciation goes also  to key stakeholders,  in particular,  those  involved  in conducting the survey, preparing this report and publishing the results; from the fieldworkers  to  the  members  of  the  MICS  Technical  Steering  Committee,  UNICEF  Suriname  Country  Office,  UNICEF  Regional Office and UNICEF Headquarters.    October 2012,    The Minister of Social affairs and Housing  Drs. Alice Amafo, MSC    Executive Summary  xvi   Suriname MICS4  Executive Summary The Suriname Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey (MICS) which was carried out as part of the fourth round of  the global MICS household survey programme with the technical and financial support from UNICEF. MICS   is a nationally representative sample survey of   women aged 15‐49 and children under age  five of 7,407  responding households out of a total of 9,356 sampled households. The main purpose of MICS 2010  is to  support the government of Suriname to generate statistically sound and comparable data for monitoring  the situation of children and women in the country. MICS 4 covers topics related to nutrition, child health,  water and sanitation, reproductive health, child development, literary and education, child protection, HIV  and AIDS, mass media and  the use of  information and communication  technology and attitude  towards  domestic violence.  The results of this MICS reveal interesting similarities and differences between the rural interior area that  is  the principal  spatial domain of  the maroons and  indigenous peoples of Suriname, and  the urban and  rural coastal areas. More favourable outcomes are evident for indicators when reference is made to urban  spaces as opposed to the rural coastal area or the rural interior.  Nutrition  In MICS, weights and heights of all  children under 5 years of age were measured using anthropometric  equipment  recommended  by  UNICEF  (www.childinfo.org).  Findings  are  based  on  the  results  of  these  measurements. Almost 6 percent of children under age five are moderately or severely underweight (5.8  percent) and 1.3 percent are classified as severely underweight. Just under one tenth of children (9%) are  moderately or severely stunted or too short for their age and 5 percent are moderately or severely wasted  or too thin for their height. A higher prevalence of being overweight appears to be consistent with children  whose mothers have higher  levels of educational attainment. Whether underweight, stunted, wasted or  overweight, the data point to higher prevalence rates among boys when compared to girls.  45 percent of mothers are estimated to have initiated breastfeeding of their infants within the first hour of  birth while two  in the three (64%)  initiated such feeding within the first day. Whether within one day or  one hour, greater proportions of mothers from rural districts are observed to have initiated breastfeeding  within such time spans subsequent to their infants’ births when compared to corresponding proportions in  urban areas.   Just 3 percent of children aged  less than six months are exclusively breastfed, a  level considerably  lower  than  recommended. Girls were more  likely  to be  exclusively breastfed  than boys.  For  children under 2  years, more than a half of the children 8‐9 months or in older age groups are no longer breastfed.    Child health  About  83 percent of  children  age  18‐29 months  received  three doses of  the polio  vaccine  at  any  time  before the survey. As much as 91 percent had received at  least a first dose of the polio vaccine. HepB at  birth shows a prevalence of 39 percent of children age 18‐29 months vaccinated at any  time before  the  survey.  In rural communities, 64 percent of these children were  immunized for Yellow Fever before their  first birthday or at  some point prior  to  the  survey. With  respect  to  the vaccine against measles  (MMR),  MICS4 data  indicate that approximately 78 percent of children age18‐29 months were estimated to have  received the measles (MMR) vaccine.  Overall, approximately 10 percent of under  five  children had diarrhoea  in  the  two weeks preceding  the  survey. Diarrhoea prevalence rates were highest in Sipaliwini (13%), Brokopondo (13%) and Wanica (11%)  and  lowest  in Saramacca (6%). Similar rates ranging between 8 percent and 10 percent were observed  in  Executive Summary      Suriname MICS4  xvii the  remaining districts. 72 percent of  the children who were  reported as having diarrhoea  received oral  rehydration treatment. Children from rural districts appear more  likely to have received oral rehydration  treatment when compared to children from urban areas.  Two percent of children aged 0‐59 months were  reported  to  have  had  symptoms  of  pneumonia  during  the  two  weeks  preceding  the  survey.  Of  these  children, almost 76 percent were taken to an appropriate provider. Just over a half of the children (51%) of  the children with suspected pneumonia were cared for  in a public sector government health centre. The  vast majority of children were cared for in government health centres in both urban and rural areas.   For Malaria  the  survey  results  relate  specifically  to  the  rural  interior  districts,  namely Brokopondo  and  Sipaliwini.   Almost  61  percent  of  households  have  at  least  one  insecticide  treated  net  and/or  received  indoor residual spraying in the last 12 months preceding the survey. 54 percent of children under the age  of five slept under any mosquito net the night prior to the survey and 43 percent slept under an insecticide  treated net. For pregnant women, 65% of them slept under any mosquito net the night prior to the survey  with a notably lower percentage indicating that they slept under an insecticide treated net.  Water and sanitation   Overall, 95 percent of the population  is using an  improved source of drinking water (99 percent  in urban  areas and 85 percent in rural areas). Compared to the other districts where there are negligible differences  in the proportion of population with  improved source of drinking water, markedly  lower proportions are  observed in Sipaliwini (64%). Ninety‐one  percent  of  the  population  of  Suriname  are  living  in  households  using  improved  sanitation  facilities. This percentage is 98 in urban areas and 71 percent in rural areas. For rural coastal and the rural  interior, the respective percentages are 93 and 42. Faeces of a little more than one fifth of all children 0‐2  years, is disposed of safely (22%). This is alarming especially since the disposal of faeces is safe for less than  one third of every sub‐population of children 0‐2 years.  A specific place  for handwashing was observed  in approximately 74 percent of  the households while 11  percent of all households could not indicate a specific place where household members usually wash their  hands  and  10  percent  of  the  households  did  not  give  any  permission  to  see  the  place  used  for  handwashing. Of those households where place for handwashing was observed, nearly 9 in every 10 (86%)  had both water and soap present at the designated place.   Reproductive Health  Current use of  contraception was  reported by 48 percent of women  currently married or  in union. The  most popular method is the pill which is used by one in four married women in Suriname. The next most  popular  method  is  female  sterilization,  which  accounts  for  11  percent  of  married  women.  Variable  proportions  ranging between  two and  five percent of women  reported use of  the  Intra‐uterine devices  (IUD),  injectables,  and  the  condom.  Less  than  one  percent  use  periodic  abstinence,  withdrawal,  male  sterilization, vaginal methods, or the Lactational Amenorrhea Method (LAM). Contraceptive prevalence  is  highest  in Commewijne at approximately 59%. Though  lower than  in Commewijne, similar magnitudes of  contraceptive prevalence are observed in Wanica (52%), Nickerie (54%) and Saramacca (54%).   Total unmet need  for  contraception  is highest  in  the  rural  interior amounting  to 33 percent. Total met  need  for contraception  is highest  in  rural coastal areas amounting  to 51 percent.  It  is worth noting  that  Sipaliwini  (43%),  Brokopondo  (43%)  and  Marowijne  (60%)  have  the  lowest  percentage  of  demand  for  contraception satisfied.   Executive Summary  xviii   Suriname MICS4  The vast majority of women obtained antenatal care from a doctor, nurse/midwife or a community health  worker,  the  respective proportions being 71 percent, 19 percent and 4 percent.   3 percent  received no  antenatal  care whatsoever.  In  the  rural  interior,  relatively  smaller proportions of women obtained  care  from  doctors  and  relatively  larger  proportions  obtained  care  from  community  health workers  than  are  observed to be the case in any of the other districts.  With respect to women giving birth in the year prior to the MICS survey, as much as 54 percent claimed to  have had such deliveries with assistance from a nurse/midwife while 36 percent claimed to have had such  assistance from doctors.  In the rural  interior, relatively small proportions of women claimed to have had  births  that were delivered by a doctor and  relatively  larger proportions claimed  to have had births  that  were delivered by community health workers when compared  to corresponding estimates  in any of  the  other districts.   92 percent of women 15‐49 with births  in the two years preceding the survey delivered their babies  in a  health facility; 72 percent of women delivered in public sector facilities and 20.8 percent in private sector  facilities. Only 4 percent of women delivered at home.   Child Development Around three quarter s (76 percent) of children aged 36‐59 months was attending pre‐school at the time of  the  survey. Urban‐rural  and district differentials  are  substantial –  the  figure  is  as high  as 44 percent  in  urban  areas,  compared  to  19  percent  in  rural  areas.  For  approximately  73  percent  of  children  36‐59  months, an adult has been engaged in four or more activities that promote learning and school readiness  during  the 3 days preceding  the  survey.  For  a  little more  than  a quarter  (25.9%) of  the  children 36‐59  months, fathers have been involved with one or more activities. A relatively high proportion of children 36‐ 59  months  have  not  been  living  with  their  natural  fathers,  this  proportion  being  in  the  vicinity  of  39  percent.  Leaving children alone or in the presence of other young children is known to increase the risk of accidents.  In  Suriname,  3  percent  of  children  aged  0‐59 months were  left  in  the  care  of  other  children, while  6  percent were left alone during the week preceding the interview. Combining the two care indicators, it is  calculated that 7 percent of children were left with inadequate care during the week preceding the survey.  The Early Child Development Index (ECDI) represents the percentage of children who are developmentally  on  track  in at  least  three of  four domains  (literacy‐numeracy, physical  socio‐emotional and  learning. 71  percent of children aged 36‐59 months were developmentally on track with the ECDI being  lower among  boys (63 percent) than girls (72 percent).   Education and literacy   92 percent of women 15‐24 years in the survey were literate.  Literacy rates in urban areas are higher than  those in rural areas being 96 percent and 80 percent respectively.  Overall, 76 percent of children attending the first grade of primary school were attending pre‐school the  previous  year.  Of  children  who  are  of  primary  school  entry  age  (age  6)  in  Suriname,  87  percent  are  attending the  first grade of primary school. The majority of children of primary school age are attending  school (95%). The primary school age children of the poorest households are estimated to have the lowest  school attendance rates (92%) when compared to children in each of the other wealth status groups.  Only 79 percent of the children that completed successfully the last grade of primary school were found at  the moment the survey to be attending the first grade of secondary school.        Executive Summary      Suriname MICS4  xix The gender parity  index  for primary  school  is close  to 1.00,  indicating  that  there  is no difference  in  the  attendance of  girls  and boys  to primary  school. With  respect  to  the  secondary  level,  the  gender parity  index  is 1.24 and  indicative of higher  school attendance at  the  secondary  level among girls  than among  boys.   Child Protection  Births of 99 percent of children under five years have been registered and there does not appear to be any  major variations in birth registration across sex, age, or education categories.  At  least 10 percent of  children 5‐14 years are engaged  in  child  labour  in Suriname. While  there are no  observed differences across the sexes, there are noteworthy variations across the districts and urban/rural  domains of Suriname.  In districts such as Sipaliwini, Brokopondo, Para and Marowijne, the prevalence of  child labour is observed to be at least equal to or greater than the national estimate of 10 percent. In the  remaining districts, the prevalence of child labour is estimated to be lower than the national estimate.   86 percent of children aged 2‐14 years were subjected  to at  least one  form of psychological or physical  punishment  by  their  mothers/caretakers  or  other  household  members.  12  percent  of  children  were  subjected to severe physical punishment.  13 percent of mothers/caretakers believed that children should  be physically punished.   Almost 6 percent of women 20‐49  years have been married before  their 15th birthday  and 23 percent  before  their  18th  birthday.  The  respective  proportions  are  greatest  in  Sipaliwini  (20%  and  50%)  and  Brokopondo  (11%  and  45%)  and  in  the  rural  interior  (19%  and  48%).  With  respect  to  spousal  age  difference, 15 percent of women 15‐19 years are estimated to be married or in union with a man who is at  least 10 years older.   Overall, 13 percent of the women 15‐49 years believe a husband is justified in beating his wife/partner for  any of the reasons mentioned  in the MICS study. With respect to the belief that a husband  is  justified  in  beating his wife/partner, this was mostly prevalent among women from Sipaliwini (27%) and Brokopondo  (30%).   In Suriname, as much as 56 percent of children 0‐17 years  lived with both parents while 29 percent  lived  with  their mothers  only  despite  the  fact  that  their  fathers were  alive.  Another  6  percent  consisted  of  children who lived with neither parent although both were alive. HIV and AIDS  98 percent of interviewed women 15‐49 years have heard of AIDS. However, the percentage that know of  two ways of preventing HIV transmission is 71 percent. Overall, 43 percent of women were found to have  comprehensive  knowledge of HIV prevention, which was markedly higher  in urban  areas  (47%)  than  in  rural coastal areas (37%), the rural interior (20%) and by extension rural areas (30%). While as much as 93  percent of women know that HIV can be transmitted from mother to child, the percentage of women who  know all three ways of mother‐to‐child transmission is 52 percent. Among women 15‐49 years, as much as 85 percent know a place where they can be tested for HIV, while  55 percent have actually been tested. A smaller proportion equivalent to 21 percent have been tested  in  the past 12 months and only 20 percent of those tested in the past 12 months have been told the result.   Among women 15‐49 years who had given birth within  the  two years preceding  the  survey, 91 percent  received antenatal care from a health care professional for their last pregnancy with just under a half (49%)  receiving HIV counselling while receiving antenatal care. During antenatal care, 82 percent were offered a  HIV test and tested for HIV. From the latter set of women, 80 percent had also received the results of their  test.  Executive Summary  xx   Suriname MICS4   55 percent of never married women 15‐24 years never had sex. In the rural coastal areas, a notably larger  proportion estimated to be 63 percent never had sex while in the rural interior the proportion is estimated  to be substantially lower being in the vicinity of 29 percent.  The MICS4 data for Suriname also show that 10 percent of women 15‐24 years had sex before their 15th  birthday. 15 percent of women 15‐24 years who had sex  in  the  last 12 months, had such an experience  with a man who was at least 10 years older.   Fifty‐nine percent of women 15‐24 years report having sex with a non‐regular partner  in  the 12 months  prior to the MICS with only 56 percent of such women claimed to have used a condom when they had such  an experience.   Access to Mass Media and use of Information/communication technology  At least once a week, 77 percent of women in Suriname read a newspaper, 84 percent listen to the radio  and  90  percent watch  television. Overall,  2  percent  do  not  have  regular  exposure  to  any  of  the  three  media, while 66 percent are exposed to all the three types of media at least on a weekly basis.  Moreover, 72 percent have used a  computer, 60 percent used  a  computer during  the  last  year and 46  percent used at  least once a week during the  last month. Overall, 57 percent of women age 15‐24 have  ever used the internet, while 49 percent have surfed the internet during the last year. Almost 4 in every 5  (79 percent) claimed  to have had a cellular phone  that worked. Smaller percentages  indicated  that  they  use  their  phones  to  make  or  receive  call  (69  percent),  to  send  text  messages  (58%),  to  receive  text  messages (60 percent) and to access the internet (9%).   Introduction      Suriname MICS4  1 1. Introduction Background The Multiple  Indicator Cluster Survey  (MICS)  is an  international household survey programme developed  by  the  United  Nations  Children’s  Fund  (UNICEF)  to  assist  countries  in  filling  data  gaps  for  monitoring  human  development  in  general  and  the  situation  of  children  and women  in  particular. MICS  data  are  critical when there  is  lack of continuous and updated disaggregated national data on specific groups and  districts to support evidence‐based planning. The survey  is based,  in  large part, on the needs to monitor  progress towards goals and targets emanating from international agreements: The Millennium Declaration,  adopted by all 191 United Nations Member States  in September 2000, and the Plan of Action of A World  Fit For Children, adopted by 189 Member States at the United Nations Special Session on Children in May  2002. Both of these commitments build upon promises made by the international community at the 1990  World  Summit  for Children.   MICS was originally developed  in  response  to  the 1990 World  Summit  for  Children (WSC) to collect statistically sound, internationally comparable estimates of key indicators used to  assess  the  situation  of  children  and  women  in  the  areas  of  health,  education,  child  protection,  and  HIV/AIDS. MICS indicators enable the monitoring and the measurement of progress towards national goals  and  global  commitments  aimed  at  promoting  the  welfare  of  children,  including  among  others,  the  Millennium Development Goals (MDGs).   