Iraq - Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey - 2000

Publication date: 2000

1 Republic of Iraq United Nations Children's Fund Council of Ministers (UNICEF) Planning Commission The Central Statistical Organisation Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey for the Year 2000 (Detailed Report) Baghdad December 2001 2 Contents Contents 2 List of Tables 4 Appreciation 6 Acknowledgement 7 Executive Summary 8 Summary Indicators 12 I. Introduction 13 Background of the Survey 13 Survey Objectives 13 II. Survey Methodology 13 Sample Design 13 Questionnaires 14 Fieldwork and Processing 15 III. Sample Characteristics and Data Quality 17 Response Rate 17 Age Distribution and Characteristics of the Household Population 18 IV. Results 19 A. Education 19 Early Childhood Education 19 Basic Education 19 Literacy 20 B. Water and Sanitation 20 Use Of Drinking Water 20 Use Of Sanitation 20 C. Child Malnutrition 21 Nutritional Status 21 Breastfeeding 22 Salt Iodization 23 Vitamin A Supplementation 23 Low Birth Weight 24 D. Child Health 24 Immunization Coverage 24 Diarrhoea 25 Acute Respiratory Infection 25 Malaria 26 E. HIV/AIDS 26 AIDS Knowledge 26 F. Reproductive Health 26 Contraception 26 Prenatal Care 27 Assistance at Delivery 27 G. Child Rights 27 Birth Registration 27 Orphanhood and Living Arrangements Of Children 28 Child Labour 28 Appendix A: Sample Design Appendix B: List of Personnel Involved in Iraq MICS 3 Appendix C: Questionnaires 4 List of Tables Table 1: Number of households and women, and response rates Table 2: Percent distribution of households by background characteristics Table 3: Percent distribution of households by background characteristics Table 4: Percent distribution of households by background characteristics Table 5: Percent distribution of women (15-49) year by background characteristics Table 6: Percent distribution of children under 5 by background characteristics Table 7: Percentage of children aged 36-59 months who are attending some form of organized early childhood education programme Table 8: Percentage o f children entering first grade of primary school who eventually reach grade 5 Table 9 -A: Percentage of children of primary school age (7-12 years) enrolled in primary schools Table 9 -B: Percentage of children of primary school age (6-11 years) enrolled in primary schools Table 10: Percentage of children of primary school age attending primary school Table 11: Percentage of children of primary school age enrolled in primary education Table 12: Percentage of literate population aged 15 years and above Table 13-A: Percentage of the population using improved drinking water sources Table 13-B: Percentage of the population using improved drinking water sources Table 14: Percentage of the population using sanitary means of excreta disposal Table 15: Percentage of under-five children who are severely or moderately malnourished Table 16: Percent of living children by breastfeeding status Table 17: Percent distribution of children by breastfeeding status Table 18: Percentage of households adequately consuming iodised salt Table 19: Percent distribution of children aged 6-59 months by their reception of a high dose of Vitamin-A Supplement in the last 6 months preceding the survey Table 20: Percentage of women with a birth in the last 12 months by whether they received a high dose of Vitamin-A supplement before the Infant reached 8 weeks old Table 21: Percentage of live births in the last 12 months (before the survey) that weighed below 2,500 grams at birth Table 22: Percentage of children aged (12-23) months immunised against childhood diseases at any time before the survey Table 23:Percentage of children aged (12-23) months immunized against childhood diseases before the first birthday with a fully dated vaccination card Table 24: Percentage of children age 12-23 months currently vaccinated against childhood diseases Table 25: Percentage of under-five children with diarrhoea in the last two weeks (before the survey) and were treated with ORS or ORT Table 26: Percentage of under-five children with diarrhoea in the last two weeks (before the survey) who took increased fluids and Continued to feed during the episode Table 27: Percentage of under-five children with acute respiratory infection in the last two weeks and methods of treatment Table 28: Percentage of children 0-59 moths of age reported ill during the last two weeks who received increased fluids and continued with feeding Table 29: Percentage of caretakers of children 0-59 months who know at least 2 signs of sickness for seeking medical treatment Table 30: Percentage of 0-59 months of age who slept under an insecticide-impregnated bednet in the previous night of the survey Table 31: Percentage of children 0-59 moths of age who were ill with fever in the last two weeks (before the survey) who received Anti-malarial drugs Table 32: Percentage of Women aged (15-49) who have knowledge about AIDS Table 33: Percentage of women aged 15-49 who know the means of infection with AIDS according to the mode of infection 5 Table 34: Percentage of married or in union women aged 15-49 who are using (or whose partner is using) a contraceptive method Table 35: Percentage of mothers with a birth in the last 12 months (before the survey) protected against neonatal tetanus Table 36: Percentage distribution of women aged 15-49 with a birth in the 12 months (before the survey) by type of personnel delivering antenatal care Table 37: Percent distribution of women aged 15-49 with a birth in the last 12 months (before the survey) by type of personnel assisting at delivery Table 38: Percent distribution of children aged 0-59 months by whether birth is registered and reasons for non-registration Table 39: Percentage of children 0-14 years of age in households not living with a biological parent Table 40: Percentage of children 5-14 years of age who are currently working 6 Appreciation The Steering Committee of the Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey for the year 2000 presents its thanks and appreciation to His Excellency the President/Minister of the Planning Commission/Ministry, Dr. Hassan Abdul Mon'em Al-Khattab, for his invaluable efforts and relevant instructions all through the stages of work. Wishing him the best of success. 7 Acknowledgement The Steering Committee of the Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey 2000 presents its appreciation to all parties who contributed in the preparation and the implementation of the survey from the staff of the Ministry of Health, the Ministry of Education and the Ministry of Interior. Special thanks go to the participants in the implementation and editing of the fieldwork in all Directorates of Education and the Water and Sewerage Directorates and all other supporting authorities. The Committee also presents its appreciation to the staff of the Central Statistical Organization at the Organization’s headquarters of all departments, and staff of the Statistics Directorates whether those who participated in the fieldwork or in all activities of the desk work. The collaboration and co-ordination of efforts starting from the preparatory phase and field work phase and ending with the computerized processing phase and preparation of survey results, have all had a big role in the success of the survey and consistency of its results within an outstanding period of time, despite the huge size of work involved. The Steering Committee of the Survey also takes this opportunity to pay special tribute to the efforts of the Office of the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) in Iraq, for its essential support to facilitate the implementation of the survey and provision of its requirements and technical expertise. Particular thanks are due to Dr. Manar El-Sheikh Abdil-Rahman, the survey's international consultant, who provided invaluable help in reviewing the technical arrangements and procedures set forth by the Central Statistical Organization and in ensuring that they are in keeping with the MICS methodologies. 8 Executive Summary The 2000 Iraq Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey (MICS) is a nationally representative survey of households, women, and children. The main objectives of the survey are to provide up-to-date information for assessing the situation of children and women in Iraq at the end of the decade, to furnish data needed for monitoring progress toward goals established at the World Summit for Children and as a basis for future action and to contribute to the improvement of data and monitoring systems in Iraq and to strengthen technical expertise in the design, implementation and analysis of such systems. Education · 76.3 percent of children of primary school age in Iraq (7-12) are attending primary school. In urban areas, 83.3 percent of children attend school, while in rural areas 61.0 percent attend. In the rural areas, female attendance rate is 49.2 percent which is lower than that of the male attendance rate 72.1 percent. In the urban areas these two rates are closer to each other being 87.4 percent and 80.0 percent for males and females respectively. Generally speaking, there are slight differences between the primary school attendance rates of the different ages, except age 12 where there is a marked decline. · Around 88.3 percent of children who enter the first grade of primary school eventually reach grade five. · There are noticeable disparities between the sexes in the achievement of grade five. 92.2 percent of male children who enter grade one reach five compared to 83.6 percent of female children. Water and Sanitation · 83.3 percent of the population has access to safe drinking water – 97.5 percent in urban areas and 51.5 percent in rural areas. Results of the survey indicate that most of the urban inhabitants (90.5 percent) use flush toilets connected to sewage systems or septic tanks, while only 37.9 percent of the rural population use similar toilets. 28.2 percent of the rural inhabitants still resort to traditional pit latrines. Child Malnutrition · 15.9 percent of children under age five in Iraq are underweight or too thin for their age. 22.1 percent of children are stunted or too short for their age and 5.9 percent are wasted or too thin for their height. · Children whose mothers have secondary or higher education are the least likely to be underweight and stunted compared to children of mothers with less education. Breastfeeding · Approximately 17.1 percent of children aged under four months are exclusively breastfed, a level considerably lower than recommended. At age 6-9 months, 51.0 percent of children are 9 receiving breast milk and solid or semi-solid foods. By age 20-23 months, 27.0 percent are continuing to breastfeed. Salt Iodization · 40 percent only of households in Iraq have adequately iodized salt. The percentage of households with adequately iodized salt ranges from 42.7 percent in urban households to 33.4 percent in rural. Vitamin A Supplementation · Within the six months prior to the MICS, 12.7 percent of children aged 6-59 months received a high dose Vitamin A supplement. Approximately 13.8 percent did receive a high dose of Vitamin A supplement prior to the last 6 months before the survey, while 56.1 percent of these children did not receive any this dose prior to the survey. · According to the survey’s results, educational level of the mother does not seem to have a significant influence on children’s intake of vitamin A supplement. · The age pattern of Vitamin A supplementation shows that supplementation in the last six months preceding the survey rises from 15.4 percent among children aged 6-11 months to22.9 percent among children aged 12-23 months and then declines steadily with age to 10 percent among the children aged 24-35 months. Low Birth weight · 12.3 percent of babies weigh less than 2500 grams at birth · Low birth weight does not vary much between urban and rural areas or by mother’s education. Immunization Coverage · 91.7 percent of children aged 12-23 months received a BCG vaccination by the age of 12 months and the first dose of DPT was given to 85.5 percent. The percentage declines for subsequent doses of DPT to 78.1 percent for the second dose, and 68.9 percent for the third dose. · Similarly, 73 percent of children received the zero dose of Polio which then increases to 93.5 percent for dose one, and then declines to 89.5 percent for the second dose and 81.8 percent for the third dose. · The coverage for measles vaccine turned out to be 78.2percent. · 60.7 percent of children received all the above-mentioned vaccines. Diarrhea · 26.5 percent of children with diarrhea received were treated with ORS or RHF. · Only 20.5 percent of children with diarrhea received increased fluids and continued eating as recommended. Acute Respiratory Infection · 6.9 percent of under five children had an acute respiratory infection in the two weeks prior to the survey. Approximately 76.1 percent of these children were taken to a health provider. 10 IMCI Initiative · Among under five children, who were reported to have had diarrhea or some other illness in the two weeks preceding the MICS, 16.1 percent received increased fluids and continued eating as recommended under the IMCI programmed. · 49.1 percent of mothers know at least two of the signs that a child should be taken immediately to a health facility. Malaria · In the areas of Iraq with the highest level of malaria risk, 7.4 percent of under five children slept under a bednet the night prior to the survey interview. However, only about two percent of the bednets used are impregnated with insecticide. · Approximately 64 percent of children with a fever in the two weeks prior to the MICS interview were given Paracetamol to treat the fever. · Children with fever in urban areas are 20 percent compared to 15.2 in rural areas . HIV/AIDS · 49.9 percent of women aged 15-49 have ever heard of AIDS. · The percentage is higher in urban areas (59.5 percent) than in rural areas (25.5 percent). · 36.6 percent of total women interviewed believe that AIDS can be prevented compared to 45.5 percent of the urban women and only 13.0 percent of rural women. · There is only slight variation between the different age groups in knowledge about the disease except for the youngest and oldest age groups where knowledge is markedly less. · 81 percent of those with at least secondary education have heard of the disease have, and 70 percent of those with at least secondary education believe that infection with AIDS can be avoided. These two percentages are significantly higher than the similar percentages for the lower educational levels. · 50.6 percent believe that AIDS is transmitted through sexual relations, 26.6percent through the intake of infected blood; and 11.8 percent cited infected medical equipment as the cause. Contraception · Current use of contraception was reported by 43.5 percent of married or in union women. The most popular method is the IUD which is used by 10.7 percent of married women followed by sterilization pills , which accounts for 9.2 percent of married women. Prenatal Care · 57.3 percent of women with recent births in Iraq are protected against neonatal tetanus. The vast majority of these women received two or more doses of tetanus toxoid within the last three years. · Overall, protection against tetanus was 63.2 percent. · 76.1 percent of women in Iraq receive some type of prenatal care from skilled personnel (doctor, nurse, midwife) and 82.0 in urban areas compared to 67.1 percent in rural areas who receive antenatal care. 11 Assistance at Delivery · A doctor, nurse, or midwife delivered about 72.1 percent of births occurring in the year prior to the MICS survey. This percentage is highest in urban areas (79 percent) and (60.2 percent) in rural . Birth Registration · The births of 98.1 percent of children under five years in Iraq have been registered. 98.7 percent in urban areas and 97.2 percent in the rural. There are no significant variations in birth registration across sex, age, or education categories. Orphanhood and Living Arrangements of Children · Overall, 94.8 percent of children aged 0-14 are living with both parents. Children who are not living with mother only and father dead comprise 2.7 percent and children who have one or both parents dead amount to 3.5 percent of all children aged 0-14. Child Labor · 14.0 percent of children aged 5-14 years are currently working. · 34.8 percent of children engage in domestic tasks ( such as cooking, fetching water, and caring for other children) for less than four hours a days while 3.2 percent spend more than four hours a day on such tasks. 