Suriname - Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey - 1999

Publication date: 1999

• r1n ~ I . . lndi ~ ·~I March, 2001 Government of Suriname Published by the Ministry of Social Affairs and Housing for the Government of Suriname Compilation by the MICS Technical Committee Designed by William Tjauw & Stephen Lieuw Printed by Drukkerij Alberga N.Y. Data may be reproduced with duly acknowledgement from source © GOS March 2001 • • • mw· "'" ,\;, {~,.""~" Sunname Multiple lndu.:.llor Cluster Survc) 2000 ~"'11'*"'"' c;_ • Suriname Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey 2000 March, 2001 • Government of Suriname • Funded by G ~ unicef United Nations Children ·s Fund J : . ~ ~ ~ ~ "'' "'1 / ~~"" , o Sun name Muluple lgdicator ('luster Survey 2000 : ' < 'if, ~ ,~ ~~ i ,fiWI~ Contents • List of Figures 3 List of Tables 3 Foreword and Acknowledgements 4 Map of Suriname 5 Executive Summary 6 Summary Indicators 9 I. Introduction 11 1.1 Geography, Population and Economy 12 1.2 Survey Objectives 13 II. Survey Methodology 14 II.l Survey Organization and Personnel 14 11.2 Sample Design 14 11.3 Listing and Mapping 16 11.4 Questionnaires 16 11.5 Fieldwork and Processing 16 11.6 Strengths and Weaknesses 17 III. Sample Characteristics and Data Quality 18 III .1 Sample Coverage and Response Rates 18 III.2 Demographic Analysis 18 III.3 Characteristics of the Household Population 20 IV. Results 22 A. Infant and Under-Five Mortality 22 • Child mortality 22 B. Education 23 Early childhood education 23 Basic education 23 Literacy 24 C. Water and Sanitation 24 Use of drinking water 24 Use of sanitation 24 D. Child Malnutrition 24 Nutritional status 24 Breastfeeding 26 Low birth weight 26 E. Child Health 27 Immunization coverage 27 Diarrhea 28 Acute respiratory infection 28 IMCI initiative 29 Malaria 29 F. HIV/AIDS 30 AIDS knowledge 30 AIDS testing 31 G. Reproductive Health 32 Contraception 32 Prenatal care 32 Assistance at delivery 33 • H. Child Rights 33 Birth registration 33 Orphanhood and living arrangements of children -:;~ . _) Contents • • • Appendix A: Sample Design Appendix B: List of Personnel Involved in the Suriname MICS Appendix C: Questionnaires Appendix D: Tables Appendix E: List of Abbreviations Appendix F: References List of Figures Figure 1: Population pyramid, Suriname, 1999-2000 Figure 2: Single year age distribution of the household population by sex, Suriname, 1999-2000 Figure 3: Estimates of infant and under-five mortality based on direct estimation, Suriname Figure 4: Percentage of children of primary school age attending primary school, Suriname, 1999-2000 Figure 5: Percentage of under five children who are undernourished, Suriname, 1999-2000 Figure 6: Percent distribution of living children by breastfeeding status, Suriname, 1999-2000 Figure 7: Percentage of children aged 12-23 months who received immunizations by age 12 months, Suriname, 1999-2000 Figure 8: Percentage of women aged 12-49 who have sufficient knowledge of HIY I AIDS transmission by level of education, Suriname, 1999-2000 Figure 9: Percent distribution of women with a birth in the last year by type of personnel delivering antenatal care, Suriname, 1999-2000 List of Tables Table II.l : Suriname by strata and clusters Table II .2 : Strata by sampling fractions and weights Table III.!: Numbers of households and women, and response rates , Suriname, 1999-2000 (unweighted) 35 40 41 61 101 102 19 19 22 23 25 26 28 31 :n 15 16 18 >!\ \ultlltllll' Multtple Indicator Clw . h:'' ~l11\e~ 2000 ~?£~ ~ Foreword and Acknowledgements This report presents the final results of the Suriname Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey (Suriname MICS 2000). The implementation structure of Suriname MICS 2000 is comprised of a National Steering Committee, a Technical Committee and a MICS Coordinator. The contribution of the members of the National Steering Committee, consisting of representatives of the following institutions, is gratefully acknowledged: The Ministry of Social Affairs and Housing; the Ministry of Planning and Development Cooperation; the Ministry of Labour; the Ministry of Health; the Ministry of Education; the Medical Mission; the Regional Health Services (RGD); the Bureau of Public Health; the University of Suriname; the General Bureau of Statistics; PAHO; UNIFEM and UNDP. The Technical Committee was instrumental in all the stages of the survey. We thank its members: Sonja Caffe Ph.D MPH, Drs. Marthelise Eersel MSPH , Drs. Ingrid Krishnadath MPH, Drs. I wan Sno M.Sc, M.Eng Adrianus Vlugman and Drs . Heidi Wirjosentono. A special . word of thanks goes to the Medical Mission and its staff for specific support in implementing the MICS in the interior. The success of the survey is due to the efforts of many individuals and institutions . We would like to especially mention the following persons: Tessa Wardlaw, Edilberto Loaiza, Roeland Monasch of UNICEF/New York; Samuel Bickles of UNICEF/TACRO; Marashetty Seenappa, Ndolamb Ngokwey, Elaine King of UNICEF/Barbados; Peter Chege, Sonja Caffe, Patrick De Milt and Orgine Renfurm of UNICEF Office Paramaribo; Alfredo Aliaga, Trevor Croft, Nicholas Hill, Ladys Ortiz of Macro International Inc. and Ann Blanc , Hasan Momin and Michel Sankara. We owe a significant debt of gratitude to the fieldworkers, data-entry personnel, and administrative staff, underlining the exceptional contribution of Drs. Eartha Groenfelt. It goes without saying that without them there would have been no survey. Finally, we are grateful to all the respondents for spending their valuable time to participate in the sur- vey. Dr. Jack Menke (MICS Coordinator) March 2000 • • • • SURINAME • 1. Paramaribo 6. Saramacca 2. Wanica 7. Coronie 3. Para 8. Nickerie 4. Brokopondo 9. Marowijne • 5 . Commewijne 10. Sipaliwini Map of Suriname Executive Summary The 2000 Suriname Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey (MICS) is a nationally representative survey of households, women, and children. The main objectives of the survey are to provide up-to-date infor- mation for assessing the situation of children and women in Suriname at the end of the decade and to furnish data needed for monitoring progress toward goals established at the World Summit for Children and as a basis for future action. The survey results show remarkable differences between the interior - that is mainly populated by maroons and indigenous people - on the one hand, and the urban and rural region on the other hand. Compared to the urban and rural region, the interior stands out by its unfavorable position on most of the indicators. Infant and Under-Five Mortality Distortions in the MICS data on deaths among children preclude obtaining estimates of very recent mortality rates. An estimation based on the MICS data for the infant mortality rate is 29 per 1000 and for the under-five mortality rate 37 per 1000 around 1998 (preliminary Q-five estimations). Education Approximately 78 percent of children of primary school age in Suriname are attending primary school. School attendance in the interior is significantly lower than in the rest of the country at 61.2 percent. At the national level, there is virtually no difference between male and female primary school attendance. Almost 84 percent of children who enter the first grade of primary school eventually reach grade five. The vast majority (86.2 percent) of the population over age 15 years is literate. The percentage literate declines from 91.7 percent among those aged 15-24 to 62.8 percent among the population aged 65 and older. Water and Sanitation Approximately 73 percent of the population has access to safe drinking water - 92.6 percent in urban areas and 66.6 percent in rural areas. The situation in the interior is considerably worse than in other regions; only 20 percent of the population in this region gets its drinking water from a safe source. Eighty eight percent of the population of Suriname is living in households with sanitary means of excreta disposal. There are vast differences between the urban or rural regions with over 98 percent and the interior by 30.5 percent having sanitary means of excreta disposal. Child Malnutrition Slightly over 13 percent of children under age five in Suriname are underweight or too thin for their age, and 2.1 percent are severely underweight. Approximately 10 percent of children are stunted or too short for their age and 6.5 percent are wasted or too thin for their height. Children whose mothers have secondary or higher education are the least likely to be under- weight and stunted compared to children of mothers with less education. Breastfeeding Almost 13 percent of children aged under four months are exclusively breastfed, a level considerably lower than recommended. At age 6-9 months, 24.5 percent of children arc receiving breas1 milk and solid or semi-solid foods. By age 20-23 months, only 11.1 percent are continuing to hrc:lstfeed. • • • • • • ~~~!, 0 ' -~?