The first round of MICS was conducted around 1995 in more than 60 countries. The second round of MICS  was conducted in 2000 followed by the third round in 2006 contributing to an increasing wealth of data to  monitor the situation of children and women.   As part of the global effort to increase the availability of high quality data, UNICEF launched the 4th round  of MICS  (MICS4)  in  2009, with  results  available  from  2010  onwards.  The  increased  frequency  of MICS  rounds helps countries to capture rapid changes in key indicators as the MDG target year 2015 approaches  and aims to expand the evidence‐base for policies and programs.   Since the  inception of MICS, two survey rounds have been carried out  in Suriname:  In 2000 (MICS2) and  2006 (MICS3). This report is based on the fourth round of MICS that was conducted in 2010 by the Ministry  of  Social  Affairs  and Housing, General  Bureau  of  Statistics  (GBS),  and  the  Institute  for  Social  Research  (IMWO) of the University of Suriname.  The MICS of 2006 enabled Suriname to present data on the different goals and objectives that were set in  the international and regional action plans. The Situation Assessment and Analysis of Children in Suriname  (SITAN 2010)2 which is an analysis of achievements in the fulfilment of children’s rights in Suriname against  the guiding framework of the MDGs and the Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC) is a clear example  of the use of the MICS survey data.  In accordance with international agreements, governments committed themselves to improving conditions  for their children and to monitoring progress towards that end. UNICEF was assigned a supporting role in  this task (see box below).                                                               2 See: Situation Assessment and Analysis of Children's Rights in Suriname 2010  http://undpsuriname.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=135:situation‐assessment‐and‐analysis‐ of‐childrens‐rights‐in‐suriname‐2010  Introduction  2 Suriname MICS4  A Commitment to Action: National and International Reporting Responsibilities The  governments  that  signed  the Millennium Declaration  and  the World  Fit  for  Children Declaration  and  Plan  of  Action also committed themselves to monitoring progress towards the goals and objectives they achieved:   “We will monitor  regularly at  the national  level and, where appropriate, at  the  regional  level and assess progress  towards the goals and targets of the present Plan of Action at the national, regional and global levels. Accordingly, we  will strengthen our national statistical capacity to collect, analyse and disaggregate data,  including by sex, age and  other  relevant  factors  that may  lead  to  disparities,  and  support  a wide  range  of  child‐focused  research. We will  enhance  international  cooperation  to  support  statistical  capacity‐building efforts and build  community  capacity  for  monitoring, assessment and planning.” (A World Fit for Children, paragraph 60)  “…We will conduct periodic reviews at the national and subnational  levels of progress  in order to address obstacles  more effectively and accelerate actions.…” (A World Fit for Children, paragraph 61)  The Plan of Action  (paragraph 61) also  calls  for  the  specific  involvement of UNICEF  in  the preparation of periodic  progress reports:   “… As the world’s lead agency for children, the United Nations Children’s Fund is requested to continue to prepare and  disseminate, in close collaboration with Governments, relevant funds, programmes and the specialized agencies of the  United  Nations  system,  and  all  other  relevant  actors,  as  appropriate,  information  on  the  progress  made  in  the  implementation of the Declaration and the Plan of Action.”  Similarly, the Millennium Declaration (paragraph 31) calls for periodic reporting on progress:   “…We request the General Assembly to review on a regular basis the progress made in implementing the provisions of  this Declaration, and ask  the Secretary‐General  to  issue periodic  reports  for consideration by  the General Assembly  and as a basis for further action.”    Since  its  commitments  to  the  implementation  of  the  CRC  in  1993,  the Government  of  the  Republic  of  Suriname has planned, executed, and evaluated programs to set and improve the basic conditions for the  implementation of  the CRC.  In  this  regard,  the UN Committee on  the Rights of  the Child was  informed  through the Initial Report for the period 1995‐2000 and the Second Country Report, which was presented  in 2007. The recommendations of the UN  for 2000 and 2007 are  interpreted  into a  feasible and realistic  Child Action Plan for the period 2009‐2013. The combined third and fourth country progress report on the  implementation of the CRC will soon be submitted to the Board of Ministers for approval. To this extent, a  permanent monitoring mechanism  for  the Action Plan  for Children will be  installed. The MICS 2010 will  provide useful input for this monitoring mechanism. The MICS allows not only generation of disaggregated  data merely  for  international  reporting, but  is one of  the  key data  sets used by  governments, UNICEF,  other UN agencies, and stakeholders to monitor the achievement of the rights of children and women as  defined  in the CRC and the Convention on the Elimination of All  forms of Discrimination against Women  (CEDAW). Therefore, the findings of the MICS4 survey will enable the government of Suriname to prepare  and evaluate national progress towards goals set  in the Millennium   Declaration and monitor goals set  in  national policies  such as  the Development Plan 2012‐2016 and  the United Nations Development Action  Plan 2012‐2016 (UNDAP).  As agreed  in the UNDAP, the United Nations  in Suriname will support the Government of Suriname  in  its  goal to strengthen its statistical and information systems and its capacity to analyse and interpret the data  for policy formulation and dissemination. The Government has prioritized the 'optimal use of technical, as  well  as  financial  assistance,  through  coherent  planning  and  close monitoring'. Data  collection,  analysis,  information  systems,  and  effective  dissemination  are  needed  to  inform  and  monitor  evidence‐based  policies,  legislative  initiatives, and programming.  In order to monitor the situation of children, efforts are  being made to strengthen the monitoring and evaluation capacity at various levels of implementation. The  Introduction      Suriname MICS4  3 MICS 2006 data have been entered  in  the DEVINFO based data  storage  system: SURINFO. DEVINFO  is a  harmonized system to store, organize, and disseminate disaggregated data to serve as a monitoring tool.  SURINFO will be updated with MICS 2010 data and data from other national sources. The General Bureau  of  Statistics  of  Suriname  is  leading  the  process  to make  SURINFO  accessible  for  policymakers  and  line  ministers for evidence based policy formulation and evaluation of programs.  This final report presents the results of the indicators and topics covered in the survey.  Survey Objectives The 2010 Suriname Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey has as its primary objectives:   To provide up‐to‐date information for assessing the situation of children and women in Suriname;   To  furnish  data  needed  for  monitoring  progress  toward  goals  established  in  the  Millennium  Declaration and other internationally agreed upon goals, as a basis for future action;   To contribute to the improvement of data and monitoring systems in Suriname and to strengthen  technical expertise in the design, implementation, and analysis of such systems.   To generate data on the situation of children and women, including the identification of vulnerable  groups and of disparities, to inform policies and interventions.  Sample and Survey Methodology  4 Suriname MICS4  2. Sample and Survey Methodology Sample Design The sample for the Suriname MICS was designed to provide estimates for a large number of indicators on  the situation of children and women at the national level, for urban, rural coastal and rural interior areas,  and representative for different country levels.  Suriname  is  located on  the northern coast of South America.  It  is bordered  in  the north by  the Atlantic  Ocean,  in  the south by Brazil,  in  the east by French Guyana and  in  the west by Guyana. Topographically  there is a subdivision of the country in the coastal lowlands, the savannah and the highlands in the south  with its tropical rainforest. Approximately 90% of the population, estimated at 493,000 during the Seventh  Population  and Housing Census  in 2004,  lives  in  the  coastal  lowland bordering  the Atlantic Ocean.  The  population density of 3.0 per square kilometre (km2) is among the lowest in South America. The population  density in the coastal area is 17.2/km2, while in the highlands it is approximately 2.9/km2.   The country is divided into ten districts: Paramaribo, Wanica, Nickerie, Coronie, Saramacca, Commewijne,  Marowijne,  Para,  Brokopondo,  and  Sipaliwini  and  62  ‘sub‐districts’  by  law.  The  ‘sub‐districts’  are  sub‐ divisions at the district level. For purposes of conducting the fieldwork during the Seventh Population and  Housing Census  in 2004, the General Bureau of Statistics sub‐divided each sub‐district  in the coastal area  (lowland  and  savannah)  into  enumeration  ‘blocks’.  An  enumeration  ‘block’  is  considered  to  be  a  manageable workload  for a census enumerator  for the  fieldwork period of two weeks and would  ideally  have between 100 and 150 households. In the interior, a somewhat different fieldwork approach was used  due  to  the  geographical  spread  of  villages  to  the  extent  that  teams  consisting  of  5‐7  fieldworkers  canvassed  clusters  of  villages.  These  clusters  are  enumeration  areas  and  were  expected  to  have  approximately 500 households, or the workload of 5 enumerators.   The MICS 2010 sample was selected based on the sample frame from the 2004 census. Based up on this  sample, GBS conducted a specific listing exercise in the field, in order to result in the final MICS clusters for  fieldwork.   In the ten districts of Suriname, three settlement types form the basis for the establishment of  strata that ought to reflect geographical spaces that are more  likely to be  internally homogeneous when  found within the same settlement type but and different when found in different settlement types.  According to settlement types, three strata can be distinguished across the ten districts of Suriname:   An urban stratum.   A rural stratum in the coastal area.   A rural stratum in the interior.  Urban  areas  include  Paramaribo,  Wanica,  Nickerie  (Nw.  Nickerie),  and  Commewijne  (Meerzorg  and  Tamanredjo). Rural Interior areas include Brokopondo and Sipaliwini while rural Coastal areas include the  remainder of Nickerie, the remainder of Commewijne, Coronie, Saramacca, Para, and Marowijne.   The three strata or classes were identified as the main sampling domains and the sample was selected in  two stages meaning that a sample of enumeration blocks were selected in a first stage of selection in each  of the three strata systematically with probability proportion to size. This was followed by a second stage  of selection in which a sample of clusters was selected within the enumeration blocks selected in the first  stage. In accordance with the MICS4 guidelines3, clusters consisted of between 20 and 30 households.  The                                                               3 See www.childinfo.org/mics4_manual.html for the MICS4 Manual.  Sample and Survey Methodology      Suriname MICS4  5 actual  sample  selection  in  the  selected  clusters was  done  as  follows.  In  urban  and  rural  coastal  areas,  where enumeration districts  (EDs) usually  contain  about 150 households, one pointer address  (PA) was  selected at random within the ED. If  it was not the address of a private household, the next address was  taken as the starting point. Twenty adjacent addresses (1 to 20) were then selected around this PA, and a  printed map provided to each team, showing the location of each address. In rural areas the enumeration  areas might  consist of either one village or  several  smaller villages  combined. Where a village was very  isolated,  it  was  treated  as  one  enumeration  area,  even  though  sometimes  it  did  not  contain  many  households.Prior  to  the  start  of  the  MICS4  fieldwork,  cartography  personnel  of  the  GBS  undertook  fieldwork activities  in order to establish as much as possible  (with the exception of the  interior stratum)  the  landmarks  and  the  boundaries  of  each  selected  MICS‐cluster.  This  was  required  to  facilitate  the  interview  teams  in  the  field  with  maps  and  clearly  defined  boundaries.  The  interview  teams  received  during  the  fieldwork  the  instructions  to  gather  information on  each household  encountered within  the  boundaries  of  designated  MICS‐clusters.  For  the  Interior  stratum  where  it  is  relatively  difficult  to  geographically divide each enumeration block  into clusters of households, names of heads of households  were used to select households that were sampled.   The  sample  is  not  self‐weighting  meaning  that  the  sampling  rate  for  households  in  districts  such  as  Sipaliwini  and Brokopondo were higher  than  those  in other districts.  In  reporting national  level  results,  sample weights are used. A more detailed description of the sample design can be found in Appendix A.  Questionnaires MICS questionnaires are designed  in a modular  fashion  that can be easily customized  to  the needs of a  country. Three  sets of questionnaires were used  in  the  survey: 1) a household questionnaire which was  used  to collect  information on all de  jure household members  (usual  residents),  the household, and  the  dwelling; 2) a women’s questionnaire administered in each household to all women aged 15‐49 years; and  3) an under‐5 questionnaire, administered  to mothers or caretakers  for all children under 5  living  in  the  household.  The Standard MICS Questionnaires4 were revised, adapted, and customized to country specific conditions  and translated into Dutch. The pre‐test of these modified questionnaires was done in June 2010. Based on  the  results of  the pre‐test  the Questionnaires were  finalized  for  the  actual  fieldwork  ensuring  that  the  customized and  translated questionnaires were comparable  to  standard MICS questionnaires. A copy of  the Suriname MICS questionnaires is provided in the Appendix.  The Household Questionnaire included the following modules:   Household Listing Form   Education   Water and Sanitation   Household Characteristics   Insecticide Treated Nets (in Brokopondo and Sipaliwini only)   Indoor Residual Spraying (in Brokopondo and Sipaliwini only)   Child Labour   Child Discipline   Handwashing                                                               4 See www.childinfo.org/mics4_questionnaire.html for the standard MICS4 Questionnaires.  Sample and Survey Methodology  6 Suriname MICS4  The Questionnaire  for  Individual Women was administered  to all women aged 15‐49 years  living  in  the  households, and included the following modules:   Woman’s Background   Access to Mass Media and Use of Information/Communication Technology   Desire For Last Birth   Illness Symptoms   Maternal and Newborn Health   Illness Symptoms   Contraception   Unmet Need   Attitudes Towards Domestic Violence   Marriage/Union   Sexual Behaviour   HIV/AIDS  The Questionnaire for Children Under Five was administered to mothers or caretakers of children under 5  years  of  age5  living  in  the  households.  Normally,  the  questionnaire  was  administered  to  mothers  of  children  under‐5,  while  in  cases  when  the  mother  was  not  listed  in  the  household  roster,  a  primary  caretaker for the child was identified and interviewed. The questionnaire included the following modules:   Age   Birth Registration   Early Childhood Development   Breastfeeding   Care of Illness   Malaria (in Brokopondo and Sipaliwini only)   Immunization (Yellow Fever in Brokopondo and Sipaliwini only)   Anthropometry  In addition to the administration of questionnaires, fieldwork teams observed the place for handwashing  and  measured  the  weights  and  heights  of  children  age  under  5  years.  Details  and  findings  of  these  measurements are provided in the respective sections of the report.  The questionnaires  included very  few non‐standard MICS questions, such as on women’s ownership and  use of cell phones, as well as a further question to mothers of children under 5 whose child’s birth had not  been registered.  It should be noted that the Malaria related modules and questions were only administered in Brokopondo  and Sipaliwini. The same approach was used on vaccination against Yellow Fever.                                                               5 The terms “children under 5”, “children age 0‐4 years”, and “children aged 0‐59 months” are used interchangeably  in this report.  Sample and Survey Methodology      Suriname MICS4  7 Training and Fieldwork Training  for  the  fieldwork  was  conducted  for  11  days  in  July  2010.  Training  included  lectures  on  interviewing techniques, the contents of the questionnaires, and mock interviews between trainees to gain  practice  in asking questions. Towards  the end of  the  training period,  trainees  spent part of  the  second  week practicing interviewing skills.  The  data  were  collected  by  12  teams;  eight  consisting  of  six  persons  (1  supervisor,  1  editor  and  4  interviewers)  and  four  consisting  of  five  persons  (1  supervisor,  1  editor  and  3  interviewers).  Fieldwork  began in July 2010 and concluded in September 2010.   For the anthropometry module, the supervisor was responsible for the measurements. This constitutes a  deviation  from  the  recommended MICS4 guidelines which  require  the existence of a separate dedicated  measurer in each team to enhance the quality of the anthropometric data collected in the field.    Data Processing Data were entered using the CSPro software. The data were entered on 6 microcomputers and carried out  by 15 data entry operators on a shift system basis and one data entry supervisor. In order to ensure quality  control,  all  questionnaires  were  double  entered  and  internal  consistency  checks  were  performed.  Procedures  and  standard  programs developed under  the  global MICS4 programme  and  adapted  to  the  Suriname questionnaire were used throughout. Data processing began simultaneously with data collection  in July 2010 and was completed early January 2011. Data were analysed using the Statistical Package for  Social Sciences (SPSS) software program and the model tabulation syntax developed by UNICEF facilitated  the generation of the estimates.  Sample Coverage and the Characteristics of Households and Respondents  8 Suriname MICS4  3. Sample Coverage and the Characteristics of Households and Respondents Sample Coverage Of the 9,356 households selected for the sample, 8,532 were found to be occupied. Successful interviews  were conducted in 7,407 of the 8,532 occupied households resulting in a household response rate of 86.8  percent.  