12 13 A. Introduction Background of the Survey The Central Statistical Organisation produced the preliminary report of the Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey MICS 2000 in February 2001 in co-ordination with the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF). That report incorporated sixteen tables covering all key findings of the survey. MICS 2000 provides a large set of detailed results, thus acquiring special significance in displaying the situation of women and children in Iraq under the sanctions imposed on the country. This report, the second in the MICS series, includes 40 tables. These tables provide a profile of the main characteristics of the sample's households, women and children and cover indicators on education, nutritional, water and sanitation, immunization, vitamin supplements, child health and morbidity, as well as indicators on family planning, antenatal health and child labour. The survey provides data on the above -mentioned indictors disaggregated by rural/urban and sex, as well as by a certain number of other key characteristics, such as number of household members, child age and mother’s/women's educational background. Survey Objectives The 2000 Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey of Iraq has as its primary objectives: · To provide up-to-date information for assessing the situation of children and women in Iraq at the end of the decade and for looking forward to the next decade; · To furnish data needed for monitoring progress toward goals established in 1990 at the World Summit for Children and as a basis for future action; · To contribute to the improvement of data and monitoring systems in Iraq and to strengthen technical expertise in the design, implementation, and analysis of such systems. B. Survey Methodology Sample Design The sample of the Iraqi MICS was designed to be representative of the whole country and for rural and urban areas1, and covered all the 18 governorates of Iraq. Sample size was set the sample size at 13,430 households. The sample size was initially distributed equally among the 18 governorates with the exception of Baghdad where the rural percentage was increased from 10 percent to 25 percent, due to the relatively small size of its rural population. Thus, each governorate was allocated an equal sample size of 740 households except Baghdad with a sample size of 850 households. The sample was to be distributed to clusters of equal size. It was decided to work on a cluster size of 10 households. 1 All frames used defined urban areas as any administrative setup lying within the municipality boarder. Areas other than that are considered rural 14 Before selecting the sample of each one of the 18 governorates -through three stages stratified random sampling method- the sample of each governorate was distributed among its Qada'as2, and among the rural and urban areas of each Qada'a, in proportion to the size of population. Accordingly, the number of household (clusters) of the urban and of the rural areas of each governorate was determined. The sampling process was done in three stages and as follows: First stage: Mahalas/Villages in each Qada'a were listed with the measure of population size in each Mahala/Village. A number of Mahallas and Villages were selected according to probability proportionate to size sampling. Second stage: Each selected Mahala in the urban area, and village in the rural area, was divided into segments with a population of approximately 500 each. One segment or more was selected according to probability proportionate to size sampling method. Then each segment was divided into blocks or Majals with 25-30 households in urban area and 20-25 households in rural areas. One Majal was then selected by simple random sampling. Third stage: Within each selected Majal an update of existing household listing was carried out and a cluster of 10 households was selected by systematic random sampling. Questionnaires The questionnaire is based on the MICS model questionnaire provided by UNICEF, which contains modules on households, women aged (15-49), and children under 5. The questionnaire used is based on the Arabic translation of the English core questionnaire, provided by the MENARO, with some revisions and adaptations. The child Mortality module was excluded, the HIV module was revised to suit local conditions, the optional modules on child disability and night blindness were included, and additional questions on breast feeding, water and sanitation, and maternal and new- born health were incorporated in the relevant modules. (See Appendix C) The Arabic version was reviewed closely and repeatedly to ensure its consistency with the original version on the one hand and its suitability with the local terminology/vocabulary on the other. To detect problem areas and minimise misinterpretations, the endorsed questionnaire was pre-tested in August 2000. Based on the results of the pre-test, modifications were made as deemed necessary. Training Training was given special prominence in the conduct of the survey. It was believed that the preparation and implementation of a detailed and comprehensive training plan was a necessary prerequisite for the proper understanding and comprehension of the technical details of sample design and selection, as well as the instructions for filling the questionnaire. The overall training activity undertaken in preparation for the conduct of the survey can be summarised as follows: 2 All sampling frames made use of the administrative set -up present in the last population census conducted in 1997. Each governorate is divided into districts (Qada'a) Each Qada'a is divided into sub-districts (Nahiya). These are further divided into Quarters (Mahala) in urban areas and (Village) in rural areas. The Primary Sampling Unit is Mahala in urban area and Village in rural area. 15 · Number of implemented training workshops : 15 · Number of training days: 50 · Number of trainees: · 10 Central Supervisors · 39 Local Supervisors · 54 Local Editors · 162 Fieldworkers · 44 Central Desk Editor · 6 Central Desk Reviewer · 13 Data Entry (Computer) Reviewer · 53 Data Entry Clerks · Total Number of Trainees 381 The workshops were conducted at the training centre in CSO. The training workshops that were concerned with the conduct of interviews or with the editing and review of questionnaires involved the conduct of pilot survey. In addition to the above workshops, the central supervisors carried out one refresher workshop in each governorate for all staff involved in the survey in the governorate concerned. These refresher workshops were implemented two days before the start of the fieldwork. Fieldwork and processing The fieldwork lasted 26 days. To ensure timely and efficient conduct, detailed workplan was drawn for carrying it out. The basic framework of this plan was the following: · Each member of the National Steering Committee was designated/appointed as a central supervisor for 2-3 governorates. · The director of the statistical office of each governorate was appointed as local supervisor of the fieldwork in the governorate concerned with the head of care unit of the directorate of health of the governorate as an aid in supervision. · In each governorate 4 teams carried out the fieldwork. Each team had one female doctor or health personnel from the directorate of health of the governorate and a statistician from the statistical office of the governorate. · In each governorate a committee of 3 was formed to do the local editing. The committee's members belonged to the following bodies of the governorate; - The General Directorate for Education - General Commission for Water and Sewerage - Statistical Offic e 16 The table below gives the number of staff, by type of work performed, who were involved in the fieldwork Type of Work Total Number Central Supervisor 10 Local Supervisor 39 Fieldworker 162 Local Editor 54 One vehicle was provided for each central supervisor, and for each single fieldteam. Thus a total of 86 vehicles was provided for the fieldwork. The provided transport ensured the arrival of the field teams to the selected clusters on time and contributed to the timely execution of work. Office Work As a complement to fieldwork, a plan for desk/office work was also prepared. This plan can be summarised as follows: - The conduct of local editing by the local office editing teams in the governorates. - Editing of work at the local/governorate level by the central supervisors. - Editing of the work by the central office editing teams at the centre at CSO premises. - Return of the questionnaire with mistakes or data gaps to the field so that it can be filled again correctly. - Reviewing the edited questionnaires once again by central office reviewing teams as a prelude to computer entry. - Entry of data by the data entry clerks trained for that purpose. - Editing of entry operations by data entry (Computer) reviewers, making the corrections whenever possible. - Cleaning and verification of data entry operations in accordance with the stages set in the data entry programme (EPI-Info) - Final editing and cleaning of files by the central supervisors of the data processing work. And the cleaning of files after completion of data entry. - Merging of files and the preparation of the required tables and reports. These activities were continuously followed up and evaluated by the consultant commissioned by UNICEF for the survey. 17 C. Sample Characteristics and Data Quality Response Rate Of the 13,430 households selected for the sample, 13,114 were reached. Of these, 13,011 were successfully interviewed yielding a household response rate of 99.2 per cent countrywide, 99.3 per cent response rate for the urban areas, and 99.2 per cent for the rural areas. In the interviewed households of the sample, 23,079 eligible women (age 15-49) were identified. Of these, 22994 women were successfully interviewed, giving a rate of 1.77 eligible woman per interviewed household. Thus giving an eligible women response rate of 99.6 per cent countrywide, 99.6 per cent in urban areas, and 99.7 percent in rural areas. In addition, the sample contained 14,744 children, of whom 14,676 were interviewed (i.e. at the rate of 1.13 child per household selected). The response rate of children was 99.5 per cent for the whole country, 99.6 per cent and 99.5 per cent for the urban areas and rural areas respectively (Table 1). Data processing For data entry, CSO for the first time applied the software package (EPI Info). Senior staffs were trained to supervise operation of this package. In the year 2000, two data analysts participated in a workshop held in Syria for training on this software. However, the data entry and processing programmes, which were developed by the consultative team supervising the survey globally, have been adapted to comply with the modifications made to the questionnaire and the tabulation plan. These modifications were reviewed carefully and thoroughly by the international consultant hired by UNICEF for the survey. The modified programme was put to trial through the pre-test. Intensive training on supervision of data entry and processing was then provided for 13 programmers and system analysts of CSO's computer department. 53 of CSO staff were trained on data entry. They worked in two shifts (morning and evening) for around 30 days. During this period, editing and validation were carried out according to the methodology set in the EPI-Info software. All entries of the questionnaires verified/audited both logically and computationally. Afterwards, files on households, women and children were merged. General and detailed tabulations of the survey results were developed after verification of the processes of review, evaluation, merging files, weighing of data according to the procedure described below and conformity of figures of indicators across all tabulations. Weighing of Data Since the sampling fractions, i.e. ratio of sample size to population size, varies from one governorate to another, it was necessary -when calculating averages of more than one statistical strata- to weigh households and persons covered by the survey in each governorate with weights that are inversely proportional to the sampling fractions. Because of this procedure all the indicators cited in this report are weighted indicators that have taken into account the relative significance of the population size of each governorate (or stratum). 18 Age Distribution and Characteristics of the Household Population A. Household's characteristics Table (2) presents the percentage distribution of households in the sample by a number of major characteristics at the level of the urban and rural areas. Of the weighted number of respondent households, 71.8 percent are urban households, and 28.2% are rural. The percentage of households who have less than 4 members of the total respondent households is 12.3 per cent, while households who have between six and seven members represent 24.6 per cent. Table (3) shows that percentage of households, in rural areas, with more than seven members is higher than those households in urban areas. This confirms that the average size of household in rural areas is bigger than the average size of the household in urban areas. Table (4) indicates that 81.5 per cent of the interviewed households contain at least one child under the age of fifteen years countrywide; with 80 per cent in urban areas and 85.3 per cent in rural areas. This table also shows that households having at least one child under five years of age represent 56.7 per cent countrywide in comparison with 52.7 per cent in urban areas and 66.9 per cent in rural areas. Percentage of households that have at least one female aged between 15-49 years is 94.3 per cent, which is close to the same percentages found in both urban and rural areas. B. Characteristics of Eligible women (15-49) Years of Age Table (5) shows that the weighted number of eligible women interviewed was 22980, of which 71.7 per cent were in the urban areas and 28.3 per cent were in the rural areas. Women aged between 15-19 years comprise the largest percentage across age groups. This percentage declines steadily across age groups as it is noted that 8.2 per cent of women are of the age group 45-49, which is the last age group of eligible women in this questionnaire. Approximately 51.4 per cent of the female respondents in the sample are married, while 4.9 per cent of the respondent women were previously married (divorced, widowed or separated) and 43.8 per cent were never married. Of the total number of respondent women, the percentage of uneducated women (never attended school) reached 26 per cent. Those who have completed primary/elementary education form 38 per cent, those who have completed intermediate and higher education form 34.7 percent, while those women who received non-formal standard education form 1.3 per cent. III. Characteristics of Eligible Children (Children Under 5) There is slight difference between the proportions of female and male under 5 children covered by the survey (as shown in Table 6); 50.4 per cent of these children are males and 49.6 per cent are females. Approximately 63.6 per cent of interviewed children under age 5 live in the urban areas, compared to 36.4 per cent in the rural. When comparing the proportional distribution of under 5 children and that of eligible women between rural and urban areas, one will observe that the proportion of under fives living in the rural areas is greater than that of eligible women living in the same areas by 8.1 percentage points. Given the fact that the response rates for rural and urban areas are very close to each other, the aforementioned phenomenon can be attributed to the higher fertility rate of rural females. 19 Review of the age structure of children under five years of age covered by the survey shows that 9.5 per cent of these children are under 6 months of age, and 11.3 per cent of them belong to the age group 6-11 months. The proportions of the age groups (12-23) months, (24-35) months, (36-47), (48-59) months show slight disparities from each other; all of them roam around 20 per cent with slight variations. IV. Results 1st. Education Early Childhood Education Despite the fact that the primary school enrolment age in Iraq is 6 years, there are regular education programmes for those children below the age of 6 years, such as nurseries and kindergartens. The percentage of children aged 36-59 months attending these programmes amounts to 3.7 per cent with 3.8 per cent males and 3.6 per cent females (Table 7). The percentage in urban areas is 5.2 per cent, against 0.9 per cent in rural areas. The table also indicates that 5 per cent of the children aged (48-59 months) have enrolled in nurseries and kindergartens compared to 2.6 per cent for younger children. It is to be noted that most of the children who joined these programmes have mothers with education levels above intermediate education. Basic Education Universal access to basic education and the achievement of primary education is considered as one of the most important goals of the World Summit for Children. Education is a vital prerequisite for combating poverty, empowering women, protecting children from hazards of work at an early age and from discrimination between the sexes. It also enhances the capacities/capabilities, i.e. it empowers, the citizens of the country, and of both sexes, in strengthening the process of development and construction. Table (8) shows that the 88.3 per cent of children enter the first grade of primary school and eventually reach grade five, with 92.2 per cent for male children and 83.6 for females. This percentage is slightly higher in urban areas 89.8 per cent than that in rural 83.5 per cent. Overall, 76.3 per cent of children of primary school age (7-12 years) in Iraq are attending primary school (Table 9-A). In urban areas, 83.8 per cent of children attend school while in rural areas 61 per cent attend. In the rural areas, female attendance rate (49.2 per cent) is lower than that of the male attendance rate (72.4 per cent). In the urban areas these two rates are closer to each other being 87.4 per cent and 80 per cent for males and females respectively. Generally speaking there are slight differences between the primary school attendance rates of the different ages, except age 12 where there is a marked decline as shown in Table (9-A). Whereas, Table (10) reflects greater decline in primary education enrolment indicators for children in primary school age than those shown in preceding tables. This is because indicators in Table (10) refer to children of all ages eligible for primary education level. 