· ~ iloi.\ii. ~ Sun name Mult1ple lnd1cator Cluster Survey 2000 ' ~ '0:"; : J;l: mr\ o , Low Birth Weight Slightly over 11 percent of infants are estimated to weigh less than 2500 grams at birth. This percentage is somewhat higher than the average for the Latin America and Caribbean region (9 percent). Immunization Coverage Approximately 89 percent of children aged 12-23 months received the first dose of DPT. The percentage declines for subsequent doses of DPT to 84.4 percent for the second dose, and 79.1 percent for the third dose. Similarly, 87.8 percent of children received Polio I by age 12 months and this declines to 78.5 percent by the third dose. The coverage for measles vaccine is lower than for the other vaccines at 60 .2 percent. Slightly over half of children had all eight recommended vaccinations in the first 12 months of life. Male and female children are vaccinated at roughly the same rate. Vaccination coverage is highest among children whose mothers have secondary or higher education. Diarrhea Eighty one percent of children with diarrhea received one or more of the recommended home treatments (i.e., were treated with ORS or RHF). Only 24.2 percent of children with diarrhea received increased fluids and continued eating as recommended. Acute Respiratory Infection Slightly over 4 percent of under five children had an acute respiratory infection in the two weeks prior to the survey. Approximately 58 percent of these children were taken to an appropriate health provider. IMCI Initiative Among under five children who were reported to have had diarrhea or some other illness in the two weeks preceding the MICS, 15.3 percent received increased fluids and continued eating as recommended under the IMCI programme. Nineteen percent of mothers know at least two of the signs that a child should be taken immediately to a health facility . Malaria In the interior of Suriname with the highest level of malaria risk, 72 .2 percent of under five children slept under a bednet the night prior to the survey interview. However, only about five percent of the bednets used are impregnated with insecticide. HIVIAIDS Approximately 36 percent of women aged 12-49 know all three of the main ways to prevent HIV transmission - having only one uninfected sex partner, using a condom every time, and abstaining from sex. Slightly over 35 percent of women correctly identified three misconceptions about HIV transmission -that HIV can be transmitted through supernatural means, that it can be transmitted through mosquito bites, and that a healthy looking person cannot be infected. Fifty six percent of women of reproductive age in Suriname know a place to get tested for AIDS and about 10 percent have been tested. The percentage of women who have sufficient knowledge of HIV transmission and the percentage who know where to get tested for HIV increases dramatically with the level of education . Contraception Current use of contraception was reported by 42.1 percent of married or in union women . The most popular method is the pill, which is used by one in four married women followed by female sterilization , which accounts for 9.3 percent of married women. Executi ve Sum mary ' ~,.,"f/>., lP" Sunn.unc Multtpk lndtc.ttor Cluster Suney 2000 · ·.;;,',. 0 ~ ~ -~r.:: . Prenatal Care Virtually all women in Suriname receive some type of prenatal care and 90.6 percent receive antenatal care from skilled personnel (doctor, nurse, midwife). Assistance at Delivery A doctor, nurse, or midwife delivered about 85 percent of births occurring in the year prior to the MICS survey. This percentage is highest in the districts of Commewijne and Wanica at respectively 100 and 98 .8 percent and lowest in the district of Brokopondo at 42.3 percent. Birth Registration The births of 94.9 percent of children under five years in Suriname have been registered. This percentage is highest in the districts of Coronie and Para at respectively 100 and 99 percent and lowest in the district of Nickerie at 82.7 percent. There are no significant variations in birth registration across sex, age, or education. Orphanhood and Living Arrangements of Children Overall, 62.2 percent of children aged 0-14 are living with both parents. Children who are not living with a biological parent comprise 7.8 percent and children who have one or both parents dead amount to 3.5 percent of all children aged 0- 14. The situation of children in the interior differs from that of other children. In the interior, less than half of children live with both parents. Slightly over 34 percent live with their mother only although their father is alive and a relatively large proportion (10.4 percent) are living with neither parent. • • • ? "' = 3 3 ., .:l -= Q. £. e' ;;l • Summary Indicators Under-five mortality rate Infant mortality rate Underweight prevalence Stunting prevalence Wasting prevalence Use of safe drinking water Use of sanitary means of excreta disposal Children reaching grade five Net primary school attendance rate Literacy rate Antenatal care Contraceptive prevalence Childbirth care Birth weight below 2.5 kg. Exclusive breastfeeding rate Timely complementary feeding rate Continued breastfeeding rate DPT immunization coverage Measles immunization coverage Polio immunization coverage ORTuse Home management of diarrhea Care seeking for acute respiratory infections Preschool development • • World Summit for Children Indicators I Probability of dying before reaching age five 37 per 1000 Probability of dying before reaching age one 29 per 1000 Proportion of under-fives who are too thin for their age 13.3 percent Proportion of under-fives who are too short for their age 9.9 percent Proportion of under fives who are too thin for their height 6.5 percent Proportion of population who use a safe drinking water source 72.6 percent Proportion of population who use a sanitary means of excreta disposal 88.0 percent Proportion of children entering first grade of primary school who eventually reach grade five 83.8 percent Proportion of children of primary school age attending primary school 77.5 percent Proportion of population aged 15+ years who are able to read a letter or newspaper 86.2 percent Proportion of women aged 12-49 attended at least once during pregnancy by skilled personnel 90.6 percent Proportion of married or in union women aged 12-49 who are using a contraceptive method 42.1 percent Proportion of births attended by ski lled health personnel 84.5 percent Proportion of live births that weigh below 2500 grams 11.4 percent Proportion of infants aged less than 4 months who are exclusively breastfed 12.8 percent Proportion of infants aged 6-9 months who are receiving breast milk and complementary food 24.5 percent ~-. Proportion of children aged 12-15 months and 20-23 months who are breastfeeding 42.9 percent (12-15) 11 .1 percent (20-23) Proportion of children immunized against diptheria, pertussis and tetanus by age one 79.1 percent Proportion of children immunized against measles by age one 60.2 percent Proportion of children immunized against polio by age one 78.5 percent Proportion of under-five children who had diarrhea in the last 2 weeks who were treated with 81.0 percent oral rehydration salts or an appropriate household solution Proportion of under-five children who had diarrhea in the last 2 weeks and received increased 24.2 percent fluids and continued feeding during the episode Proportion of under-five children who had ARI in the last 2 weeks and were taken to an 57.8 percent appropriate health provider Proportion of children aged 36-59 months who are attending some form of organized early 36.9 percent childhood education program ~ "' = § ., .:l [ ;:;· ., 0 ;;l Birth registration · Children's living arrangements Orphans in household Home management of illness Care seeking knowledge Bednets Knowledge of preventing HIV I AIDS Knowledge of misconceptions of HIVIAIDS Knowledge of