In  the  interviewed households, 7,237 women  (age 15‐49) were  identified. Of  these, 6,290 were  successfully  interviewed, yielding a  response  rate of 86.9 percent.  In addition, 3,462 children under age  five  were  listed  in  the  household  questionnaire.  Questionnaires  were  completed  for  3,308  of  these  children, which corresponds to a response rate of 95.6 percent. Overall response rates of 75.5 and 83.0 are  calculated for the women’s and under‐5’s interviews respectively (Table HH.1, page 9)  In  the  rural  interior,  virtually  all  of  the  sampled  households  were  occupied  (99.3%)  with  respective  proportions of 99.8 percent and 99.2 percent  in Brokopondo and Sipaliwini. The proportions of sampled  households that were occupied were lowest in Wanica (86.3%) and Coronie (86.5%). Household response  rates  are  expressed  as  the  percentage  of  occupied  households  in  which  interviews  were  successfully  conducted  and  were  highest  in  Sipaliwini  (93.8%)  and  Brokopondo  (90.5%)  being  lowest  in  Coronie  (76.2%). In the remaining districts, household response rates ranged between 83.4 percent in Commewijne  and 89.7 percent  in Nickerie. While  there  is not much difference between the household response rates  between  urban  communities  and  those  in  rural  coastal  areas  being  84.4  percent  and  85.6  percent  respectively, markedly higher household response rates are evident in the rural interior (93.0%).   A wide variety of  issues contributed  to  the  low  response  rates  recorded countrywide at household  level  among which absent household members was the dominant. This will  inform  future surveys. Please also  note  that  the  actual number of  interviewed households,  individual women,  and  children under  five  for  Coronie is so low that only few results could be produced for the district. Unfortunately the sample design  did not  include oversampling of district with  low population. This  should be addressed  in  future  sample  designs in Suriname, as not only Coronie was affected by a low absolute sample.  Characteristics of Households The age and sex distribution of the survey population is provided in Table HH.2 (page 10). The distribution  is  also  used  to  produce  the  population  pyramid  in  Figure  HH.1  (page  11).  In  the  7,407  households  successfully  interviewed  in  the  survey,  28,421  household members were  listed. Of  these,  14,021 were  males, and 14,398 were females.   Using  data  from  the  2004  Population  and  Housing  Census  in  Suriname,  the  population  size  was  disaggregated by age and  sex  in accordance with  the  following age group  categories: 0‐14 years, 15‐64  years and 65 years or older. Males in the respective age groups constitute 15.0 percent, 31.7 percent and  2.8 percent. Corresponding  figures  for  females are 14.8 percent, 31.8 percent and 3.2 percent. A similar  age sex distribution is generated using the data from the 2010 Suriname MICS and reveal that males 0‐14  years, 15‐64 years and 65 years or older constitute 15.6 percent, 30 percent and 2.9 percent of the total  population with corresponding estimates for the female population being 14.3 percent, 32.3 percent and  3.7 percent (calculations not shown). Despite the time lapse between the national census in 2004 and the  2010 MICS,  the  age‐sex distribution of  the population  reflected  in  the  context of  the  2010 MICS  seem  consistent  with  population  dynamics  associated  with  expected  temporal  changes  in  components  that  facilitate changes in population sizes. Whether in the context of the 2004 Population and Housing Census  or the 2010 MICS, less than 1 percent of the total population constituted males or females for whom age  was not known. As such, the  low proportion of missing  information  is not expected to seriously threaten  the quality of observations pertaining to age and sex based on the 2010 MICS.  Sa m pl e C ov er ag e a nd  th e C ha ra ct er ist ic s o f H ou se ho ld s a nd  Re sp on de nt s          Su rin am e M IC S4 9   Ta bl e H H .1 : R es ul ts o f h ou se ho ld , w om en 's , a nd u nd er -5 in te rv ie w s N um be r o f h ou se ho ld s, w om en , a nd c hi ld re n un de r 5 b y re su lts o f t he h ou se ho ld , w om en 's , a nd u nd er -5 's in te rv ie w s, a nd h ou se ho ld , w om en 's , a nd u nd er -5 's re sp on se ra te s, S ur in am e, 2 01 0 A re a D is tr ic t To ta l U rb an R ur al P ar am ar ib o W an ic a N ic ke rie C or on ie S ar am ac ca C om m ew ijn e M ar ow ijn e P ar a B ro ko po nd o S ip al iw in i R ur al C oa st al R ur al In te rio r To ta l R ur al H ou se ho ld s S am pl ed 4, 24 3 3 ,0 95 2 ,0 18 5, 11 3 2 ,9 05 1 ,0 13 9 77 1 41 6 08 5 52 5 65 5 77 4 84 1 ,5 34 9, 35 6 O cc up ie d 3, 76 3 2 ,7 65 2 ,0 04 4, 76 9 2 ,6 12 8 74 8 80 1 22 5 29 5 01 5 19 4 91 4 83 1 ,5 21 8, 53 2 In te rv ie w ed 3, 17 6 2 ,3 67 1 ,8 64 4, 23 1 2 ,1 84 7 57 7 89 9 3 4 45 4 18 4 46 4 11 4 37 1 ,4 27 7, 40 7 H ou se ho ld re sp on se ra te 8 4. 4 8 5. 6 9 3. 0 8 8. 7 8 3. 6 8 6. 6 8 9. 7 7 6. 2 8 4. 1 8 3. 4 8 5. 9 83 .7 9 0. 5 9 3. 8 8 6. 8 W om en E lig ib le 3, 28 2 2 ,3 29 1 ,6 26 3, 95 5 2 ,1 97 8 56 7 60 6 4 4 20 4 04 4 85 4 25 3 87 1 ,2 39 7, 23 7 In te rv ie w ed 2, 78 8 2 ,0 36 1 ,4 66 3, 50 2 1 ,8 36 7 49 6 69 5 8 3 75 3 52 4 25 3 60 3 31 1 ,1 35 6, 29 0 W om en 's re sp on se ra te 8 4. 9 8 7. 4 9 0. 2 8 8. 5 8 3. 6 8 7. 5 8 8. 0 9 0. 6 8 9. 3 8 7. 1 8 7. 6 84 .7 8 5. 5 9 1. 6 8 6. 9 W om en 's o ve ra ll re sp on se ra te 7 1. 7 7 4. 8 8 3. 9 7 8. 6 6 9. 9 7 5. 8 7 8. 9 6 9. 1 7 5. 1 7 2. 7 7 5. 3 70 .9 7 7. 4 8 5. 9 7 5. 5 C hi ld re n un de r 5 E lig ib le 1, 05 3 9 76 1 ,4 33 2, 40 9 6 76 3 13 2 30 2 3 1 46 1 25 3 33 1 83 3 55 1 ,0 78 3, 46 2 M ot he rs /c ar et ak er s in te rv ie w ed 9 93 9 32 1 ,3 83 2, 31 5 6 34 2 95 2 23 2 2 1 40 1 19 3 18 1 74 3 33 1 ,0 50 3, 30 8 U nd er -5 's re sp on se ra te 9 4. 3 9 5. 5 9 6. 5 9 6. 1 9 3. 8 9 4. 2 9 7. 0 9 5. 7 9 5. 9 9 5. 2 9 5. 5 95 .1 9 3. 8 9 7. 4 9 5. 6 U nd er -5 's o ve ra ll re sp on se ra te 7 9. 6 8 1. 7 8 9. 8 8 5. 3 7 8. 4 8 1. 6 8 6. 9 7 2. 9 8 0. 7 7 9. 4 8 2. 1 79 .6 8 4. 9 9 1. 4 8 3. 0 Sample Coverage and the Characteristics of Households and Respondents  10 Suriname MICS4  Table HH.2: Household age distribution by sex Percent and frequency distribution of the household population by five-year age groups, dependency age groups, and by child (age 0-17 years) and adult populations (age 18 or more), by sex, Suriname, 2010 Males Females Missing Total Number Percent Number Percent Number Percent Number Percent Age 0-4 1,458 10.4 1,450 10.1 1 40.5 2,908 10.2 5-9 1,460 10.4 1,352 9.4 0 0.0 2,812 9.9 10-14 1,519 10.8 1,276 8.9 0 0.0 2,795 9.8 15-19 1,133 8.1 1,299 9.0 0 0.0 2,433 8.6 20-24 1,132 8.1 1,210 8.4 0 0.0 2,341 8.2 25-29 1,047 7.5 1,160 8.1 0 0.0 2,206 7.8 30-34 871 6.2 947 6.6 0 0.0 1,818 6.4 35-39 925 6.6 985 6.8 0 0.0 1,910 6.7 40-44 904 6.4 945 6.6 0 0.0 1,849 6.5 45-49 914 6.5 915 6.4 0 0.0 1,830 6.4 50-54 656 4.7 711 4.9 0 0.0 1,366 4.8 55-59 525 3.7 588 4.1 0 0.0 1,113 3.9 60-64 430 3.1 431 3.0 0 29.8 862 3.0 65-69 293 2.1 367 2.5 0 0.0 660 2.3 70-74 253 1.8 303 2.1 0 29.8 556 2.0 75-79 171 1.2 187 1.3 0 0.0 358 1.3 80-84 70 0.5 113 0.8 0 0.0 183 0.6 85+ 49 0.3 84 0.6 0 0.0 133 0.5 Missing/DK 213 1.5 75 0.5 0 0.0 288 1.0 Dependency age groups 0-14 4,437 31.6 4,078 28.3 1 40.5 8,516 30.0 15-64 8,537 60.9 9,191 63.8 0 29.8 17,728 62.4 65+ 835 6.0 1,054 7.3 0 29.8 1,889 6.6 Missing/DK 213 1.5 75 0.5 0 0.0 288 1.0 Child and adult populations Children age 0-17 years 5,118 36.5 4,823 33.5 1 40.5 9,941 35.0 Adults age 18+ years 8,690 62.0 9,500 66.0 1 59.5 18,192 64.0 Missing/DK 213 1.5 75 0.5 0 0.0 288 1.0 Total 14,021 100.0 14,398 100.0 1 100.0 28,421 100.0   Table HH.2 shows the age‐sex structure of the household population. The proportions in child, working and  old‐age age groups  (0–14, 15–64 and 65 years and over)  in  the household population of  the sample are  30.0, 62.4 and 6.6 percent, respectively  Table HH.3  (page 12) provides basic background  information on  the households. Within households,  the  sex of the household head, district, urban/rural status, number of household members, and ethnic group  of  the  household  head  are  shown  in  the  table.  These  background  characteristics  are  also  used  in  subsequent  tables  in  this  report;  the  figures  in  the  table  are  also  intended  to  show  the  numbers  of  observations by major categories of analysis in the report.  The weighted and unweighted numbers of households are equal, since sample weights were normalized  (See Appendix A, page 178). The table also shows the proportions of households where at least one child  under 18, at least one child under 5, and at least one eligible woman age 15‐49 were found. In accordance  with the MICS sample, households are predominantly male‐headed (64%). The largest ethnic group among  heads  of  households  is  Indian  (Hindustani,  descendants  of  India)  at  28  percent  with  the  next  highest  proportion being headed by  someone who  is a Maroon  (22%). The MICS  sample also estimates  that 20  Sample Coverage and the Characteristics of Households and Respondents      Suriname MICS4 11 percent of households are headed by a Creole person and 15 percent being headed by someone who  is  Javanese.  Figure HH.1: Age and sex distribution of household population, Suriname, 2010   At 20 percent, a  four member household  is  the most common size of households. However, 13 percent  consist of persons living alone while 2 percent have at least 10 persons. These figures also indicate that the  survey estimated the average household size at 3.8.  A  little more than half of all of the households (52%) are headed by someone who attained a secondary‐ level education or higher with another 31 percent being headed by someone attaining education only up  to the primary‐level.  Almost  half  (49%)  of  households  are  located  in  Paramaribo.  Wanica  accounted  for  17  percent  of  the  households in Suriname while Nickerie accounted for 8 percent. Almost 5 percent of the households were  located  in  Commewijne  while  similar  proportions  of  just  over  3  percent  were  located  in  Saramacca,  Marowijne, and Para. Less  than one percent of all households were  located  in Coronie. Consistent with  Suriname’s predominantly urban profile, 72 percent of all households are in areas classified as being urban.  Please  note  the  small  number  of  cases  with  “Missing/DK”  in  background  characteristic  ‘Ethnicity  of  household head’. As this characteristic is used throughout the report and indicator value for “Missing/DK”  is required to be suppressed consistently, the tables in the report presenting this background characteristic  for  households  do  not  include  the  ‘Missing/DK’  category  or,  in  other  words,  the  row  is  suppressed.  Whenever this approach is applied to a table, a note is presented below the table. The implication of this  approach is that the denominator sum will not add up to the total denominator in such tables.      8 6 4 2 0 2 4 6 8 0-4 5-9 10-14 15-19 20-24 25-29 30-34 35-39 40-44 45-49 50-54 55-59 60-64 65-69 70-74 75-79 80-84 85+ Percent Figure HH.1: Age and sex distribution of household population, Suriname, 2010 Females Males Sample Coverage and the Characteristics of Households and Respondents  12 Suriname MICS4  Table HH.3: Household composition Percent and frequency distribution of households by selected characteristics, Suriname, 2010 Weighted percent Number of households Weighted Unweighted Sex of household head Male 63.5 4,700 4,573 Female 36.5 2,707 2,833 Missing 0.0 0 1 District Paramaribo 49.1 3,640 2,184 Wanica 17.2 1,275 757 Nickerie 7.6 563 789 Coronie 0.7 51 93 Saramacca 3.3 244 445 Commewijne 4.9 359 418 Marowijne 3.1 226 446 Para 3.3 243 411 Brokopondo 2.5 186 437 Sipaliwini 8.4 619 1,427 Area Urban 71.6 5,301 3,176 Rural Coastal 17.6 1,300 2,367 Rural interior 10.9 806 1,864 Total Rural 28.4 2,106 4,231 Number of household members 1 13.1 971 1,039 2 17.4 1,288 1,230 3 18.3 1,354 1,283 4 19.5 1,447 1,367 5 12.8 946 982 6 8.7 644 668 7 4.2 313 354 8 2.3 169 196 9 1.4 104 121 10+ 2.3 171 167 Education of household head None 10.8 800 1,293 Primary 30.8 2,281 2,526 Secondary + 52.3 3,875 3,158 Other/Non-standard 1.4 107 85 Missing/DK 4.6 344 345 Ethnicity of household head Indigenous/Amerindian 3.7 271 408 Maroon 21.5 1,594 2,454 Creole 19.5 1,447 1,060 Hindustani 27.9 2,069 1,775 Javanese 14.5 1,072 988 Mixed 10.5 777 587 Others 2.3 172 126 Missing/DK 0.1 6 9 Total 100.0 7,407 7,407 Households with at least One child age 0-4 years 28.5 7,407 7,407 One child age 0-17 years 58.2 7,407 7,407 One woman age 15-49 years 71.2 7,407 7,407 Mean household size 3.8 7,407 7,407 Sample Coverage and the Characteristics of Households and Respondents      Suriname MICS4 13 Characteristics of Female Respondents 15-49 Years of Age and Children Under-5 Tables HH.4 and HH.5 provide information on the background characteristics of female respondents 15‐49  years of age and of children under age 5.  In both tables, the total numbers of weighted and unweighted  observations  are  equal,  since  sample  weights  have  been  normalized  (standardized).  In  addition  to  providing useful information on the background characteristics of women and children, the tables are also  intended to show the numbers of observations in each background category. These categories are used in  the subsequent tabulations of this report.  Table HH.4 (page 14) provides background characteristics of female respondents 15‐49 years of age. The  table  includes  information  on  the  distribution  of  women  according  to  district,  urban‐rural  areas,  age,  marital status, motherhood status, education6, wealth  index quintiles7, and ethnicity. The distribution of  women  15‐49  years  by  background  characteristics  such  as  district,  area  (urban/rural),  and  ethnicity  of  household head is very similar to corresponding distributions observed in the context of households. While  just over  70 percent of  these women  attained  at  least  secondary‐level  education  (71%),  corresponding  proportions attaining at most a primary level education or no education whatsoever are observed to be 21  percent and 6 percent, respectively.   Among  the  15‐49  year  old  women,  the  largest  group  is  aged  15‐19  years  (17%)  with  corresponding  proportions  following  a  generally  downward  trend  in  successive  five‐year  age  groups.  The  smallest  proportion  amounting  to  12  percent  were  age  45‐49  years.  In  accordance  with  the  MICS  sample,  the  proportion of women in each of the wealth quintile groups is inversely related to wealth quintile with the  highest proportion in the wealthiest quintile (21%) and the lowest proportion in the poorest quintile (18%).  More than half of the women 15‐49 years in the MICS sample were currently married or in a common‐law  relationship (54%) compared to 32 percent that were never married or never in a union. Some 10 percent  were  separated  with  substantially  smaller  proportions  being  either    divorced  (2%)  or  widowed  (1%).  Almost two thirds of the women (65%) had given birth in their life and 17 percent indicated that they had a  birth in the past two years.                                                               6Unless otherwise stated, “education” refers to educational level attended by the respondent throughout this report  when it is used as a background variable.  7 Principal components analysis was performed by using information on the ownership of consumer goods, dwelling  characteristics, water and sanitation, and other characteristics that are related to the household’s wealth to assign  weights (factor scores) to each of the household assets. Each household was then assigned a wealth score based on  these weights and the assets owned by that household. The survey household population was then ranked according  to the wealth score of the household they are living in, and was finally divided into 5 equal parts (quintiles) from  lowest (poorest) to highest (richest). The assets used in these calculations were as follows: persons per sleeping  room, type of floor, type of roof, type of wall, type of cooking fuel, other household assets namely: electricity, radio,  television, mobile telephone, non‐mobile telephone, refrigerator, computer, washing machine, ownership of a watch,  bicycle, motor cycle/scooter, car/truck, boat with motor, source of drinking water, and type of sanitary facility. The  wealth index is assumed to capture the underlying long‐term wealth through information on the household assets,  and is intended to produce a ranking of households by wealth, from poorest to richest. The wealth index does not  provide information on absolute poverty, current income or expenditure levels. The wealth scores calculated are  applicable for only the particular data set they are based on. Further information on the construction of the wealth  index can be found in Filmer, D. and Pritchett, L., 2001. “Estimating wealth effects without expenditure data – or  tears: An application to educational enrolments in states of India”. Demography 38(1): 115‐132. Gwatkin, D.R.,  Rutstein, S., Johnson, K. , Pande, R. and Wagstaff. A., 2000. Socio‐Economic Differences in Health, Nutrition, and  Population. HNP/Poverty Thematic Group, Washington, DC: World Bank. Rutstein, S.O. and Johnson, K., 2004. The DHS  Wealth Index. DHS Comparative Reports No. 6. Calverton, Maryland: ORC Macro.   Sample Coverage and the Characteristics of Households and Respondents  14 Suriname MICS4    Table HH.4: Women's background characteristics Percent and frequency distribution of women age 15-49 years by selected background characteristics, Suriname, 2010 Weighted percent Number of women Weighted Unweighted District Paramaribo 48.3 3,037 1,836 Wanica 19.9 1,252 749 Nickerie 7.5 471 669 Coronie 0.5 31 58 Saramacca 3.2 198 375 Commewijne 4.7 296 352 Marowijne 3.3 208 425 Para 3.3 205 360 Brokopondo 2.1 132 331 Sipaliwini 7.3 461 1,135 Area Urban 73.5 4,620 2,788 Rural Coastal 17.1 1,077 2,036 Rural interior 9.4 593 1,466 Total Rural 26.5 1,670 3,502 Age 15-19 17.2 1,085 1,088 20-24 15.8 991 965 25-29 15.5 972 991 30-34 13.0 816 838 35-39 13.5 852 856 40-44 13.2 831 839 45-49 11.8 743 713 Marital/Union status Currently married/in union 54.1 3,406 3,470 Widowed 1.1 72 78 Divorced 2.4 153 133 Separated 10.0 630 750 Never married/in union 31.8 1,998 1,825 Missing 0.5 32 34 Motherhood status Ever gave birth 64.8 4,078 4,343 Never gave birth 34.7 2,180 1,926 Missing 0.5 32 21 Births in last two years Had a birth in last two years 16.9 1,060 1,265 Had no birth in last two years 82.6 5,198 5,004 Missing 0.5 32 21 Education None 5.7 361 718 Primary 21.2 1,335 1,683 Secondary + 71.0 4,463 3,785 Other/Non-standard 1.8 111 85 Missing/DK 0.3 21 19     Sample Coverage and the Characteristics of Households and Respondents      Suriname MICS4 15 Table HH.4: Women's background characteristics (continued) Weighted percent Number of women Weighted Unweighted Wealth index quintile Poorest 17.8 1,117 1,981 Second 19.6 1,231 1,199 Middle 20.3 1,276 1,079 Fourth 21.1 1,328 1,064 Richest 21.3 1,339 967 Ethnicity of household head Indigenous/Amerindian 3.9 246 372 Maroon 24.0 1,510 2,178 Creole 16.8 1,056 762 Hindustani 29.4 1,851 1,613 Javanese 13.8 870 783 Mixed 9.9 621 475 Others 2.1 131 100 Missing/DK 0.1 5 7 Total 100.0 6,290 6,290 Please  note  the  small  number  of  cases  with  “Missing/DK”  in  background  characteristics  ‘Education  of  women’ and  ‘Ethnicity of household head’. As  these characteristics are used  throughout  the  report and  indicator  values  for  “Missing/DK”  are  required  to  be  suppressed  consistently,  the  tables  in  the  report  presenting these background characteristics  for women do not  include the  ‘Missing/DK’ categories or,  in  other words, the rows are suppressed. Whenever this approach  is applied to a table, a note  is presented  below the table. The implication of this approach is that the denominator sum will not add up to the total  denominator in such tables.  