20 Table (11) shows percentages of children in primary school age who were registered. It is noted that 88.9 per cent of children aged 7-12 years were registered in primary education in urban areas against 71.3 per cent in rural areas. There is little difference between the male and female percentages in registration in primary school in urban areas. Literacy Table (12) indicates that the percentage of literate population from 15 years of age and above in Iraq is 73.5 per cent. This rate in urban areas is clearly higher (78.9 per cent) than in rural areas (59.6 per cent). Literacy declines with increasing age as it reaches its lowest rate among the population aged 65 years and above with a literacy percentage rate of 18 per cent. 2nd. Water and Sanitation Use of Drinking Water Safe drinking water is a basic necessity for good health. Unsafe drinking water can be a source of epidemiological diseases such as trachoma, cholera, and typhoid. Drinking water can also be tainted with chemical and physical contaminants with harmful effects on human health. This adds to the importance of accessibility to drinking water, particularly for women and children, who bear the primary responsibility for carrying water from their sources, often for long distances from their residence. Table (13) shows that 83.3 per cent of Iraq's population have access to sources of safe drinking water. Majority of urban areas population with access to these sources of water form 97.5 per cent against 51.5 per cent only in the rural areas. The relatively low access in rural areas to safe drinking water is primarily due to the inability to construct new projects for potable water and or the establishment of water compact units because of the imposed sanctions. This is reflected in the fact that only 27.1 per cent of rural residential areas/units are linked to the public water network, compared to 89 per cent in the urban areas, while 7.1 per cent of the rural inhabitants use public taps compared to 2.1 per cent only of the urban people, as shown in Table (13). Use of Sanitation As for excreta disposal, Table (14) shows that 92.5 per cent of the population of Iraq use sanitary means of excreta disposal (Sanitary means of excreta disposal include: flush toilets connected to sewage systems or septic tanks, other flush toilets, improved pit latrines, and traditional pit latrines). This percentage is 99.1 in urban areas and 77.8 per cent in rural. Results of the survey indicate that most of the urban inhabitants at a 90.5 per cent use flush toilets connected to sewage systems or septic tanks, while only 37.9 per cent of the rural population use similar toilets as 28.2 per cent of the rural inhabitants still resort to the traditional pit latrines. 21 3rd. Child Malnutrition Nutritional Status Children’s nutritional status is a reflection of their overall health. When children have access to an adequate food supply, are not exposed to repeated illness, and are well cared for, they reach their growth potential and are considered well nourished. To evaluate and assess the nutritional status of the child, UNICEF and the World Health Organisation recommend the use of simple numerical measures to compare the children’s nutritional status between countries and within the same country in accordance with standard classification. There are three major measures to evaluate the nutritional status of children as follows: - Malnutrition Indicator This measure is based on classifying the chronic and acute malnutrition by comparing the weight of children under five years with their ages (there are standard tabulations for this purpose). Percentage of children whose weight for age is more than two standard deviations (-2 SD) below the median of the reference population is considered the moderate or severe underweight rate, while the percentage of those children whose weight for age is more than three standard deviations (-3 SD) below the median represents the severe underweight rate. - Stunting Indicator Height for age is a measure of linear growth. Children whose height for age is more than two standard deviations below the median of the reference population are considered short for their age and are classified as moderately or severely stunted. Whose height for age is more than three standard deviations below the median are classified as severely stunted. Stunting is a reflection of chronic malnutrition as a result of failure to receive adequate nutrition over a long period. - Wasting Indicator If weight is measured in comparison with height (weight for height), then the child’s weight that is more than two standard deviations below the median of the reference population reflects that the child suffers from moderate or severe wasting. While those whose weight falls more than three standard deviations below the median are severely wasted. Table (15) displays malnutrition indicators, summarised in the following: - 15.9 per cent of Iraqi children suffer from moderate or severe malnutrition; and 2 per cent of them suffer from severe malnutrition. - 22.1 per cent are moderately or severely stunted with 6.4 per cent of them are severely stunted. - 5.9 per cent of children are moderately or severely wasted, with 1.2 per cent of those children are severely wasted. - All indicators of malnutrition (underweight, stunting and wasting) are higher in the rural areas than in the urban for both moderate and severe cases. - Malnutrition indicators for males and females are generally close to each other. 22 - Underweight has decreased slightly since 1996 when it was 23.4 per cent. But stunting indicator is still on the high side. Given the fact that stunting is influenced by long run under- nourishment, the level of the stunting indicator highlights and reflects the harsh effects of the unjust sanctions that has lasted for quiet a long period. Stunting indicator is not easily influenced by the relative improvement in feeding patterns, as is the case for the underweight indicator. - All three indicators of nutrition status vary inversely with the educational level of mother. Children of mothers with at least intermediate education have lower rates of malnutrition. Breastfeeding Breastfeeding for the first few years of life provides children with immunity against many diseases. It also provides an ideal source of nutrients, and is economical and safe. However, many mothers stop breastfeeding too soon after birth, which can contribute to growth faltering and micronutrient malnutrition and is unsafe if clean water is not readily available. The World Summit for Children states that children should be exclusively breastfed for the first four months during the first year of life, and that breastfeeding should continue with complementary food, until the end of the second year of life. Many countries have adopted the recommendation of exclusive breastfeeding for the first six months. Table (16) gives the relative distribution of children by breastfeeding status. Despite the fact that the number of children in the different age groups involved does not allow making detailed comparisons between children of various age groups, unless when extreme caution is exercised, it is possible to draw a number of conclusions. It is clear that 17.1 per cent of children aged (0-3) months are exclusively breast-fed, 51 per cent of children aged (6-9) months are receiving breastmilk with complementary feeding, 58.6 per cent of children aged (12-15) months continue to be breastfed while taking other foods, but the percentage decreases to 27 for children aged (20-23) months. Data, however, do not show any noticeable effect of level of mother's education on breastfeeding practice. This phenomenon can be partly attributed to the positive long-standing tradition in Iraqi society of giving special care to infants, and is also affected by the presence of the mother at home near her child especially during infancy, whether the mother is a housewife, or a civil servant enjoying her six-month fully paid maternity leave and six-month partially paid maternity leave. Table (17) shows that the percentage of children who do not depend on breastfeeding increases with age during the first three years of life. Percentage of children who are not breastfed during the first month is 3.7 per cent, while during the second and third months of age the percentage reaches 8.1. The table shows that 42.4 per cent of children aged (14-15) months are not breastfed, and when the children reach the age of 2 years, 83.9 per cent of those children are not breastfed. This rate increases to 96.9 per cent for children aged between 34 and 35 months. The percentage of exclusive breastfeeding (i.e. children who receive only breast milk) during the first month of age is 23.8 per cent. While in the second the third months of life, the percentage of breast- feeding is 11.9, then this percentage drops dramatically for the rest of age groups of children. It is noted from the rest of the tabulation that reliance on liquids, solid and semi-solid food increases with the child’s age. 23 Salt Iodization Deficiency of iodine in the diet is the world’s single greatest cause of preventable mental retardation and can lower the average intelligence quotient (IQ) of a population. Salt iodization is an effective, low-cost way of preventing iodine deficiency disorders (IDD). Adequately iodized salt contains 15 ppm (parts per million) of iodine or more. In MICS, interviewers tested household salt for iodine levels by means of a testing kit. It was found out that during the survey period, as in Table (18), only 40 per cent of households use iodised salt with (15 PPM) or more, 42.7 per cent urban households and 33.4 per cent rural. Salt distributed to households through the ration is iodised. Yet the quantities given do not meet the actual requirements of households for iodised salt. The 1988 household budget survey showed that average monthly per capita consumption of salt was 331 gms, while what is provided through the ration is only 150 gms per capita. So the food ration provides only 45 per cent of actual households' needs and the other (55 per cent) has to be purchased from the local market, which is either totally lacking in iodine or contains less than (15PPM). Therefore the quantity of salt provided by the food ration is completely iodised and form 40 per cent as per the survey’s results which is quite close to the distributed amount. It is also probable that irregularity in the distribution of iodised salt during the survey period accounted for the low rates. Vitamin A Supplementation Vitamin A deficiency (VAD) impairs children's immune systems, increasing their chances of dying of common childhood diseases and undermines the health of pregnant and lactating women. It can also cause eye damage and blindness in children. Yet it can be easily prevented by vitamin A supplementation or food fortification. UNICEF and WHO recommend that all countries with an under five mortality rate exceeding 70 per 1000 live births, or where vitamin A deficiency is a public health problem, should put in place a programme for control of vitamin A deficiency. Based on UNICEF/WHO guidelines, the Iraqi Ministry of Health recommends that children aged 6-12 months be given one dose Vitamin A capsule of 100,000 IU every six months, and children older than one year be given one high dose of 200,000 IU every six months. Table (19) shows that 12.7 per cent of children aged 6-59 months received a high dosage of Vitamin A supplement during the last six months (prior to the conduct of MICS). Approximately 13.8 per cent did not receive the supplement in the last 6 months but did receive one prior to that time. The table also indicates that 6.7 per cent of children received a Vitamin A supplement at some time in the past but their mothers/caretakers were unable to specify when. It is observed that Vitamin A supplementation coverage in the urban areas is slightly higher than in the rural areas. This small difference in coverage reflects the serious efforts made by the concerned health institutions to ensure the availability of vitamin A supplement to the remotest rural areas of the country in spite of the resource limitations arising from the sanctions imposed on the country. According to the survey's results, educational status/level of the mother does not seem to have a significant influence on children's intake of vitamin A supplement. This fact confirms the effectiveness of the social awareness campaigns during immunisation carried out by the ministry of health and the supporting bodies. 24 The age pattern of Vitamin A supplementation shows that supplementation in the last six months preceding the survey rises from 15.4 per cent among children aged 6-11 months to 22.9 per cent among children aged 12-23 months and then declines steadily with age to 10 per cent among the children aged 24-35 months. Table (20) shows that 21.6 per cent of women, who gave birth to a child during the last six months prior to the survey, received a Vitamin A supplement before the new-born child reaches 6 weeks of age. Women who received Vitamin A supplement in urban areas is higher than in rural areas, 23.2 and 18.7 per cent respectively, while 2.6 per cent of women are not certain whether they received a supplement or not. The educational level of the women does not seem to have any significant or influence on the rates of Vitamin A supplementation. Low birth weight Table (21) indicates that 12.3 per cent of infants are estimated to weigh less than 2500 grams at birth. However, the table indicates that low birth weight does not vary much between urban and rural areas or by mother’s education. In addition, 35.5 per cent of live births were weighed at birth. 4th. Child Health Immunization Coverage According to UNICEF and WHO guidelines, a child should receive, through a national immunisation programme, a BCG vaccination to protect against tuberculosis, three doses of DPT to protect against diphtheria, pertussis, and tetanus, three doses of polio vaccine, and a measles vaccination by the age of 12 months. In MICS, mothers were asked to provide vaccination cards for children under the age of five. Interviewers copied vaccination information from the cards onto the MICS questionnaire. Table (22) shows that 91.7 per cent of children aged (12-23) months received a BCG vaccination at any time prior to the survey according to the vaccination cards or the mother's report/memory. The results show that the first, second and third doses of DPT were given to 85.5 per cent, 78.1 per cent and 68.9 per cent of children respectively. Similarly, percentages of children who received the zero dose, first, second and third doses of polio were 73, 93.5, 89.5 and 81.8 per cent. The coverage for measles vaccination turned out to be 78.1 per cent. The survey also showed that 60.7 per cent of children received all the above-mentioned vaccines. Table (23) is concerned with children (12-23) months of age that have received vaccinations before their first birthday and who have properly dated vaccination cards. This table indicates that 98.7 per cent of these children received a BCG vaccination and the coverage with the first, second and third dose of DPT was 97.5 per cent, 96.2 per cent and 92.7 per cent respectively. The consecutive four doses of Polio vaccine were received by 99.2 per cent, 97.6 per cent, 96.1 per cent and 92.5 per cent of children (12-23) months of age, while only 78.1 per cent of these children were vaccinated against measles. As a result the percentage of children with vaccination cards who had all the recommended vaccinations by their first birthday was at 70.3 per cent. 25 Table (24) shows the percentage of children aged 12-23 months currently vaccinated against childhood diseases. According to the figures of this table, male and female children are vaccinated at roughly the same rate. Urban children are more likely to be vaccinated than rural children. The table also highlights the fact that mothers’ education has a positive effect on vaccination coverage, i.e. vaccination coverage varies proportionately with mother's education. The table also indicates that 61 per cent of children have health vaccination cards. Diarrhoea Table (25) shows that 21.3 per cent of under five children had diarrhoea in the two weeks preceding the survey. Diarrhoea prevalence has no significant difference between male and female children and urban and rural, though it is slightly higher in urban than in rural areas. The peak of diarrhoea prevalence occurs in the weaning period, among children age 6-11 months. This rate declines with the baby advancing in age over the next four years. Table (25) also shows the percentage of children receiving various types of recommended liquids during the episode of diarrhoea as 37.5 per cent of children received breast milk while they had diarrhoea, 49.3 per cent of the children received gruel and 26.5 per cent of children received ORS. Table (26) shows that 29 per cent children with diarrhoea had liquids in quantities above the norm. This percentage is higher in urban areas (31.4 per cent) than in rural areas (23.8 per cent). This table also indicates that 29 per cent of children’s consumption of food diminishes largely during the diarrhoeal episodes whereas the nutrition system of 70.3 per cent falters during the episode of diarrhoea with minor difference between urban and rural areas and males and females. Overall, children in early ages are more affected than others when they receive less food during diarrhoea. Acute respiratory infection Table (27) shows that 6.9 per cent of under-five children had an acute respiratory infection in the two weeks prior to the survey. Of these, 18.9 per cent received medical counsel from a hospital, 35.9 per cent from a health centre, 9.3 per cent from a public health clinic and 21.5 per cent from a private doctor. The table also shows that 7.8 per cent of the children with ARI were males against 5.0 per cent females. The incidence rates do not vary much between rural and urban areas and these incidences usually occur in children aged 6-23 months old. Table (28) shows that 38.9 per cent were reported to have been ill in the two weeks preceding the survey. Of these, 22.5 per cent drank more liquids during the illness and 75.4 per cent drank equal amounts of liquids or less than usual. The same table shows that 72.7 per cent of the children continued eating (i.e., ate somewhat less, the same, or more than usual amount of food), whereas 26.8 per cent of children declined food or ate less. Table (29) indicates that mothers or caretakers of children were able to name some ailment symptoms. 