mother to child transmission Attitude to people with HIV I AIDS Women who know where to be tested for HIV Women who have been tested for HIV • Indicators for Monitoring Children's Rights Proportion of under-five children whose births are reported registered 94.9 percent Proportion of children aged 0-14 years in households not living with a biological parent 7.8 percent Proportion of children aged 0-14 years who are orphans living in households 0.2 percent (both parents) 3.5 percent (one parent) Indicators for Monitoring IMCI and Malaria Proportion of under-five children reported ill during the last 2 weeks who received increased 15.3 percent fluids and continued feeding Proportion of caretakers of under-five children who know at least 2 signs for seeking care 19.0 percent immediately Proportion of under-five children who sleep under an insecticide impregnated bednet 4.6 percent (high risk areas only) Indicators for Monitoring HIV I AIDS Proportion of women who correctly state the 3 main ways of avoiding HIV infection 35.6 percent Proportion of women who correctly identify 3 misconceptions about HIVIAIDS 35.3 percent Proportion of women who correctly identify means of transmission of HIV from mother to child 31.3 percent Proportion of women expressing a discriminatory attitude towards people with HIVIAIDS 49.3 percent Proportion of women who know where to get a HIV test 56.1 percent Proportion of women who have been tested for HIV 10.3 percent • • • • • ~:";;:; _"'? ;h '&"'···r '' • Sun name Multiple Indicator Cluster Suney 2000 ::t,;;;~:, /' 0 (I 0 I. Introduction In 1989 the Convention on the Rights of the Child was unanimously adopted by the General Assembly of the United Nations. This convention sets universal legal standards for the protection of children against neglect, abuse and exploitation and for promotion of basic rights for survival, development and full participation in social , cultural, and other aspects of community life . In September 1990 the largest gathering of world leaders in history assembled at the United Nations to attend the World Summit for Children. The World Summit adopted a Declaration and Plan of Action to reach a set of goals for children in the 1990s with regard to survival, development, protection and participation. The Plan of Action urged for concerted national action and international cooperation to strive for the achievement of the goals by the year 2000 and for the establishment of mechanisms to monitor and measure progress towards the goals. In 1995 countries were called to prepare mid-decade progress reports . In order to assist countries to implement mid-decade assessments, UNICEF and other collab- oration UN agencies developed MICS - Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey- as a tool and supported several countries to implement MICS. Based on experiences and lessons learnt, MICS was improved and adjusted for end-decade assessments. Suriname participated at the highest level in the World Summit for Children and in 1993 Suriname rat- ified the Convention on the Rights of the Child. In order to adequately fulfill the end-decade report- ing responsibilities, the Government of Suriname decided in 1999 to undertake a MICS with UNICEF support. A National Steering Committee was formed to achieve a broad-based government and non- government input and support for the survey implementation and repmting, in order to foster communi- ty ownership for the fina l survey report. The MICS Steering Committee consists of representatives of relevant government and non-government agencies. A Technical Committee was also formed to give technical support to the MICS Coordinator to prepare and implement a survey of high quality. The TC members are experts, covering all the technical aspects of the MICS. The Ministry of Social Affairs and Housing coordinated the data entry. The preparation of the survey and the fieldwork were implemented with the institutional support and facilities of the Foundation for Information and Development (SWI). UNICEF provided most of the funding. This report presents the final results on the principal topics covered in the survey and on a subset of indicators . Sunn<~me MultJ~Ie lnd1cator Cluster Survey 2000 ., ' ; , : ; '~, ' ' .• , . . ~ 1.1 Geography, Population and Economy Geography Suriname is located in the northern coast of South America. It is bordered in the north by the Atlantic Ocean, in the south by Brazil, in the east by French Guyana and in the west by Guyana. The country covers an area of 163,820 square kilometers. Topographically there is a subdivision of the country into the coastal lowlands, the savanna and the highlands in the south with its tropical rain forest. Suriname is divided into 10 districts, the main administrative division. These districts are subdivided into 62 'ressorten'. The capital city is Paramaribo, located in the northern coastal area. Population According to official sources the population was estimated 422,000 as of december in 1997 (based on the last census that was held in 1980), while unofficial sources estimate the population at 460,000 in 1999. More than 80 percent of the population lives in the coastal lowland bordering the Atlantic Ocean. The population densi~y of 2.5 is among the lowest in South America. There are vast differences in population density in the country. About 70 percent of the population lives in the mainly urban districts of Paramaribo and Wanica, which occupy only 0.4 percent of the total land area (General Bureau of Statistics 1997). The Sipaliwini district is situated in the interior, a southern region with a vast rain forest. This district occupies 80 percent of the land area with a density of only 0.2 inhabitants per square kilometer. The population is multi-ethnic with 16 ethno-linguistic groups. The major groups in the urban and rural areas are Hindustani, Creoles, and Javanese. The population in the interior consists predominantly of maroons and indigenous people with a variety of ethno-linguistic groups. Economy Suriname has a small open economy. Since the 1980s the economy experienced several adjustment shocks due to external and internal developments: the decline in the bauxite mining and processing sector (the mainstay of the economy) in the 1980s; the suspension of Dutch development aid in the 1980s; and the implementation of structural adjustment policies in the 1990s. Economic policies in the 1988-1996 period were strongly influenced by Holland, the most important financial donor of Suriname. The implementation of a structural adjustment program became a pre- requisite to restore the flow of Dutch development aid, which was suspended from 1982-1987. Against the background of an increasing government budget deficit, a growing shortage in foreign exchange within the formal economy and a massive devaluation of the Surinamese curren«y, a structural adjust- ment program (SAP) was implemented in 1993. After a short period of further deterioration of the macroeconomic situation from 1993-1995, a period of monetary stabilization was reached in 1996. From 1997-2000 the parallel exchange rate increased enormously with a peak of 2,100 Surinamese guilders for I US dollar in July 2000. After a short revival of GDP growth in 1995-1997, the growth decreased to 0.7 percent in 1998 in the context of a worsening macroeconomic and monetary environment which affected the standard of liv- ing negatively until today. By 2000, bauxite mining and processing is still the pillar of the ecenomy while the public sector still maintains its position as the most important sector in terms of formal employment and contribution to GDP. Unemployment data in Suriname pertain only to the Districts of Paramaribo and Wanica. Unemployment (ILO definition, both sexes combined) in the nineties reached a high of 17.2 percent in 1992 and a low of 8.4 percent in 1995. For 1999 the estimate was 14 percent. · • • As regards income inequality it should be noted that, using Consumption Expenditure as a proxy for • Income, since it is well-known that income data are unreliable most of the time, the situation has wors- ened over a 30-years span. While in the 1968/1969 Household Budget Survey a Gini-coefficient of 0.2522 was obtained, the figure for the 1999/2000 survey turned out 0.4552 (General Bureau of Statistics, January 2001). Introduction • • • .,.,.!;¥1M ,;""T'i " ,., , ' ~t Sunname Multtple Indtcator Cluster Survey 2000 ~~';_ to 1.2 Survey Objectives The 2000 Suriname Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey (Suriname MICS 2000) has as its primary objectives: To provide internationally comparable up-to-date information for assessing the situation of children and ~omen in Suriname at the end of the decade; To furnish data needed as input to the National Plan of Suriname on children; To contribute to the improvement of data and monitoring systems in Suriname and to technical expertise in the design, implementation, and analysis of such systems . <: -~t",~/~ ~ Sunn.1me Mult1ple lnd1cator Cluster Survey 2000 ; ' ' . :~•, Cl 0 ~ ='f:iii:i " II. Survey Methodology e l Survey Methodology 11.1 Survey Organization and Personnel Suriname MICS 2000 was a national 5'trvey carried out under supervision of the Ministry of Social Affairs and Housing of the Republic f Suriname with institutional and academic support of the Foundation for Information and Development (SWI). The Medical Mission in Suriname provided logistical assistance. The UNICEF and Macro International Inc. (USA) provided technical assistance. The UNICEF and UNDP provided financ ial assistance . In September 1999 an implementation structure was developed compnsmg a MICS Steering Committee, a Technical Committee and a MlCS Coordinator. The main function of the MICS Steering Committee was to achieve a broad-based government and non-government input in , and support for the survey implementation and reporting, in order to foster community ownership for the final survey report. The MICS Steering Committee consisted of representatives of relevant government and non-government agencies . A Technical Committee (TC) was installed to give technical support to the MICS Coordinator to pre- pare and implement a survey of high quality. Various drafts of a MICS implementation Plan were designed and were discussed at length with the Technical Committee, consultants, and the Steering Committee. This resulted in 4 adjustments of the implementation plan . Finally, a MICS implementa- tion plan for Suriname was produced, dated November 16, 1999. Human resource recruitment and training were considered critical to enable a smooth implementation and high quality of the survey. To this end the following categories of personnel were recruited and • trained: full-time and part-time support personnel (survey sampling , logistics , administrative support); listing and mapping personnel; field workers (supervisors, interviewers, editors and drivers) data-entry typists Most of the listers and field workers were students of the Medical, Social and Technical Faculty of the University of Suriname. 11.2 Sample Design The sample for the Suriname MICS 2000 was designed to provide estimates of health indicators at several levels. The sample was stratified into three strata: urban, rural , and interior. The urban and rural strata are comprised of districts located in the coastal area while the interior is comprised of dis- tricts in the rain forest populated mainly by maroons (descendants of escaped slaves) and indigenous peo- ple. The sampling frame was composed of 449 'stemburo's' (the smallest administrative divisions used in national elections). The sample was selected in two stages. At the first stage, 123 'stemburo's (clusters) were selected with probability proportional to size (Table ILL). Within the 123 selected clusters , 4,671 households were identified by drawing a systematic sample. It is important to stress that the procedure to identify and select households in the urban and rural strata differs from the procedure used in most clusters of the interior stratum. In all 108 urban and rural clusters as well as in 4 interior clusters (2 in district of Para and 2 in district of Marowijne) dwellings were selected prior to the identification of households. In the remaining 11 clusters of the Brokopondo and Sipaliwini districts in the interior, female persons on • an up to date patient's lists with female representatives of family units of the Medical Mission were selected prior to the identification of households, rather than dwellings (Appendix A: Table 1). I I I • • • Table 11.1 Suriname by strata and clusters Stratum Type of Number of settlements clusters Paramaribo Urban 56 Wanica Urban 10 Nickerie Urban 4 Wanica Rural 12 Nickerie Rural 7 Coronie Rural 2 Saramacca Rural 3 Commewijne Rural 7 Marowijne Rural 4 Para Rural 3 Marowijne Interior 2 Para Interior 2 Brokopondo Interior 2 Sipaliwini Interior 9 Total 14 123 The household is operationally defined as one or more persons who live and sleep at least 4 days per week on the address selected and us ing collectively basic facilities and needs. This definition was applied in all districts . However as a Consequence of the different selection procedure applied in all 11 clusters in two interior districts (Brokopondo and Sipaliwini) the operational definition of households might differ slightly from the 108 clusters in the urban and rural districts together with the 4 interior clusters in the Para and Marowijne districts, due to a different sampling frame used. In the sample design the overall sample size was determined based on the UNICEF recommendati n for the minimum number of cases to estimate vaccine coverage for children age 12-23 months as follows . For selection in the sample of I targeted child (assuming children age 12- 23 months are 2.5 percent of the total household population) 40 individuals must be drawn in the sam- ple (100/2.5=40). With an expected mean household size of 5 this results in 8 households (40/5=8). To include 512 targeted children in the sample, the number of households to be selected is 512 x 8 = 4,096 . Allowing for possible non-response of 8 percent this results in a preliminary sample size of 4,452 households. The actual sample of 4 ,397 dwellings was drawn from the listings in 8 urban and rural districts and from the patient's list of the Medical Mission in 2 interior districts. In this sample of dwellings 4,692 households were identified. The attained sample of households (households with a complete interview) was 4 ,293 and the number of targeted children (12-23 months) completed was 376. This is lower than the expected 512 in the sample design with 4 ,096 expected households. The lower number is among others due to: i) a lower proportion of targeted children (12-23 months) found in the actual household population than the assumption of 2.5% made in the sample design; ii) a lower mean of 4 household members found in the actual household population than the assumption of 5 made in the sample design . Because of differences between the estimated and actually sampled households in the three strata, the actual sample is not self-weighting at the national level. For analyzing and reporting national level results , the sampling fractions and weights (1/sampling fraction) are calculated for the three strata in table II.2 (see details. in Appendix A: Table 2). Survey Methodology iii!' Sunname Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey 2000 '\" ~:~\m"E't Survey Methodology Table 11.2 Strata by sampling fractions and weights Strata Sampling fraction Weight Urban 0.139119 7.188091 Rural 0.142170 7.033833 Interior 0.086461 11.565908 11.3 Listing and Mapping The listing of dwellings in the 123 sampled clusters was implemented from October to November 1999. Unlike the previous MICS procedures, to make rough listing sketches and to sample directly at the second stage (households), the listing and mapping of dwellings was implemented prior to the interviewing. This was done in108 clusters of 8 districts in the urban and rural areas. In the 15 remain- ing clusters of two districts in the interior (Brokopondo and Sipaliwini), lists of patients of the Medical Mission were used for sampling households. After having selected the clusters, the location of these areas was examined by using available maps . In most cases one had to start from scratch . Instructions were given to listers to draw a map and to make a list of dwellings, containing one line of information for each dwelling . Since in rural and trib- al areas house numbers were seldom available, listers were instructed to look for identifying informa- tion, like type and color of house . Landmarks (waterpower, shop, milestones, and bridges) were drawn on the maps in order to facilitate the identification of sampled dwellings in the interviewing stage. The listed dwellings and their description were registered per cluster in a database. • Following the listing, manual mapping was performed based on the raw material of the listed clusters . • The mapping was executed according to procedures in academic literature (Kish 1965) and guidelines from Demographic Health Survey (DHS). Finally, the database of listed dwellings with the map of each corresponding cluster was compared to guarantee quality. 