Some background characteristics of children under 5 years are presented  in Table HH.5 (page 16). These  include  distribution  of  children  by  several  attributes:  sex,  district,  area,  age  in  months,  mothers  (or  caretaker’s) education, wealth, and ethnicity. The sex composition  is  indicative of an even split between  the sexes with males marginally outnumbering females. The largest group of children were 12‐23 months  (23%)  while  the  smallest  proportion  were  children  under  6  months  (9%).  If,  however,  the  ages  were  distributed  in accordance with 12‐month age groups, children under 5 years will virtually be distributed  evenly, though with the smallest group being age 48‐59 months (18%).  More than half of the children under 5 years reside  in the two districts of Paramaribo (39%) and Wanica  (18%). The rural  interior consisting of Sipaliwini  (16%) and Brokopondo (5%) accounted for  just over one  fifth of all children under 5 years. Nickerie and Marowijne each accounted  for almost 6 percent, but the  smallest  proportion  is  evident  in  Coronie  (0.4%).  Although  the majority  of  children  live  in  urban  areas  (61%),  a  comparison with  the national distribution of  the population by urban/rural  areas  suggest  that  children under age 5 constitute a noteworthy proportion of persons living in rural communities.  A high proportion of children are born  in households headed by a Maroon (42%). Although the group of  Hindustanis constitute  the  largest share of  the national population,  just about 20 percent of all children  under 5 years live in households headed by a  Hindustani. Relatively lower proportions of children under 5  years live in households headed by Creole (13%) and Javanese (11%) persons. More than a half of children  under age 5 were born  to mothers who had at  least a  secondary‐level education  (55%). As much as 14  percent were born to mothers who had no education whatsoever. The MICS sample is consistent with an  inverse relationship between wealth  index quintile groups and the proportion of children  in the different  quintiles. A little more than one third (34%) of the children were in the poorest wealth quintile while a little  more than one tenth were in the wealthiest quintile group (13%).  Sample Coverage and the Characteristics of Households and Respondents  16 Suriname MICS4  Table HH.5: Under-5's background characteristics Percent and frequency distribution of children under five years of age by selected characteristics, Suriname, 2010 Weighted percent Number of under-5 children Weighted Unweighted Sex Male 50.1 1,659 1,644 Female 49.8 1,649 1,663 Missing 0.0 1 1 District Paramaribo 38.5 1,274 634 Wanica 18.1 599 295 Nickerie 5.7 188 223 Coronie 0.4 14 22 Saramacca 2.8 91 140 Commewijne 3.7 122 119 Marowijne 5.8 192 318 Para 3.7 122 174 Brokopondo 5.1 167 333 Sipaliwini 16.2 537 1,050 Area Urban 60.5 2,001 993 Rural Coastal 18.2 603 932 Rural interior 21.3 705 1,383 Total Rural 39.5 1,307 2,315 Age 0-5 months 8.6 286 304 6-11 months 10.9 360 351 12-23 months 22.5 744 711 24-35 months 19.3 640 657 36-47 months 21.0 694 699 48-59 months 17.7 584 586 Mother’s education* None 13.7 454 728 Primary 29.2 967 1,157 Secondary + 55.1 1,824 1,375 Other/Non-standard 1.4 48 35 Missing/DK 0.5 16 13 Wealth index quintile Poorest 34.4 1,139 1,758 Second 20.4 675 564 Middle 17.0 563 401 Fourth 15.2 501 327 Richest 13.0 429 258 Ethnicity of household head Indigenous/Amerindian 4.6 153 215 Maroon 42.0 1,389 1,860 Creole 12.9 428 267 Hindustani 19.5 644 480 Javanese 10.5 346 250 Mixed 9.3 308 207 Others 1.1 38 24 Missing/DK 0.1 3 5 Total 100.0 3,308 3,308 * Mother's education refers to educational attainment of mothers (or caretakers) of children under 5.   Sample Coverage and the Characteristics of Households and Respondents      Suriname MICS4 17 Please  note  the  small  number  of  cases  with  “Missing”,  “Missing/DK”  or  “Others”  in  background  characteristics  ‘Sex’,  ‘Mother’s education’ and  ‘Ethnicity of household head’. As  these characteristics are  used throughout the report and indicator values for “Missing’, “Missing/DK” and “Others” are required to  be  suppressed  consistently,  the  tables  in  the  report  presenting  these  background  characteristics  for  children  under  age  five  do  not  include  these  categories  or,  in  other  words,  the  rows  are  suppressed.  Whenever this approach is applied to a table, a note is presented below the table. The implication of this  approach is that the denominator sum will not add up to the total denominator in such tables.  Children’s Living Arrangements and Orphans Table HH.6 (page 18) presents information on the  living arrangements and orphanhood status of children  under age 18. As much as 56 percent of children 0‐17 years lived with both parents while 29 percent lived  with their mothers only despite the fact that their fathers were alive. Another 6 percent of children  lived  with neither parent although both were alive.  In total, 8 percent of children did not  live with a biological  parent and 5 percent had lost one or both parents. As the wealth of households increase, the likelihood of  the child living with both parents increase. As many as 38 percent of children from the poorest households  lived  only with their mother, despite their father being alive. Saramacca and Nickerie stand out among the  districts, where 79 percent of children  live with both parents. At  the other end of  the scale,  in Coronie,  Brokopondo,  and  Sipaliwini,  less  than  half  of  children  live with  both  their  parents. Over  10  percent  of  children in these three districts do not live with a biological parent.   Due  to  the  low  prevalence  (0.4%)  of  orphans,  that  is  children whose mother  and  father  have  died,  in  Suriname,  it  is not possible to produce the standard MICS table comparing school attendance of orphans  and non‐orphans age 10‐14. However, as  it  is part of an MDG  indicator,  the percentage of non‐orphans  who are attending school should be mentioned: 97%.  Sa m pl e C ov er ag e a nd  th e C ha ra ct er ist ic s o f H ou se ho ld s a nd  Re sp on de nt s  18 Su rin am e M IC S4      Ta bl e H H .6 : C hi ld re n' s liv in g ar ra ng em en ts a nd o rp ha nh oo d P er ce nt d is tri bu tio n of c hi ld re n ag e 0- 17 y ea rs a cc or di ng to li vi ng a rr an ge m en ts , p er ce nt ag e of c hi ld re n ag e 0- 17 y ea rs in h ou se ho ld s no t l iv in g w ith a b io lo gi ca l p ar en t a nd p er ce nt ag e of ch ild re n w ho h av e on e or b ot h pa re nt s de ad , S ur in am e, 2 01 0 Li vi ng w ith bo th pa re nt s Li vi ng w ith n ei th er p ar en t Li vi ng w ith m ot he r o nl y Li vi ng w ith fa th er o nl y Im po ss ib le to de te rm in e To ta l N ot li vi ng w ith a bi ol og ic al pa re nt 1 O ne or bo th pa re nt s de ad 2 N um be r of ch ild re n ag e 0- 17 ye ar s O nl y fa th er al iv e O nl y m ot he r al iv e B ot h al iv e B ot h de ad Fa th er al iv e Fa th er de ad M ot he r al iv e M ot he r de ad Se x* M al e 56 .4 0. 6 0. 7 5. 6 0. 4 28 .7 2. 4 2. 6 0. 4 2. 2 10 0. 0 7. 3 4. 5 5, 11 8 Fe m al e 56 .0 0. 8 0. 4 7. 0 0. 3 28 .4 2. 5 1. 8 0. 5 2. 4 10 0. 0 8. 5 4. 6 4, 82 3 D is tr ic t P ar am ar ib o 51 .2 0. 9 0. 6 5. 3 0. 5 31 .0 3. 0 3. 7 0. 5 3. 3 10 0. 0 7. 2 5. 7 4, 05 0 W an ic a 62 .1 0. 6 0. 7 5. 5 0. 4 25 .3 1. 7 1. 2 0. 7 1. 9 10 0. 0 7. 2 4. 0 1, 80 4 N ic ke rie 78 .8 0. 6 1. 1 3. 1 0. 5 11 .0 2. 0 1. 4 0. 2 1. 3 10 0. 0 5. 3 4. 6 64 9 C or on ie 42 .7 1. 0 0. 0 13 .6 0. 0 39 .8 1. 9 1. 0 0. 0 0. 0 10 0. 0 14 .6 2. 9 56 S ar am ac ca 78 .9 0. 2 0. 4 3. 6 0. 0 9. 2 2. 9 2. 2 1. 1 1. 6 10 0. 0 4. 1 4. 5 30 4 C om m ew ijn e 72 .0 0. 4 0. 1 5. 6 0. 1 16 .2 1. 5 1. 1 0. 0 3. 0 10 0. 0 6. 3 2. 2 40 7 M ar ow ijn e 54 .6 0. 5 0. 6 8. 0 0. 0 30 .7 2. 1 1. 6 0. 4 1. 5 10 0. 0 9. 1 3. 6 52 4 P ar a 53 .3 0. 7 0. 7 8. 4 0. 1 31 .7 2. 0 1. 7 0. 4 1. 2 10 0. 0 9. 8 3. 8 45 1 B ro ko po nd o 46 .0 1. 0 0. 4 11 .5 0. 1 36 .8 2. 3 0. 6 0. 2 1. 0 10 0. 0 13 .0 4. 0 42 3 S ip al iw in i 47 .4 0. 4 0. 4 9. 5 0. 1 37 .6 2. 6 0. 4 0. 0 1. 4 10 0. 0 10 .5 3. 6 1, 27 3 A re a U rb an 55 .7 0. 8 0. 6 5. 2 0. 4 28 .5 2. 6 2. 7 0. 5 2. 9 10 0. 0 7. 1 5. 1 6, 32 4 R ur al C oa st al 65 .8 0. 4 0. 7 6. 4 0. 1 20 .9 2. 0 1. 9 0. 4 1. 4 10 0. 0 7. 6 3. 7 1, 92 2 R ur al in te rio r 47 .1 0. 6 0. 4 10 .0 0. 1 37 .4 2. 6 0. 5 0. 1 1. 3 10 0. 0 11 .1 3. 7 1, 69 5 To ta l R ur al 57 .0 0. 5 0. 5 8. 1 0. 1 28 .6 2. 3 1. 2 0. 3 1. 3 10 0. 0 9. 3 3. 7 3, 61 8 A ge 0- 4 61 .4 0. 3 0. 1 4. 0 0. 2 30 .6 0. 8 1. 2 0. 1 1. 3 10 0. 0 4. 6 1. 6 2, 90 8 5- 9 56 .3 0. 7 0. 4 6. 0 0. 2 29 .7 2. 1 2. 5 0. 5 1. 7 10 0. 0 7. 3 3. 9 2, 81 2 10 -1 4 54 .9 0. 8 0. 9 7. 4 0. 4 26 .8 3. 8 2. 6 0. 6 1. 8 10 0. 0 9. 6 6. 8 2, 79 5 15 -1 7 48 .0 1. 4 1. 2 9. 3 0. 6 25 .4 3. 9 3. 0 0. 6 6. 6 10 0. 0 12 .5 7. 7 1, 42 6     Sa m pl e C ov er ag e a nd  th e C ha ra ct er ist ic s o f H ou se ho ld s a nd  Re sp on de nt s          Su rin am e M IC S4 19   Ta bl e H H .6 : C hi ld re n' s liv in g ar ra ng em en ts a nd o rp ha nh oo d P er ce nt d is tri bu tio n of c hi ld re n ag e 0- 17 y ea rs a cc or di ng to li vi ng a rr an ge m en ts , p er ce nt ag e of c hi ld re n ag e 0- 17 y ea rs in h ou se ho ld s no t l iv in g w ith a b io lo gi ca l p ar en t a nd p er ce nt ag e of ch ild re n w ho h av e on e or b ot h pa re nt s de ad , S ur in am e, 2 01 0 Li vi ng w ith bo th pa re nt s Li vi ng w ith n ei th er p ar en t Li vi ng w ith m ot he r o nl y Li vi ng w ith fa th er o nl y Im po ss ib le to de te rm in e To ta l N ot li vi ng w ith a bi ol og ic al pa re nt 1 O ne or bo th pa re nt s de ad 2 N um be r of ch ild re n ag e 0- 17 ye ar s O nl y fa th er al iv e O nl y m ot he r al iv e B ot h al iv e B ot h de ad Fa th er al iv e Fa th er de ad M ot he r al iv e M ot he r de ad W ea lth in de x qu in til es P oo re st 46 .2 0. 8 0. 7 7. 8 0. 5 38 .0 2. 7 0. 9 0. 1 2. 3 10 0. 0 9. 8 4. 9 2, 89 9 S ec on d 56 .3 0. 4 0. 6 6. 4 0. 1 26 .8 2. 8 3. 1 0. 7 2. 8 10 0. 0 7. 5 4. 6 2, 16 7 M id dl e 59 .0 0. 6 0. 7 5. 6 0. 3 25 .3 2. 4 2. 8 0. 7 2. 7 10 0. 0 7. 1 4. 9 1, 75 6 Fo ur th 63 .6 1. 0 0. 2 5. 4 0. 6 23 .7 1. 8 2. 0 0. 5 1. 3 10 0. 0 7. 1 4. 2 1, 60 9 R ic he st 64 .2 0. 8 0. 6 5. 0 0. 1 21 .9 2. 3 2. 9 0. 1 2. 1 10 0. 0 6. 5 4. 0 1, 51 1 Et hn ic ity o f h ou se ho ld h ea d* In di ge no us /A m er in di an 73 .0 0. 1 0. 4 5. 9 0. 4 15 .6 0. 8 2. 0 0. 9 0. 9 10 0. 0 6. 9 2. 7 53 6 M ar oo n 41 .3 0. 8 0. 7 8. 9 0. 5 40 .8 3. 0 1. 5 0. 1 2. 4 10 0. 0 10 .8 5. 1 3, 73 7 C re ol e 43 .7 0. 8 0. 6 5. 2 0. 2 40 .2 2. 5 3. 0 0. 5 3. 3 10 0. 0 6. 8 5. 0 1, 46 9 H in du st an i 78 .4 0. 8 0. 5 2. 7 0. 3 10 .3 2. 0 2. 4 0. 5 2. 0 10 0. 0 4. 3 4. 1 2, 13 5 Ja va ne se 72 .7 0. 1 0. 5 5. 1 0. 1 15 .7 0. 8 2. 5 0. 5 2. 1 10 0. 0 5. 7 2. 1 1, 07 1 M ix ed 53 .3 1. 3 0. 7 8. 0 0. 4 26 .1 4. 4 2. 9 1. 0 2. 0 10 0. 0 10 .4 7. 8 84 7 O th er s 74 .0 0. 0 0. 0 0. 3 0. 0 18 .4 1. 2 3. 6 0. 0 2. 4 10 0. 0 0. 3 1. 2 13 8 To ta l 56 .2 0. 7 0. 6 6. 3 0. 3 28 .5 2. 5 2. 2 0. 4 2. 3 10 0. 0 7. 9 4. 6 9, 94 1 * ‘M is si ng /D K ’ c at eg or ie s no t s ho w n du e to lo w n um be r o f o bs er va tio ns 1 M IC S in di ca to r 9 .1 7 2 M IC S in di ca to r 9 .1 8 Nutrition  20 Suriname MICS4   4. Nutrition   Nutrition      Suriname MICS4 21 Nutritional Status Children’s  nutritional  status  is  a  reflection  of  their  overall  health.  When  children  have  access  to  an  adequate food supply, are not exposed to repeated illness, and are well cared for, they reach their growth  potential and are considered well nourished.  Malnutrition is associated with more than half of all child deaths worldwide. Undernourished children are  more likely to die from common childhood ailments, and for those who survive, have recurring sicknesses  and faltering growth. Three‐quarters of the children who die from causes related to malnutrition were only  mildly  or  moderately  malnourished  –  showing  no  outward  sign  of  their  vulnerability.  The  Millennium  Development target  is to reduce by half the proportion of people who suffer from hunger between 1990  and 2015. A reduction in the prevalence of malnutrition will also assist in the goal to reduce child mortality.  In a well‐nourished population,  there  is a  reference distribution of height and weight  for children under  age  five.  Under‐nourishment  in  a  population  can  be  gauged  by  comparing  children  to  a  reference  population. The reference population used in this report is based on the WHO growth standards8. Each of  the  three nutritional  status  indicators  can be  expressed  in  standard deviation units  (z‐scores)  from  the  median of the reference population.   Weight‐for‐age  is  a measure  of  both  acute  and  chronic malnutrition.  Children whose weight‐for‐age  is  more  than  two  standard  deviations  below  the  median  of  the  reference  population  are  considered  moderately  or  severely  underweight  while  those  whose  weight‐for‐age  is  more  than  three  standard  deviations below the median are classified as severely underweight.  Height‐for‐age  is a measure of  linear growth. Children whose height‐for‐age  is more  than  two  standard  deviations  below  the  median  of  the  reference  population  are  considered  short  for  their  age  and  are  classified  as moderately  or  severely    stunted.  Those whose  height‐for‐age  is more  than  three  standard  deviations  below  the  median  are  classified  as  severely  stunted.  Stunting  is  a  reflection  of  chronic  malnutrition as a result of failure to receive adequate nutrition over a long period and recurrent or chronic  illness.   Finally, children whose weight‐for‐height  is more  than two standard deviations below the median of  the  reference population are classified as moderately or severely wasted, while those who fall more than three  standard deviations below the median are classified as severely wasted. Wasting  is usually the result of a  recent nutritional deficiency. The indicator may exhibit significant seasonal shifts associated with changes  in the availability of food or disease prevalence.   In MICS, weights and heights of all  children under 5 years of age were measured using anthropometric  equipment recommended by UNICEF (www.childinfo.org). Findings in this section are based on the results  of these measurements.   Table NU.1 (page 24) shows percentages of children classified into each of these categories, based on the  anthropometric  measurements  that  were  taken  during  fieldwork.  Additionally,  the  table  includes  the  percentage of  children who  are overweight, which  takes  into  account  those  children whose weight  for  height is above 2 standard deviations from the median of the reference population, and mean z‐scores for  all three anthropometric indicators.  Children whose full birth date (month and year) were not obtained, and children whose measurements are  outside a plausible range are excluded  from Table NU.1. Children are excluded  from one or more of the  anthropometric indicators when their weights and heights have not been measured, whichever applicable.                                                               8 http://www.who.int/childgrowth/standards/second_set/technical_report_2.pdf   Nutrition  22 Suriname MICS4  For example if a child has been weighed but his/her height has not been measured, the child is included in  underweight calculations, but not  in the calculations for stunting and wasting. Percentages of children by  age and reasons for exclusion are shown in the data quality tables DQ.6 and DQ.7 in Appendix D. Overall 13  percent of children did not have both weights and heights measured (Table DQ.6, page 210). Table DQ.7  (page 211) shows  that due  to  incomplete dates of birth,  implausible measurements, and missing weight  and/or height, 15 percent of children have been excluded from calculations of the weight‐for‐age indicator,  while the figures are 19 percent for the height‐for‐age indicator, and 19 percent for the weight‐for‐height  indicator.  Such  relatively  high  rates  of  excluded  children  warrant  cautious  interpretation  of  the  anthropometric indicators.  The MICS shows that almost 6 percent of children under age five  in Suriname are moderately or severely  underweight (5.8 percent) and 1.3 percent are classified as severely underweight. Just under one tenth of  children (9%) are moderately or severely stunted (too short for their age) and 5 percent are moderately or  severely wasted (too thin for their height).   Figure NU.1: Percentage of children under age 5   Wasting prevalence  is  lowest  in  rural  interior areas, but,  in  contrast,  stunting prevalence  is  significantly  higher, mainly driven by 17 percent moderate and  severe stunting  in Sipaliwini. High stunting  levels are  also seen among children of mothers with no education and  in the poorest wealth quintile at 17 and 13  percent, respectively. Considering the caution necessary with this data and the confidence  intervals they  carry, no further observations seem appropriate.  With  reference  to  Figure NU.1  above, undernourishment  is  assessed  children  less  than  6 months,  6‐11  months, 12‐23 months, 24‐35 months, 36‐47 months and 48‐59 months. For children aged 12‐23 months  or  in an older age group, stunting prevalence  is greater  than underweight and wasting prevalence. With  regard to stunting, the highest prevalence rates are observed among children 12‐23 months and declines  markedly  among  children  in  each  of  the  successive  age  groups.  With  regard  to  being  underweight  or  0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 0 6 12 18 24 30 36 42 48 54 60 Pe rc en t Age (in months) Figure NU.1: Percentage of children under age 5 who are underweight, stunted, and wasted, Suriname, 2010 Underweight Stunted Wasted Nutrition      Suriname MICS4 23 wasted, there appears to be little or no differences in prevalence rates between children in age groups 12‐ 23 months or older age groups.  Breastfeeding and Infant and Young Child Feeding Breastfeeding  for  the  first  few years of  life protects children  from  infection, provides an  ideal  source of  nutrients, and is economical and safe. However, many mothers stop breastfeeding too soon and there are  often pressures  to  switch  to  infant  formula, which can contribute  to growth  faltering and micronutrient  malnutrition and is unsafe if clean water is not readily available.   WHO/UNICEF have the following feeding recommendations:   Exclusive breastfeeding for first six months   Continued breastfeeding for two years or more    Safe and age‐appropriate complementary foods beginning at 6 months   Frequency of complementary feeding: 2 times per day for 6‐8 month olds; 3 times per day for 9‐11  month olds    It is also recommended that breastfeeding be initiated within one hour of birth.  