7.3 per cent of mothers were able to identify child’s inability to drink or breastfeed, 77.4 per cent of mothers were able to identify if the child developed a fever and that 30.2 per cent of mothers mentioned breathing difficulty. Overall, 49.1 per cent of mothers or caretakers know at least two signs of ailment that require medical care. However no significant differences exist in the other disaggregation used in the table for these indicators. 26 Malaria Table (30) shows that 7.4 per cent of under-five children sleep under bednet. This percentage in rural areas (8.3 per cent) is higher than in urban areas (6.9 per cent). The table indicates that infants less than 6 months of age form the largest group of under fives sleeping under a bednet (24 per cent). It is also found that 97.9 per cent of the bednets are not treated with insecticide. Table (31) shows that 18.2 per cent of under five children were suffering from fever and 64 per cent of them were treated with Paracetamol. Overall, children suffering from fever in urban areas are 20 per cent compared to 15.2 per cent in rural areas. The table also points out that 1.3 per cent received an appropriate anti-malarial drug. 5th. HIV/AIDS AIDS Knowledge Iraq is considered as an AIDS free country. Nonetheless, it was considered appropriate and relevant to incorporate in Iraq's questionnaire a limited number of questions on this subject to measure the level and degree of knowledge of this disease and of the means of its transmission. One of the most important strategies for reducing the rate of HIV/AIDS infection is the promotion of accurate knowledge of how AIDS is transmitted and how to prevent transmission. Among women aged 15-49 in Iraq, 49.9 per cent have ever heard of AIDS (Table 32). This percentage is higher in urban areas (59.5 per cent) than in rural areas (25.5 per cent). 36.3 per cent of total interviewed women believe that AIDS can be prevented compared to 45.5 per cent of the urban women and only 13 per cent of rural women. There is only slight variation between the different age groups in knowledge about the disease except for the youngest and oldest age groups where knowledge is markedly less. The survey's results show a marked influence of educational level on awareness of AIDS. 81 per cent of those who have heard of the disease have at least secondary education, and nearly 70 per cent of those believe that infection with AIDS can be avoided. These two percentages are significantly higher than the similar percentages for the lower educational levels. Table (33) expresses knowledge about means of transmission of the disease. 50.6 per cent believe that AIDS is transmitted through sexual relations, 26.6 per cent through the intake of infected blood; and 11.8 per cent cited infected medical equipment as the cause. Educational level is the only classification criterion that yields marked variations between different groups. Women with at least secondary education have cited that sexual relations, intake of infected blood and medical equipment are the primary means for the transmission of the virus. 6th. Reproductive Health Contraception Table (34) indicates that 43.5 per cent of married couples use contraception methods, and that 25.4 per cent of them were reported to have been using modern methods in comparison with 18.1 per 27 cent that use traditional methods. The most popular method is IUD (10.7 per cent). The next most popular method is the contraceptive pills (9.2 per cent). Prenatal Care Table (35) points out that 57.3 per cent of mothers, who gave birth to children during the 12 months that preceded the survey, were given at least two doses of Tetanus Toxoid (TT) injections over the past three years. Yet only 5.5 per cent of mothers received at least 3 doses over the past 10 years. Overall immunization coverage rate against TT was 63.2 per cent. This rate is greatly affected by the surrounding environment and mother’s educational background. Table (36) shows that 76.4 per cent of women aged 15-45 years who gave birth to babies in the year prior to the MICS survey have received antenatal medical care from doctors, whereas 22.4 per cent of women did not receive any kind of health care during that period. Rates of women in urban areas seen by doctors during pregnancy are significantly higher than those in rural areas. This indicator is also affected by mothers’ educational level. Assistance at Delivery The care provided to the mother at delivery by medically trained attendants is quite essential to achieve safe delivery both to the mother and child as a result of the use of technically sounds procedures. This also reduces the probability of any complication and improves accurate treatment of any health problems that may occur. Skilled assistance at delivery is defined as assistance provided by a doctor, nurse, midwife or auxiliary midwife. Table (37) shows that the percentage of women who gave birth to babies in the year prior to the MICS survey and who were receiving health care from skilled personnel countrywide is 72.1 per cent countrywide; with 79 per cent in urban areas and 60.2 per cent in rural areas. The percentage of mothers with intermediate education who received health care from skilled persons is 84.7 per cent, higher than the percentage of women of other educational levels. During the year prior to this survey, the highest percentage of births delivered with assistance of a nurse or trained midwife was 37 per cent, followed by the percentage of deliveries assisted by doctors at 28.2 per cent. It is also observed that traditional midwives assisted in 24.2 per cent of the deliveries. The latter type of assistance is still widely resorted to in the rural areas where the percentage rises to 34.5 per cent. 7th. Child Rights Birth Registration Birth registration is a fundamental means of supporting the respect of child's rights and the interest in his care and future. The survey results, as per Table (38), show that countrywide birth registration of children aged (0-59) months at the official bureaux is very high at 98.1 per cent, with 98.7 per cent in the urban areas and 97.2 per cent on the rural. The high birth registration reflects the respect that Iraqi people have for the laws, rules and regulations of their country. The fact that birth registration is equally high in the rural areas as in the 28 urban highlights the keenness of the rural inhabitants to overcome the difficulties and problems associated with going to the registration offices given the fact that these offices are normally far from their residence as they are usually located in the urban areas. The survey shows no significant variations in birth registration among the educational levels of mothers or the different age groups of under five children. Low birth registration is usually connected with many reasons particularly the fact that registration requires travel for long distances. Orphanhood and living arrangements of children Table (39) shows that 94.8 per cent of the children are living with their biological parents and that 2.7 per cent are living with their mothers only as their fathers are deceased. Other cases do not lead to a significant indicator. The aforementioned table also shows that 3.5 per cent of children have one or both parents dead. Child Labour Table (40) shows that currently 14.0 per cent of children aged 5-14 years old go to work. The highest rate is found in rural areas, 27.8 per cent, in comparison with 7.1 per cent in urban areas. Child labour rates are higher at ages between 10 years and above (21.8 per cent) against 6.9 per cent for younger ages. Urban Rural Sampled households 8,141 5,289 13430 Occupied households 8,024 5090 13114 Completed households 7,964 5047 13011 Household response rate 99.3 99.2 99.2 Eligible women 13,998 9081 23079 Interviewed women 13,943 9051 22994 Women response rate 99.6 99.7 99.6 Children under 5 7,799 6945 14744 Interviewed children under 5 7,764 6912 14676 Child response rate 99.6 99.5 99.5 * MICS -2000 Table 2: Percent distribution of households by background characteristics Percent Number Unweighted Urban 71.8 9,338 7,964 Area Rural 28.2 3,673 5,047 1 1.2 150 147 2-3 11.1 1,443 1,301 4-5 21.7 2,819 2,514 6-7 24.6 3,204 3,146 8-9 19.4 2,523 2,658 Number of HH Members 10+ 22.1 2,872 3,245 Total 100.0 13,011 13,011 * MICS -2000 Area Total Urban Rural 1 1.1 1.3 1.2 2-3 11.6 9.7 11.1 4-5 23.6 16.7 21.7 6-7 25.7 22.0 24.6 8-9 19.0 20.4 19.4 Number of HH Members 10+ 19.0 29.9 22.1 Total 100.0 100.0 100.0 Number 9,338 3,673 13,011 Unweighted 7,964 5,047 13,011 * MICS 2000 Table 4: Percent distribution of households by background characteristics Area Total Urban Rural At least one child age < 15 80.0 85.3 81.5 At least one child age < 5 52.7 66.9 56.7 At least one women age 15-49 94.2 94.5 94.3 Number 9,338 3,667 13,005 Unweighted 7,964 5,037 13,001 * MICS 2000 t Unweighted Urban 71.7 16,471 13,944 Area Rural 28.3 6,509 9,026 15-19 23.6 5,429 5,592 20-24 20.7 4,756 4,719 25-29 16.2 3,715 3,693 30-34 13.1 3,015 3,029 35-39 10.8 2,475 2,410 40-44 7.4 1,702 1,677 Age 45-49 8.2 1,887 1,847 Currently married 51.4 11,803 11,902 Formerly married 4.9 1,119 1,107 Marital status Never married 43.8 10,053 9,957 Yes 50.1 11,522 11,665 Ever given birth No 49.9 11,453 11,301 None 26.0 5,971 7,028 Primary 38.0 8,729 9,077 Secondary+ 34.7 7,971 6,530 Non-standard curriculum 1.3 303 329 Women’s education level Missing/DK 0.0 6 6 Total 100.0 22,980 22,970 * MICS 2000 Male 50.4 7,339 7,382 Sex Female 49.6 7,215 7,180 Urban 63.6 9,262 7,740 Area Rural 36.4 5,292 6,822 <6 months 9.5 1,378 1,325 6-11 months 11.3 1,646 1,665 12-23 months 20.4 2,962 3,006 24-35 months 18.8 2,735 2,759 36-47 months 21.7 3,152 3,129 Age 48-59 months 18.4 2,677 2,673 None 31.8 4,622 5,265 Primary 41.1 5,984 5,848 Secondary + 25.3 3,683 3,161 Non-standard curriculum 1.8 259 283 Mother’s education level Missing/DK 0.0 5 5 Total 100.0 14,554 14,562 * MICS 2000 Characteristics Total Number Male 3.8 3,015 Sex Female 3.6 2,815 Urban 5.2 3,740 Area Rural 0.9 2,089 36-47 months 2.6 3,152 Age 48-59 months 5.0 2,677 None 1.2 1,967 Primary 2.4 2,268 Secondary 8.8 1,463 Non Standard curriculum 6.2 131 Mother’s education level Missing /DK .0 1 Total 3.7 5,830 * MICS 2000 Percent in grade 1 reaching grade 2 Percent in grade 2 reaching grade 3 Percent in grade 3 reaching grade 4 Percent in grade 4 reaching grade 5 Percent who reach grade 5 of those who enter grade 1 Male 98.4 99.2 98.1 96.3 92.2 Sex Female 97.2 96.6 95.3 93.4 83.6 Urban 97.7 98.6 97.2 95.9 89.8 Area Rural 98.3 96.7 95.7 91.7 83.5 Total 97.9 98.1 96.9 95.0 88.3 * MICS 2000 Male Female Missing Attending Primary School Attending Primary School Attending Primary School Percentage Number Percentage Number Percentage Number Percentage Number Urban 87.4 5,543 80.0 5,249 100.0 1 83.8 10,793 Area Rural 72.4 2,686 49.2 2,587 . 0 61.0 5,273 7 71.9 1,436 67.4 1,320 0.0 0 69.8 2,756 8 85.1 1,431 74.7 1,226 . 0 80.3 2,756 9 87.8 1,356 77.7 1,361 . 0 82.6 2,748 10 88.3 1,599 75.9 1,361 . 0 82.6 2,960 11 87.1 1,262 69.9 1,276 . 0 78.5 2,537 Age 12 73.3 1,146 52.2 1,260 100.0 1 62.3 2,407 Total (7-12) 82.5 8,230 69.8 7,836 100.0 1 76.3 16,066 * MICS 2000 Table 9-B: Percentage of children of primary school age (6-11 years) enrolled in primary schools Sex Total Male Female (6-11) years of age Attending Primary School Attending Primary School Percentage Number Percentage Number Percentage Number Area Urban 78.4 5,640 72.5 5,268 75.6 10,908 Rural 61.8 2,845 44.9 2,666 53.6 5,510 Age 6 16.1 1,401 15.0 1,358 15.6 2,759 7 71.9 1,436 67.4 1,320 69.8 2,756 8 85.1 1,431 74.7 1,226 80.3 2,657 9 87.8 1,356 77.7 1,392 82.6 2,748 10 88.3 1,599 75.9 1,361 82.6 2,960 11 87.1 1,262 69.9 1,276 78.5 2,537 Total (6-11) 72.8 8,485 63.2 7,933 68.2 16,418 * MICS 2000 Percentage Number Urban 66.0 14,182 Area Rural 45.7 7,331 7 69.9 2,670 8 80.3 2,659 9 82.6 2,747 10 82.6 2,959 11 78.4 2,536 Age 12 62.2 2,405 Total 59.1 21,493 * MICS 2000 37 Table 11: Percentage of children of primary school age enrolled in primary education Sex Total (7-12) Male Female Missing Enrollment at primary School Enrollment at primary School Enrollment at primary School Percentage Number Percentage Number Percentage Number Percentage Number Urban 91.0 5,543 86.8 5,249 0.0 1 88.9 10,793 Area Rural 79.8 2,686 62.5 2,587 . 0 71.3 5,273 7 82.8 1,436 76.4 1,320 . 0 79.7 2,756 8 89.4 1,431 80.6 1,226 . 0 85.3 2,657 9 91.1 1,356 82.5 1,392 . 0 86.7 2,748 10 92.4 1,599 83.8 1,361 . 0 88.4 2,960 11 90.1 1,262 81.3 1,276 . 0 85.6 2,537 Age 12 75.8 1,146 67.3 1,260 . 1 71.3 2,407 0 75.0 471 75.7 434 0.0 1 75.2 906 1 94.9 1,372 92.0 1,219 0 93.5 2,591 2 98.9 1,631 98.7 1,296 0 98.8 2,928 3 99.5 1,496 99.4 1,260 0 99.5 2,756 4 99.9 1,347 99.9 1,126 0 99.9 2,473 5 99.3 772 100.0 742 0 99.7 1,514 6 96.0 331 95.2 336 0 95.6 667 Highest school grade Don’t know . 0.0 0.0 1 0 0.0 1 Total (7-12) 96.9 7,419 96.2 6,416 1 96.5 13,837 * MICS 2000 38 Table 12: Percentage of literate population aged 15 years and above Total Literate Percentage Not known Number Urban 78.9 0.6 38,836 Area Rural 59.6 1.1 15,256 15-24 84.5 0.4 20,596 25-34 84.8 0.4 13,211 35-44 74.4 0.7 7,671 45-54 55.8 1.2 6,233 55-64 42.2 1.7 3,322 Age 65+ 18.0 3.3 3,059 Total 73.5 0.8 54,092 * MICS 2000 39 Table 13: Percentage of the population using improved drinking water sources Main Source of Water Total Total with safe drinking water Number of persons Pond, river or stream Tanker truck Vendor Other Urban 0.9 1.2 0.3 100.0 97.5 64,844 Area Rural 29.6 9.2 3.2 100.0 51.5 29,037 Total 9.8 3.7 1.2 100.0 83.3 93,881 Continued Table 13: Main Source of Water HH directly linked to the water network Piped into yard or plot Public tap Tube- well/Bore- hole with pump Protected dug well Protected spring Bottled water Unprotected dug well Unprotected Spring Urban 89.0 5.8 2.1 0.3 0.3 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 Area Rural 27.1 6.7 7.1 5.2 4.0 1.5 0.1 5.2 1.3 Total 69.8 6.1 3.6 1.8 1.5 0.5 0.0 1.6 0.4 * MICS 2000 40 Table 14: Percentage of the population using sanitary means of excreta disposal Type of Toilet Facility Total Total with sanitary means of excreta disposal Total Number of persons Flush to sewage system/ Septic tank Pour flush latrine Improved pit latrine Traditional pit latrine Open pit Bucket Others No facilities/ bush/ field Area Urban 90.5 3.4 0.9 4.2 0.6 0.0 0.1 0.2 100.0 99.1 64,844 Rural 37.9 2.6 9.1 28.2 4.7 0.0 0.5 17.0 100.0 77.8 29,037 Total 74.2 3.2 3.5 11.6 1.9 0.0 0.2 5.4 100.0 92.5 93,881 * MICS 2000 41 Table 15: Percentage of under-five children who are severely or moderately malnourished Weight for age -2 SD Weight for age -3 SD Height for age -2 SD Height for age -3 SD Weight for Height -2 SD Weight for Height -3 SD Number of children Male 16.1 1.6 22.2 6.0 6.1 1.3 6,914 Sex Female 15.6 2.5 22.1 6.7 5.7 1.0 6,798 Urban 14.9 1.8 19.8 5.3 5.7 1.0 8,795 Area Rural 17.5 2.5 26.3 8.3 6.2 1.5 4,917 <6 months 6.1 0.9 8.3 2.3 6.2 2.0 1,181 6-11 months 15.4 2.2 12.6 3.3 7.9 2.8 1,564 12-23 months 17.9 2.7 26.2 9.0 7.9 1.3 2,774 24-35 months 17.7 2.5 21.6 5.6 5.9 09. 