11.4 Questionnaires In addition to a household questionnaire , questionnaires were administered in each household for women aged 12-49 and children under age five. The questionnaires are based on the MICS model questionnaire excluding the child labor, salt iodization, tetanus toxoid , and vitamin A modules. A few questions on household expenditure and income were added to estimate income poverty. From the MICS model English version, the questionnaires were adapted and translated into two languages: Dutch and Sranan (Suriname's lingua franca). The questionnaires were pretested during November 1999. Based on the results of the pretest, modifications were made to the wording and translation of the questionnaires. 11.5 Fieldwork and Processing A total of 65 interviewers were recruited from areas where they would eventually conduct the field- work. The field staff was initially trained in November 1999 with additional training in December. The field workers for the interior were health assistants in the Medical Mission who were trained in January 2000 . In the urban and rural areas , 5 teams collected the data. Each team consisted of 3-5 interviewers, one field editor and a supervisor/driver. In the interior, 4 small teams of 1-2 interview- ers did interviewing. Fieldwork in the interior was supervised by the MICS Coordinator with support of a member of the Technical Committee who works in health management in the interior. The field- • work began in November 1999 and concluded in April 2000. A total of 10 data entry typists were recruited and trained in a three-day training course using the soft- ware program Epi-Info. Data were entered on 5 microcomputers. In order to ensure quality control, all questionnaires were double entered and internal consistency checks were performed. Data pro- cessing began in February 2000 and finished in April 2000 . • • • 11.6 Strengths and Weaknesses One of the strengths of Suriname MICS was the broad-based government and non-government input in and support achieved for the survey implementation, in order to foster community ownership for the final survey report. To this end a MICS Steering Committee consisting of representatives of relevant government and non-government agencies was involved successfully from the start. The human resources involved in the preparation and implementation in most areas contributed to the quality and the implementation slightly longer than the time schedule, except the data-entry and pro- cessing. The project had the advantage of a well-trained staff in training and planning of the fieldwork, a Technical Committee with professional and specific skills, and the availability during the day and evening of core staff and administrative personnel. The quality of the human resources and expertise was reflected particularly in listing and mapping, which was executed as a separate and professional activity prior to the interviewing. Further, the high level of formal education, the quality and high morale of the fieldworkers, field supervisors and edi- tors contributed to both quality and response rates of data collection. One of the weaknesses relates to the financial planning and budgeting , which is mainly due to the dras- tic changes of the parallel exchange rate for the US dollar, resulting in about 30-500 percent higher costs for some core activities, such as car renting. The bureaucratic procedures for purchasing equipment caused some delay in the project implementation. Delay in listing activities was due to poor contribu- tion of official government institutions to make relevant data available in order to identify borders of clusters easily. Most problems were with data-entry. The accuracy of some of the data-entry typist was below the required norms, which caused serious delays and problems in data cleaning, data process- ing and producing the final data . Survey Methodology \o' ~~"'~:.~ Sunn,1me Mult1ple Indicator Clthter Survey 20011 "':"":!,', -.-111-.r:~.S: III. Sample Characteristics and Data Quality 111.1 Sample Coverage and Response Rates In a sample of 4 ,397 dwellings, 4,692 households were selected of which 4,585 were found to be occupied (Table IILl). Of these 4 ,585 households , 4,293 were successfully interviewed for a house- hold response rate of 93.6 percenL In the interviewed households , 5,055 eligible women (age 12-49) were identified . Of these, 4,555 were successfully interviewed, yielding a response rate of 90.1 per- cent. In addition, 1,961 children under age 5 were listed in the household questionnaire. Of these , questionnaires were completed for 1,885 for a response rate of 96.1 percent. Table 111.1 Number of households and women, and response rates, Suriname, 1999-2000 (unweighted} Stratum Total Urban Rural Interior Sampled households 2600 1579 513 4692 Occupied households 2541 1554 490 4585 Completed households 2313 1495 485 4293 Household response rate 91.0 96.2 99.0 93.6 Eligible women 2698 1813 544 5055 Interviewed women 2392 1640 523 4555 Women response rate 88.7 90.5 96.1 90.1 Children under 5 929 658 374 196 1 Interviewed children under 5 889 633 363 1885 Child response rate 95.7 96.2 97.1 96.1 Of the three units (households, women and children) women have the lowest response rate. This is mainly due to working women who were not at home during the first and second interviewers' contact. From the point of view of the country stratification, the interior has the highest and the urban strata the lowest response rate for each of the three research units. Analysis of the non-response at the household level shows that the largest non-response category is 'not at home' by 4.2 percent of all the households found. In the urban strata the proportion is highest by 5.7 percent and in the interior the proportion is lowest by OA percent. There is a fairly low overall per- centage of 2.2 percent refusals, which is also lowest for the interior by 0.6 percent and highest for the urban strata by 3.2 percent. Appendix A: Table 2 contains a detailed overview of the non-response cat- egories . 111.2 Demographic Analysis Fertility, Mortality and Migration are the only determinants of the size and (age-sex) composition of a population . In sample surveys most attention is given to Fertility and Mortality, especially given the extensive indirect methods of estimating fertility and mortality. This section starts with an analysis of age reporting and then moves on with some minor attention to fertility. M01tality, especially infant and under-five mortality, are not treated here , as they are separately being treated in chapter IV. Sample Characteristics and Data Qual it\ • • • • • • Age reporting Age is the most important variable in the study of many demographic phenomena. Age reporting is subject to many errors, inter alia age heaping (also called digit preference), age shifting, reporting of extreme old age and failure to report age. The 4,293 households responding in the MICS survey yield- ed 17,071 persons of which 8,566 males and 8,505 females, of which there were 185 cases with age missing or unknown . The slight male excess is in line with estimates of the General Bureau of Statistics (GBS, 1999) , reporting that as of 1991 the number of males surpassed the number of females, due to the migration pattern between 1980 and 1997 , which generally exhibits an excess of female outmigration. Below we present the Population Pyramid for quinquennial MICS data (Figure 1). Figure 1: Population Pyramid, Suriname, 1999-2000 Age i Males 75-79 lt Females i m "" 60-64 ' ~~ 45-49 ~ 30-34 15-19 >QQQ Iii . ll!l! 00 04 liiii 1500 1000 500 0 0 500 1000 1500 The structure of the quinqennial MICS data, as depicted in the Population Pyramid looks very similar to the 1995 GBS estimates as depicted in the 1995 pyramid produced by GBS. Some omnibus Chi Square tests could not lead us to rejecting the null hypothesis of similar distributions. Looking at the single-years-of-age data, it is clear that there are instances of age heaping, particularly there seems to be a preference for ages ending in 0 (Figure 2). One should realize that the Brass procedures for estimating fertility and child mortality rely heavily on parity, number of deceased children and recent fertility reported by younger women and hence is vulnerable to gross errors in age reporting among females aged 15-29. The single-years-of-age data was subjected to Whipple's test and Myers' Blended test. The former yielded a score of 117 .8, which qualifies as 11 Approximate 11 , while the latter indeed showed a preference for digits 0 and 5. The grouped data was subjected to the UN's Age-sex test , which result- ed in a score of 35.4, which qualifies as inaccurate or fairly umeliable. However, if the sample size is taken into consideration and the necessary adjustments are made, the results qualify as reaso.nably reliable. 