The indicators related to recommended child feeding practices are as follows:   Early initiation of breastfeeding (within 1 hour of birth)   Exclusive breastfeeding rate (< 6 months)   Predominant breastfeeding (< 6 months)   Continued breastfeeding rate (at 1 year and at 2 years)   Duration of breastfeeding   Age‐appropriate breastfeeding (0‐23 months)   Introduction of solid, semi‐solid and soft foods (6‐8 months)   Minimum meal frequency (6‐23 months)   Milk feeding frequency for non‐breastfeeding children (6‐23 months)   Bottle feeding (0‐23 months)    Table  NU.2  (page  26)  provides  the  proportion  of  children  born  in  the  last  two  years  who  were  ever  breastfed, those who were first breastfed within one hour and one day of birth, and those who received a  prelacteal  feed.  These  practices  are  very  important  step  in  the  management  of  lactation  and  the  establishment of a physical and emotional  relationship between  the baby and  the mother. Figure NU.2  (page 27)  is  illustrative of  the proportion of women who  started breastfeeding  their  infants within one  hour of birth, and women who started breastfeeding within one day of birth  (which  includes  those who  started within one hour). Whether within one day or one hour, greater proportions of mothers from rural  districts such as Sipaliwini (81% and 63%), Para (79% and 53%), Brokopondo (74% and 63%) and Nickerie  (77% and 53%) are observed  to have  initiated breastfeeding within such  time spans subsequent  to  their  infants’ births when compared to corresponding proportions in urban areas such as Paramaribo (52% and  36%) and Wanica (64% and 43%). At the national level, approximately 45 percent of mothers responded to  have  initiated breastfeeding of their  infants within  the  first hour of birth while as much as 64%  initiated  such feeding within the first day.  N ut rit io n  24 Su rin am e M IC S4     Ta bl e N U .1 : N ut rit io na l s ta tu s of c hi ld re n P er ce nt ag e of c hi ld re n un de r a ge 5 b y nu tri tio na l s ta tu s ac co rd in g to th re e an th ro po m et ric in di ce s: w ei gh t f or a ge , h ei gh t f or a ge , a nd w ei gh t f or h ei gh t, S ur in am e, 2 01 0 W ei gh t f or a ge N um be r of ch ild re n un de r ag e 5 H ei gh t f or a ge N um be r of ch ild re n un de r ag e 5 W ei gh t f or h ei gh t N um be r of ch ild re n un de r ag e 5 U nd er w ei gh t M ea n Z- S co re (S D ) St un te d M ea n Z- S co re (S D ) W as te d O ve rw ei gh t M ea n Z- S co re (S D ) pe rc en t b el ow pe rc en t b el ow pe rc en t b el ow pe rc en t ab ov e - 2 S D 1 - 3 S D 2 - 2 S D 3 - 3 S D 4 - 2 S D 5 - 3 S D 6 + 2 S D Se x M al e 6. 2 1. 1 -0 .4 1, 43 9 9. 9 2. 6 -0 .5 1, 37 6 5. 7 0. 9 5. 0 -0 .1 1, 37 0 Fe m al e 5. 3 1. 4 -0 .3 1, 43 2 7. 6 1. 8 -0 .4 1, 36 9 4. 2 0. 8 3. 0 -0 .2 1, 35 5 A re a U rb an 5. 6 1. 1 -0 .3 1, 77 5 6. 8 2. 0 -0 .3 1, 69 2 5. 0 0. 8 4. 3 -0 .2 1, 67 8 R ur al C oa st al 7. 2 1. 8 -0 .4 52 5 8. 8 1. 8 -0 .4 50 0 6. 9 1. 1 4. 9 -0 .2 49 6 R ur al in te rio r 5. 1 1. 1 -0 .5 57 0 14 .9 3. 1 -0 .8 55 2 3. 1 0. 6 2. 2 -0 .1 55 1 To ta l R ur al 6. 1 1. 4 -0 .5 1, 09 5 12 .0 2. 5 -0 .6 1, 05 2 4. 9 0. 8 3. 5 -0 .1 1, 04 7 D is tr ic t P ar am ar ib o 5. 6 1. 1 -0 .2 1, 11 8 5. 8 1. 9 -0 .2 1, 06 7 5. 0 0. 8 4. 2 -0 .1 1, 05 3 W an ic a 5. 6 1. 5 -0 .4 54 2 9. 7 2. 7 -0 .5 52 2 5. 1 0. 8 5. 4 -0 .2 52 2 N ic ke rie 8. 3 1. 5 -0 .4 17 4 5. 9 0. 8 -0 .3 16 7 9. 2 1. 2 4. 8 -0 .3 16 4 C or on ie (* ) (* ) (* ) 14 (* ) (* ) (* ) 14 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 14 S ar am ac ca 4. 8 0. 8 -0 .5 82 6. 8 0. 8 -0 .5 77 5. 1 0. 0 5. 1 -0 .3 77 C om m ew ijn e 8. 9 0. 6 -0 .5 10 4 5. 9 0. 7 -0 .3 90 13 .2 4. 4 2. 9 -0 .6 90 M ar ow ijn e 5. 1 2. 6 -0 .3 16 5 9. 1 2. 7 -0 .5 15 9 2. 7 0. 4 4. 6 0. 0 15 7 P ar a 6. 9 1. 4 -0 .4 10 1 11 .8 2. 2 -0 .5 96 3. 6 0. 7 2. 9 -0 .2 96 B ro ko po nd o 5. 7 0. 4 -0 .4 12 4 7. 5 1. 2 -0 .6 12 7 3. 3 0. 8 3. 3 -0 .2 12 3 S ip al iw in i 4. 9 1. 3 -0 .5 44 6 17 .1 3. 7 -0 .9 42 5 3. 1 0. 6 1. 9 0. 0 42 9 A ge 0- 5 m on th s 11 .0 2. 8 -0 .3 24 5 9. 4 6. 6 -0 .3 22 8 5. 4 1. 9 6. 5 -0 .1 21 5 6- 11 m on th s 5. 8 1. 6 -0 .2 32 4 5. 7 1. 3 0. 1 31 3 8. 6 1. 9 3. 8 -0 .2 31 3 12 -2 3 m on th s 5. 8 0. 9 -0 .3 67 0 12 .0 1. 9 -0 .5 62 8 3. 9 0. 3 5. 5 -0 .1 62 6 24 -3 5 m on th s 5. 1 0. 6 -0 .4 53 7 9. 1 3. 1 -0 .6 50 6 4. 9 1. 3 4. 0 -0 .1 50 7 36 -4 7 m on th s 5. 0 1. 9 -0 .5 58 2 8. 4 1. 8 -0 .6 56 5 3. 7 0. 2 3. 8 -0 .2 55 9 48 -5 9 m on th s 4. 8 0. 7 -0 .5 51 2 6. 6 0. 8 -0 .4 50 5 5. 4 0. 7 1. 4 -0 .4 50 6     N ut rit io n          Su rin am e M IC S4 25 Ta bl e N U .1 : N ut rit io na l s ta tu s of c hi ld re n (c on tin ue d) P er ce nt ag e of c hi ld re n un de r a ge 5 b y nu tri tio na l s ta tu s ac co rd in g to th re e an th ro po m et ric in di ce s: w ei gh t f or a ge , h ei gh t f or a ge , a nd w ei gh t f or h ei gh t, S ur in am e, 2 01 0 W ei gh t f or a ge N um be r of ch ild re n un de r ag e 5 H ei gh t f or a ge N um be r of ch ild re n un de r ag e 5 W ei gh t f or h ei gh t N um be r of ch ild re n un de r ag e 5 U nd er w ei gh t M ea n Z- S co re (S D ) St un te d M ea n Z- S co re (S D ) W as te d O ve rw ei gh t M ea n Z- S co re (S D ) pe rc en t b el ow pe rc en t b el ow pe rc en t b el ow pe rc en t ab ov e - 2 S D 1 - 3 S D 2 - 2 S D 3 - 3 S D 4 - 2 S D 5 - 3 S D 6 + 2 S D M ot he r’s e du ca tio n* N on e 4. 4 0. 8 -0 .5 37 0 17 .0 5. 6 -0 .9 35 7 2. 4 0. 3 2. 2 -0 .1 35 7 P rim ar y 7. 2 1. 8 -0 .4 85 7 10 .6 2. 5 -0 .5 81 7 6. 0 1. 3 2. 4 -0 .2 80 9 S ec on da ry + 5. 2 1. 1 -0 .3 1, 58 6 6. 0 1. 3 -0 .3 1, 51 4 5. 1 0. 7 5. 0 -0 .2 1, 50 3 O th er /N on -s ta nd ar d (1 1. 4) (0 .0 ) (-0 .2 ) 41 (4 .9 ) (0 .0 ) (-0 .3 ) 41 (4 .9 ) (0 .0 ) (4 .9 ) (0 .0 ) 41 W ea lth in de x qu in til e P oo re st 6. 2 1. 6 -0 .5 94 9 13 .4 3. 4 -0 .7 90 2 4. 0 1. 0 3. 1 -0 .1 90 0 S ec on d 5. 6 1. 1 -0 .4 60 7 8. 3 1. 2 -0 .4 58 3 6. 5 0. 7 2. 4 -0 .2 57 9 M id dl e 5. 2 1. 3 -0 .2 50 0 5. 1 1. 5 -0 .2 48 2 6. 0 1. 1 6. 0 -0 .2 47 7 Fo ur th 6. 9 1. 2 -0 .3 44 4 6. 6 2. 7 -0 .3 42 4 5. 2 1. 1 4. 6 -0 .2 42 2 R ic he st 4. 2 0. 5 -0 .2 37 0 5. 5 1. 1 -0 .2 35 3 3. 5 0. 0 5. 6 -0 .1 34 7 Et hn ic ity o f h ou se ho ld h ea d* In di ge no us /A m er in di an 4. 5 1. 8 -0 .1 13 9 12 .1 3. 6 -0 .6 12 8 1. 8 0. 0 4. 9 0. 3 12 8 M ar oo n 4. 4 1. 1 -0 .4 1, 15 9 11 .1 2. 8 -0 .6 1, 11 9 3. 7 1. 1 3. 4 -0 .1 1, 11 3 C re ol e 6. 3 1. 1 -0 .3 38 3 3. 5 0. 6 -0 .1 36 2 4. 5 0. 7 4. 7 -0 .2 35 8 H in du st an i 9. 1 1. 8 -0 .6 58 7 5. 6 1. 7 -0 .3 56 3 9. 3 0. 8 2. 6 -0 .5 56 1 Ja va ne se 7. 0 1. 9 -0 .5 29 1 11 .9 2. 3 -0 .7 26 7 5. 3 0. 5 6. 3 -0 .1 26 3 M ix ed 2. 8 0. 2 -0 .1 27 9 9. 2 2. 6 -0 .2 27 2 2. 7 0. 7 6. 5 0. 1 27 0 O th er s (* ) (* ) (* ) 32 (* ) (* ) (* ) 32 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 32 To ta l 5. 8 1. 3 -0 .4 2, 87 0 8. 8 2. 2 -0 .4 2, 74 4 5. 0 0. 8 4. 0 -0 .2 2, 72 6 * ‘M is si ng /D K ’ c at eg or ie s no t s ho w n du e to lo w n um be r o f o bs er va tio ns ( ) F ig ur es th at a re b as ed o n 25 -4 9 un w ei gh te d ca se s (* ) F ig ur es th at a re b as ed o n le ss th an 2 5 un w ei gh te d ca se s 1 M IC S in di ca to r 2 .1 a an d M D G in di ca to r 1 .8 2 M IC S in di ca to r 2 .1 b 3 M IC S in di ca to r 2 .2 a 4 M IC S in di ca to r 2 .2 b 5 M IC S in di ca to r 2 .3 a 6 M IC S in di ca to r 2 .3 b Nutrition  26 Suriname MICS4    Table NU.2: Initial breastfeeding Percentage of last-born children in the 2 years preceding the survey who were ever breastfed, percentage who were breastfed within one hour of birth and within one day of birth, and percentage who received a prelacteal feed, Suriname, 2010 Percentage who were ever breastfed1 Percentage who were first breastfed: Percentage who received a prelacteal feed Number of last-born children in the two years preceding the survey Within one hour of birth2 Within one day of birth District Paramaribo 88.1 35.8 51.9 53.1 430 Wanica 92.1 43.0 64.0 46.5 191 Nickerie 91.2 52.7 77.2 52.6 61 Coronie (*) (*) (*) (*) 4 Saramacca 91.2 43.9 70.2 54.4 30 Commewijne 86.2 43.8 62.5 45.0 44 Marowijne 87.9 42.4 66.7 40.2 65 Para 92.4 53.0 78.8 53.0 38 Brokopondo 94.7 63.2 74.4 62.4 53 Sipaliwini 94.7 62.8 81.4 37.8 146 Area Urban 89.1 39.2 56.6 50.9 668 Rural Coastal 90.6 44.9 70.9 48.5 193 Rural interior 94.7 62.9 79.5 44.3 199 Total Rural 92.7 54.0 75.3 46.4 392 Months since last birth 0-11 months 92.3 41.7 62.5 50.8 509 12-23 months 88.7 47.5 64.4 47.7 551 Assistance at delivery Skilled attendant 91.2 44.7 63.5 49.8 982 Traditional birth attendant 93.4 51.4 75.9 47.2 57 Place of delivery Public sector health facility 90.5 43.9 62.5 49.7 758 Private sector health facility 94.3 48.5 66.1 52.1 220 Home 90.0 52.2 76.2 41.9 41 Other/Missing 69.3 31.5 55.4 32.5 41 Mother’s education* None 94.9 61.0 77.2 38.8 125 Primary 87.5 49.4 63.7 48.0 305 Secondary + 91.0 38.9 60.6 51.9 609 Other/Non-standard (*) (*) (*) (*) 16 Wealth index quintile Poorest 91.1 54.8 73.7 43.4 341 Second 87.3 42.9 56.1 51.5 212 Middle 88.8 39.7 64.0 45.7 200 Fourth 92.8 31.1 50.3 54.0 167 Richest 93.1 46.1 64.9 59.1 141 Ethnicity of household head* Indigenous/Amerindian 85.3 52.0 70.3 36.5 50 Maroon 91.7 53.3 70.9 45.9 429 Creole 90.7 25.0 48.4 51.4 131 Hindustani 90.8 43.0 59.2 54.0 216 Javanese 86.6 34.1 57.4 47.7 111 Mixed 90.5 43.0 62.0 55.7 104 Others (*) (*) (*) (*) 20 Total 90.4 44.7 63.5 49.2 1,060 * ‘Missing/DK’ categories not shown due to low number of observations (*) Figures that are based on less than 25 unweighted cases 1 MICS indicator 2.4 2 MICS indicator 2.5 Nutrition      Suriname MICS4 27 Figure NU.2: Percentage of mothers who started breastfeeding within one hour and within one day of birth, Suriname, 2010   In Table NU.3 (page 28), breastfeeding status  is based on the reports of mothers/caretakers of children’s  consumption  of  food  and  fluids  during  the  previous  day  or  night  prior  to  the  interview.  Exclusively  breastfed  refers  to  infants  who  received  only  breast  milk  (and  vitamins,  mineral  supplements,  or  medicine). The table shows exclusive breastfeeding of infants during the first six months of life, as well as  continued breastfeeding of children at 12‐15 and 20‐23 months of age.   Only about  three percent of  children aged  less  than  six months are exclusively breastfed. By age 12‐15  months,  23  percent of  children  are  still being  breastfed  and  by  age  20‐23 months,  15  percent  are  still  breastfed. Girls were more  likely  to be exclusively breastfed  than boys. This  is also  true with  respect  to  continued breastfeeding whether by age 12‐15 month or 20‐23 months. While there are other interesting  observations  to make,  caution  is  advised  due  to  a  limited  number  of  observations  and  therefore  large  confidence  intervals on  estimates. However,  there  is  an  interesting dynamic  to note  in  the urban/rural  disaggregation, where the urban children have  less chance of breastfeeding exclusively or predominantly  at the young age, but that the opposite holds true for continued breastfeeding at age 2. It would seem that  fewer urban women choose to breastfeed, but that those who do breastfeed continue to do so.   According  to  Figure NU.3  (page 29),  it  is estimated  that 6 percent of  children  are exclusively breastfed  among  those  in  their  first  two months of  life. Among  those  in  their  fourth and  fifth months,  less  than 1  percent (0.8%) was exclusively breastfed. Figure NU.3 also shows that approximately 6 in every 10 infants  in their first two months are breastfed and given milk or formula. This is observed to be the case for nearly  7 in every 10 infants 2‐3 months old. There appears to be consecutive increases in the proportion of infants  who are breastfed and given solid food among infants in successive two‐month age groups comprising the  first  year  of  life.  While  the  proportion  among  infants  in  their  first  two  years  of  life  is  0.6  percent,  it  increased  to  21  percent  among  infants  6‐7  months  and  32  percent  among  those  10‐11  months.  For  52 64 77 70 63 67 79 74 81 57 71 80 75 64 36 43 53 44 44 42 53 63 63 39 45 63 54 45 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 Pe rc en t Figure NU.2: Percentage of mothers who started breastfeeding within one hour and within one day of birth, Suriname, 2010 Within one day Within one hour Nutrition  28 Suriname MICS4  children under 2 years, more  than half of  the children 8‐9 months or  in older age groups are no  longer  breastfed.  Among  those  22‐23  months,  approximately  88  percent  were  no  longer  breastfeeding  thus  implying  that about 12 percent of  the  children had  still been breastfeeding while having  solid  food  just  before their second birthday.  Table NU.3: Breastfeeding Percentage of living children according to breastfeeding status at selected age groups, Suriname, 2010 Children age 0-5 months Children age 12-15 months Children age 20-23 months Percent exclusively breastfed1 Percent predominantly breastfed2 Number of children Percent breastfed (Continued breastfeeding at 1 year)3 Number of children Percent breastfed (Continued breastfeeding at 2 years)4 Number of children Sex Male 1.6 18.6 150 19.2 103 12.0 150 Female 4.0 18.1 136 26.8 88 17.5 163 District Paramaribo 1.8 10.7 113 (20.0) 80 15.8 115 Wanica (*) (*) 41 (*) 32 (17.1) 71 Nickerie (*) (*) 15 (*) 6 (*) 18 Coronie (*) (*) 1 (*) 1 (*) 1 Saramacca (*) (*) 8 (*) 8 (*) 7 Commewijne (*) (*) 7 (*) 7 (*) 15 Marowijne (2.4) (11.9) 25 (*) 13 (18.5) 16 Para (*) (*) 10 (*) 6 (*) 13 Brokopondo (4.5) (34.1) 22 (*) 9 (*) 11 Sipaliwini 2.3 40.7 44 39.2 26 6.6 47 Area Urban 1.3 10.1 159 17.2 117 17.8 204 Rural Coastal 6.4 18.1 61 26.8 39 12.2 53 Rural interior 3.1 38.5 66 36.3 35 7.1 57 Total Rural 4.7 28.7 127 31.3 74 9.5 110 Mother’s education None 1.3 28.9 39 (22.0) 30 3.5 44 Primary 5.6 20.4 76 30.5 58 20.2 95 Secondary + 1.9 15.6 165 18.5 100 15.2 167 Non-standard/ Missing/DK (*) (*) 6 (*) 3 (*) 8 Wealth index quintile Poorest 2.4 24.7 116 27.5 54 11.6 96 Second (3.0) (13.5) 39 (29.7) 48 (21.4) 62 Middle (1.3) (14.4) 51 (*) 28 (11.4) 59 Fourth (6.8) (14.7) 49 (*) 31 (18.8) 57 Richest (*) (*) 31 (*) 29 (*) 39 Ethnicity of household head* Indigenous/Amerindian (*) (*) 10 (*) 9 (*) 18 Maroon 1.2 24.2 137 27.8 67 4.6 134 Creole (*) (*) 35 (*) 25 (*) 38 Hindustani (4.0) (5.3) 49 (13.1) 45 (22.5) 68 Javanese (*) (*) 28 (*) 21 (*) 32 Mixed (*) (*) 24 (*) 16 (*) 20 Others (*) (*) 3 (*) 6 (*) 3 Total 2.8 18.4 286 22.7 191 14.9 313 * ‘Missing/DK’ category of ethnicity of household head not shown due to low number of observations ( ) Figures that are based on 25-49 unweighted cases (*) Figures that are based on less than 25 unweighted cases 1 MICS indicator 2.6 2 MICS indicator 2.9 3 MICS indicator 2.7 4 MICS indicator 2.8 Nutrition      Suriname MICS4 29 Figure NU.3: Infant feeding patterns by age, Suriname 2010   Table NU.4 (page 31) shows the median duration of breastfeeding by selected background characteristics.  Among  children under age 3,  the median duration  is 8.0 months  for any breastfeeding, 0.4 months  for  exclusive  breastfeeding,  and  0.5  months  for  predominant  breastfeeding.  With  respect  to  any  breastfeeding, girls were more  likely to have continued breastfeeding than boys. This  is also the case for  children who  living  in  the  rural  interior  as  opposed  to  rural  coastal  areas  or  urban  areas.  The median  duration of any breastfeeding was  longer among children whose mothers had no education than among  those whose mothers had higher levels of education, as well as for particularly the poorest wealth quintile.  The adequacy of infant feeding in children under 24 months is provided in Table NU.5 (page 32). Different  criteria  of  feeding  are  used  depending  on  the  age  of  the  child.  For  infants  aged  0‐5 months,  exclusive  breastfeeding is considered as age‐appropriate feeding, while infants aged 6‐23 months are considered to  be appropriately fed if they are receiving breast milk and solid, semi‐solid or soft food. As a result of these  feeding  patterns,  only  18  percent  of  children  aged  6‐23  months  are  being  appropriately  fed.  Age‐ appropriate  feeding among all  infants age 0‐5 months drops  to 3 percent. Whether 0‐5 months or 6‐23  months, girls are more likely to be adequately breastfed than boys and children from rural areas are more  likely to be adequately fed when compared to those from urban areas. There does not appear to be any  clear pattern of relationship associating the adequacy of  infant feeding  in children under 24 months with  either their mothers’ education or their wealth status.   Appropriate  complementary  feeding  of  children  from  6  months  to  two  years  of  age  is  particularly  important  for growth and development and  the prevention of under nutrition. Continued breastfeeding  beyond six months should be accompanied by consumption of nutritionally adequate, safe and appropriate  complementary  foods  that help meet nutritional  requirements when breast milk  is no  longer  sufficient.  This requires that for breastfed children, two or more meals of solid, semi‐solid or soft foods are needed if  they are six to eight months old, and three or more meals if they are 9‐23 months of age. For children 6‐23  Breastfed and other  milk / formula Breastfed and  complimentary foods Weaned (not  breastfed) 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% 0‐1 2‐3 4‐5 6‐7 8‐9 10‐11 12‐13 14‐15 16‐17 18‐19 20‐21 22‐23 Percent Age Figure NU.3: Infant feeding patterns by age, Suriname 2010 Exclusively breastfed Breastfed and plain water only Breastfed and non‐milk liquids Breastfed and other milk / formula Breastfed and complimentary foods Weaned (not breastfed) Nutrition  30 Suriname MICS4  months and older who are not breastfed, four or more meals of solid, semi‐solid or soft foods or milk feeds  are needed.  Overall, 47 percent of  infants’ age 6‐8 months received solid, semi‐solid, or soft foods (Table NU.6, page  33). Among currently breastfeeding infants this percentage is 41 while it is 53 among infants currently not  breastfeeding.   Table NU.7 (page 34) presents the proportion of children age 6‐23 months who received semi‐solid or soft  foods  the minimum number of  times or more during  the previous day according  to breastfeeding status  (see the note in Table NU.7 for a definition of minimum number of times for different age groups). Overall,  a  little  less than two‐thirds of the children age 6‐23 months (64 percent) were receiving solid, semi‐solid  and  soft  foods  the minimum number of  times. The disaggregated values  show  that while 70 percent of  urban and 73 percent of rural coastal children enjoy the minimum meal frequency, the percentage in the  rural  interior  is only 38. Large differences are also  found according  to mother’s education and wealth of  the household. Somewhat expected, the children of the higher educated and the wealthier are better off.  Interestingly, the percentage of children receiving the minimum meal frequency increases with age of the  child as well, ranging from 52 percent of children age 6‐8 months to 69 percent of 18‐23 month olds.   