2,628 36-47 months 16.1 1.7 24.3 7.7 4.4 0.6 3,016 Age 48-59 months 16.3 1.7 28.1 6.5 4.1 0.6 2,547 None 16.6 2.3 26.7 8.0 5.5 0.9 4,297 Primary 16.7 2.2 22.1 6.2 6.2 1.4 5,659 Secondary + 13.8 1.4 16.5 4.8 5.7 1.1 3,501 Non-standard curriculum 13.2 4.8 23.4 4.3 8.7 1.7 252 Mother’s education level Missing/DK 0.0 0.0 17.0 17.0 0.0 0.0 4 Total 15.9 2.0 22.1 6.4 5.9 1.2 13,712 * MICS 2000 42 Table 16: Percent of living children by breastfeeding status Exclusive breastfeeding rate Complementary feeding rate Continued breastfeeding rate Continued breastfeeding rate Children 0-3 months Number of children Children 6-9 months Number of children Children 12-15 months Number of children Children 20-23 months Number of children Male 17.8 426 53.6 593 61.5 457 26.8 537 Sex Female 16.4 443 48.2 540 56.1 502 27.3 530 Urban 13.1 566 50.0 718 57.3 582 26.2 653 Area Rural 24.6 303 52.9 415 60.8 377 28.4 414 None 21.2 250 47.5 326 61.6 328 32.1 334 Primary 17.7 398 54.7 491 59.4 400 25.5 456 Secondary 11.1 214 48.7 297 54.1 226 23.5 259 Non-standard curriculum 26.8 6 58.1 18 24.2 6 25.1 18 Mother’s education level Missing/DK 0.0 1 0.0 1 . 0 . 0 Total 17.1 869 51.0 1,133 58.6 959 27.0 1,067 * MICS 2000 43 Table 17: Percent distribution of children by breastfeeding status Breastfeeding status percentage Total Not breastfeeding Exclusively breastfed Breast milk and water Only Breast milk and liquids only Breast milk and solid/mushy Food Percent Total Number of children 0-1 3.7 23.8 40.8 30.1 1.6 100.0 365 2-3 8.1 11.9 37.4 35.3 7.2 100.0 459 4-5 15.2 4.1 18.5 26.7 35.4 100.0 482 6-7 14.6 2.1 9.8 18.7 54.9 100.0 458 8-9 29.5 0.5 5.9 11.5 52.7 100.0 621 10-11 24.6 0.6 5.8 12.1 56.9 100.0 490 12-13 34.6 0.7 2.6 9.8 52.2 100.0 432 14-15 42.4 0.5 1.7 6.5 48.9 100.0 475 16-17 42.9 0.3 4.3 7.5 45.0 100.0 426 18-19 59.8 0.4 0.5 4.7 34.6 100.0 472 20-21 68.0 0.3 0.2 3.2 28.3 100.0 546 22-23 76.0 0.3 0.9 2.9 19.9 100.0 452 24-25 83.9 0.0 0.1 0.7 15.3 100.0 416 26-27 88.4 0.0 0.1 0.5 11.0 100.0 389 28-29 93.6 0.0 0.0 0.3 6.1 100.0 434 30-31 92.6 0.0 0.1 0.9 6.4 100.0 482 32-33 94.0 0.0 0.0 2.0 4.0 100.0 509 Age (Month) 34-35 96.9 0.0 0.0 0.0 3.1 100.0 395 * MICS 2000 44 Table 18: Percentage of households adequately consuming iodised salt Result of test Number of households interviewed Percent of households in which consumption of salt was not tested Percent of households in which consumption of salt was tested Iodine <15 PPM Iodine >15 PPM Urban 0.2 99.8 57.3 42.7 9,338 Area Rural 0.2 99.7 66.6 33.4 3,673 Total 0.2 99.7 60.0 40.0 13,011 * MICS 2000 45 Table 19: Percent distribution of children aged 6-59 months by their reception of a high dose of Vitamin-A Supplement in the last 6 months preceding the survey Received Vitamin-A within last 6 months Received Vitamin-A prior to last 6 months Received Vitamin- A but not sure when Not sure if received Vitamin-A Not received Vitamin-A Percent Total Number of children Male 12.2 14.3 6.9 10.5 56.0 100.0 6,677 Sex Female 13.1 13.2 6.6 10.9 56.2 100.0 6,497 Urban 13.6 15.2 7.2 10.4 53.6 100.0 8,353 Area Rural 11.1 11.3 5.9 11.3 60.5 100.0 4,822 6-11 months 15.4 1.1 1.7 6.3 75.5 100.0 1,646 12-23 months 22.9 9.6 5.2 9.0 53.3 100.0 2,961 24-35 months 10.0 19.4 7.1 9.2 54.3 100.0 2,735 36-47 months 7.8 16.9 8.3 13.3 53.7 100.0 3,152 Age 48-59 months 8.1 16.8 9.4 13.7 52.0 100.0 2,677 None 12.8 11.9 7.0 11.0 57.3 100.0 4,243 Primary 12.2 12.8 6.6 12.2 56.2 100.0 5,346 Secondary + 13.0 17.7 6.6 8.0 54.7 100.0 3,333 Non-standard curriculum 15.1 12.5 8.6 10.6 53.1 100.0 247 Mother’s education level Missing/DK 0.0 14.7 0.0 0.0 85.3 100.0 5 Total 12.7 13.8 6.7 10.1 56.1 100.0 13,175 * MICS 2000 46 Table 20: Percentage of women with a birth in the last 12 months by whether they received a high dose of Vitamin-A supplement before the Infant reached 8 weeks old Received Vitamin-A Supplement Not sure if received Number of women Urban 23.2 2.0 1,863 Area Rural 18.7 3.6 1,072 None 22.2 3.0 833 Primary 21.7 2.5 1,306 Secondary + 20.5 2.3 757 Non-standard curriculum 23.7 3.7 37 Woman’s education level Missing/DK 66.0 0.0 2 Total 21.6 2.6 2,935 * MICS 2000 47 Table 21: Percentage of live births in the last 12 months (before the survey) that weighed below 2,500 grams at birth Percent of live births below 2,500 grams Percent of live births weighed at birth Number of live births Urban 12.9 43.3 1,863 Area Rural 11.3 22.0 1,072 None 10.8 22.3 833 Primary 12.7 33.1 1,306 Secondary + 13.1 54.7 757 Non-standard curriculum 10.9 23.0 37 Woman’s education level Missing/DK 29.1 34.0 2 Total 12.3 35.5 2,935 * MICS 2000 48 Table 22: Percentage of children aged (12-23) months immunised against childhood diseases at any time before the survey Vaccination type Data Sources Percentage of children vaccinated Vaccination Card 58.0 Mother’s report 33.7 BCG Not vaccinated 8.4 Vaccination Card 57.2 Mother’s report 28.3 DPT 1 Not vaccinated 14.5 Vaccination Card 52.8 Mother’s report 25.3 DPT 2 Not vaccinated 22.0 Vaccination Card 47.8 Mother’s report 21.1 DPT 3 Not vaccinated 31.1 Vaccination Card 54.7 Mother’s report 18.3 Polio 0 Not vaccinated 27.0 Vaccination Card 56.8 Mother’s report 36.7 Polio 1 Not vaccinated 6.5 Vaccination Card 52.1 Mother’s report 37.4 Polio 2 Not vaccinated 10.6 Vaccination Card 46.7 Mother’s report 35.1 Polio 3 Not vaccinated 18.2 Vaccination Card 50.4 Mother’s report 27.7 Measles Not vaccinated 21.8 Vaccination Card 40.7 Mother’s report 20.0 All Not vaccinated 39.3 Vaccination Card 0.0 Mother’s report 2.6 None Had some vaccinations 97.4 Number of Children 2,961.5 49 * MICS 2000 Table 23:Percentage of children aged (12-23) months immunized against childhood diseases before the first birthday with a fully- dated vaccination card Vaccination type Percentage of children vaccinated BCG 98.7 DPT 1 97.5 DPT 2 96.2 DPT 3 92.7 Polio 0 99.2 Polio 1 97.6 Polio 2 96.1 Polio 3 92.5 Measles 78.1 All vaccinations 70.3 No vaccinations 0.1 * MICS 2000 50 Table 24: Percentage of children age 12-23 months currently vaccinated against childhood diseases BCG DPT1 DPT2 DPT3 Polio 0 Polio 1 Polio 2 Polio3 Measle s All Non e % with Health card Number of children Male 91.3 85.1 78.3 68.9 71.8 94.2 90.2 83.5 77.0 60.2 2.4 61.3 1,444 Sex Female 92.0 85.9 77.8 68.8 74.1 92.9 88.7 80.2 79.2 61.1 2.8 60.7 1,518 Urban 94.3 90.1 83.6 76.5 79.9 95.5 91.4 85.1 85.0 68.2 1.5 69.8 1,830 Area Rural 87.4 78.1 69.0 56.6 61.8 90.3 86.1 76.6 67.0 48.6 4.5 46.7 1,132 None 87.6 77.4 66.3 55.2 62.1 89.6 83.9 73.2 68.5 46.5 4.7 49.9 928 Primary 91.4 86.2 78.9 69.5 74.2 94.5 90.4 83.4 78.0 61.1 2.1 61.3 1,236 Secondary + 96.9 94.0 90.5 84.1 84.5 96.5 94.2 89.2 89.7 76.7 1.1 74.0 756 Mother's education level Non-standard curriculum 94.9 91.4 88.5 77.3 71.7 98.2 95.3 93.7 86.9 72.3 0.0 58.8 41 Total 91.6 85.5 78.0 68.9 73.0 93.5 89.4 81.8 78.2 60.7 2.6 61.0 2,962 51 Table 25: Percentage of under-five children with diarrhoea in the last two weeks (before the survey) and were treated with ORS or ORT Had diarrhoea in last two weeks Number of children Under 5 Breast milk Gruel Local Acceptable liquids ORS packet Other milk or Infant formula Water with feeding Any other treatment No treatment Number of children with diarrhoea Male 21.9 7,339 35.9 50.0 58.7 26.1 57.6 77.2 99.2 0.8 1,608 Sex Female 20.9 7,215 39.3 48.4 56.2 27.0 53.7 74.6 99.1 0.9 1,494 Urban 22.7 9,262 38.0 48.5 58.1 25.6 57.2 75.3 99.3 0.7 2,101 Area Rural 18.9 5,292 36.5 50.8 56.2 28.4 52.7 77.2 98.7 1.3 1,000 < 6 months 20.4 1,378 75.4 19.8 17.2 23.9 49.7 38.3 98.5 1.5 282 6-11 months 36.7 1,646 0.1 8.1 50.1 30.3 52.3 65.2 99.9 0.1 604 12-23 months 32.5 2,962 44.8 54.5 60.6 27.7 57.4 82.9 99.4 0.6 963 24-35 months 19.9 2,735 11.6 51.7 66.5 26.7 60.9 85.2 98.8 1.2 545 36-47 months 13.3 3,152 5.1 55.5 69.5 20.9 54.4 83.8 98.7 1.6 420 Age 48-59 months 10.8 2,677 3.9 49.4 67.5 25.0 55.8 83.0 98.9 1.1 288 None 21.1 4,622 37.3 48.9 55.6 31.4 52.3 74.2 98.2 1.8 976 Primary 22.4 5,984 39.4 47.1 54.9 23.3 55.5 76.2 99.4 0.6 1,33 Secondary + 19.8 3,683 35.1 53.0 63.8 26.4 61.2 78.0 99.8 0.2 731 Non-standard curriculum 21.8 259 28.7 57.1 72.1 22.3 50.7 74.1 100.0 . 57 Mother’s Education level Missing/DK 0.0 5 0.0 . . . . . . . 0 Total 21.3 14,554 37.5 49.3 57.5 26.5 55.8 75.9 99.1 0.9 3,101 * MICS 2000 52 Table 26: Percentage of under-five children with diarrhoea in the last two weeks (before the survey) who took increased fluids and Continued to feed during the episode Had diarrhoea In last two weeks Number of children Under 5 Drinking during Diarrhoea Total Eating during diarrhoea Total Received Increased Fluids and Continued Eating More than norm Same/ Less than norm Missing /DK Some What Less/ Same/ More Much Less/ None Missing /DK Number of Children with diarrhoea Male 21.9 7,339 30.7 66.3 2.9 100.0 70.0 29.7 0.3 100.0 21.3 1,608 Sex Female 20.7 7,215 27.1 69.5 3.4 100.0 70.6 28.1 1.3 100.0 19.6 1,494 Urban 22.7 9,262 31.4 65.6 3.0 100.0 70.5 28.6 0.9 100.0 23.0 2,101 Area Rural 18.9 5,292 23.8 72.7 3.5 100.0 69.8 29.7 0.4 100.0 15.2 1,000 < 6 months 20.4 1,378 18.7 76.6 4.7 100.0 58.4 39.8 1.8 100.0 11.8 282 6-11 months 36.7 1,646 29.1 68.6 2.3 100.0 64.8 34.8 0.3 100.0 21.3 604 12-23 months 32.5 2,962 31.6 65.1 3.2 100.0 70.3 28.9 0.8 100.0 21.2 963 24-35 months 19.9 2,735 27.7 69.7 2.6 100.0 77.9 21.7 0.4 100.0 20.9 545 36-47 months 13.3 3,152 28.6 67.4 4.0 100.0 72.4 26.4 1.2 100.0 19.6 420 Age 48-59 months 10.8 2,677 32.9 64.1 3.0 100.0 75.8 23.6 0.6 100.0 25.6 288 None 21.1 4,622 22.9 73.4 3.8 100.0 69.2 29.8 1.0 100.0 16.6 976 Primary 22.4 5,984 29.5 67.6 2.8 100.0 70.1 29.5 0.4 100.0 19.5 1,337 Secondary + 19.8 3,683 34.8 62.3 3.0 100.0 72.3 26.6 1.1 100.0 26.1 731 Non-standard curriculum 21.8 259 48.1 49.8 2.2 100.0 67.3 32.7 0.0 100.0 38.4 57 Mother’s Education Level Missing/DK 0.0 5 0.0 0.0 0.0 100.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 . 0 Total 21.3 14,554 29.0 67.9 3.1 100.0 70.3 29.0 0.8 100. 0 20.5 3,101 * MICS 2000 53 54 Table 27: Percentage of under-five children with acute respiratory infection in the last two weeks and methods of treatment Had acute Respiratory Infection Number Of Children Under 5 Hospital Health Centre Dispensary Village Health Worker MCH Clinic Mobile/ Out-reach Clinic Private Physician Traditional Healer Other Any Appropriate Provider Number of children with ARI Male 7.8 7,339 18.9 34.0 10.0 3.5 0.0 0.1 22.7 0.0 1.9 74.9 576 Sex Female 5.9 7,215 19.0 38.5 8.3 2.1 0.0 0.0 19.9 0.0 1.8 77.8 426 Urban 6.8 9,262 20.9 34.9 12.5 2.0 0.0 0.0 22.2 0.0 2.1 80.5 633 Area Rural 7.0 5,292 15.6 37.7 3.6 4.5 0.0 0.0 20.3 0.0 1.5 86.6 368 < 6 months 5.2 1,378 22.8 38.9 8.6 3.0 0.0 0.2 24.8 0.0 2.8 87.1 71 6-11 months 9.7 1,646 14.1 48.9 4.4 3.1 0.0 0.0 25.8 0.0 2.4 79.8 159 12-23 months 8.5 2,962 16.3 32.2 14.0 3.6 0.0 0.0 24.3 0.0 0.3 75.4 253 24-35 months 7.6 2,735 24.1 33.8 9.5 4.3 0.0 0.3 19.8 0.0 0.7 81.4 207 36-47 months 5.6 3,152 17.8 33.5 10.6 1.7 0.0 0.0 15.3 0.0 5.1 66.9 176 Age 48-59 months 5.0 2,677 20.9 32.6 4.4 0.8 0.0 0.0 20.0 0.0 1.6 71.4 135 None 7.0 4,622 14.1 39.7 6.6 2.0 0.0 0.2 18.9 0.0 2.2 68.8 325 Primary 7.3 5,984 21.9 33.9 8.7 4.1 0.0 0.0 24.2 0.0 2.2 79.0 438 Secondary + 6.1 3,683 18.4 35.1 14.8 1.9 0.0 0.0 20.7 0.0 1.0 80.6 224 Non-standard curriculum 5.2 259 47.9 26.9 0.0 5.0 0.0 0.0 8.2 0.0 0.0 84.9 13 Mother’s Education Level Missing/DK 0.0 5 . . . . . . . . . . 0 Total 6.9 14,554 18.9 35.9 9.3 2.9 0.0 0.1 21.5 0.0 1.9 76.1 1,001 * MICS 2000 55 Table 28: Percentage of children 0-59 moths of age reported ill during the last two weeks who received increased fluids and continued with feeding Reported illness in last two weeks Number of children Under 5 Drinking during Illness Total Eating during illness Total More than norm Same/ Less Missing /DK Some- what Less/ Same/ More Much Less/ None Missing /DK Received Increased Fluids and Continued Eating Number of sick Childr en Male 40.1 7,339 23.8 74.2 2.1 100.0 71.9 27.8 0.3 100.0 16.5 2,946 Sex Female 37.7 7,215 21.1 76.7 2.3 100.0 736 256 0.8 100.0 157 2,717 Urban 42.1 9,262 23.8 74.2 2.0 100.0 72.6 268 0.6 100.0 174 3,901 Area Rural 333 5,292 195 780 2.5 100.0 729 267 0.4 100.0 133 1,762 < 6 months 360 1,378 13.5 823 4.2 100.0 59.6 38.4 2.0 100.0 9.0 496 6-11 months 537 1,646 22.5 758 1.6 100.0 67.0 32.7 0.3 100.0 16.8 884 12-23 months 50.0 2,962 27.2 707 2.1 100.0 72.9 26.6 0.5 100.0 19.2 1,480 24-35 months 39.0 2,735 22.8 756 1.6 100.0 75.6 24.1 0.3 100.0 15.6 1,068 36-47 months 32.4 3,152 19.6 781 2.3 100.0 76.6 22.9 0.6 100.0 14.5 1,020 Age 48-59 months 26.7 2,677 22.4 755 2.2 100.0 78.5 21.2 0.2 100.0 16.8 718 None 35.6 4,622 18.6 78.6 2.8 100.0 72.2 27.1 0.7 100.0 13.4 1,645 Primary 40.2 5,984 21.7 76.2 2.0 100.0 71.3 28.3 0.4 100.0 14.4 2,406 Secondary + 41.0 3,683 26.2 72.2 1.6 100.0 75.2 24.1 0.6 100.0 20.2 1,512 Non-standard curriculum 0.0 259 46.6 50.3 3.1 100.0 76.2 23.8 0.0 100.0 39.8 101 Mother’s Education Level Missing/DK 38.8 5 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 TOTAL 38.9 14,554 22.5 75.4 2.2 100.0 72.7 26.8 0.5 100.0 16.1 5,663 * MICS 2000 56 Table 29: Percentage of caretakers of children 0-59 months who know at least 2 signs of sickness for seeking medical treatment Not able to drink/breast feed Becomes Sicker Develops a fever Has fast Breathing Has difficulty in Breathing Has blood in stool Is drinking poorly Knows at Least two Signs Number of Caretakers Urban 6.7 22.1 76.8 15.5 31.7 12.3 1.2 47.6 9,262 Area Rural 8.3 26.8 78.4 14.4 27.7 11.7 1.2 51.8 5,292 None 7.5 26.7 78.1 14.7 27.7 12.2 1.2 50.4 4,622 Primary 7.6 25.0 76.6 14.3 29.8 11.6 0.9 48.5 5,984 Secondary + 6.7 18.8 77.5 17.0 33.7 12.9 1.5 48.7 3,683 Non-Standard curriculum 4.2 18.6 80.7 13.1 36.0 8.4 2.2 47.3 259 Mother’s Education Level Missing/DK 24.8 0.0 100.0 0.0 12.8 0.0 0.0 37.6 5 Total 7.3 23.8 77.4 15.1 30.2 12.1 1.2 49.1 14,554 * MICS 2000 57 Table 30: Percentage of 0-59 months of age who slept under an insecticide-impregnated bednet in the previous night of the survey Slept under a bednet Number of Children Bednet tr eated with insecticide Number of children who Slept under a bednet Yes No DK/Missing Yes No DK/Missing Male 7.3 92.6 0.1 7,336 1.5 97.8 0.7 533 Sex Female 7.5 92.4 0.1 7,212 1.2 98.0 0.8 536 Urban 6.9 93.1 0.1 9,257 1.5 98.3 0.2 631 Area Rural 8.3 91.6 0.1 5,291 1.2 97.4 1.5 439 < 6 months 24.0 75.9 0.1 1,378 1.8 97.6 0.7 326 6-11 months 15.2 84.8 0.0 1,646 0.6 98.3 1.1 249 12-23 months 8.6 91.3 0.1 2,961 0.7 99.0 0.3 255 24-35 months 2.8 97.1 0.1 2,735 1.1 98.9 0.0 76 36-47 months 3.2 96.8 0.1 3,149 2.7 97.3 0.0 101 Age 48-59 months 2.4 97.6 0.0 2,676 3.0 93.5 3.5 63 Total 7.4 92.5 0.1 14,544 1.4 97.9 0.7 1,069 * MICS 2000 58 Table 31: Percentage of children 0-59 moths of age who were ill with fever in the last two weeks (before the survey) who received Anti-malarial drugs Medication taken by child Had a fever in last two Weeks Number of Children Under-5 Paraceta- mol Chloro- quine Fansidar Quinine Bremaquine Other Don’t Know Other appropriate anti-malarial Drug Number Of Children With high fever Male 19.2 7,339 64.1 0.8 0.2 0.0 0.2 33.3 2.7 1.1 1,407 Sex Female 17.3 7,215 63.9 1.1 0.3 0.0 0.1 32.8 4.3 1.5 1,249 Urban 20.0 9,262 65.8 0.8 0.3 0.0 0.1 33.1 2.7 1.1 1,851 Area Rural 15.2 5,292 59.7 1.1 0.2 0.0 0.4 33.0 5.0 1.7 805 < 6 months 16.1 1,378 66.6 0.0 0.6 0.0 0.0 35.4 2.5 0.6 222 6-11 months 25.1 1,646 65.9 0.7 0.3 0.0 0.5 36.0 3.2 1.5 413 12-23 months 23.1 2,962 63.3 0.9 0.4 0.0 0.0 35.2 4.9 1.1 683 24-35 months 18.8 2,735 62.0 1.2 0.0 0.0 0.3 31.8 3.0 1.5 514 36-47 months 15.1 3,152 67.1 1.7 0.3 0.0 0.3 31.1 2.7 2.0 477 Age 48-59 months 13.0 2,677 59.8 0.6 0.0 0.0 0.0 28.1 2.9 0.6 347 None 16.8 4,622 52.2 0.2 0.7 0.0 0.6 25.5 7.5 3.1 777 Primary 19.4 5,984 66.7 0.3 0.0 0.0 0.1 35.9 1.9 0.3 1,162 Secondary + 17.9 3,683 73.7 0.4 0.2 0.0 0.0 37.3 0.5 0.7 659 Non-standard curriculum 22.3 259 54.7 2.2 0.0 0.0 0.0 27.7 12.2 2.0 58 Mother’s Education Level Missing/DK 0.0 5 . . . 0.0 . 0.0 . . 0 Total 18.2 14,554 64.0 0.9 0.3 0.0 0.2 33.0 3.4 1.3 2,656 * MICS 2000 59 Table 32: Percentage of Women aged (15-49) who have knowledge about AIDS Characteristics Heard of AIDS The extent of women's involvement in the possibility of avoiding AIDS Number of Women Urban 59.5 45.5 16,471 Area Rural 25.5 13.0 6,509 15-19 years 40.4 27.4 5,429 20-24 years 53.2 37.9 4,756 25-29 years 57.5 43.4 3,715 30-34 years 55.3 41.3 3,015 35-39 years 53.4 41.0 2,475 40-44 years 50.4 37.8 1,702 Age 45-49 years 39.9 28.2 1,887 None 19.9 9.4 5,971 Primary 42.3 24.4 8,729 Secondary + 81.0 69.8 7,971 Non-standard curriculum 40.9 25.1 303 Mother’s Education Level Missing/DK 10.6 10.6 6 Total 49.9 36.3 22,980 * MICS 2000 60 Table 33: Percentage of women aged 15-49 who know the means of infection with AIDS according to the mode of infection Mode of Infection Characteristics Sexual Intercourse Taking infected blood From mother to child during pregnancy From mother to child during breastfeeding Mosquito bites Mother is infected by polluted tools Do not know DK/ Missing Total Number of Women Urban 49.8 27.3 2.4 0.6 0.4 12.3 7.1 0.1 100.0 7,487 Area Rural 58.1 20.5 0.6 0.4 0.9 7.0 12.4 0.2 100.0 849 None 62.9 11.8 0.7 0.0 1.3 4.0 18.9 0.4 100.0 560 Primary 59.6 16.7 0.8 0.2 0.7 7.0 14.7 0.2 100.0 2,134 Secondary + 45.7 32.0 2.9 0.7 0.2 14.5 3.8 0.1 100.0 5,566 Non-standard curriculum 65.6 16.6 0.0 0.0 0.0 5.0 12.7 0.0 100.0 76 Mother’s Education Level Missing/DK 100.