300 250 200 Q; ~ 150 ::J z 100 50 0 Figure 2: Single year age distribution of the household population by sex, Suriname, 1999-2000 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 Age 40 45 50 55 60 65 70 _._ Males_ Females Sample Characteristics and Data Quality ::''~~~.~ Stu marne Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey 2000 ' ··'~iii! ~~.!~~ '*. Fertility For estimating fertility using MICS data the Brass P/F procedure was used. This resulted in an adjust- ed total fertility rate (TFR) of 3.3, which is much higher than could be expected, based on the fact that for 1980, 1985, 1990 and 1995, the TFR in Suriname was estimated to be 3.6, 3.4, 2.6 and 2.4 respec- tively. This series clearly exhibits a downward trend! A Proximate Determinants decomposition (Bongaarts variant) in which the index of contraception was adjusted (because MICS 2000 measured a prevalence of 42.1 percent, compared to the earlier estimate of 49.3 percent) and estimates of all other relevant indexes were kept constant, yielded a TFR of 3.0, which is close to the MICS estimate. It could be that all other relevant indexes need to be adjusted, thus it should be noted that further investigation (most likely utilizing all relevant MICS 2000 data) is certainly warranted . Missing data As a basic check on the quality of the survey data, the percentage of cases missing information on selected questions is shown in Table 3. Fewer than one percent of household members have missing infor- mation on their level of education but three percent are missing data on the year of education. Among female respondents , 0.3 percent did not report a complete birth date (i.e., month and year). These low levels of missing data suggest that there were not significant problems with the questions or the field- work. The data on weight and height are the most likely among the selected information to be missing. Approximately five percent of children are missing this information , which may be the result of the child not being present, refusal, or S?me other reason. By international standards, this percentage is relatively low in comparison to other surveys in which anthropometric measurements are taken (Sommerfelt and Boerma, 1996). 111.3 Characteristics of the Household Population Information on the characteristics of the household population and the survey respondents is provided to assist in the interpretation of the survey findings and to serve as a basic check on the sample imple- mentation (percentages in the text are weighted) . The principal observation unit in the survey is the household. Slightly more than half (53 .9 percent) of the households are urban, one third (34.8 percent) are rural and 11.3 percent are in the interior (unweighted data). There are differences in the number of household members in the three strata: the rural stratum has a mean of 4.12 which is highest, the mean for the urban stratum is 3.91 and the inte- rior stratum has the lowest mean by 3.87. Further analysis of the interior shows great differences between Brokopondo with a mean of 4.37 and the Sipaliwini district with a mean of 3.64 only. In the latter district 16 percent of the households consists of one person, while in the Brokopondo district 9.8 percent are one-person households. Table 4 presents the percent distribution of households by background characteristics. Most of the households contain between two and five persons. Table 5 shows the characteristics of female respondents. Women age 15-19 comprise the greatest per- centage of the sample at 18.6 percent . This percentage declines steadily across age groups until age 45-49 where it is 8 percent. This pattern is typical of countries in the Caribbean. Slightly over 61 per- cent of women in the sample have ever had a birth. The majority of women have had at least some secondary education. Only 8.1 percent have had no education. • • Table 6 shows the characteristics of children under age 5. Almost 53 percent of the children are male and 47.4 percent are female. There are disproportionately more children in the interior than in the other two strata in comparison to the distribution of households by strata. This is presumably due to high- • er fertility in the interior. Approximately 15 percent of mothers of children under age 5 have no edu- cation, a percentage that is two times greater than the overall percentage of women . Sample Characteristics and Data Quaiity • • • Socio-economic characteristics of households To assess the socio-economic situation of the households three indicators are used: the number of rooms, the floor material of the house and the household income, expenditures and food consumption. The number of rooms are highest in the urban strata where the mean is 4.64, for the rural strata this is 4.41 and for the interior the mean is 2.11. It is not justified to compare the interior with the rural or urban area as in housing situation is quite different in the interior. Here, traditionally most families live in huts, with sleeping facilities separated in space from cooking and recreation facilities. The floor material in the urban stratum is by far the most favorable in terms of luxury, as 22 percent of the households have tiles or parquet, as against approximately 8 percent in the rural stratum and only 1 percent in the interior. On the other hand, 'sand, dirt or straw' has the highest relative frequency in the interior (25.5 percent), in the rural stratum there is approximately 1 percent and in the urban stratum there is none. The total household expenditures are highest for the urban and lowest for the interior strata. The mean monthly expenditures are approximately SRG 244,000 in the urban stratum, SRG 200,000 in the rural stratum and SRG 73,000 in the interior. Food expenditures show more or less the same ranking pat- tern . To assess the proportion of households below the poverty line the income poverty ratio was calculated (Menke 1998). Poverty is lowest in the urban stratum with approximately 52 percent of the households living below the poverty line. For the rural stratum this is 61 percent and for the interior the propor- tion below the poverty line is 91 percent. One should be cautious with comparisons between the inte- rior and the urban or rural strata, as this poverty assessment is based on an uni-dimensional index with income and the price of a basic food basket as the principal dimension. However, in the interior many communities depend on subsistence farming for food intake, rather than earning exclusively a money income. Therefore, the income poverty measure could overestimate the proportion of households in the interior that live below the poverty line . Sample Characteristics and Data Quality IV. Results A. Infant and Under-Five Mortality Child mortality The infant mortality rate is the probability of dying before the first birthday. The under-five mortality rate is the probability of dying before the fifth birthday. In MICS, infant and under-five mortality rates are calculated based on an indirect estimation technique (the Brass method). The data used in the esti- mation are: the mean number of children ever born for five year age groups of women from age 15 to 49, and the proportion of these children who are dead, also for five year age groups of women. The technique converts these data into probabilities of dying by taking account of both the mortality risks to which children are exposed and their length of exposure to the risk of dying. The data used for mortality estimation are shown in Table 7. The mean number of children ever born rises from 