Looking  just  at  the  currently  breastfeeding  children  age  6‐23  months,  just  16  percent  of  them  were  receiving  solid,  semi‐solid  and  soft  foods  the  minimum  number  of  times.  Among  non‐breastfeeding  children, as much as 83 percent of the children were receiving solid, semi‐solid and soft foods or milk feeds  4  times  or  more.  As  above,  this  however  masks  large  discrepancies  with  poor  conditions  in  the  rural  interior, especially Sipaliwini where only 51 percent of non‐breastfeeding children enjoyed feeds 4 times or  more.  The continued practice of bottle‐feeding is a concern because of the possible contamination due to unsafe  water and lack of hygiene in preparation. Table NU.8 (page 35) shows that bottle‐feeding is still prevalent  in Suriname with 72 percent of children under 2 years being reported to be fed using a bottle with a nipple.  Greater percentages are observed among  children  from urban areas and  those  from  rural  coastal areas  than among those from the rural interior, at 78, 72, and 52 percent, respectively. Greater percentages can  also  be  observed  among  children  whose  mothers  had  higher  levels  of  educational  attainment,  the  respective percentages ranging between 58 percent among children whose mothers had no education and  76 percent among those whose mothers had at least a secondary school education.      Nutrition      Suriname MICS4 31 Table NU.4: Duration of breastfeeding Median duration of any breastfeeding, exclusive breastfeeding, and predominant breastfeeding among children age 0-35 months, Suriname, 2010 Median duration (in months) of Number of children age 0-35 months Any breastfeeding1 Exclusive breastfeeding Predominant breastfeeding Sex* Male 6.9 0.4 0.6 1,063 Female 10.5 0.4 0.5 966 District Paramaribo 5.7 0.4 0.5 788 Wanica 7.6 0.0 0.5 362 Nickerie 9.0 0.0 0.0 124 Coronie (*) (*) (*) 7 Saramacca 5.5 0.5 2.8 54 Commewijne 5.8 1.4 1.4 74 Marowijne 7.9 0.0 0.5 127 Para 6.5 0.0 0.6 72 Brokopondo 10.1 0.5 1.6 105 Sipaliwini 13.1 0.4 1.0 316 Area Urban 5.8 0.4 0.5 1,231 Rural Coastal 6.6 0.4 0.6 378 Rural Interior 12.6 0.4 1.3 421 Total Rural 10.4 0.4 0.7 799 Mother’s education None 11.4 0.4 1.4 267 Primary 9.8 0.4 0.5 572 Secondary + 5.6 0.4 0.5 1,154 Non-standard/Missing/DK (*) (*) (*) 25 Wealth index quintile Poorest 11.7 0.4 0.5 668 Second 7.5 0.4 0.5 425 Middle 6.1 0.4 0.5 355 Fourth 3.1 0.5 0.6 331 Richest 5.5 0.0 0.5 250 Ethnicity of household head** Indigenous 17.0 0.5 0.6 96 Maroon 10.8 0.4 0.6 843 Creole 6.2 0.4 0.4 250 Hindustani 4.1 0.4 0.4 402 Javanese 5.2 0.5 1.5 219 Mixed 3.8 0.0 0.5 196 Others (*) (*) (*) 24 Median 8.0 0.4 0.5 2,030 Mean for all children (0-35 months) 10.5 0.2 1.4 2,030 * ‘Missing/DK’ categories not shown due to low number of observations (*) Figures that are based on less than 25 unweighted cases 1 MICS indicator 2.10       Nutrition  32 Suriname MICS4  Table NU.5: Age-appropriate breastfeeding Percentage of children age 0-23 months who were appropriately breastfed during the previous day, Suriname, 2010 Children age 0-5 months Children age 6-23 months Children age 0-23 months Percent exclusively breastfed1 Number of children Percent currently breastfeeding and receiving solid, semi- solid or soft foods Number of children Percent appropriately breastfed2 Number of children Sex* Male 1.6 150 15.7 575 12.8 724 Female 4.0 136 20.1 528 16.8 665 District Paramaribo 1.8 113 14.5 442 12.0 555 Wanica (*) 41 17.0 203 14.2 244 Nickerie (*) 15 31.6 64 26.5 79 Coronie (*) 1 (*) 5 (*) 5 Saramacca (*) 8 (16.7) 31 16.4 40 Commewijne (*) 7 (20.8) 48 20.5 55 Marowijne (2.4) 25 17.9 64 13.5 89 Para (*) 10 18.5 38 14.7 48 Brokopondo (4.5) 22 12.5 48 10.0 70 Sipaliwini 2.3 44 22.7 160 18.3 204 Area Urban 1.3 159 16.5 697 13.6 856 Rural Coastal 6.4 61 19.9 198 16.7 259 Rural interior 3.1 66 20.3 208 16.2 274 Total Rural 4.7 127 20.1 407 16.4 534 Mother’s education None 1.3 39 14.5 134 11.5 173 Primary 5.6 76 21.1 330 18.2 407 Secondary + 1.9 165 17.1 618 13.9 782 Non-standard/Missing/DK (*) 6 (*) 22 (*) 27 Wealth index quintile Poorest 2.4 116 20.3 335 15.7 451 Second (3.0) 39 18.7 233 16.5 272 Middle (1.3) 51 15.1 209 12.4 260 Fourth (6.8) 49 17.1 180 14.9 229 Richest (*) 31 15.4 148 12.7 179 Ethnicity of household head* Indigenous/Amerindian (*) 10 37.8 54 33.4 64 Maroon 1.2 137 14.3 418 11.1 555 Creole (*) 35 21.0 143 17.2 178 Hindustani (4.0) 49 21.9 237 18.8 287 Javanese (*) 28 20.0 121 18.0 149 Mixed (*) 24 8.8 113 7.3 137 Others (*) 3 (*) 17 (*) 20 Total 2.8 286 17.8 1,104 14.7 1,390 * ‘Missing/DK’ categories not shown due to low number of observations ( ) Figures that are based on 25-49 unweighted cases (*) Figures that are based on less than 25 unweighted cases 1 MICS indicator 2.6 2 MICS indicator 2.14       Nutrition      Suriname MICS4 33 Table NU.6: Introduction of solid, semi-solid or soft foods Percentage of infants age 6-8 months who received solid, semi-solid or soft foods during the previous day, Suriname, 2010 Currently breastfeeding Currently not breastfeeding All Percent receiving solid, semi- solid or soft foods Number of children age 6-8 months Percent receiving solid, semi- solid or soft foods Number of children age 6-8 months Percent receiving solid, semi- solid or soft foods1 Number of children age 6-8 months Sex Male (44.8) 48 (49.2) 51 47.1 99 Female 37.9 47 (57.9) 39 46.9 85 Area Urban (*) 48 (53.1) 64 50.0 113 Rural Coastal (*) 15 (59.0) 19 62.5 33 Rural interior 22.6 32 (*) 6 24.4 38 Total Rural 36.7 46 (52.7) 25 42.3 71 Total 41.4 95 53.0 89 47.0 184 ( ) Figures that are based on 25-49 unweighted cases (*) Figures that are based on less than 25 unweighted cases 1 MICS indicator 2.12     Nutrition  34 Suriname MICS4  Table NU.7: Minimum meal frequency Percentage of children age 6-23 months who received solid, semi-solid, or soft foods (and milk feeds for non-breastfeeding children) the minimum number of times or more during the previous day, according to breastfeeding status, Suriname, 2010 Currently breastfeeding Currently not breastfeeding All Percent receiving solid, semi-solid and soft foods the minimum number of times Number of children age 6-23 months Percent receiving at least 2 milk feeds1 Percent receiving solid, semi-solid and soft foods or milk feeds 4 times or more Number of children age 6-23 months Percent with minimum meal frequency2 Number of children age 6-23 months Sex* Male 15.3 142 81.8 83.6 433 66.8 575 Female 17.0 162 79.2 81.1 366 61.5 528 Age 6-8 months 16.8 95 94.7 88.2 89 51.5 184 9-11 months 16.3 79 94.5 92.9 97 58.3 176 12-17 months 10.9 66 89.1 85.8 221 68.6 287 18-23 months 20.8 64 69.2 76.7 393 69.0 456 District Paramaribo 17.6 103 88.8 87.6 340 71.4 442 Wanica (11.1) 55 89.0 89.0 148 68.0 203 Nickerie (*) 24 85.5 88.7 41 67.3 64 Coronie (*) 2 (*) (*) 3 (*) 5 Saramacca (*) 5 (90.0) (90.0) 26 (79.2) 31 Commewijne (*) 10 (78.9) (86.0) 38 (70.8) 48 Marowijne (20.0) 18 82.9 85.5 46 67.0 64 Para (*) 8 (79.1) (83.7) 30 72.2 38 Brokopondo (0.0) 17 62.9 69.4 31 44.8 48 Sipaliwini 13.1 62 40.8 50.8 98 36.1 160 Area Urban 16.1 175 88.0 87.7 522 69.7 697 Rural Coastal 26.5 49 84.4 87.9 150 72.8 198 Rural interior 10.3 80 46.2 55.3 129 38.1 208 Total Rural 16.5 128 66.7 72.8 278 55.0 407 Mother’s education None 11.1 38 51.5 60.6 96 46.6 134 Primary 18.2 114 76.4 79.0 217 58.1 330 Secondary + 15.8 150 88.7 88.8 468 71.1 618 Non-standard/ Missing/DK (*) 2 (*) (*) 19 (*) 22 Wealth index quintile Poorest 19.5 115 59.2 65.4 219 49.6 335 Second 3.9 69 85.7 89.7 164 64.4 233 Middle (26.2) 43 92.4 88.8 165 75.8 209 Fourth (18.5) 43 90.7 88.2 136 71.4 180 Richest (*) 33 85.4 88.9 115 72.4 148 Ethnicity of household head* Indigenous/Amerindian (8.0) 29 (77.2) (71.8) 25 37.5 54 Maroon 13.0 120 67.4 73.3 298 56.1 418 Creole (19.5) 41 90.2 86.9 102 67.8 143 Hindustani (22.9) 61 89.4 89.0 177 72.1 237 Javanese (*) 30 83.0 85.2 91 69.5 121 Mixed (*) 21 91.5 94.3 92 79.1 113 Others (*) 2 (*) (*) 15 (*) 17 Total 16.2 303 80.6 82.5 800 64.3 1,104 * ‘Missing/DK’ categories not shown due to low number of observations ( ) Figures that are based on 25-49 unweighted cases; (*) Figures that are based on less than 25 unweighted cases 1 MICS indicator 2.15 2 MICS indicator 2.13 Among currently breastfeeding children age 6-8 months, minimum meal frequency is defined as children who also received solid, semi- solid or soft foods 2 times or more. Among currently breastfeeding children age 9-23 months, receipt of solid, semi-solid or soft foods at least 3 times constitutes minimum meal frequency. For non-breastfeeding children age 6-23 months, minimum meal frequency is defined as children receiving solid, semi-solid or soft foods, and milk feeds, at least 4 times during the previous day. Nutrition      Suriname MICS4 35   Table NU.8: Bottle feeding Percentage of children age 0-23 months who were fed with a bottle with a nipple during the previous day, Suriname, 2010 Percentage of children age 0-23 months fed with a bottle with a nipple1 Number of children age 0-23 months Sex* Male 73.7 724 Female 69.8 665 Age 0-5 months 76.5 286 6-11 months 78.2 360 12-23 months 67.0 744 District Paramaribo 80.1 555 Wanica 76.7 244 Nickerie 67.8 79 Coronie (*) 5 Saramacca 63.9 40 Commewijne 66.3 55 Marowijne 81.1 89 Para 70.6 48 Brokopondo 63.6 70 Sipaliwini 48.1 204 Area Urban 78.1 856 Rural Coastal 72.1 259 Rural interior 52.1 274 Total Rural 61.8 534 Mother’s education None 58.3 173 Primary 69.2 407 Secondary + 76.3 782 Non-standard/ Missing/DK (*) 27 Wealth index quintile Poorest 61.8 451 Second 74.1 272 Middle 77.2 260 Fourth 81.7 229 Richest 73.4 179 Ethnicity of household head* Indigenous/Amerindian 67.8 64 Maroon 66.3 555 Creole 80.9 178 Hindustani 77.0 287 Javanese 69.0 149 Mixed 72.9 137 Others (*) 20 Total 71.9 1,390 * ‘Missing/DK’ categories not shown due to low number of observations (*) Figures that are based on less than 25 unweighted cases 1 MICS indicator 2.11 Nutrition  36 Suriname MICS4  Low Birth Weight Weight  at  birth  is  a  good  indicator  not  only  of  a  mother's  health  and  nutritional  status  but  also  the  newborn's chances for survival, growth, long‐term health and psychosocial development. Low birth weight  (less than 2,500 grams) carries a range of grave health risks for children. Babies who were undernourished  in the womb face a greatly increased risk of dying during their early months and years. Those who survive  have  impaired  immune  function and  increased risk of disease; they are  likely to remain undernourished,  with reduced muscle strength, throughout their  lives, and suffer a higher  incidence of diabetes and heart  disease  in  later  life. Children born underweight  also  tend  to have  a  lower  IQ  and  cognitive disabilities,  affecting their performance in school and their job opportunities as adults.   In  the developing world,  low birth weight  stems primarily  from  the mother's poor health and nutrition.  Three factors have most impact: the mother's poor nutritional status before conception, short stature (due  mostly to under nutrition and  infections during her childhood), and poor nutrition during the pregnancy.  Inadequate weight gain during pregnancy is particularly important since it accounts for a large proportion  of  foetal  growth  retardation. Moreover, diseases  such  as diarrhoea  and malaria, which  are  common  in  many developing  countries, can  significantly  impair  foetal growth  if  the mother becomes  infected while  pregnant.   In the industrialized world, cigarette smoking during pregnancy is the leading cause of low birth weight. In  developed and developing countries alike,  teenagers who give birth when  their own bodies have yet  to  finish growing run the risk of bearing underweight babies.   One of the major challenges in measuring the incidence of low birth weight is the fact that more than half  of  infants  in  the developing world are not weighed.  In  the past, most estimates of  low birth weight  for  developing  countries were based on data  compiled  from health  facilities. However,  these estimates are  biased for most developing countries because the majority of newborns are not delivered in facilities, and  those who are represent only a selected sample of all births.   Because many infants are not weighed at birth and those who are weighed may be a biased sample of all  births, the reported birth weights usually cannot be used to estimate the prevalence of  low birth weight  among all children. Therefore, the percentage of births weighing below 2500 grams is estimated from two  items  in  the questionnaire:  the mother’s assessment of  the  child’s  size at birth  (i.e., very  small,  smaller  than average, average, larger than average, very large) and the mother’s recall of the child’s weight or the  weight as recorded on a health card if the child was weighed at birth.9  Overall,  Table  NU.9  (page  37)  shows  that  about  81  percent  of  births  were  weighed  at  birth  and  approximately 14 percent of infants are estimated to weigh less than 2,500 grams at birth. On birth weight  there  are  just  slight  and  inconclusive  variations  across  background  characteristics.  However,  some  differences can be seen among districts and elsewhere when looking at percentage weighed at birth.                                                              9 For a detailed description of the methodology, see Boerma, J. T., Weinstein, K. I., Rutstein, S.O., and Sommerfelt, A.  E. , 1996. Data on Birth Weight in Developing Countries: Can Surveys Help? Bulletin of the World Health Organization,  74(2), 209‐16.  Nutrition      Suriname MICS4 37 Table NU.9: Low birth weight infants Percentage of last-born children in the 2 years preceding the survey that are estimated to have weighed below 2500 grams at birth and percentage of live births weighed at birth, Suriname, 2010 Percent of live births: Number of last-born children in the two years preceding the survey Below 2500 grams1 Weighed at birth2 District Paramaribo 14.5 82.3 430 Wanica 15.6 86.0 191 Nickerie 14.2 86.0 61 Coronie (*) (*) 4 Saramacca 10.7 87.7 30 Commewijne (12.1) (83.7) 44 Marowijne 12.2 81.1 65 Para 9.5 80.3 38 Brokopondo 12.4 71.4 53 Sipaliwini 13.0 67.2 146 Area Urban 14.9 83.4 668 Rural Coastal 11.4 83.2 193 Rural interior 12.8 68.3 199 Total Rural 12.1 75.7 392 Mother’s education None 13.3 64.7 125 Primary 15.2 76.9 305 Secondary + 13.3 85.4 609 Non-standard/ Missing/DK (*) (*) 21 Wealth index quintile Poorest 14.2 69.4 341 Second 13.7 81.4 212 Middle 13.4 86.0 200 Fourth 13.9 92.4 167 Richest 13.9 84.4 141 Ethnicity of household head* Indigenous/Amerindian 11.0 67.6 50 Maroon 13.4 74.4 429 Creole 14.7 78.6 131 Hindustani 16.0 92.4 216 Javanese 12.3 82.6 111 Mixed 12.7 89.4 104 Others (*) (*) 20 Total 13.9 80.5 1,060 * ‘Missing/DK’ category of ethnicity of household head not shown due to low number of observations ( ) Figures that are based on 25-49 unweighted cases (*) Figures that are based on less than 25 unweighted cases 1 MICS indicator 2.18 2 MICS indicator 2.19         Child Health  38 Suriname MICS4   5. Child Health   Child Health      Suriname MICS4 39 Immunization The Millennium Development Goal (MDG) 4  is to reduce child mortality by two thirds between 1990 and  2015. Immunization plays a key part in this goal. Immunizations have saved the lives of millions of children  in  the  three  decades  since  the  launch  of  the  Expanded  Programme  on  Immunization  (EPI)  in  1974.  Worldwide, there are still 27 million children overlooked by routine immunization and as a result, vaccine‐ preventable diseases cause more than 2 million deaths every year.  A World Fit for Children goal is to ensure full immunization of children under one year of age at 90 percent  nationally, with at least 80 percent coverage in every district or equivalent administrative unit.  According  to  the national  vaccination  schedule,  a  child  should  receive one dose of hepatitis  vaccine  at  birth, three doses of Pentavalent to protect against diphtheria, pertussis, tetanus, haemophilias  influenza  type b, and hepatitis b, and three doses of polio vaccine by six months. After their first birthday, children  should  receive  a  dose  of  MMR  to  protect  against  Measles,  Mumps  and  Rubella,  and  a  Yellow  Fever  vaccination for children living in the interior. By the age of 18 months a child should receive a fourth dose  of DPT and polio vaccine.   Information on vaccination coverage was collected for all children under five years of age. All mothers or  caretakers  were  asked  to  provide  vaccination  cards.  If  the  vaccination  card  for  a  child  was  available,  interviewers copied vaccination information from the cards onto the MICS questionnaire. If no vaccination  card was available for the child, the interviewer proceeded to ask the mother to recall whether or not the  child had  received each of  the  vaccinations,  and  for Polio, DPT  and Hepatitis B, how many doses were  received.  The  final  vaccination  coverage  estimates  are  based  on  both  information  obtained  from  the  vaccination card and the mother’s report of vaccinations received by the child.  In the case of Suriname, the Pentavalent vaccine  is given together with DPT and HepB.   However, during  the customisation of  the standard MICS questionnaires,  the  introduction of  the Pentavalent vaccine was  not  added  into  the  final  questionnaires  used  in  the  survey.  This,  due  to  restrictions  pertaining  to  the  uniformity of  the questionnaire  formats.   This  resulted  in underestimation of children  receiving  the DPT  and HepB vaccines now no longer given separately, but as part of the Pentavalent vaccine. The coverage of  DPT and HepB are therefore omitted from this report as the results would be misleading. The coverage of  HepB given at birth is still valid, as well as the results for Polio and Measles (MMR). With regards to Yellow  Fever, the results are presented for Brokopondo and Sipaliwini districts.  The percentage of children age 18  to 29 months who have received each of  the specific vaccinations by  source  of  information  (vaccination  card  and  mother’s  recall)  is  shown  in  Table  CH.1  (page  40).  The  denominator  for  the  table  is comprised of children age 18‐29 months so  that only children who are old  enough to be fully vaccinated are counted. In the first three columns of the table, the numerator includes  all children who were vaccinated at any time before the survey according  to the vaccination card or  the  mother’s report. In the last column, only those children who were vaccinated before their first birthday are  included.  For  children  without  vaccination  cards,  the  proportion  of  vaccinations  given  before  the  first  birthday is assumed to be the same as for children with vaccination cards.  In Suriname,  the MICS4 data  reveal  that about 83 percent of children age 18‐29 months  received  three  doses of the polio vaccine at any time before the survey. As much as 91 percent had received at least a first  dose of the polio vaccine. HepB at birth, the only HepB vaccine that can be tabulated due to the mentioned  design issue, shows a prevalence of 39 percent of children age 18‐29 months vaccinated at any time before  the survey. Figure CH.1 (page 42) presents coverage of each vaccine on the children who were vaccinated  at any time before the survey.   