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 100.0 1 Total 50.6 26.6 2.2 0.5 0.4 11.8 7.7 0.1 100.0 8,336 61 Table 34: Percentage of married or in union women aged 15-49 who are using (or whose partner is using) a contraceptive method Current method No method Female Sterilisation Male Sterilisation Pill IUD Injection Condom Female Condom Diaphragm/ foam/Jelly Urban 50.8 3.9 0.1 11.0 12.5 1.4 1.0 0.0 0.1 Area Rural 69.6 2.3 0.0 5.1 6.4 1.0 0.2 0.0 0.0 15-19 months 83.5 0.0 0.1 7.0 5.0 1.2 0.3 0.0 0.0 20-24 months 71.0 0.0 0.0 2.7 2.1 0.9 0.1 0.1 0.0 Age 25-49 months 51.8 4.3 0.1 10.1 12.4 1.3 0.9 0.0 0.1 None 65.1 4.4 0.0 6.5 8.2 1.0 0.1 0.0 0.0 Primary 56.3 2.6 0.0 9.6 9.9 1.9 0.5 0.0 0.0 Secondary + 46.6 2.9 0.0 11.9 14.7 0.8 1.7 0.0 0.0 Non-standard curriculum 57.1 6.7 0.0 9.0 8.8 1.2 0.2 0.0 0.8 Mother’s Education Level Missing/DK 100.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 Total 56.5 3.4 0.1 9.2 10.7 1.3 0.7 0.0 0.0 Continued Table 34: Used Method Total Any new method Any traditional method Any method Number of Married women covered by the survey Breastfeeding External Ejaculation Others Urban 7.5 2.4 8.8 0.6 100.0 29.9 19.3 49.2 8,265 Area Rural 11.1 0.8 3.3 0.2 100.0 15.0 15.4 30.4 3,538 15-19 months 6.6 1.2 2.7 0.0 100.0 5.9 10.6 16.5 641 20-24 months 10.4 0.3 4.7 0.2 100.0 13.5 15.5 29.0 1,825 Age 25-49 months 8.4 2.2 8.0 0.6 100.0 29.1 19.2 48.2 9,337 None 8.6 0.7 4.1 0.9 100.0 20.6 14.3 34.9 3,818 Primary 10.6 1.7 6.6 0.2 100.0 24.5 19.1 43.7 4,380 Secondary + 6.1 3.6 11.2 0.5 100.0 32.0 21.3 53.4 3,353 Non-standard curriculum 5.9 0.8 9.1 0.3 100.0 26.8 16.1 42.9 428 Mother’s Education Level Missing/DK 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 100.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 4 Total 8.6 1.9 7.2 0.5 100.0 25.4 18.1 43.5 11,803 62 * MICS 2000 63 Table 35: Percentage of mothers with a birth in the last 12 months (before the survey) protected against neonatal tetanus Received at Least 2 doses, Within Last 3 years Received at Least 3 doses, within last 10 years Received at Least 5 doses, in lifetime Protected Against tetanus Number of Mothers Urban 62.6 6.5 0.5 69.5 1,863 Area Rural 48.2 4.0 0.2 52.3 1,072 None 44.8 3.7 0.5 49.1 833 Primary 55.9 5.5 0.3 61.6 1,306 Secondary + 73.6 7.8 0.3 81.7 575 Non-standard curriculum 58.8 2.9 0.0 61.7 37 Woman’s Education Level Missing/DK 34.0 0.0 0.0 34.0 2 Total 57.3 5.5 0.4 63.2 2,935 * MICS 2000 64 Table 36: Percentage distribution of women aged 15-49 with a birth in the 12 months (before the survey) by type of personnel delivering antenatal care Antenatal care provider Doctor Nurse/ Midwife Auxiliary Midwife Traditional Birth attendant Other/ Missing No antenatal Care received Total Any skilled Personnel Number of Women Urban 81.7 0.3 0.0 0.1 0.8 17.0 100.0 81.5 1,863 Area Rural 67.0 0.1 0.0 0.2 0.9 31.7 100.0 66.2 1,072 None 64.8 0.5 0.1 0.3 0.9 33.7 100.0 64.4 833 Primary 76.5 0.1 0.0 0.0 0.3 23.1 100.0 75.7 1,306 Secondary + 89.1 0.3 0.0 0.1 1.6 8.9 100.0 88.9 757 Non- standard curriculum 73.9 0.0 0.0 0.0 3.7 22.4 100.0 73.9 37 Woman’s Education Level Missing/DK 34.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 66.0 100.0 34.0 2 Total 76.4 0.3 0.0 0.1 0.8 22.4 100.0 75.9 2,935 * MICS 2000 65 Table 37: Percent distribution of women aged 15-49 with a birth in the last 12 months (before the survey) by type of personnel assisting at delivery Person assisting at delivery Doctor Nurse/ Midwife Auxiliary Midwife Traditional Birth attendant Relative/f riend Other/ Missing No assistance Received Total Any skilled Personnel Number of Women Urban 31.6 40.5 6.9 18.3 1.7 0.8 0.2 100.0 79.0 1,863 Area Rural 22.3 31.0 6.9 34.5 4.1 0.8 0.4 100.0 60.2 1,072 None 21.5 32.9 6.5 33.7 3.9 0.9 0.5 100.0 60.9 833 Primary 24.7 39.3 8.3 24.5 2.9 0.2 0.2 100.0 72.3 1,306 Secondary + 41.5 38.0 5.3 12.8 0.7 1.6 0.2 100.0 84.7 757 Non-standard curriculum 28.7 30.0 0.0 35.6 2.0 3.7 0.0 100.0 58.7 37 Woman’s Education Level Missing/DK 34.0 66.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 100.0 100.0 2 Total 28.2 37.0 6.9 24.2 2.6 0.8 0.3 100.0 72.1 2,935 * MICS 2000 66 Table 38: Percent distribution of children aged 0-59 months by whether birth is registered and reasons for non-registration Registration status Births Registered DK if birth registered Costs too much Must travel Too far Didn’t know It should be registered Late & Didn’t want to pay fine Doesn’t know Where to register Other All Cases Total Number of Children Male 98.1 0.1 0.1 0.3 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.5 0.8 100.0 7,339 Sex Female 98.1 0.1 0.2 0.1 0.1 0.0 0.0 0.5 0.9 100.0 7,215 Urban 98.7 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.4 0.5 100.0 9,262 Area Rural 97.2 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.7 1.6 100.0 5,292 <6 months 92.0 0.2 0.2 0.6 0.3 0.1 0.1 3.7 28 100.0 1,378 6-11 months 98.2 0.0 0.3 0.2 0.3 0.1 0.0 0.2 1.1 100.0 1,646 12-23 months 98.3 0.1 0.0 0.3 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.3 0.9 100.0 2,962 24-35 months 98.8 0.2 0.1 0.1 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.2 0.7 100.0 2,735 36-47 months 99.0 0.1 0.2 0.1 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.1 0.5 100.0 3,152 Age 48-59 months 99.3 0.2 0.1 0.0 0.1 0.0 0.0 0.1 0.3 100.0 2,677 None 97.3 0.2 0.2 0.3 0.1 0.0 0.0 0.6 1.3 100.0 4,622 Primary 98.1 0.1 0.1 0.3 0.0 0.0 0.0 06 0.9 100.0 5,984 Secondary + 99.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.3 0.3 100.0 3,683 Non formal education 99.7 0.0 0.0 0.1 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.2 0.1 100.0 259 Mother’s education level Unknown or lost data 100.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 100.0 5 Total 98.1 0.1 0.1 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.5 0.9 100.0 14,554 * MICS 2000 67 Table 39: Percentage of children 0-14 years of age in households not living with a biological parent Living arrangement Living with both Parents Living with neither: only father alive Living with neither: only mother alive Living with neither: both are alive Living with neither: both are dead Living with mother only: father alive Living with mother only: father dead Living with father only: mother alive Living with father only: mother dead Male 94.9 0.0 0.1 0.2 0.1 1.1 2.5 0.4 0.7 Sex Female 94.7 0.0 0.1 0.2 0.1 1.2 2.8 0.3 0.6 Urban 94.6 0.0 0.1 0.3 0.1 1.2 2.7 0.3 0.7 Area Rural 95.1 0.0 0.2 0.1 0.1 1.1 2.6 0.3 0.5 0-4 years 79.9 0.0 0.0 0.1 0.0 0.8 0.7 0.2 0.3 5-9 years 95.0 0.0 0.1 0.3 0.0 1.4 2.1 0.4 0.6 Age 10-14 years 91.1 0.0 0.1 0.3 0.2 1.2 5.4 0.4 1.0 Total 94.8 0.0 0.1 0.2 0.1 1.1 2.7 0.3 0.6 Continued Table 39: Cannot specify living place Total Do not live with either parent One or both parents are dead Number of Children Male 0.1 100.0 0.4 3.3 20,202 Sex Female 0.1 100.0 0.4 3.6 19,546 Urban 0.1 100.0 0.4 3.5 25,987 Area Rural 0.1 100.0 0.4 3.4 13,763 0-4 years 0.0 100.0 0.1 1.0 13,538 5-9 years 0.0 100.0 0.4 2.8 13,587 Age 10-14 years 0.1 100.0 0.7 6.8 12,624 Total 0.1 100.0 0.4 3.5 39,749 * MICS 2000 68 Table 40: Percentage of children 5-14 years of age who are currently working Working with Pay Working without Pay Domestic Work: <4 hours/day Domestic Work: > 4 or more Hours/day Currently working Number of Children Male 2.4 0.7 21.1 0.5 14.9 13,387 Sex Female 0.1 0.3 49.2 5.9 13.1 12,823 Urban 1.4 0.3 34.6 2.2 7.1 17,411 Area Rural 1.0 0.3 35.3 5.0 27.8 8,800 5-9 years 0.2 0.4 24.6 0.7 6.9 13,587 Age 10-14 years 2.4 0.6 45.8 5.8 21.8 12,624 Total 1.3 0.5 34.8 3.2 14.0 26,211 * MICS 2000 Appendix A Sample Design The sample of the Iraqi MICS was designed to be representative of the whole country and for rural and urban areas1, and covered all the 18 governorates of Iraq. CSO professionals did the national sample size calculations. These calculations set the sample size at 13,430 households. The sample size was initially distributed equally among the 18 governorates with the exception of Baghdad where the rural percentage was increased from 10 percent to 25 percent. Thus, each governorate was allocated an equal sample size of 740 households except Baghdad with a sample size of 850 households. The sample was to be distributed to clusters of equal size. It was decided to work on a cluster size of 10 households. Before selecting the sample of each one of the 18 governorates -through three stages stratified random sampling method- the sample of each governorate was distributed among its Qada'as2, and among the rural and urban areas of each Qada'a, in proportion to the size of population. Accordingly, the number of household (clusters) of the urban and of the rural areas of each governorate was determined. The sampling process was done in three stages and as follows: First stage: Mahalas/Villages in each Qada'a were listed with the measure of population size in each Mahala/Village. A number of Mahallas and Villages were selected according to probability proportionate to size sampling. Second stage: Each selected Mahala in the urban area, and village in the rural area, was divided into segments with a population of approximately 500 each. One segment or more was selected according to probability proportionate to size sampling method. Then each segment was divided into blocks or Majals with 25-30 households in urban area and 20-25 households in rural areas. One Majal was then selected by simple random sampling. Third stage: Within each selected Majal an update of existing household listing was carried out and a cluster of 10 households was selected by systematic random sampling. 1 All frames used defined urban areas as any administrative setup lying within the municipality boarder. Areas other than that are considered rural 2 All sampling frames made use of the administrative set-up present in the last population census conducted in 1997. Each governorate is divided into districts (Qada'a) Each Qada'a is divided into sub-districts (Nahiya). These are further divided into Quarters (Mahala) in urban areas and (Village) in rural areas. The Primary Sampling Unit is Mahala in urban area and Village in rural area. Appendix B List of Personnel Involved in the Iraq MICS The Steering Committee on the Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey of the year 2000 Mr. Adnan Shehab Hamad Director General of the Central Statistical Organisation Chairperson Mr. Behnam Elias Butrus Director General of Technical Affairs Department Member Mr. Abdulla Hasan Mathi Acting Director General of Administrative & Financial Affairs Member Dr. Mahdi Mohsen Ismail Director of Training and Statistical Research Centre Member Ms. Huda Hadawi Mohammed Director of Industrial Statistics Member Ms. Suham Mohammed Abdul Hameed Director of Educational and Social Statistics Member Mr. Amer Abdul Karim Ibrahim Representative of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs Member Dr. Khawla Naji Salman Representative of the Ministry of Health Member Dr. Nayera Al-Awqati Representative of the Ministry of Health Member Ms. Assima Majeed Hassani Representative of the Ministry of Education Member Central Supervision on Computerization Mrs. Fawziya Ibrahim Chief Programme Analyst Mr. Najem Abed Taqi Chief Programmer Scientific Consultancy Dr. Ayed Mohan Al-Delaimi Director General of Preventive Health Department/Ministry of Health Mr. Khalil Mohsen Nutrition Research Institute/Ministry of Health Dr. Mohammed Abdul Rahman Al-Ani Expanded Programme of Immunization/ Ministry of Health Coordinator of the Office of the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) Mr. Hatim George Hatim / Planning Officer International Consultant of the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) Dr. Manar Al-Sheikh Abdul Rahman Appendix C Questionnaires END-DECADE MULTIPLE INDICATOR CLUSTER SURVEY UNITED NATIONS CHILDREN’S FUND NOVEMBER 1999 Q.1 END-DECADE MULTIPLE INDICATOR CLUSTER SURVEY MODEL QUESTIONNAIRE FLOW OF MODULES Note: ‘Age’ refers to ‘age at last birthday’ and a dash ( - ) denotes ‘up to and including age X’. The survey's questionnaire consists of three questionnaires, each of which contains a number of modules Household questionnaire Household information panel Household listing form (all residents) and orphanhood questions (birth to 14) Education module: educational attainment (age 5 or over), school attendance (age 5-17) Child labour module (age 5-14*) Water and sanitation module (all households) Salt iodization module (all households) * Upper limit beyond age 14 may be set by individual country Questionnaire for individual women (women of reproductive age, 15-49) Women’s information panel (all eligible women, 15-49) Child mortality module (all eligible women) Tetanus toxoid module (all mothers with last birth within last year) Maternal and newborn health module (all mothers with last birth within last year) Contraceptive use module (currently married women, 15-49) HIV/AIDS module (all women, 15-49) Questionnaire for children under five Birth registration and early learning module Vitamin A module Breastfeeding module Care of illness module Malaria module (for high-risk areas) Immunization module Anthropometry module DESIGN FEATURES Changes in font are used to indicate the various components of the questionnaire. General instructions to the interviewer are provided in simple font. Arrows point out to movements to the specific location specified after the arrow in question. Interviewer must form a clear idea about the economic and social status of the household before the visits so that she/he can deal with the household in an appropriate manner. Q.2 HOUSEHOLD QUESTIONNAIRE W E ARE FROM THE CENTRAL STATISTICAL ORGANISATION . WE ARE WORKING ON A PROJECT CONCERNED WITH FAMILY HEALTH AND EDUCATION. I WOULD LIKE TO TALK TO YOU ABOUT THIS. THE INTERVIEW WILL TAKE ABOUT 30 MINUTES. ALL THE INFORMATION WE OBTAIN WILL REMAIN STRICTLY CONFIDENTIAL AND YOUR ANSWERS WILL NEVER BE IDENTIFIED. DURING THIS TIME I WOULD LIKE TO SPEAK WITH ALL MOTHERS OR OTHERS WHO TAKE CARE OF CHILDREN IN THE HOUSEHOLD . DO Y OU ALLOW US NOW TO CONDUCT THE INTERVIEW? If permission is given, begin the interview. HOUSEHOLD INFORMATION PANEL ** 1. Cluster number: ___ ___ ______ ___ ___ 2. Household number in c luster : 1.1 Names of Interviewing Team: 1. 2. ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ 3. Day/Month/Year of interview: 4. Number of Interviewing team: ___ ___ / ___ ___ / ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ 5. Name of head of household: __________________________________________________________ 6. Area: Urban .1 Rural.2 7. Address:** Governorate . Qada'a . Nahiyah. Mahala (or District) . Street (or Zukak/alley) (or Village) Number of Dwelling in the Census 8A. Type of dwelling: House(Villa)……………………………………1 Flat (Apartment).2 Hut or Mud Hut .3 Tent or Hair House…………………. ………4 Caravan……………………………………….5 8B.Material used in the construction of the dwelling's walls Brick………………………………………….1 Stone………………………………………….2 Block………………………………………….3 Prefab……………………………………….4 Mud or Mud with Straw…………………….5 Other(specify) ________________________ 6 Not Applicable…………………………………8 Other(specify) _______________________5 Not Apllicable…………………………….8 9. Number of rooms in dwelling:** ___ ___ 10. Result of HH interview: Completed.1 Refused.2 Not at home.3 HH not found/destroyed .4 Other (specify) ______________________5 11. No. of women eligible for interview: 12. No. of women interviews completed: ___ ___ ___ ___ 13. No. of children under age 5: 14. No. of child interviews completed: Q.3 ___ ___ ___ ___ 15. Data entry clerk: ___ ___ Interviewer/supervisor notes: Use this space to record notes about the interview with this household, such as call-back times, incomplete individual interview forms, number of attempts to re-visit, etc. ** This section to be adapted for country-specific use. Q .4 Cluster no. __ __ __ Household no. __ __ __ HOUSEHOLD LISTING FO RM FIRST, PLEASE TELL ME THE NAME OF EACH PERSON WHO USUALLY LIVES HERE, STARTING WITH THE H EAD OF THE HH. (Use survey definition of HH member). List the first name in line 01. List adult HH members first, then list children. Then ask: A RE THERE ANY OTHERS WHO LIVE HERE, EVEN IF THEY ARE NOT AT HOME NOW? (THESE MAY INCLUDE CHILDREN IN SCHOOL OR AT WORK). If yes, complete listing. Then, ask and record answers to questions as described in Instructions for Interviewers. Add a continuation sheet if there is not enough room on this page. Tick here if continuation sheet used ¨ Eligible for: WOMEN’S MODULES CHILD LABOUR MODULE CHILD HEALTH MODULES For persons age 15 or over ask Qs. 8 and 9 For children under age 15 years ask Qs. 10-13 1. Line no. 2. Name 3. IS (name) MALE OR FEMALE ? 1 MALE 2 FEM. 4. HOW OLD IS (name)? HOW OLD WAS (name) ON HIS/HER LAST BIRTHDAY? Record in completed years 99=DK* 5. Circle Line no. if woman is age 15-49 6. For each child age 5-14: WHO IS THE MOTHER OR PRIMARY CARETAKER OF THIS CHILD? Record Line no. of mother/ caretaker 7. For each child under 5: WHO IS THE MOTHER OR PRIMARY CARETAKER OF THIS CHILD? Record Line no. of mother/ caretaker 8. CAN HE/SHE READ A LETTER OR NEWSPAPER EASILY, WITH DIFFICULTY OR NOT AT ALL? 1 EASILY 2 DIFFICULT 3 NOT AT ALL 9 DK 9. WHAT IS THE MARITAL STATUS OF (name)?** 1 CURRENTLY MARRIED / IN UNION 2 WIDOWED 3 DIVORCED 4 SEPARATED 5 NEVER MARRIED 10. IS (name’s) NATURAL MOTHER ALIVE? 1 YES 2 NO 9 DK 11. If alive: DOES (name’s) NATURAL MOTHER LIVE IN THIS HOUSE- HOLD? 1 YES 2 NO 12. IS (name’s) NATURAL FATHER ALIVE? 