0.16 among 15-19 year olds to 4.18 among 45-49 year olds as expected. However, the pro- portion of children dead has an irregular pattern. In particular, the proportion of children dead among women aged 25-29 is low and the proportions among younger women appear to be too high. This pat- tern may be affected by the age heaping noted in Figure 1. If some women in their twenties underre- ported their ages but reported the births and deaths of their children correctly then the deaths would effectively be moved downward toward age 15 . In addition, an examination of sex ratios at birth (not shown) suggests that the births of boys may have been underreported among women age 15 tol9 for whom the sex ratio of births is 5 but the ratios are in the plausible range of 1.03 to 1.08 for the remain- ing age groups. • Mortality estimates were obtained using the United Nations QFIVE program. Because no previous . ,, estimates of infant and child mortality for Suriname were available, the North model life table was selected as most appropriate. Estimates of infant and under five mortality for several reference years are plotted in Figure 3. The estimate for reference year 1995 based on the reports of women aged 25- 29 is clearly too low while the estimates based on the reports of women aged 20-24 and 15-19 for more recent years are clearly too high and, in any case, use of estimates based on the two youngest age groups is not usually recommended. Plausible estimates for the most recent years thus cannot be obtained from these data. The estimates for 1996 (precisely 1995 .6) appear to be the most recent fig- ures that can be used with some confidence although they may be slight overestimates of mortality given the downward trend evident in the three previous estimates. Therefore the use of more in-depth analy- sis is required for more recent estimates . Figure 3: Estimates of infant and under-five mortality based on indirect estimation, Suriname 70 65 60 55 50 "* 45 a: 40 35 30 25 20 1983.7 Results -Infant and Under-Five Mortality 1986.9 1990 Reference year 1992.9 1995.5 -o- Infant mortality -a- Under-five mortality • I • • ~;;.· ~ ~~ , :1-; Sun name Mulllplc lndtcator Clu,tcr SUI' cy 2000 ';"~. B. Education Universal access to basic education and the achievement of primary education by the world's children is one of the most important goals of the World Summit for Children. Education is a vital prerequisite for combating poverty, empowering women, protecting children from hazardous and exploitative labor and sexual exploitation, promoting hMman rights and democracy, protecting the environment, and influencing population growth. Early childhood education Almost 37 percent of children aged 36-59 months are attending an organized early childhood education programme, such as kindergarten or community childcare with organized learning activities (Table 9). Approximately equal percentages of girls and boys are attending these programme. There are large variations according to region ranging from 4.3 percent of children in the interior to 51.6 percent in the urban. Slightly more than half of the children are from the urban areas, 40.8 percent from the rural areas and 4.3 percent from the interior. Relatively few children attend at age three (36-47 months) while the majority of children attend at age four (48-59 months). Finally the education of the mother is strongly related to the likelihood that a child will attend an early childhood education programme. The percentage of children attending increases from 12.8 percent to 49.2 percent as the mother's edu- cation increases from none to secondary or higher education. Basic education Overall, almost 78 percent of children is attending primary school (Table 10). In the urban areas, 81.6 percent of children attend school while in rural areas 81.9 percent attend. School attendance in the interior is significantly lower at 61.2 percent (Figure 4). There is virtually no difference between male and female primary school attendance. Figure 4: Percentage of children of primary school age attending primary school, Suriname, 1999-2000 Interior Rural II Urban Sipaliwini Brokopondo Para Marowijne Commewijne Saramacca , ••••••••••••••••• Coronie Nickerie Wanica Paramaribo 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80' 90 100 Percentage Almost 84 percent of children who enter the first grade of primary school eventually reach grade 5 (Table 11). The disadvantage of children in the interior is also demonstrated in Table 11. Only 84.8 percent of children in the interior entering grade 1 reach grade 2 compared to I 00 percent of children in the urban areas and 96.6 percent in the rural areas. In subsequent grades, except for grade 2 reaching grade 3, the percentage of children continuing schooling remains lower in the interior than in other areas although the differences are not as great. Overall , only 64.5 percent of children in the interior who enter grade 1 reach grade 5 in comparison to 92.8 percent of those in urban areas and 82.5 per- cent in rural areas. Results -Education ,.,. ~""".ii~ "''" ". '*""~~ , Sunname Mulllple Ind1cator Cluster Survey 2000 . • • •· · ·;; #• Literacy Overall literacy of the population aged 15 years and older is 86.2 percent. This figure is based on an indicator that measures an elementary form of literacy in terms of the ability to read a newspaper easi- ly. Overall literacy in the interior is far lower by 51.1 percent. Female literacy is lower than male . The overall literacy percentage declines steadily across age groups until age 65+ where it is 62 .8 percent (Table 12). C. Water and Sanitation Use of drinking water Safe drinking water is a basic necessity for good health. Unsafe drinking water can be a significant carrier of diseases such as trachoma, cholera, typhoid and schistosomiasis. Drinking water can also be tainted with chemical, physical and radiological contaminants with harmful effects on human health. In addition to its association with disease, access to drinking water may be particularly impor- tant for women and children, particularly in rural areas, who bear the primary responsibility for car- rying water, often for long distances . Over half of the population uses drinking water that is piped into their dwelling and about 19 percent used water piped into their yard or plot. Rainwater collection and rivers and streams are also important sources of drinking water. • The source of drinking water for the population varies strongly by region (Table 13). In the urban areas, about 91 percent of the population uses drinking water that is piped into their dwelling or into their yard or plot. In the rural areas , 65 percent used piped water, while in contrast, only 18 percent of those residing in the interior have access to piped water. In the rural areas the second most important source of drinking water is rainwater collection . In the interior some 60 percent of the people use river or • stream water (an unsafe source) and most of the remainder collect rainwater. Results -Water and The population using safe drinking water sources are those who use any of the following types of sup- ply; piped water, public tap, borehole/tubewell, protected well, protected spring. Overall, about 73 per- cent of the population has access to safe drinking water- 92 .6 percent in urban areas and 66.6 percent in rural areas. The situation in the interior is considerably worse than in other regions; only 20 percent of the population in this region gets its drinking water from a safe source. Use of sanitation Inadequate disposal of human excreta and personal hygiene is associated with a range of 9iseases including diarrheal diseases and polio . Sanitary means of excreta disposal include: flush toilets connected to sewage systems or septic tanks, other flush toilets , improved pit latrines, and traditional pit latrines . Eighty eight percent of the population in Suriname is living in households with sanitary · means of excreta disposal (Table 14). This percentage is 99.1 in urban areas and 98.3 percent in rural areas . Residents of the interior are much less likely, only 30.5 percent, than others to use sanitary means of excreta disposal. Most of this population, about 68 percent, have no access to sanitary facilities and uses rivers, bush and or fields. In contrast , the most common facilities in other areas of the country are flush toilets with connection to a septic tank. D. Child