Child Health  40 Suriname MICS4  With respect to the vaccine against measles (MMR), MICS4 data indicate that approximately 78 percent of  children  age18‐29 months were estimated  to have  received  the measles  vaccine. Nonetheless, national  estimates by the Ministry of Health for 2010 and 2011 reveal that Suriname has attained an immunization  profile above the international threshold of 85% for vaccinations against measles (MMR). This discrepancy  should be  investigated  further. There are a number of possible  reasons  for  the difference.  In  the MICS,  issues could be related to data quality, but certainly also to imprecise vaccination cards that have omitted  vaccines.   Discrepancy  is also found on the coverage of Yellow fever vaccination. According to MICS,  in Brokopondo  and Sipaliwini 64 percent of children age 18‐29 were immunized at any time before the survey, but only 15  percent were vaccinated by 12 months of age.  It should be noted  that national  immunization estimates  from the Ministry of Health for children age 12‐23 months in these parts of the country and a part of Para,  are 79 percent  in 2009, 80 percent  in 2010, and 77 percent  in 2011. While  the numbers are not strictly  comparable, the large discrepancy is evident and further investigation is necessary to understand and learn  for future data collection activities.  Table CH.1: Vaccinations in first year of life Percentage of children age 18-29 months immunized against childhood diseases at any time before the survey and before the first birthday (by 18 months of age against measles-MMR), Suriname, 2010 Vaccinated at any time before the survey according to: Vaccinated by 12 months of age Vaccination card Mother's report Either Polio 1 80.1 10.3 90.5 89.9 2 80.0 8.4 88.5 86.5 31 77.1 6.1 83.2 79.0 Measles (MMR)2 70.5 7.4 77.9 73.9 HepB At birth 32.8 5.7 38.5 38.0 Number of children age 18-29 months 746 746 746 746 Yellow fever3 (Brokopondo and Sipaliwini ) 59.3 4.7 64.0 15.1 Number of children age 18-29 months (Brokopondo and Sipaliwini ) 154 154 154 154 1 MICS indicator 3.2; 2 MICS indicator 3.4; MDG indicator 4.3 3 MICS indicator 3.6   Table  CH.2  (page  41)  presents  vaccination  coverage  estimates  among  children  18‐29  months  by  background characteristics. The figures  indicate children receiving the vaccinations at any time up to the  date  of  the  survey,  and  are  based  on  information  from  both  the  vaccination  cards  and  mothers’  (or  caretakers’) reports. Vaccination cards have been seen by the interviewer for 82 percent of children. This  total hides  that while most district  values  center  around  this  total,  the  interviewers  in Marowijne only  managed  to  see  the  card of  every  second  child  (54%).  The  table does not  reveal  any obvious patterns  without  background  characteristics,  although  precisely  Marowijne  have  significantly  lower  vaccination  rates across the board.      Child Health      Suriname MICS4 41 Table CH.2: Vaccinations by background characteristics Percentage of children age 18-29 months currently vaccinated against childhood diseases, Suriname, 2010 Percentage of children who received: Percentage with vaccination card seen Number of children age 18- 29 months Brokopondo and Sipaliwini: Polio Measles (MMR) HepB at birth Percentage of children who received yellow fever Number of children age 18-29 months 1 2 3 Sex* Male 90.7 89.6 85.3 78.0 37.5 81.5 385 62.8 88 Female 90.1 87.5 81.0 77.9 39.5 81.9 361 65.8 66 Region Paramaribo 91.4 90.7 85.7 78.1 34.3 83.6 281 na na Wanica 88.7 87.3 83.1 79.7 39.1 80.3 144 na na Nickerie 97.1 97.1 91.3 75.0 52.2 94.2 45 na na Coronie (*) (*) (*) (*) (*) (*) 2 na na Saramacca (96.8) (96.8) (96.8) (90.3) (45.2) (93.5) 20 na na Commewijne (97.6) (85.4) (85.4) (89.5) (56.1) (85.4) 27 na na Marowijne 69.0 62.9 52.9 47.1 20.0 53.5 43 na na Para (97.6) (97.5) (95.0) (87.2) (48.7) (90.2) 29 na na Brokopondo 95.1 90.0 81.7 70.9 41.7 77.0 31 52.7 31 Sipaliwini 89.7 88.2 80.6 82.9 40.0 81.0 124 66.8 124 Area Urban 91.2 89.9 85.1 78.4 38.2 83.3 459 na na Rural Coastal 87.5 83.5 79.3 73.4 37.4 77.4 133 na na Rural interior 90.7 88.5 80.8 80.6 40.3 80.2 154 64.0 154 Total Rural 89.2 86.2 80.1 77.2 39.0 78.9 287 na na Mother’s education* None 87.2 86.4 77.4 79.6 37.2 77.9 110 61.2 77 Primary 89.3 87.3 81.4 78.5 39.7 78.3 210 70.6 60 Secondary + 92.0 89.6 85.6 76.5 38.6 84.2 409 (50.1) 16 Other/Non-standard (*) (*) (*) (*) (*) (*) 14 (*) 1 Wealth index quintile Poorest 87.3 84.6 76.6 76.7 37.6 75.7 236 65.1 142 Second 91.8 90.2 87.7 78.7 39.3 86.5 153 (*) 11 Middle 94.2 94.2 91.1 77.4 40.6 86.2 148 (*) 1 Fourth 89.2 85.2 78.5 74.0 33.5 76.9 130 (*) 1 Richest (92.3) (91.6) (86.6) (87.3) (43.1) (89.0) 79 - 0 Ethnicity of household head Indigenous/Amerindian 91.3 91.6 83.4 81.5 31.9 87.1 42 (71.4) 11 Maroon 88.4 86.1 79.3 76.1 40.1 76.1 319 63.5 142 Creole 94.0 92.3 89.7 81.8 37.0 89.7 77 - 0 Hindustani 92.3 91.8 89.1 80.5 33.0 90.5 148 - 0 Javanese 90.0 84.3 76.8 78.2 47.9 74.4 81 - 0 Mixed (91.0) (91.0) (91.0) (72.5) (36.2) (87.3) 74 (*) 1 Others (*) (*) (*) (*) (*) (*) 6 - 0 Total 90.5 88.5 83.2 77.9 38.5 81.6 746 64.0 154 * ‘Missing/DK’ categories not shown due to low number of observations ( ) Figures that are based on 25-49 unweighted cases (*) Figures that are based on less than 25 unweighted cases       Child Health  42 Suriname MICS4  Figure CH.1: Percentage of children aged 18-29 months who received the recommended vaccinations at any time before the survey, Suriname, 2010   Neonatal Tetanus Protection One  of  the  MDGs  is  to  reduce  by  three  quarters  the  maternal  mortality  ratio,  with  one  strategy  to  eliminate maternal tetanus. In addition, another goal is to reduce the incidence of neonatal tetanus to less  than 1 case of neonatal  tetanus per 1000  live births  in every district. A World Fit  for Children goal  is  to  eliminate maternal and neonatal tetanus by 2005.  The strategy for preventing maternal and neonatal tetanus is to assure all pregnant women receive at least  two doses of  tetanus  toxoid vaccine.  If a woman has not  received at  least  two doses of  tetanus  toxoid  during a particular pregnancy, she (and her newborn) are also considered to be protected against tetanus if  the woman:    Received at least two doses of tetanus toxoid vaccine, the last within the previous 3 years;   Received at least 3 doses, the last within the previous 5 years;   Received at least 4 doses, the last within the previous 10 years;   Received 5 or more doses anytime during her life.    To assess the status of tetanus vaccination coverage, women who gave birth during the two years before  the survey were asked  if they had received tetanus toxoid  injections during the pregnancy for their most  recent birth, and  if so, how many. Women who did not receive two or more tetanus toxoid vaccinations  during this pregnancy were then asked about tetanus toxoid vaccinations they may have received prior to  this  pregnancy.  Interviewers  also  asked  women  to  present  their  vaccination  card,  on  which  dates  of  tetanus toxoid are recorded and referred to information from the cards when available.   Table CH.3 (page 43) shows the protection status from tetanus of women who have had a live birth within  the last 2 years. Figure CH.2 (page 44) shows the protection of women against neonatal tetanus by major  background  characteristics. Among women with a  live birth  in  the  last years  in  the different districts of  Suriname,  the  largest  proportion  to  have  been  protected  against  neonatal  tetanus was  in  Brokopondo  (53%)  and  Para  (49%).  The  smallest  proportions  were  observed  in  Paramaribo  (28%).  Given  the  small  proportion that was observed in Paramaribo, it is not surprising that notably smaller proportions of women  in urban areas have been protected against neonatal  tetanus when compared  to  those  in rural areas.  In  fact, similar proportions have been observed  in rural areas whether  in coastal domains or  in the  interior.  There  is  an  inverse  relationship between  the mother’s  education  and  the proportion protected  against  neonatal  tetanus as  those with higher  levels of education appearing  to have  lower  likelihoods of being  90 88 83 38 78 64 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 Pe rc en t Figure CH.1: Percentage of children aged 18-29 months who received the recommended vaccinations at any time before the survey, Suriname, 2010 Child Health      Suriname MICS4 43 protected against neonatal tetanus. In Suriname as a whole, 36 percent of women with a  live birth in the  last years were estimated to have been protected against neonatal tetanus.  Table CH.3: Neonatal tetanus protection Percentage of women age 15-49 years with a live birth in the last 2 years protected against neonatal tetanus, Suriname, 2010 Percentage of women who received at least 2 doses during last pregnancy Percentage of women who did not receive two or more doses during last pregnancy but received: Protected against tetanus1 Number of women with a live birth in the last 2 years 2 doses, the last within prior 3 years 3 doses, the last within prior 5 years 4 doses, the last within prior 10 years 5 or more doses during lifetime Area Urban 23.6 8.4 0.5 0.0 0.0 32.5 668 Rural Coastal 32.3 10.0 0.3 0.0 0.3 42.9 193 Rural interior 32.2 10.4 0.4 0.0 0.0 43.0 199 Total Rural 32.3 10.2 0.4 0.0 0.1 42.9 392 District Paramaribo 20.4 7.3 0.0 0.0 0.0 27.7 430 Wanica 30.7 10.5 1.8 0.0 0.0 43.0 191 Nickerie 25.4 15.8 0.0 0.0 0.0 41.2 61 Coronie (*) (*) (*) (*) (*) (*) 4 Saramacca 33.3 10.5 0.0 0.0 0.0 43.9 30 Commewijne (30.0) (2.5) (0.0) (0.0) (0.0) (32.5) 44 Marowijne 31.8 9.8 0.0 0.0 0.8 42.4 65 Para 37.9 9.1 1.5 0.0 0.0 48.5 38 Brokopondo 45.9 6.0 0.8 0.0 0.0 52.6 53 Sipaliwini 27.2 11.9 0.3 0.0 0.0 39.4 146 Education* None 34.8 11.5 0.6 0.0 0.0 46.9 125 Primary 31.7 8.8 0.2 0.0 0.2 40.8 305 Secondary + 22.1 9.0 0.5 0.0 0.0 31.7 609 Other/Non-standard (*) (*) (*) (*) (*) (*) 16 Wealth index quintile Poorest 30.6 9.2 0.4 0.0 0.1 40.3 341 Second 26.3 9.2 0.0 0.0 0.0 35.5 212 Middle 24.8 8.0 0.8 0.0 0.0 33.6 200 Fourth 24.4 7.8 0.0 0.0 0.0 32.2 167 Richest 24.2 11.7 1.2 0.0 0.0 37.0 141 Ethnicity of household head Indigenous/Amerindian 25.2 10.2 0.0 0.0 1.0 36.3 50 Maroon 29.9 8.0 0.3 0.0 0.0 38.2 429 Creole 22.5 14.3 0.0 0.0 0.0 36.7 131 Hindustani 24.3 9.9 0.0 0.0 0.0 34.2 216 Javanese 25.7 8.9 3.0 0.0 0.0 37.6 111 Mixed 24.4 5.3 0.0 0.0 0.0 29.7 104 Others (*) (*) (*) (*) (*) (*) 20 Total 26.8 9.1 0.4 0.0 0.0 36.4 1,060 * ‘Missing/DK’ category of education not shown due to low number of observations ( ) Figures that are based on 25-49 unweighted cases (*) Figures that are based on less than 25 unweighted cases 1 MICS indicator 3.7   Child Health  44 Suriname MICS4  Figure CH.2: Percentage of women with a live birth in the last 12 months who are protected against neonatal tetanus, Suriname, 2010 Oral Rehydration Treatment Diarrhoea  is  the  second  leading  cause of death  among  children under  five worldwide. Most diarrhoea‐ related deaths  in children are due  to dehydration  from  loss of  large quantities of water and electrolytes  from the body in liquid stools. Management of diarrhoea – either through oral rehydration salts (ORS) or a  recommended  home  fluid  (RHF)  ‐  can  prevent  many  of  these  deaths.  Preventing  dehydration  and  malnutrition by  increasing  fluid  intake and continuing  to  feed  the child are also  important strategies  for  managing diarrhoea.  The  goals  are  to:  1)  reduce  by  one  half  death  due  to  diarrhoea  among  children  under  five  by  2010  compared to 2000 (A World Fit for Children); and 2) reduce by two thirds the mortality rate among children  under  five  by  2015  compared  to  1990  (Millennium Development Goals).  In  addition,  the World  Fit  for  Children calls for a reduction in the incidence of diarrhoea by 25 percent.  In the MICS, prevalence of diarrhoea was estimated by asking mothers or caretakers whether their child  under age  five years had an episode of diarrhoea  in  the  two weeks prior  to  the  survey.  In cases where  mothers reported that the child had diarrhoea, a series of questions were asked about the treatment of  the illness, including what the child had to drink and eat during the episode and whether this was more or  less than the child usually drinks and eats.   Overall, approximately 10 percent of under  five  children had diarrhoea  in  the  two weeks preceding  the  survey  (Table CH.4, page 47). Diarrhoea prevalence  rates were highest  in  Sipaliwini  (13%), Brokopondo  28 43 41 44 (32) 42 48 39 33 43 43 43 47 41 32 42 0 10 20 30 40 50 Regions Paramaribo Wanica Nickerie Coronie Saramacca Commewijne Marowijne Para Brokopondo Sipaliwini Area Urban Rural Coastal Rural interior Total Rural Education None Primary Secondary + Total Percent Figure CH.2: Percentage of women with a live birth in the last 2 years who are protected against neonatal tetanus, Suriname, 2010 53 Child Health      Suriname MICS4 45 (13%) and Wanica  (11%) and  lowest  in Saramacca  (6%). Similar  rates  ranging between 8 percent and 10  percent were  observed  in  the  remaining  districts. One  year  old  children were more  likely  to  have  had  diarrhoea in the last two weeks preceding the survey (14%) when compared to children less than 1 year old  (13%), 2 year olds (9%), 3 year olds (7%), and 4 year olds (6%). Diarrhoea prevalence is higher for children  of mothers with no or only primary (both 13%) than for those with secondary or higher education (8%).   Table CH.4 also shows the percentage of children receiving various types of recommended  liquids during  the  episode  of  diarrhoea.  Since  children  may  have  been  given  more  than  one  type  of  liquid,  the  percentages do not necessarily  add  to 100. About 42 percent  received  fluids  from ORS packets or pre‐ packaged ORS fluids and 52 percent received recommended homemade fluids. Tea is as commonly used as  ORS  fluids  and  is  also  the most  common homemade  remedy  (42%), whereas  rice water  and  extract of  guava leaves were given in 12 and 16 percent of cases, respectively. Approximately 72 percent of children  with diarrhoea received one or more of the recommended treatments (i.e., were treated with ORS or RHF),  while 28 percent received no treatment.   Figure CH.3 reveals that children of mothers with secondary education and those residing  in urban areas  were less likely to have received oral rehydration treatment than other children.  Figure CH.3: Percentage of children under age 5 with diarrhoea who received ORS or recommended home fluids, Suriname, 2010   Just 39 percent of under  five  children with diarrhoea were given more  to drink  than usual  (Table CH.5,  page 49). More than one fifth (22%) ate much less, stopped eating, or had never been given food.   Table CH.6 (page 51) provides the proportion of children age 0‐59 months with diarrhoea  in the  last two  weeks who  received oral  rehydration  therapy with  continued  feeding,  and percentage of  children with  diarrhoea who received other treatments. Overall, 63 percent of children with diarrhoea received ORS or  increased  fluids, 81 percent  received ORT  (ORS or  recommended homemade  fluids or  increased  fluids),  and 61 percent of children received ORT and continued feeding, as is the recommendation.  There  are  significant  differences  in  the  home management  of  diarrhoea  by  background  characteristics.  According to Figure CH.4 (below), the proportion of children to have received ORT with continued feeding  is  fairly constant around  the national average across  the groups. However,  the use of ORS or  increased  68 77 76 77 73 80 67 71 60 62 64 66 68 70 72 74 76 78 80 82 Pe rc en t Figure CH.3: Percentage of children under age 5 with diarrhoea who received ORS or recommended home fluids, Suriname, 2010 Child Health  46 Suriname MICS4  fluids is highest with mothers in the rural interior and those with no education and lowest among mothers  in urban areas and with secondary or higher education. This observation is similar to use of ORT.  Figure CH.4: Treatment of diarrhoea, Suriname, 2010   50 60 70 80 90 100 Percent Figure CH.4: Treatment of diarrhoea, Suriname, 2010 ORS or increased fluids ORT (ORS or recommended homemade fluids or increased fluids) ORT with continued feeding Ch ild  He al th           Su rin am e M IC S4 47 Ta bl e C H .4 : O ra l r eh yd ra tio n so lu tio ns a nd re co m m en de d ho m em ad e flu id s P er ce nt ag e of c hi ld re n ag e 0- 59 m on th s w ith d ia rr ho ea in th e la st tw o w ee ks , a nd tr ea tm en t w ith o ra l r eh yd ra tio n so lu tio ns a nd r ec om m en de d ho m em ad e flu id s, S ur in am e, 20 10 H ad di ar rh oe a in la st tw o w ee ks N um be r of ch ild re n ag e 0- 59 m on th s C hi ld re n w ith d ia rr ho ea w ho re ce iv ed : N um be r o f ch ild re n ag e 0- 59 m on th s w ith di ar rh oe a in la st tw o w ee ks O R S (F lu id fr om O R S pa ck et o r p re - pa ck ag ed O R S flu id ) R ec om m en de d ho m em ad e flu id s O R S o r a ny re co m m en de d ho m em ad e flu id R ic e w at er E xt ra ct gu av a le av es Te a A ny re co m m en de d ho m em ad e flu id Se x* M al e 11 .1 1, 65 9 43 .4 13 .4 14 .5 44 .7 54 .6 75 .3 18 5 Fe m al e 8. 6 1, 64 9 41 .2 9. 2 17 .0 39 .0 48 .1 66 .5 14 1 M is si ng (* ) 1 - - - - - - 0 D is tr ic t P ar am ar ib o 8. 4 1, 27 4 30 .2 9. 4 13 .2 52 .8 58 .5 66 .0 10 7 W an ic a 11 .2 59 9 (3 3. 3) (1 5. 2) (9 .1 ) (3 6. 4) (4 5. 5) (6 9. 7) 67 N ic ke rie 7. 7 18 8 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 14 C or on ie (* ) 14 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 2 S ar am ac ca 6. 4 91 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 6 C om m ew ijn e 8. 7 12 2 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 11 M ar ow ijn e 9. 4 19 2 (5 3. 3) (2 3. 3) (2 6. 7) (4 0. 0) (5 0. 0) (7 6. 7) 18 P ar a 9. 2 12 2 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 11 B ro ko po nd o 12 .6 16 7 (4 7. 6) (7 .1 ) (1 9. 0) (2 6. 2) (4 2. 9) (6 9. 0) 21 S ip al iw in i 12 .8 53 7 61 .2 14 .2 24 .6 32 .1 50 .0 78 .4 69 A re a U rb an 9. 4 2, 00 1 33 .3 10 .8 10 .8 46 .2 52 .7 67 .7 18 7 R ur al C oa st al 8. 0 60 3 49 .1 12 .9 19 .9 48 .3 54 .9 77 .5 48 R ur al in te rio r 12 .7 70 5 58 .0 12 .5 23 .3 30 .7 48 .3 76 .2 90 To ta l R ur al 10 .6 1, 30 7 54 .9 12 .7 22 .1 36 .9 50 .6 76 .6 13 8 A ge 0- 11 m on th s 12 .5 64 6 35 .5 10 .9 19 .2 31 .7 45 .8 68 .9 81 12 -2 3 m on th s 14 .2 74 4 47 .9 15 .5 14 .3 39 .6 51 .0 71 .4 10 6 24 -3 5 m on th s 8. 7 64 0 43 .9 2. 0 11 .6 53 .2 56 .9 78 .7 56 36 -4 7 m on th s 6. 7 69 4 (3 4. 7) (1 0. 4) (1 2. 2) (4 7. 9) (5 5. 8) (7 0. 4) 46 48 -5 9 m on th s 6. 3 58 4 (4 9. 6) (1 7. 8) (2 1. 5) (4 9. 1) (5 4. 6) (6 7. 9) 37 Ch ild  He al th   48 Su rin am e M IC S4   H ad di ar rh oe a in la st tw o w ee ks N um be r of ch ild re n ag e 0- 59 m on th s C hi ld re n w ith d ia rr ho ea w ho re ce iv ed : N um be r of ch ild re n ag e 0- 59 m on th s w ith di ar rh oe a in l as t tw o w ee ks O R S (F lu id fro m O R S pa ck et or pr e- pa ck ag ed O R S flu id ) R ec om m en de d ho m em ad e flu id s O R S or an y re co m m en de d ho m em ad e flu id R ic e w at er E xt ra ct gu av a le av es Te a A ny re co m m en de d ho m em ad e flu id M ot he r’s e du ca tio n* N on e 12 .1 45 4 57 .6 11 .6 23 .6 25 .5 45 .0 72 .8 55 P rim ar y 11 .6 96 7 49 .9 16 .1 23 .5 49 .5 58 .7 79 .5 11 2 S ec on da ry + 8. 4 1, 82 4 32 .5 8. 4 7. 2 44 .2 50 .6 66 .9 15 3 O th er /N on -s ta nd ar d (1 2. 