1 YES 2 NO 9 DK 13. If alive: DOES (name’s) NATURAL FATHER LIVE IN THIS HOUSE- HOLD? 1 YES 2 NO LINE NAME M F AGE 15-49 MOTHER MOTHER E D N DK M W D S N Y N DK Y N Y N DK Y N 01 1 2 ____ ____ 01 ___ ___ ___ ___ 1 2 3 9 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 9 1 2 1 2 9 1 2 02 1 2 ____ ____ 02 ___ ___ ___ ___ 1 2 3 9 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 9 1 2 1 2 9 1 2 03 1 2 ____ ____ 03 ___ ___ ___ ___ 1 2 3 9 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 9 1 2 1 2 9 1 2 04 1 2 ____ ____ 04 ___ ___ ___ ___ 1 2 3 9 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 9 1 2 1 2 9 1 2 05 1 2 ____ ____ 05 ___ ___ ___ ___ 1 2 3 9 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 9 1 2 1 2 9 1 2 06 1 2 ____ ____ 06 ___ ___ ___ ___ 1 2 3 9 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 9 1 2 1 2 9 1 2 07 1 2 ____ ____ 07 ___ ___ ___ ___ 1 2 3 9 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 9 1 2 1 2 9 1 2 ARE THERE ANY OTHER CHILDREN LIVING HERE – EVEN IF THEY ARE NOT MEMBERS OF YOUR FAMILY OR DO NOT HAVE PARENTS LIVING IN THIS HOUSEHOLD? INCLUDING CHILDREN AT WORK OR AT SCHOOL? If yes, insert child’s name and complete form. * See instructions: to be used only for elderly household members (code meaning “do not know/over age 50”). Q .5 Cluster no. __ __ __ Household no. __ __ __ EDUCATION MODULE If interview takes place between two school years, use alternative wording found in Appendix 1. For persons age 5 or over ask Qs. 15 and 16 For children age 5 through 17 years, continue on, asking Qs. 18-22 (Note: Kindly omit Qs. 17 & 19) 14. Line no. 15. HAS (name) EVER ATTENDED SCHOOL? 1 YES ð Q.16 2 NO ø NEXT LINE 16. WHAT IS THE HIGHEST LEVEL OF SCHOOL (name) ATTENDED? WHAT IS THE HIGHEST GRADE (name) COMPLETED AT THIS LEVEL? LEVEL: 1 PRIMARY 2 SECONDARY 3 HIGHER 4 NON-STANDARD CURRICULUM 9 DK GRADE: 99 DK If less than 1 grade, enter 00. 17. IS (name) CURRENTLY ATTENDING SCHOOL? 1 YES ð Q.19 2 NO 18. DURING THE CURRENT SCHOOL YEAR , DID (name) ATTEND SCHOOL AT ANY TIME? 1 YES 2 NO ð Q.21 19. SINCE LAST (day of the week), HOW MANY DAYS DID (name) ATTEND SCHOOL? Insert number of days in space below. 20. WHICH LEVEL AND GRADE IS/WAS (name) ATTENDING? LEVEL: 1 PRESCHOOL 2 PRIMARY 3 SECONDARY 4 NON-STANDARD CURRICULUM 9 DK GRADE: 99 DK 21. DID (name) ATTEND SCHOOL LAST YEAR? 1 YES 2 NO ø NEXT LINE 9 DK ø NEXT LINE 22. WHICH LEVEL AND GRADE DID (name) ATTEND LAST YEAR? LEVEL: 1 PRESCHOOL 2 PRIMARY 3 SECONDARY 4 NON-STANDARD CURRICULUM 9 DK GRADE: 99 DK LINE Y NO LEVEL GRADE YES NO YES NO DAYS LEVEL GRADE Y N DK LEVEL GRADE 01 1 2ðNEXT LINE 1 2 3 4 9 ___ ___ 1 2 1 2 ____ 1 2 3 4 9 ___ ___ 1 2 9 1 2 3 4 9 ___ ___ 02 1 2ðNEXT LINE 1 2 3 4 9 ___ ___ 1 2 1 2 ____ 1 2 3 4 9 ___ ___ 1 2 9 1 2 3 4 9 ___ ___ 03 1 2ðNEXT LINE 1 2 3 4 9 ___ ___ 1 2 1 2 ____ 1 2 3 4 9 ___ ___ 1 2 9 1 2 3 4 9 ___ ___ 04 1 2ðNEXT LINE 1 2 3 4 9 ___ ___ 1 2 1 2 ____ 1 2 3 4 9 ___ ___ 1 2 9 1 2 3 4 9 ___ ___ 05 1 2ðNEXT LINE 1 2 3 4 9 ___ ___ 1 2 1 2 ____ 1 2 3 4 9 ___ ___ 1 2 9 1 2 3 4 9 ___ ___ 06 1 2ðNEXT LINE 1 2 3 4 9 ___ ___ 1 2 1 2 ____ 1 2 3 4 9 ___ ___ 1 2 9 1 2 3 4 9 ___ ___ 07 1 2ðNEXT LINE 1 2 3 4 9 ___ ___ 1 2 1 2 ____ 1 2 3 4 9 ___ ___ 1 2 9 1 2 3 4 9 ___ ___ Now for each woman age 15-49 years, write her name and line number at the top of each page in the Women’s Questionnaire. For each child under age 5, write his/her name and line number AND the line number of his/her mother or caretaker at the top of each page in the Children’s Questionnaire. You should now have a separate questionnaire for each eligible woman and child in the household. Q .6 Cluster no. __ __ __ Household no. __ __ __ CHILD LABOUR MODULE To be administered to caretaker of each child resident in the household age 5 through 14 years. ** Country-specific adaptation may change age range through to age 17. Copy line number of each eligible child from household listing. NOW I WOULD LIKE TO ASK ABOUT ANY WORK CHILDR EN IN THIS HOUSEHOLD MAY DO. 1. Line no. 2. Name 3. DURING THE PAST WEEK, DID (name) DO ANY KIND OF WORK FOR SOMEONE WHO IS NOT A MEMBER OF THIS HOUSEHOLD ? If yes: FOR PAY? 1 YES, FOR PAY (CASH OR KIND) 2 YES, UNPAID 3 NO ðTO Q.5 4. If yes: SINCE LAST (day of the week) , ABOUT HOW MANY HOURS DID HE/SHE DO THIS WORK FOR SOMEONE WHO IS NOT A MEMBER OF THIS HOUSEHOLD? If more than one job, include all hours at all jobs. Record response then ð Q.6 5. A T ANY TIME DURING THE PAST YEAR , DID (name) DO ANY KIND OF WORK FOR SOMEONE WHO IS NOT A MEMBER OF THIS HOUSEHOLD? If yes: FOR PAY? 1 YES, FOR PAY (CASH OR KIND) 2 YES, UNPAID 3 NO 6. DURING THE PAST WEEK, DID (name) HELP WITH HOUSEKEEPING CHORES SUCH AS COOKING, SHOPPING , CLEANING , WASHING CLOTHES, FETCHING WATER, OR CARING FOR CHILDREN? 1 YES 2 NO ð TO Q.8 7. If yes: SINCE LAST (day of the week) , ABOUT HOW MANY HOURS DID HE/SHE SPEND DOING THESE CHORES? 8. DURING THE PAST WEEK, DID (name) DO ANY OTHER FAMILY WORK (ON THE FARM OR IN A BUSINESS)? 1 YES 2 NO ø NEXT LINE 9. If yes: SINCE LAST (day of the week) , ABOUT HOW MANY HOURS DID HE/SHE DO THIS WORK? LINE YES YES NO. NAME PAID UNPAID NO NO. HOURS PAID UNPAID NO YES NO NO. HOURS YES NO NO. HOURS ___ ___ 1 2 3 ____ ____ 1 2 3 1 2 ____ ____ 1 2 ____ ____ ___ ___ 1 2 3 ____ ____ 1 2 3 1 2 ____ ____ 1 2 ____ ____ ___ ___ 1 2 3 ____ ____ 1 2 3 1 2 ____ ____ 1 2 ____ ____ ___ ___ 1 2 3 ____ ____ 1 2 3 1 2 ____ ____ 1 2 ____ ____ ___ ___ 1 2 3 ____ ____ 1 2 3 1 2 ____ ____ 1 2 ____ ____ ___ ___ 1 2 3 ____ ____ 1 2 3 1 2 ____ ____ 1 2 ____ ____ ___ ___ 1 2 3 ____ ____ 1 2 3 1 2 ____ ____ 1 2 ____ ____ Q .7 Cluster no. __ __ __ Household no. __ __ __ CHILD DISABILITY MO DULE To be administered to caretaker of each child resident in the household age 2 through 9 years. Copy line number of each eligible child from household listing. NOW I WOULD LIKE TO ASK ABOUT ANY WORK CHILDR EN IN THIS HOUSEHOLD MAY DO. 1. Line no. 2. Name 3. COMPARED WITH OTHER CHILDREN, DOES OR DID [NAME ] HAVE ANY SERIOUS DELAY IN SITTING, STANDING, OR WALKING? 4. COMPARED WITH OTHER CHILDREN, DOES [name ] HAVE DIFFICULTY SEEING , EITHER IN THE DAYTIME OR AT NIGHT? 5. Does [NAME ] appear to have difficulty hearing? (uses hearing aid, hears with difficulty, completely deaf?) 6. When you tell [NAME ] to do something, does he/she seem to understand what you are saying 7. Does [NAME ] have difficulty in walking or moving his/her arms or does he/she have weakness and/or stiffness in the arms or legs? 8. Does [NAME ] sometimes have fits, become rigid, or lose consciousness? 9. Does [NAME ] learn to do things like other children his/her age? 12. Compared with other children of the same age, does [NAME appear in any way mentally backward, dull or slow? LINE YES NO NO. NAME YES N O YES NO ___ ___ ____ ____ 1 2 1 2 ____ ____ 1 2 ____ ____ ___ ___ ____ ____ 1 2 1 2 ____ ____ 1 2 ____ ____ ___ ___ ____ ____ 1 2 1 2 ____ ____ 1 2 ____ ____ ___ ___ ____ ____ 1 2 1 2 ____ ____ 1 2 ____ ____ ___ ___ ____ ____ 1 2 1 2 ____ ____ 1 2 ____ ____ ___ ___ ____ ____ 1 2 1 2 ____ ____ 1 2 ____ ____ ___ ___ ____ ____ 1 2 1 2 ____ ____ 1 2 ____ ____ Q.8 Cluster no. __ __ __ Household no. __ __ __ WATER AND SANITATION MODULE This module is to be administered once for each household visited. Record only one response for each question. If more than one response is given, record the most usual source or facility. 1. WHAT IS THE MAIN SOURCE OF DRINKING WATER FOR MEMBERS OF YOUR HOUSEHOLD ? Piped into dwelling .01 Piped into yard or plot .02 Public tap.03 Tubewell/borehole with pump.04 Protected dug well .05 Protected spring.06 Rainwater collection .07 Bottled water .08 Unprotected dug well.09 Unprotected spring.10 Pond, river or stream .11 Tanker-truck, vendor .12 Other (specify) _______________________13 No answer or DK .99 2. HOW LONG DOES IT TAKE TO GO THERE, GET WATER, AND COME BACK? No. of minutes .__ __ __ Water on premises.888 DK .999 3. WHAT KIND OF TOILET FACILITY DOES YOUR HOUSEHOLD USE? Flush to sewage system or septic tank . 1 Pour flush latrine (water seal type). 2 Improved pit latrine (e.g., VIP) . 3 Traditional pit latrine . 4 Open pit. 5 Bucket. 6 Other (specify) _______________________ 7 No facilities or bush or field. 8 8ðQ.5 4. IS THIS FACILITY LOCATED WITHIN YOUR DWELLING, OR YARD OR COMPOUND?** Yes, in dwelling/yard/compound. 1 No, outside dwelling/yard/compound . 2 DK . 9 5. WHAT HAPPENS WITH THE STOOLS OF YOUNG CHI LDREN (0-3 YEARS) WHEN THEY DO NOT USE THE LATRINE OR TOILET FACILITY? Children always use toilet or latrine . 1 Thrown into toilet or latrine. 2 Thrown outside the yard. 3 Buried in the yard. 4 Not disposed of or left on the ground . 5 Other (specify) ________________________6 No young children in household. 8 5A. WHAT IS THE SEWAGE DISPOSAL FACILITY USED BY THE HOUSEHOLD? Household sewage network connected to a public sewage network and treatment plant…………………………………………1 Domestic network but with unhygienic sewage disposal to open areas or stormsewers………………………………2 Domestic network connected connected to 3ðQ.5B Q.9 septic tank………………………………….3 Pit latrine. Wash water disposed of to open areas or to storm sewers………………….4 5B. STATUS OF DOMESTIC NETWORK CONNECTED TO SEPTICTANK. Working properly. Septic tank emptied in due time………………………………….…….1 Non-functional. Sewage is disposed of to streets and open areas………………….2 Non-functional. Sewage is disposed of to storm sewers……………………………….3 GO TO NEXT MODULE ð Q.10 Cluster no. __ __ __ Household no. __ __ __ SALT IODIZATION MODULE 1. WE WOULD LIKE TO CHECK WHETHER THE SALT USED IN YOUR HOUSEHOLD IS IODIZED. MAY I SEE A SAMPLE OF THE SALT USED TO COOK THE MAIN MEAL EATEN BY MEMBERS OF YOUR HOUSEHOLD LAST NIGHT? Once you have examined the salt, circle number that corresponds to test outcome. Categories correspond to test kit recommended by UNICEF to be used in all MICS surveys. Not iodized 0 PPM (no colour) . 1 Less than 15 PPM (weak colour) . 2 15 PPM or more (strong colour). 3 No salt in home. 8 Salt not tested . 9 GO TO WOMEN’S QUESTIONNAIRE ð Q.8 Cluster no. __ __ __ Household no. __ __ __ Woman line no. __ __ QUESTIONNAIRE FOR INDIVIDUAL WOMEN WOMEN’S INFORMATION PANEL This module is to be administered to all women age 15 through 49 (see column 5 of HH listing). Fill in one form for each eligible woman. 1. Woman’s line number (from HH listing). Line number.__ __ 2. Woman’s name. Name ________________________________ 3A. IN WHAT MONTH AND YEA R WERE YOU BORN? Or: 3B. HOW OLD WERE YOU AT YOUR LAST BIRTHDAY? Date of birth Month/Year .__ __ / __ __ __ __ DK date of birth .999999 Or: Age (in completed years) .__ __ DKð3B GO TO NEXT MODULE ð Q.9 Cluster no. __ __ __ Household no. __ __ __ Woman line no. __ __ CHILD BIRTH MODULE This module is to be administered to all women age 15-49. All questions refer only to LIVE births. 1. NOW I WOULD LIKE TO ASK ABOUT ALL THE BIRTHS YOU HAVE HAD DURING YOUR LIFE . HAVE YOU EVER GIVEN BIRTH? MAKE SURE TO REMIND THE WOMAN THAT YOU MEAN TO A CHILD WHO EVER BREATHED OR CRIED OR SHOWED OTHER SIGNS OF LIFE – EVEN IF HE OR SHE LIVED ONLY A FEW MINUTES OR HOURS? Yes . 1 No. 2 2ð CONTRA - CEPTIVE USE MODULE 2A. WHAT WAS THE DATE OF YOUR FIRST BIRTH? I MEAN THE VERY FIRST TIME YOU GAVE BIRTH, EVEN IF THE CHILD IS NO LONGER LIVING, OR IS THE CHILD OF A MAN OTHER THAN YOUR CURRENT PARTNER. Or: 2B. HOW MANY YEARS AGO DID YOU HAVE YOUR FIRST BIRTH? Date of first birth Day/Month/Year .__ __/__ __/__ __ __ __ DK date of first birth .99999999 Or: Completed years since first birth .__ __ DKð2B 3A. WHAT IS THE NUMBER OF LIVE BIRTHS YOU HAVE HAD DURING YOUR LIFE ? (I.E CHILDREN WHO ARE STILL ALIVE OR WHO HAVE DECEASED) Number of Males ____ ____ Number of Females ____ ____ Total ____ ____ 11. OF THESE (total number ) BIRTHS YOU HAVE HAD, WHEN DID YOU DELIVE R THE LAST ONE (EVEN IF HE OR SHE HAS DIED)? Date of last birth Day/Month/Year .__ __/__ __/__ __ __ __ Did the woman’s last birth occur within the last year, that is, since ( insert date)? ¨ Yes, live birth in last year. ð GO TO TETANUS TOXOID MODULE ¨ No live birth in last year. ð GO TO CONTRACEPTIVE USE MODULE Q.10 Cluster no. __ __ __ Household no. __ __ __ Woman line no. __ __ TETANUS TOXOID (TT) MODULE This module is to be administered to all women with a live birth in the year preceding date of interview. 1. DO YOU HAVE A CARD OR OTHER DOCUMENT WITH YOUR OWN IMMUNIZATIONS LISTED? If a card is presented, use it to assist with answers to the following questions. Yes (card seen) . 1 Yes (card not seen) . 2 No. 3 DK . 9 2. WHEN YOU WERE PREGNANT WITH YOUR LAST CHILD, DID YOU RECEIVE ANY INJECTION TO PREVENT HIM OR HER FROM GETTING CONVULSIONS AFTER BIRTH (AN ANTI-TETANUS SHOT, AN INJECTION AT THE TOP OF THE ARM OR SHOULDER)? Yes . 1 No. 2 DK . 9 2ðQ.4 9ðQ.4 3. If yes: HOW MANY DOSES OF TETANUS TOXOID (ANTI-TETANUS INJECTIONS ) DID YOU RECEIVE DURING YOUR LAST PRE GNANCY? No. of doses .__ __ DK .99 How many TT doses were reported during last pregnancy in Q.3? ¨ At least two TT injections during last pregnancy. ð GO TO MATERNAL AND NEWBORN HEALTH MODULE ¨ Fewer than two TT injections during last pregnancy. ð CONTINUE WITH Q.4 4. DID YOU RECEIVE ANY TETANUS TOXOID INJECTION (additional probes) AT ANY TIME BEFORE YOUR LAST PRE GNANCY , INCLUDING DURING A PREVIOUS PREGNANCY OR BETWEEN PREGNANCIES? Yes . 1 No. 2 DK . 9 2ðQ.7 9ðQ.7 5. If yes: HOW MANY DOSES DID YO U RECEIVE? No. of doses .__ __ 6A. WHEN WAS THE LAST DOSE RECEIVED? Or: 6B. HOW MANY YEARS AGO DID YOU RECEIVE THE LAST DOSE? Date of last dose Month/Year .__ __ / __ __ __ __ DK date .999999 Or: Years ago.__ __ DKð6B 7. Add responses to Q.3 and Q.5 to obtain total number of doses in lifetime. Total no. of doses .__ __ GO TO MATERNAL AND N EWBORN HEALTH MODULE ð Q.11 Cluster no. __ __ __ Household no. __ __ __ Woman line no. __ __ MATERNAL AND NEWBORN HEALTH MODULE This module is to be administered to all women with a live birth in the year preceding date of interview. Use Q.7 and Q.8 only in countries where a local term for night blindness exists. 1. IN THE FIRST TWO MONTHS AFTER YOUR LAST BIRTH, DID YOU RECEIVE A VITAMIN A DOSE LIKE THIS? Show 200,000 IU capsule or dispenser. Yes . 1 No. 2 DK . 9 2. DID YOU SEE ANYONE FOR ANTENATAL CARE FOR THIS PREGNANCY ? If yes: WHOM DID YOU SEE? ANYONE ELSE? Probe for the type of person seen and circle all answers given. Health professional: Doctor . 1 Government doctor in a health centre.11 Private doctor……………………………12 Nurse/midwife . 2 Auxiliary midwife. 3 Other person Traditional birth attendant . 4 Other (specify) ________________________6 No one. 0 No of visits ðQ.B2 ðQ.A2 2A. IF THE ANSWER IS NO , I .E. DID NOT SEE ANYONE WHAT ARENTHE RREASONS FOR NOT SEEING ANYONE (MORE THAN ONE ANSWER CAN BE GIVEN) Did not feel the need to see anyone……. …1 Not convinced by the assistance……………2 Financially not capable to see anyone…….3 Difficulty in getting to the health care center……………………………………….4 Non-availability of medicaments…………….5 DK………………………………………………9 ðQ.3 2B IN WHICH MONTH DURI NG YOUR LAST PEGNANCY, DID THE FIRST VISIT TO A HEALTH CARE CENTRE, OR ANY OTHER PUBLIC/GOVERNMENTAL HEALTH INSTITITION TAKE PLACE? In month……………………………._______ DK………………………………………………9 2C IN WHICH MONTH DURING YOUR LAST PREGNACY DID THE LAST VISIT TO A HEALTH CARE CENTRE, OR ANY OTHER PUBLIC/GOVERNMENTAL HEALTH INSTITITION TAKE PLACE? In month……………………………._______ DK………………………………………………9 3. WHO ASSISTED WITH THE DELIVERY OF YOUR LAST CHILD (or name)? ANYONE ELSE? Probe for the type of person assisting and circle all answers given. Health professional: Doctor . 1 Nurse/midwife . 2 Auxiliary midwife. 3 Other person Traditional birth attendant . 4 Relative/friend . 5 Other (specify) ________________________6 No one. 0 3A WHERE DID THE DELIVE RY TAKE PLACE? In hospital…………………………………….1 At home……………………………………….2 At midwife's house……………………………3 Other………………………………………….4 4. WHEN YOUR LAST CHILD (name) WAS BORN , WAS HE/SHE VERY LARGE, LARGER THAN AVERAGE, Very large. 1 Larger than average . 2 Q.12 AVERAGE, SMALLER THAN AVERAGE, OR VERY SMALL? Average. 3 Smaller than average. 4 Very small. 5 DK . 9 5. WAS (name) WEIGHED AT BIRTH? Yes . 1 No. 2 DK . 9 2ðQ.7 9ðQ.7 6. HOW MUCH DID (name) WEIGH? Record weight from health card, if available. From card.1 (grams) __ , __ __ __ From recall .2 (grams) __ , __ __ __ DK .99999 7. WHEN YOU WERE PREGNANT WITH YOUR LAST CHILD, DID YOU HAVE DIFFICULTY WITH YOUR VISION DURING THE DAYLIGHT ? Yes . 1 No. 2 DK . 9 8. DURING THAT PREGNANCY, DID YOU SUFFER FROM NIGHT BLINDNESS (insert local term)? Yes . 1 No. 2 DK . 9 GO TO NEXT MODULE ð Q.13 Cluster no. __ __ __ Household no. __ __ __ Woman line no. __ __ CONTRACEPTIVE USE MODULE Ask Q.1 for all women age 15-49 and then follow the skip instruction carefully. Questions on pregnancy and contraception are to be asked only of women who are currently married or in union. 1. ARE YOU CURRENTLY MARRIED OR LIVING WITH A MAN? Yes . 1 No, widowed, divorced, separated . 2 No, never married. 3 2ðNEXT MODULE 3ðNEXT MODULE 2. NOW I AM GOING TO CHANGE TOPICS. I WOULD LIKE TO TALK WITH YOU ABOUT ANOTHER SUBJECT – FAMILY PLANNING – AND YOUR REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH. I KNOW THIS IS A DIFFICULT SUBJECT TO TALK ABOUT , BUT IT IS IMPORTANT THAT WE OBTAIN THIS INFORMATION. OF COURSE, ALL THE INFORMATION YOU SUPPLY WILL REMAIN STRICTLY CONFIDENTIAL. YOU WILL NEVER BE IDE NTIFIED WITH THE ANSWERS TO THESE QUESTIONS . ARE YOU PREGNANT NOW? Yes, currently pregnant. 