2) 48 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 6 W ea lth in de x qu in til e P oo re st 12 .5 1, 13 9 56 .9 17 .7 19 .6 36 .6 48 .4 72 .9 14 2 S ec on d 11 .1 67 5 32 .0 11 .4 18 .0 57 .5 68 .5 80 .9 75 M id dl e 6. 4 56 3 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 36 Fo ur th 10 .3 50 1 (4 5. 4) (7 .9 ) (6 .5 ) (2 8. 5) (4 0. 3) (7 0. 2) 51 R ic he st 5. 0 42 9 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 21 Et hn ic ity o f h ou se ho ld h ea d In di ge no us /A m er in di an 18 .0 15 3 (5 8. 4) (8 .8 ) (1 6. 9) (5 2. 4) (6 0. 1) (8 0. 9) 28 M ar oo n 10 .8 1, 38 9 53 .3 17 .2 21 .7 40 .1 54 .4 79 .1 15 0 C re ol e 8. 3 42 8 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 36 H in du st an i 9. 6 64 4 (3 4. 7) (4 .4 ) (7 .6 ) (3 1. 4) (3 4. 7) (5 6. 5) 62 Ja va ne se 3. 5 34 6 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 12 M ix ed 11 .9 30 8 (3 4. 5) (7 .4 ) (5 .5 ) (4 5. 8) (5 1. 3) (6 7. 6) 37 O th er s (* ) 38 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 2 To ta l 9. 8 3, 30 8 42 .4 11 .6 15 .6 42 .2 51 .8 71 .5 32 5 * ‘M is si ng /D K ’ c at eg or ie s no t s ho w n du e to lo w n um be r o f o bs er va tio ns ( ) F ig ur es th at a re b as ed o n 25 -4 9 un w ei gh te d ca se s (* ) F ig ur es th at a re b as ed o n le ss th an 2 5 un w ei gh te d ca se s     Ch ild  He al th           Su rin am e M IC S4 49   Ta bl e C H .5 : F ee di ng p ra ct ic es d ur in g di ar rh oe a P er ce nt d is tri bu tio n of c hi ld re n ag e 0- 59 m on th s w ith d ia rr ho ea in th e la st tw o w ee ks b y am ou nt o f l iq ui ds a nd fo od g iv en d ur in g ep is od e of d ia rr ho ea , S ur in am e, 2 01 0 H ad di ar rh oe a in la st tw o w ee ks N um be r of ch ild re n ag e 0- 59 m on th s D rin ki ng p ra ct ic es d ur in g di ar rh oe a: Ea tin g pr ac tic es d ur in g di ar rh oe a: N um be r of ch ild re n ag e 0- 59 m on th s w ith di ar rh oe a in la st tw o w ee ks G iv en m uc h le ss to dr in k G iv en so m ew ha t le ss to dr in k G iv en ab ou t th e sa m e to dr in k G iv en m or e to dr in k G iv en no th in g to d rin k M is si ng /D K G iv en m uc h le ss to e at G iv en so m ew ha t le ss to e at G iv en ab ou t th e sa m e to e at G iv en m or e to e at S to pp ed fo od H ad ne ve r be en gi ve n fo od M is si ng /D K To ta l To ta l Se x* M al e 11 .1 1, 65 9 7. 7 14 .6 30 .4 41 .3 0. 0 5. 9 10 0. 0 18 .4 29 .4 33 .3 14 .5 0. 0 1. 7 2. 7 10 0. 0 18 5 Fe m al e 8. 6 1, 64 9 9. 7 19 .2 32 .4 36 .4 1. 1 1. 1 10 0. 0 20 .6 27 .8 39 .7 8. 5 0. 5 2. 5 0. 4 10 0. 0 14 1 D is tr ic t P ar am ar ib o 8. 4 1, 27 4 5. 7 18 .9 30 .2 39 .6 0. 0 5. 7 10 0. 0 13 .2 28 .3 41 .5 15 .1 0. 0 0. 0 1. 9 10 0. 0 10 7 W an ic a 11 .2 59 9 (3 .0 ) (1 2. 1) (3 6. 4) (4 5. 5) (0 .0 ) (3 .0 ) 10 0. 0 (2 4. 2) (3 3. 3) (2 7. 3) (1 2. 1) (0 .0 ) (3 .0 ) (0 .0 ) 10 0. 0 67 N ic ke rie 7. 7 18 8 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 10 0. 0 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 10 0. 0 14 C or on ie (* ) 14 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 10 0. 0 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 10 0. 0 2 S ar am ac ca 6. 4 91 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 10 0. 0 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 10 0. 0 6 C om m ew ijn e 8. 7 12 2 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 10 0. 0 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 10 0. 0 11 M ar ow ijn e 9. 4 19 2 (1 0. 0) (1 3. 3) (4 0. 0) (2 6. 7) (3 .3 ) (6 .7 ) 10 0. 0 (1 3. 3) (2 0. 0) (4 0. 0) (1 6. 7) (0 .0 ) (3 .3 ) (6 .7 ) 10 0. 0 18 P ar a 9. 2 12 2 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 10 0. 0 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 10 0. 0 11 B ro ko po nd o 12 .6 16 7 (9 .5 ) (1 1. 9) (2 8. 6) (4 7. 6) (2 .4 ) (0 .0 ) 10 0. 0 (2 3. 8) (3 1. 0) (3 5. 7) (9 .5 ) (0 .0 ) (0 .0 ) (0 .0 ) 10 0. 0 21 S ip al iw in i 12 .8 53 7 12 .7 24 .6 26 .1 32 .1 0. 7 3. 7 10 0. 0 23 .1 28 .4 35 .1 9. 0 0. 0 3. 0 1. 5 10 0. 0 69 A re a U rb an 9. 4 2, 00 1 6. 4 15 .1 33 .3 40 .9 0. 0 4. 3 10 0. 0 17 .2 31 .2 35 .5 12 .9 0. 0 2. 1 1. 1 10 0. 0 18 7 R ur al C oa st al 8. 0 60 3 10 .9 13 .3 31 .7 38 .9 1. 2 3. 8 10 0. 0 20 .3 18 .7 40 .0 13 .2 1. 4 1. 2 5. 2 10 0. 0 48 R ur al in te rio r 12 .7 70 5 11 .9 21 .6 26 .7 35 .7 1. 1 2. 9 10 0. 0 23 .3 29 .0 35 .2 9. 1 0. 0 2. 3 1. 1 10 0. 0 90 To ta l R ur al 10 .6 1, 30 7 11 .6 18 .7 28 .5 36 .9 1. 2 3. 2 10 0. 0 22 .2 25 .4 36 .9 10 .5 0. 5 1. 9 2. 6 10 0. 0 13 8 A ge 0- 11 m on th s 12 .5 64 6 4. 5 25 .9 39 .4 26 .4 0. 6 3. 3 10 0. 0 13 .8 30 .2 38 .5 13 .4 0. 0 0. 0 4. 0 10 0. 0 81 12 -2 3 m on th s 14 .2 74 4 10 .5 16 .3 24 .3 44 .2 0. 0 4. 8 10 0. 0 21 .8 31 .8 31 .9 9. 2 0. 0 4. 8 0. 5 10 0. 0 10 6 24 -3 5 m on th s 8. 7 64 0 9. 7 16 .7 19 .6 48 .1 2. 0 3. 9 10 0. 0 25 .9 29 .8 32 .1 8. 2 1. 2 0. 9 2. 0 10 0. 0 56 36 -4 7 m on th s 6. 7 69 4 (9 .0 ) (4 .6 ) (4 2. 2) (3 9. 8) (0 .0 ) (4 .3 ) 10 0. 0 (1 7. 8) (2 4. 2) (4 2. 1) (1 4. 8) (0 .0 ) (1 .1 ) (0 .0 ) 10 0. 0 46 48 -5 9 m on th s 6. 3 58 4 (1 0. 0) (1 2. 3) (3 7. 3) (3 8. 6) (0 .0 ) (1 .8 ) 10 0. 0 (1 6. 7) (2 0. 5) (4 1. 4) (1 8. 2) (0 .0 ) (1 .4 ) (1 .8 ) 10 0. 0 37 Ch ild  He al th   50 Su rin am e M IC S4   Ta bl e C H .5 : F ee di ng p ra ct ic es d ur in g di ar rh ea (c on tin ue d) P er ce nt d is tri bu tio n of c hi ld re n ag e 0- 59 m on th s w ith d ia rr ho ea in th e la st tw o w ee ks b y am ou nt o f l iq ui ds a nd fo od g iv en d ur in g ep is od e of d ia rr ho ea , S ur in am e, 2 01 0 H ad di ar rh oe a in la st tw o w ee ks N um be r of ch ild re n ag e 0- 59 m on th s D rin ki ng p ra ct ic es d ur in g di ar rh oe a: Ea tin g pr ac tic es d ur in g di ar rh oe a: N um be r of ch ild re n ag e 0- 59 m on th s w ith di ar rh oe a in la st tw o w ee ks G iv en m uc h le ss to dr in k G iv en so m ew ha t le ss to dr in k G iv en ab ou t th e sa m e to dr in k G iv en m or e to dr in k G iv en no th in g to d rin k M is si ng /D K G iv en m uc h le ss to e at G iv en so m ew ha t le ss to e at G iv en ab ou t th e sa m e to e at G iv en m or e to e at S to pp ed fo od H ad ne ve r be en gi ve n fo od M is si ng /D K To ta l To ta l M ot he r’s e du ca tio n* N on e 12 .1 45 4 14 .3 17 .7 30 .3 33 .1 0. 0 4. 7 10 0. 0 31 .1 19 .5 33 .9 12 .7 0. 0 0. 9 1. 9 10 0. 0 55 P rim ar y 11 .6 96 7 8. 9 24 .5 23 .2 37 .8 1. 4 4. 1 10 0. 0 23 .4 29 .1 30 .3 10 .6 0. 6 5. 5 0. 5 10 0. 0 11 2 S ec on da ry + 8. 4 1, 82 4 6. 3 10 .7 38 .1 42 .7 0. 0 2. 2 10 0. 0 12 .6 32 .6 41 .8 10 .5 0. 0 0. 0 2. 6 10 0. 0 15 3 O th er /N on -s ta nd ar d (1 2. 2) 48 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 10 0. 0 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 10 0. 0 6 W ea lth in de x qu in til e P oo re st 12 .5 1, 13 9 11 .0 18 .0 30 .8 36 .5 1. 1 2. 7 10 0. 0 22 .7 27 .9 32 .4 10 .8 0. 0 3. 3 3. 0 10 0. 0 14 2 S ec on d 11 .1 67 5 14 .0 21 .1 29 .5 32 .6 0. 0 2. 7 10 0. 0 26 .0 23 .8 37 .9 9. 7 0. 0 2. 7 0. 0 10 0. 0 75 M id dl e 6. 4 56 3 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 10 0. 0 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 10 0. 0 36 Fo ur th 10 .3 50 1 (3 .8 ) (1 5. 7) (3 4. 9) (4 5. 5) (0 .0 ) (0 .0 ) 10 0. 0 (1 3. 0) (4 5. 5) (2 5. 8) (1 3. 1) (1 .3 ) (0 .0 ) (1 .3 ) 10 0. 0 51 R ic he st 5. 0 42 9 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 10 0. 0 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 10 0. 0 21 Et hn ic ity o f h ou se ho ld h ea d* In di ge no us /A m er in di an 18 .0 15 3 (3 0. 1) (3 5. 4) (1 0. 0) (2 0. 5) (1 .9 ) (2 .2 ) 10 0. 0 (3 9. 8) (2 0. 7) (1 9. 6) (1 0. 0) (0 .0 ) (7 .8 ) (2 .2 ) 10 0. 0 28 M ar oo n 10 .8 1, 38 9 10 .5 16 .1 33 .4 35 .8 0. 7 3. 5 10 0. 0 24 .4 24 .5 35 .1 13 .3 0. 0 0. 3 2. 4 10 0. 0 15 0 C re ol e 8. 3 42 8 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 10 0. 0 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 10 0. 0 36 H in du st an i 9. 6 64 4 0. 0 14 .2 52 .1 33 .7 0. 0 0. 0 10 0. 0 12 .0 31 .6 40 .1 7. 7 1. 1 6. 5 1. 1 10 0. 0 62 Ja va ne se 3. 5 34 6 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 10 0. 0 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 10 0. 0 12 M ix ed 11 .9 30 8 (5 .4 ) (7 .3 ) (1 2. 8) (6 1. 7) (0 .0 ) (1 2. 8) 10 0. 0 (9 .1 ) (2 9. 0) (4 0. 0) (2 0. 2) (0 .0 ) (0 .0 ) (1 .8 ) 10 0. 0 37 O th er s (* ) 38 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 10 0. 0 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 10 0. 0 2 To ta l 9. 8 3, 30 8 8. 6 16 .6 31 .3 39 .2 0. 5 3. 8 10 0. 0 19 .4 28 .7 36 .1 11 .9 0. 2 2. 0 1. 7 10 0. 0 32 5 * ‘M is si ng /D K ’ c at eg or ie s no t s ho w n du e to lo w n um be r o f o bs er va tio ns ( ) F ig ur es th at a re b as ed o n 25 -4 9 un w ei gh te d ca se s (* ) F ig ur es th at a re b as ed o n le ss th an 2 5 un w ei gh te d ca se s Child Health      Suriname MICS4 51 Table CH.6: Oral rehydration therapy with continued feeding and other treatments Percentage of children age 0-59 months with diarrhoea in the last two weeks who received oral rehydration therapy with continued feeding, and percentage of children with diarrhoea who received other treatments, Suriname, 2010 Children with diarrhoea who received: Other treatments: Not given any treatment or drug Number of children age 0-59 months with diarrhoea in last two weeks ORS or increased fluids ORT (ORS or recommended homemade fluids or increased fluids) ORT with continued feeding1 Pill or syrup Injection Home remedy, herbal medicine Other Sex Male 62.5 82.8 64.1 83.1 0.0 7.3 21.3 11.5 185 Female 62.9 77.7 56.4 78.6 0.5 9.6 13.9 17.0 141 District Paramaribo 54.7 77.4 66.0 77.4 0.0 13.2 22.6 15.1 107 Wanica (57.6) (75.8) (51.5) (75.8) (0.0) (3.0) (15.2) (21.2) 67 Nickerie (*) (*) (*) (*) (*) (*) (*) (*) 14 Coronie (*) (*) (*) (*) (*) (*) (*) (*) 2 Saramacca (*) (*) (*) (*) (*) (*) (*) (*) 6 Commewijne (*) (*) (*) (*) (*) (*) (*) (*) 11 Marowijne (56.7) (80.0) (66.7) (86.7) (0.0) (6.7) (13.3) (6.7) 18 Para (*) (*) (*) (*) (*) (*) (*) (*) 11 Brokopondo (73.8) (88.1) (64.3) (88.1) (0.0) (7.1) (7.1) (9.5) 21 Sipaliwini 74.6 86.6 61.9 87.3 0.0 9.0 16.4 7.5 69 Area Urban 57.0 76.3 59.1 76.3 0.0 8.6 19.3 18.3 187 Rural Coastal 62.8 85.7 64.0 88.2 1.3 6.5 20.3 7.9 48 Rural interior 74.4 86.9 62.5 87.5 0.0 8.5 14.2 7.9 90 Total Rural 70.4 86.5 63.0 87.7 0.5 7.8 16.4 7.9 138 Age 0-11 months 47.6 74.8 61.0 75.5 0.0 3.7 14.9 23.2 81 12-23 months 69.8 85.4 60.7 85.4 0.6 11.4 16.2 10.5 106 24-35 months 74.7 92.3 65.4 93.4 0.0 10.2 20.6 3.8 56 36-47 months (60.2) (71.5) (59.2) (72.6) (0.0) (5.6) (23.4) (13.1) 46 48-59 months (60.1) (73.7) (55.7) (73.7) (0.0) (9.6) (19.9) (19.4) 37 Mother’s education* None 75.3 86.8 56.7 88.8 0.0 6.8 17.1 6.5 55 Primary 64.3 87.4 60.2 87.4 0.6 12.4 14.3 10.1 112 Secondary + 57.5 74.3 63.0 74.7 0.0 6.1 18.9 19.6 153 Other/Non-standard (*) (*) (*) (*) (*) (*) (*) (*) 6 Wealth index quintile Poorest 70.7 84.2 58.0 85.4 0.0 12.6 16.1 8.4 142 Second 51.9 85.0 59.0 85.0 0.9 4.9 19.7 11.6 75 Middle (*) (*) (*) (*) (*) (*) (*) (*) 36 Fourth (66.3) (78.1) (67.7) (78.1) (0.0) (9.1) (19.5) (18.0) 51 Richest (*) (*) (*) (*) (*) (*) (*) (*) 21 Ethnicity of household head* Indigenous/Amerindian (62.1) (82.7) (44.7) (84.9) (2.4) (0.0) (9.6) (11.3) 28 Maroon 67.1 88.4 64.3 89.2 0.0 13.1 13.8 7.5 150 Creole (*) (*) (*) (*) (*) (*) (*) (*) 36 Hindustani (55.4) (60.8) (44.6) (60.8) (0.0) (4.3) (20.7) (29.4) 62 Javanese (*) (*) (*) (*) (*) (*) (*) (*) 12 Mixed (72.6) (87.2) (78.1) (87.2) (0.0) (1.8) (23.7) (7.3) 37 Others (*) (*) (*) (*) (*) (*) (*) (*) 2 Total 62.6 80.6 60.8 81.2 0.2 8.3 18.1 13.9 325 * ‘Missing/DK’ categories not shown due to low number of observations ( ) Figures that are based on 25-49 unweighted cases (*) Figures that are based on less than 25 unweighted cases 1 MICS indicator 3.8       Child Health  52 Suriname MICS4  Care Seeking and Antibiotic Treatment of Pneumonia Pneumonia is the leading cause of death in children and the use of antibiotics in under‐5s with suspected  pneumonia is a key intervention. A World Fit for Children goal is to reduce by one‐third the deaths due to  acute respiratory infections.   Children with suspected pneumonia are those who had an  illness with a cough accompanied by rapid or  difficult breathing and whose symptoms were NOT due to a problem in the chest and a blocked nose. The  indicators are:   Prevalence of suspected pneumonia   Care seeking for suspected pneumonia   Antibiotic treatment for suspected pneumonia   Knowledge of the danger signs of pneumonia    Table CH.7 (page 53) presents the prevalence of suspected pneumonia and, if care was sought outside the  home,  the  site of care. Specifically, 2 percent of children aged 0‐59 months were  reported  to have had  symptoms of pneumonia during the two weeks preceding the survey. Of these children, a little more than  three quarters (76%) were taken to an appropriate provider. Just over a half of the children (51%) of the  children with suspected pneumonia were cared for in a public sector government health centre. Table CH.7  shows  that  13  percent were  cared  for  by  a  private  physician.  Public  sector  government  hospitals  and  private  hospitals/clinics  provided  care  for  5  percent  and  8  percent,  respectively,  of  all  children  with  suspected pneumonia.   Table CH.7 also presents the use of antibiotics for the treatment of suspected pneumonia  in under‐5s by  sex, age, district, area, age, and socioeconomic factors.  In Suriname, 71 percent of under‐5 children with  suspected pneumonia had received an antibiotic during the two weeks prior to the survey.   Issues  related  to  knowledge  of  danger  signs  of  pneumonia  are  presented  in  Table  CH.8  (page  55).  Obviously, mothers’ knowledge of the danger signs is an important determinant of care‐seeking behaviour.  Overall,  just  10  percent  of  women  know  of  the  two  danger  signs  of  pneumonia  –  fast  and  difficult  breathing. Such knowledge was  relatively more  frequent among mother’s who had secondary education  (12%)  than  among  those  with  lower  levels  of  education  (8%  for  primary  education  and  8%  for  no  education). Compared  to  urban  and  rural  interior  areas,  rural  coastal  areas have higher  proportions of  mothers who had known the two danger signs of pneumonia, the respective proportions being 10 percent,  8 percent, and 14 percent. The most commonly identified symptom for taking a child to a health facility is if  the  child  develops  a  fever  (72%). Nonetheless,  12  percent  of mothers  identified  fast  breathing  and  17  percent of mothers identified difficulty breathing as symptoms for taking children immediately to a health  care  provider.  63  percent  of  mothers  identified  other  symptoms  not  specifically  mentioned  in  the  questionnaire, which should inform future data collection activities.  Ch ild  He al th           Su rin am e M IC S4 53   Ta bl e C H .7 : C ar e se ek in g fo r s us pe ct ed p ne um on ia a nd a nt ib io tic u se d ur in g su sp ec te d pn eu m on ia P er ce nt ag e of c hi ld re n ag e 0- 59 m on th s w ith s us pe ct ed p ne um on ia in th e la st tw o w ee ks w ho w er e ta ke n to a h ea lth p ro vi de r a nd p er ce nt ag e of c hi ld re n w ho w er e gi ve n an tib io tic s, S ur in am e, 2 01 0 H ad su sp ec te d pn eu m on ia in th e la st tw o w ee ks N um be r of ch ild re n ag e 0- 59 m on th s C hi ld re n w ith s us pe ct ed p ne um on ia w ho w er e ta ke n to : A ny ap pr op . pr ov id er 1 P er ce nt ag e of c hi ld re n w ith su sp ec te d pn eu m on ia w ho re ce iv ed an tib io tic s in th e la st tw o w ee ks 2 N um be r o f ch ild re n ag e 0- 59 m on th s w ith su sp ec te d pn eu m on ia in th e la st tw o w ee ks Pu bl ic s ou rc es Pr iv at e so ur ce s O th er s ou rc e G ov t. ho sp ita l G ov t. he al th ce nt re G ov t. he al th po st V illa ge he al th w or ke r M ob ile / ou tre ac h cl in ic O th er pu bl ic P riv at e ho sp ita l / c lin ic P riv at e ph ys ic ia n O th er pr iv at e m ed ic al R el a- tiv e or fri en d Tr ad . P ra ct i- tio ne r O th er Se x* M al e 2. 9 1, 65 9 (4 .6 ) (5 2. 5) (0 .0 ) (2 .2 ) (1 .1 ) (1 .4 ) (8 .5 ) (1 4. 2) (0 .0 ) (0 .0 ) (1 4. 1) (0 .0 ) (7 2. 1) (7 3. 1) 47 Fe m al e 1. 5 1, 64 9 (6 .7 ) (4 8. 2) (4 .0 ) (4 .0 ) (0 .0 ) (0 .0 ) (7 .9 ) (1 1. 9) (0 .0 ) (2 .4 ) (0 .0 ) (0 .0 ) (8 2. 8) (6 7. 7) 25 D is tr ic t P ar am ar ib o 2. 1 1, 27 4 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 26 W an ic a 1. 4 59 9 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 8 N ic ke rie 3. 1 18 8 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 6 C or on ie 4. 5 14 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 1 S ar am ac ca 0. 7 91 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 1 C om m ew ijn e 3. 3 12 2 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 4 M ar ow ijn e 0. 9 19 2 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 2 P ar a 1. 7 12 2 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 2 B ro ko po nd o 2. 7 16 7 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 5 S ip al iw in i 3. 5 53 7 (1 0. 8) (5 6. 8) (5 .4 ) (1 0. 8) (2 .7 ) (0 .0 ) (0 .0 ) (2 .7 ) (0 .0 ) (0 .0 ) (0 .0 ) (0 .0 ) (8 6. 5) (4 5. 9) 19 A re a U rb an 2. 1 2, 00 1 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 42 R ur al C oa st al 1. 2 60 3 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 7 R ur al in te rio r 3. 3 70 5 (1 0. 9) (5 0. 1) (4 .4 ) (8 .7 ) (2 .2 ) (0 .0 ) (0 .0 ) (4 .3 ) (0 .0 ) (0 .0 ) (0 .0 ) (0 .0 ) (7 8. 4) (4 1. 4) 23 To ta l R ur al 2. 3 1, 30 7 12 .7 49 .3 3. 3 6. 7 1. 7 2. 1 0. 0 5. 6 0. 0 2. 0 2. 1 0. 0 75 .4 51 .2 31 A ge 0- 11 m on th s 2. 3 64 6 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 15 12 -2 3 m on th s 4. 0 74 4 (7 .4 ) (4 6. 3) (3 .5 ) (1 .7 ) (0 .0 ) (2 .2 ) (6 .9 ) (1 5. 3) (0 .0 ) (0 .0 ) (1 5. 8) (0 .0 ) (8 1. 0) (8 2. 6) 30 24 -3 5 m on th s 1. 4 64 0 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 9 36 -4 7 m on th s 1. 8 69 4 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 13 48 -5 9 m on th s 1. 2 58 4 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 7 M ot he r’s e du ca tio n* N on e 3. 9 45 4 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 18 P rim ar y 2. 4 96 7 (4 .3 ) (7 1. 3) (0 .0 ) (2 .2 ) (0 .0 ) (0 .0 ) (8 .5 ) (8 .5 ) (0 .0 ) (2 .6 ) (0 .0 ) (0 .0 ) (7 7. 8) (5 8. 7) 24 S ec on da ry + 1. 7 1, 82 4 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 31 O th er /N on -s ta nd ar d (0 .0 ) 48 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 0 W ea lth in de x qu in til e P oo re st 2. 6 1, 13 9 (9 .2 ) (5 5. 9) (3 .4 ) (6 .8 ) (1 .7 ) (0 .0 ) (0 .0 ) (3 .4 ) (0 .0 ) (2 .0 ) (0 .0 ) (0 .0 ) (7 8. 7) (4 6. 7) 30 S ec on d 2. 4 67 5 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 16 M id dl e 1. 3 56 3 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 7 Fo ur th 2. 3 50 1 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 11 R ic he st 1. 9 42 9 (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) (* ) 8   Ch ild  He al th   54 Su rin am e M IC S4       Ta bl e C H .7 : C ar e se ek in g fo r s us pe ct ed p ne um on ia a nd a nt ib io tic u se d ur in g su sp ec te d pn eu m on ia ( co nt in ue d) P er ce nt ag e of c hi ld re n ag e 0- 59 m on th s w ith s us pe ct ed p ne um on ia in th e la st tw o w ee ks w ho w er e ta ke n to a h ea lth p ro vi de r a nd p er ce nt ag e of c hi ld re n w ho w er e gi ve n an tib io tic s, S ur in am e, 2 01 0 H ad su sp ec te d pn eu m on ia

View the publication

You are currently offline. Some pages or content may fail to load.