1 No. 2 Unsure or DK . 3 1ðNEXT MODULE 3. SOME COUPLES USE VARI OUS WAYS OR METHODS TO DELAY OR AVOID A PREGNANCY . ARE YOU CURRENTLY DOING SOMETHING OR USING ANY METHOD TO DELAY OR AVOID GETTING PREGNANT? Yes . 1 No. 2 1ðQ.4 A3. IF THE ANSWER IS NO, WHAT IS THE REASON? (MORE THAN ONE ANSWER CAN BE GIVEN/MARKED) Desire to have children………………………1 Health reasons……………………….………2 Religious causes/reasons……………………3 Husband not convinced…………………….4 Wife not convinced……………………………5 High price of contraceptives…………………6 Other………………………………………….7 DK………………………………………………9 ðNEXT MODULE AFTER FINISHIG THIS Q. 4. WHICH METHOD ARE YOU USING? Do not prompt. If more than one method is mentioned, circle each one. Female sterilization .01 Male sterilization .02 Pill .03 IUD.04 Injections.05 Implants .06 Condom.07 Female condom .08 Diaphragm.09 Foam/jelly.10 Lactational amenorrhoea method (LAM) .11 Periodic abstinence .12 Withdrawal .13 Other (specify) _______________________14 Q.14 GO TO NEXT MODULE , I.E. HIV MODULE ð Q.15 Cluster no. __ __ __ Household no. __ __ __ Woman line no. __ __ HIV/AIDS MODULE This module is to be administered to all women age 15-49. See Instructions for Interviewers for further discussion of these questions. 1. NOW I WOULD LIKE TO TALK WITH YOU ABOUT WHAT YOU KNOW ABOUT SERIOUS ILLNESS , IN PARTICULAR, ABOUT HIV AND AIDS. HAVE YOU EVER HEARD OF THE VIRUS HIV OR AN ILLNESS CALLED AIDS? Yes . 1 No. 2 2ðQ.18 2. IS THERE ANYTHING A PERSON CAN DO TO AVOID GETTING HIV, THE VIRUS THAT CAUSES AIDS? Yes . 1 No. 2 DK . 9 2ðQ.8 9ðQ.8 2A. HOW DOESTHE INFECTION TAKE LACE? (MORE THAN ONE ANSWER CAN BE GIVEN/MARKED) Sexual relation……………………………….1 Transfer of infected blood……………………2 From mother to child during pregnancy…….3 From mother to child through breastfeeding.4 Mosquito bites…………………………………5 Exposed to Infected medical equipment……6 DK………………………………………………9 18. Is the woman a caretaker of any children under five years of age? ¨ Yes. ð GO TO QUESTIONNAIRE FOR CHILDREN UNDER FIVE and administer one questionnaire for each child under five for whom she is the caretaker. ¨ No. ð CONTINUE WITH Q.19 19. Does another eligible woman reside in the household? ¨ Yes. ð End the current interview by thanking the woman for her cooperation and GO TO QUESTIONNAIRE FOR INDIVIDUAL WOMEN to administer the questionnaire to the next eligible woman. ¨ No. ð End the interview with this woman by thanking her for her cooperation. Gather together all questionnaires for this household and tally the number of interviews completed on the cover page. PS: USE THE LETTERS Y OR N WHEN ANSWERING YES OR NO Q.16 Cluster no. __ __ __ Household no. __ __ __ Caretaker line no. __ __ Child line no. __ __ QUESTIONNAIRE FOR CHILDREN UNDER FIVE This questionnaire is to be administered to all women who care for a child that lives with them and is under the age of 5 years (see Q.4 of the HH listing). A separate form should be used for each eligible child. Questions should be administered to the mother or caretaker of the eligible child (see Q.7 of the HH listing). Fill in the line number of each child, the line number of the child’s mother or caretaker, and the household and cluster numbers in the space at the top of each page. BIRTH REGISTRATION AND EARLY LEARNING MODULE 1. Child’s name. Name ________________________________ 2. Child’s age (copy from Q.4 of HH listing). Age (in completed years) .__ __ 3. NOW I WOULD LIKE TO ASK YOU SOME QUESTIONS ABOUT THE HEALTH OF EACH CHILD UNDER THE AGE OF 5 IN YOUR CARE , WHO LIVES WITH YOU NOW. NOW I WANT TO ASK YOU ABO UT (name). IN WHAT MONTH AND YEAR WAS (name) BORN? Probe: WHAT IS HIS/HER BIRTHDAY? If the mother knows the exact birth date, also enter the day; otherwise, enter 99 for day. Date of birth Day/Month/Year .__ __/__ __/__ __ __ __ 4. DOES (name) HAVE A BIRTH CERTIFICATE? MAY I SEE IT? If certificate is presented, verify repor ted birth date. If no birth certificate is presented, try to verify date using another document (health card, etc.). Correct stated age, if necessary. Yes, seen. 1 Yes, not seen . 2 No. 3 DK . 9 1ðQ.8 5. If no birth certificate is shown, ask : HAS (name’s) BIRTH BEEN REGISTERED? Yes . 1 No. 2 DK . 9 1ðQ.8 9ðQ.7 6. WHY IS (name’s) BIRTH NOT REGISTERED? Costs too much** . 1 Must travel too far. 2 Did not know it should be registered . 3 Late, and did not want to pay fine. 4 Does not know where to register . 5 Other (specify) ________________________6 DK . 9 7. DO YOU KNOW HOW TO REGISTER YOUR CHILD’S BIRTH? Yes . 1 No. 2 No answer . 8 Q.17 8. Check age. If child is 3 years old or more, ask: DOES (name) ATTEND ANY ORGANIZED LEARNING OR EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION PROGRAMME, SUCH AS A PRIVATE O R GOVERNMENT FACILITY, INCLUDING KINDERGARTEN OR COMMUNITY CHILD CARE? Yes . 1 No. 2 DK . 9 2ðNEXT MODULE 9ðNEXT MODULE 9. WITHIN THE LAST SEVEN DAYS, ABOUT HOW MANY HOURS DID (name) ATTEND? Number of hours .__ __ GO TO NEXT MODULE ð Q.18 Cluster no. __ __ __ Household no. __ __ __ Caretaker line no. __ __ Child line no. __ __ VITAMIN A MODULE Further optional questions are found in Appendix Two. 1. HAS (name) EVER RECEIVED A VITAMIN A CAPSULE (SUPPLEMENT ) LIKE THIS ONE ? Show capsule or dispenser. Yes . 1 No. 2 DK . 9 2ðNEXT MODULE 9ðNEXT MODULE 2. HOW MANY MONTHS AGO DID (name) TAKE THE LAST DOSE? Months ago .__ __ DK .99 3. WHERE DID (name) GET THIS LAST DOSE? On routine visit to health centre. 1 Sick child visit to health centre. 2 National Immunization Day campaign. 3 Other (specify) ________________________4 DK . 9 GO TO NEXT MODULE ð Q.19 Cluster no. __ __ __ Household no. __ __ __ Caretaker line no. __ __ Child line no. __ __ BREASTFEEDING MODULE 1. HAS (name) EVER BEEN BREASTFED? Yes . 1 No. 2 DK . 9 2ðQ.4 9ðQ.4 A1. AFTER HOW MANY HOUSRS AFTER BIRTH DID BREASTFEEDING START ? No. of hours…………………………_______ DK…………………………………………….99 B1. DID (NAME) TAKE COLUSTROM? Yes . 1 No. 2 DK . 9 C1. TO WHAT AGE (IN MONTHS) WAS EXCLUSIVE BRESTFEEDING MAINTAINED/USED? Age (in months)……………………____ ____ 2. IS HE/SHE STILL BEING BREASTFED? Yes . 1 No. 2 DK . 9 2ðQ.4 9ðQ.4 3. SINCE THIS TIME YESTERDAY , DID HE/SHE RECEIVE ANY OF THE FOLLOWING : Read each item aloud and record response before proceeding to the next item. 3A. VITAMIN, MINERAL SUPPLEMENTS OR MEDICINE ? 3B. PLAIN WATER? 3C. SWEETENED, FLAVOURED WATER OR FRUIT JUICE OR TEA OR INFUSION? 3D. ORAL REHYDRATION SOLUTION (ORS)? 3E. TINNED, POWDERED OR FRESH MILK OR INFANT FORMULA? 3F. ANY OTHER LIQUIDS? 3G. SOLID OR SEMI-SOLID (MUSHY ) FOOD? Y N DK A. Vitamin supplements.1 2 9 B. Plain water .1 2 9 C. Sweetened water or juice.1 2 9 D. ORS.1 2 9 E. Milk.1 2 9 F. Other liquids (specify) __________ 1 2 9 G. Mushy food .1 2 9 4. SINCE THIS TIME YESTERDAY , HAS (name) BEEN GIVEN ANYTHING TO DRINK FROM A BOTTLE WITH A NIPPLE OR TEAT? Yes . 1 No. 2 DK . 9 GO TO NEXT MODULE ð Q.20 Cluster no. __ __ __ Household no. __ __ __ Caretaker line no. __ __ Child line no. __ __ CARE OF ILLNESS MODULE 1. HAS (name) HAD DIARRHOEA IN THE LAST TWO WEEKS, THAT IS, SINCE (day of the week ) OF THE WEEK BEFORE LAST ? Diarrhoea is determined as perceived by mother or caretaker, or as three or more loose or watery stools per day, or blood in stool. Yes . 1 No. 2 DK . 9 1ðQ.3 2. IN THE LAST TWO WEEKS, HAS (name) HAD ANY OTHER ILLNESS , SUCH AS COUGH OR FEVER, OR ANY OTHER HEALTH PROBLEM ? Yes . 1 No. 2 DK . 9 1ðQ.4 2ðQ.11 9ðQ.11 3. DURING THIS LAST EPISODE OF DIARRHOEA, DID (name) DRINK ANY OF THE FOLLOWING: Read each item aloud and record response before proceeding to the next item. 3A. BREAST MILK? 3B. CEREAL-BASED GRUEL OR GRUEL MADE FROM ROOTS OR SOUP? 3C. other locally-defined acceptable home fluids (e.g., SSS, yogurt drink)? 3D. ORS PACKET SOLUTION? 3E. OTHER MILK OR INFANT FORMULA? 3F. WATER WITH FEEDING DURING SOME PART OF THE DAY? 3G. WATER ALONE? 3H. defined “unacceptable” fluids (e.g., cola, etc. (insert local names)) 3I. NOTHING Y N DK A. Breast milk .1 2 9 B. Gruel .1 2 9 C. Other acceptable.1 2 9 D. ORS packet.1 2 9 E. Other milk.1 2 9 F. Water with feeding .1 2 9 G. Water alone.1 2 9 H. Unacceptable fluids .1 2 9 I. Nothing .1 2 9 1ðQ.5 4. DURING (name’s) ILLNESS , DID HE/SHE DRINK MUCH LESS, ABOUT THE SAME, OR MORE THAN USUAL? Much less or none. 1 About the same (or somewhat less) . 2 More . 3 DK . 9 5. DURING (name’s) ILLNESS , DID HE/SHE EAT LESS, ABOUT THE SAME, OR MORE FOOD THAN USUAL? If “less”, probe: MUCH LESS OR A LITTLE LESS? None. 1 Much less. 2 Somewhat less. 3 About the same. 4 More . 5 DK . 9 6. HAS (name) HAD AN ILLNESS WITH A COUGH AT ANY TIME IN THE LAST TWO WEEKS, THAT IS, SINCE (day of the week) OF THE WEEK BEFORE LAST? Yes . 1 No. 2 DK . 9 2ðQ.11 9ðQ.11 Q.21 7. WHEN (name) HAD AN ILLNESS WITH A COUGH, DID HE /SHE BREATHE FASTER THAN USUAL WITH SHORT , QUICK BREATHS OR HA VE DIFFICULTY BREATHING? Yes . 1 No. 2 DK . 9 2ðQ.11 9ðQ.11 8. WERE THE SYMPTOMS DUE TO A PROBLEM IN THE CHEST OR A BLOCK ED NOSE? Blocked nose. 1 Problem in chest . 2 Both . 3 Other (specify) ________________________4 DK . 9 1ðQ.11 4ðQ.11 9. DID YOU SEEK ADVICE OR TREATMENT FOR THE ILLNESS OUTSIDE THE HOME? Yes . 1 No. 2 DK . 9 2ðQ.11 9ðQ.11 10. FROM WHERE DID YOU SEEK CARE? ANYWHERE ELSE? Circle all providers mentioned, but do NOT prompt with any suggestions. Hospital .01 Health centre.02 Dispensary .03 Village health worker.04 MCH clinic.05 Mobile/outreach clinic.06 Private physician.07 Traditional healer .08 Pharmacy or drug seller.09 Relative or friend.10 Other (specify) _______________________11 Ask this question (Q.11) only once for each caretaker. 11. SOMETIMES CHILDREN HAVE SEVERE ILLNESSES AND SHOULD BE TAKEN IMMEDIATELY TO A HEALTH FACILITY. WHAT TYPES OF SYMPTOM S WOULD CAUSE YOU TO TAKE YOUR CHI LD TO A HEALTH FACILITY RIGHT AWAY? Keep asking for more signs or symptoms until the caretaker cannot recall any additional symptoms. Circle all symptoms mentioned, but do NOT prompt with any suggestions. Child not able to drink or breastfeed.01 Child becomes sicker .02 Child develops a fever .03 Child has fast breathing.04 Child has difficult breathing.05 Child has blood in stool .06 Child is drinking poorly.07 Other (specify) _______________________08 Other (specify) _______________________09 Other (specify) _______________________10 GO TO NEXT MODULE ð Q.22 Cluster no. __ __ __ Household no. __ __ __ Caretaker line no. __ __ Child line no. __ __ MALARIA MODULE This module is for use in countries or regions at high risk of malaria. See manual for definition. 1. IN THE LAST TWO WEEKS, THAT IS, SINCE (day of the week) OF THE WEEK BEFORE LAST, HAS (name) BEEN ILL WITH A FEVER? Yes . 1 No. 2 DK . 9 2ðQ.8 9ðQ.8 2. WAS (name) SEEN AT A HEALTH FA CILITY DURING THIS ILLNESS ? Yes . 1 No. 2 DK . 9 2ðQ.6 9ðQ.6 3. DID (name) TAKE A MEDICINE FOR FEVER OR MALARIA THAT WAS PRO VIDED OR PRESCRIBED AT THE HEALTH FACILITY? Yes . 1 No. 2 DK . 9 2ðQ.5 9ðQ.5 4. WHAT MEDICINE DID (name) TAKE THAT WAS PROVIDED OR PRESCRIBED AT THE HEALTH FACILITY? Circle all medicines mentioned. Paracetamol . 1 Chloroquine . 2 Fansidar . 3 Kenin………………………………………….4 Premaquin…………………………………….5 Other (specify) ________________________4 DK . 9 5. WAS (name) GIVEN MEDICINE FOR THE FEVER OR MALARIA BEFORE BEING TAKEN TO THE HEALTH FACILITY? Yes . 1 No. 2 DK . 9 1ðQ.7 2ðQ.8 9ðQ.8 6. WAS (name) GIVEN MEDICINE FOR FEVER OR MALARIA DURING THIS ILLNESS? Yes . 1 No. 2 DK . 9 2ðQ.8 9ðQ.8 7. WHAT MEDICINE WAS (name) GIVEN? Circle all medicines given before visiting a health facility or if no visit was made to a health facility. Paracetamol . 1 Chloroquine . 2 Fansidar . 3 Kenin………………………………………….4 Premaquin…………………………………….5 Other (specify) ________________________4 DK . 9 7A. WAS AMOSQUIOT INSECTICDE SPRAYED WITHIN THE DWELLING UNIT? Yes . 1 No. 2 DK . 9 8B. WAS ALL THE DOORS AND WINDOWS PROTECTED AGAINST MOSQUITO ENRTY? Yes . 1 No. 2 DK . 9 8. DID (name) SLEEP UNDER A BEDNE T LAST NIGHT? Yes . 1 No. 2 2ðNEXT Q.23 DK . 9 MODULE 9ðNEXT MODULE 9. WAS THE BEDNET TREATED WITH MOSQSUITO INSECTICDES? Yes . 1 No. 2 DK . 9 2ðNEXT MODULE 9ðNEXT MODULE 10. WHEN WAS THE LAST TIME THE THE BEDNET WWAS TREATED WITH MOSQUITO INSECTICIDE? No of months that passed……… ___ ___ DK .99 GO TO THE IMMUNISATION MODULE Q.24 9. WAS THIS BEDNET EVER TREATED WITH A PRODUCT TO KILL MOSQ UITOS? Yes . 1 No. 2 DK . 9 2ðNEXT MODULE 9ðNEXT MODULE 10. WHEN WAS THE BEDNET LAST TREATED? Months ago .__ __ DK .99 GO TO NEXT MODULE ð Q.25 Cluster no. __ __ __ Household no. __ __ __ Caretaker line no. __ __ Child line no. __ __ IMMUNIZATION MODULE If an immunization card is available, copy the dates in Qs.2-5 for each type of immunization recorded on the card. Qs.7-15 are for recording vaccinations that are not recorded on the card. Qs.7-15 will only be asked when a card is not available. 1. IS THERE A VACCINATION RECORD FOR (name)? Yes, seen. 1 Yes, not seen . 2 No. 3 2ðQ.7 3ðQ.7 (a) Copy dates of all vaccinations from the card. (b) Write ‘44’ in day column if card shows that vaccination was given but no date recorded. Date of Immunization DAY MONTH YEAR 2. BCG BCG 3A. OPV0 OPV0 3B. OPV1 OPV1 3C. OPV2 OPV2 3D. OPV3 OPV3 4A. DPT1 DPT1 4B. DPT2 DPT2 4C. DPT3 DPT3 5. MEASLES MEASLES 6. IN ADDITION TO THE VACCINATIONS SHOWN ON THIS CARD, DID (name) RECEIVE ANY OTHER VACCINATIONS - INCLUDING VACCINATIONS RECEIVED IN A NATIONAL IMMUNIZATION DAY? Record ‘Yes’ only if respondent mentions BCG, OPV 0-3, DPT 1-3, and/or Measles vaccine(s). Go to Q.15 after you finish. Yes . 1 (Probe for vaccinations and write ‘66’ in the corresponding day column on Q. 2 to Q. 5.) No. 2 DK . 9 1ðQ.15 2ðQ.15 9ðQ.15 7. HAS (name) EVER RECEIVED ANY VACCINATIONS TO PREVENT HIM/HER FROM GETTING DISEASES , INCLUDING VACCINATIONS RECEIVED IN A NATIONAL IMMUNIZATION DAY CAMPAIGN? Yes . 1 No. 2 DK . 9 2ðQ.15 9ðQ.15 8. HAS (name) EVER BEEN GIVEN A BCG VACCINATION AGAINST TUBERCULOSIS – THAT IS, AN INJECTION IN THE LEFT SHOULDER THAT CAUSED A SCAR? Yes . 1 No. 2 DK . 9 Q.26 8A. C HECK THE LEFT SHOULDER (WHICH IS THE NORMAL LOCATION OF THE BCG INJECTIO)TO IDENTIFY THE SCAR? Scar existing……………………………….1 Scar not exiting…………………………….2 Not sure of the scar's existence………….3 ðQ.9 8B. GIVE THE REASON FOR NOT HAVING THE VACCINATION Vaccine not available ……………………….1 Difficulty in getting to the health facility…….2 Not convinced of the usefulness of the vaccine………………………………………3 DK………………………………………………9 9. HAS (name) EVER BEEN GIVEN ANY “VACCINATION DROPS IN THE MOUTH” TO PROTECT HIM/HER FROM GETTING DISEASES – THAT IS, POLIO? Yes . 1 No. 2 DK . 9 2ðQ.12 9ðQ.12 10. HOW OLD WAS HE/SHE WHEN THE FIRST DOSE WAS GIVEN – JUST AFTER BIRTH OR LATER? Just after birth . 1 Later . 2 11. HOW MANY TIMES HAS HE/SHE BEEN GIVEN THESE DROPS? No. of times .__ __ 12. HAS (name) EVER BEEN GIVEN “VACCINATION INJECTIONS” – THAT IS, AN INJECTION IN THE THIGH OR BUTTOCKS – TO PREVENT HIM/HER FROM GETTING TETANUS , WHOOPING COUGH, DIPHTHERIA? (SOMETIMES GIVEN AT THE SAME TIME AS POLIO ) Yes . 1 No. 2 DK . 9 2ðQ.14 9ðQ.14 13. HOW MANY TIMES? No. of times .__ __ 14. HAS (name) EVER BEEN GIVEN “VACCINATION INJECTIONS” – THAT IS, A SHOT IN THE ARM AT THE AGE OF 9 MONTHS OR OLDER - TO PREVENT HIM/HER FROM GETTING MEASLES? Yes . 1 No. 2 DK . 9 15. PLEASE TELL ME IF (name) HAS PARTICIPATED IN ANY OF THE FOLLOWING NATIONAL IMMUNIZATION DAYS: A) 1ST POLIO CAMPAIGN 4/10/1999- 8/10/1999 B) 2nd Polio Campaign 4/11/1999-8/11/1999 C) 3rd Polio Campaign 28/3/2000-1/4/2000 D) 4th Polio Campaign 25/4/2000-29/4/2000 Insert date and type of vaccination given in one of the national immunisation campaigns. Y N DK Campaign A .1 2 9 Campaign B .1 2 9 Campaign C .1 2 9 Campaign D .1 2 9 GO TO NEXT MODULE ð Q.27 Cluster no. __ __ __ Household no. __ __ __ Caretaker line no. __ __ Child line no. __ __ ANTHROPOMETRY MODULE After questionnaires for all children are complete, the measurer weighs and measures each child. Record weight and length/height below, taking care to record the measurements on the correct questionnaire for each child. Check the child’s name and line number on the HH listing before recording measurements. 1. Child’s weight. Kilograms (kg).___ ___ . ___ 2. Child’s length or height. Check age of child: ¨ Child under 2 years old. ð Measure length (lying down). ¨ Child age 2 or more years. ð Measure height (standing up). Length (cm) Lying down. 1 ___ ___ ___ . ___ Heigh t (cm) Standing up . 2 ___ ___ ___ . ___ 3. Measurer’s identification code. Measurer code.___ ___ ___ 4. Result. Measured. 1 Not present . 2 Refused. 3 Other (specify) ________________________4 5. Is there another child in the household who is eligible for measurement? ¨ Yes. ð Record measurements for next child. ¨ No. ð End the interview with this household by thanking all participants for their cooperation. Gather together all questionnaires for this household and check that identification numbers are at the top of each page. Tally on the Household Information Panel the number of interviews completed. Q.27 CLUSTER CONTROL SHEET District Name__________________ Cluster Number _______________ Interviewer Number_____________ Date ________________________ Number of Eligible Interviews Completed HH No. Name of Head of HH Women Children Women Children Notes Total: Notes: (continue on reverse side, as needed)

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