Malnutrition Nutritional status Children's nutritional status is a reflection of their overall health . When children have access to an adequate food supply and are not exposed to repeated illness, they reach their growth potential and are considered well nourished . In a well-nourished population , there is a standard distribution of height and weight for children under age fi ve. Undernourishment in a population can be gauged by comparing children to this standard dis- tribution . The standard or reference population used here is the NCHS standard, which is recom- mended for use by the World Health Organization . • • • • Weight for age is a measure of both acute and chronic malnutrition. Children whose weight for age is more than two standard deviations below the median of the reference population are considered under- weight while those whose weight for age is more than three standard deviations below the median are classified as severely underweight. Height for age .is a measure of linear growth. Children whose height for age is more than two standard deviations below the median of the reference population are considered short for their age and are clas- sified as moderately or severely stunted. Stunting is a reflection of chronic malnutrition. Those whose height for age is more than three standard deviations below the median are classified as severely stunt- ed. Finally, children whose weight for height is more than two standard deviations below the median of the reference population are classified as moderately or severely wasted while those who fall more than three standard deviations below the median are severely wasted. Wasting is usually the result of a recent nutritional deficiency. The indicator may exhibit significant seasonal shifts associated with changes in the availability of food or disease prevalence. Slightly over 13 percent of children under age five in Suriname are underweight and 2.1 percent are classified as severely underweight (Table 15). About one in ten children are stunted or too short for their age and 6.5 percent are wasted or too thin for their height. Stunting occurs more frequently in the interior (18.4 percent), and wasting more often in the rural areas (7 .7 percent). These differences could be explained by the geographical distribution of the different ethnic groups in Suriname. People of Asian descent, who tend to be slimmer, live more in the rural areas, whereas people from Maroon and indigenous descent who tend to be shorter than average, live in the interior. Those whose mothers have secondary or higher education are the least likely to be underweight and stunted compared to children of mothers with less education. The age pattern shows that a higher percentage of children aged 12-23 months are undernourished in comparison to children who are younger and older (Figure 5). This pattern is expected and is related to the age at which many chil- dren cease to be breastfed and are exposed to contamination in water, food, and environment. Boys appear to be slightly more likely to be underweight, stunted, and wasted than girls. 20 18 16 14 Q) 12 Ol ~ Q) 10 e Q) a. 8 6 4 2 0 Figure 5: Percentage of under-five children who are undernourished, Suriname, 1999-2000 0-6 mos. 6-11 mos. 12-23 mos. 24-35 mos. 36-47 mos . 48-59mos. . Underweight ., Stunted _.,_Wasted ,:, . ' '· . . •.;. . • ; Results -Child Health Breastfeeding Breastfeeding for the first few years of life protects children from infection, provides an ideal source of nutrients, and is economical and safe. However, many mothers stop breastfeeding too soon, and there are often pressures to switch to infant formula, which can contribute to growth faltering and micro- nutrient malnutrition and is unsafe if clean water is not readily available. UNICEF recommends that: children be exclusively breastfed for about the first six months of life breastfeeding should be complemented with appropriate foods from the age of around six months children continue to be breastfed for two or more years. In Table 16, breastfeeding status is based on women's reports of children's consumption in the 24 hours prior to the interview. Exclusive breastfeeding refers to children who receive only breast milk and vita- mins, mineral supplements, or medicine. Complementary feeding refers to children who receive breast milk and solid or semi-solid food. Approximately 13 percent of children aged 0-3 months are exclusively breastfed . At age 6-9 months, 24.5 percent of children are receiving breast milk and solid foods. By age 12-15 months , 42.9 percent of children are still being breastfed and by age 20-23 months, 11.1 percent are still breastfed (Figure 6). 100 90 80 70 & 60 ttl c 50 Q) ~ Q) 40 0. 30 20 10 0 Figure 6: Percent distribution of children by breastfeeding status, Suriname, 1999-2000 3 5 7 9 11 13 15 17 19 21 23 25 27 29 31 33 35 Iii Exclusively breastfed Iii Breast milk and wa1er only Ill Breast milk and liquids only Breast milk and solid/mushy food o Not breastfed Low birth weight Infants who weigh less than 2500 grams (2.5 kg.) at birth are categorized as low birth weight babies. Since many infants are not weighed at birth and those who are weighed may be a biased sample of all births, reported birth weight cannot be used to estimate the prevalence of l<;>w birth weight among all children. Therefore, the percentage of births weighing below 2500 grams is estimated from two items in the questionnaire: the mother's assessment of the child's size at birth (i.e., very small, smaller than average, average, larger than average, very large) and the mother's recall of the child's weight or the weight as recorded on a health card if the child was weighed at birth. Slightly over 77 percent of births in the Suriname MICS were weighed at birth. First, the fwo items are cross-tabulated for those children who were weighed at birth to obtain the pro- portion of births in each category of size who weighed less than 2500 grams. This proportion is then multiplied by the total number of children falling in the size category to obtain the estimated number of children in each size category who were of low birth weight. The numbers for each size category are summed to obtain the total number of low birth weight children. This number is divided by the total number of live births to obtain the percentage with low birth weight. • • • • • • ., ~~:"::'?. Surmame Mult1ple IndJcator Cluster Survey 2000 "'~~~:z\!::1'1'; ~ In Suriname, approximately 11.4 percent of infants are estimated to weigh Jess than 2500 grams at birth (Table 20). This percentage is somewhat higher than the average (9 percent) for the Latin America and Caribbean region (UNICEF, 2000). The prevalence of low birth weight births varies across the districts from 5.5 percent to 17 percent. In the urban and rural areas however it does not vary much. The percent of low birth in the interior again is somewhat lower than the other two areas . No variation was noted due to seem difference in mother's education . The fact that Suriname is a country with a population of large cultural and ethnic variety, thus not homogeneous, is probably of influence in this method of estimation. We clearly see an overestimation of low birth weight in 2 districts, Coronie and Commewijne, where 100 percent of the children were weighed. The method gave an overestimation of respectively 5.5 percent in Coronie and 17 percent in Commewijne. E. Child Health Immunization coverage According to UNICEF and WHO guidelines, a child should receive a BCG vaccination to protect against tuberculosis , three doses of DPT to protect against diptheria, pertussis, and tetanus, three doses of polio vaccine, and a measles vaccination by the age of 12 months. In Suriname, it is recommended that children be given the first doses of DPT and Polio at three months of age, the second doses at four months of age and the third doses at five months of age. The fourth doses are boosters that are given at 18 months. Measles vaccination is recommended at 12 months. Vaccinations against tuberculosis (BCG) are not given in Suriname. By the age of 12 months, chil- dren should receive three doses of DPT and Polio, and the measles vaccine . In MICS Suriname 2000, mothers were asked to provide vaccination cards for children under the age of five. Vaccination information was copied by the interviewer from the cards onto the MICS ques- tionnaire . Overall, 85 percent of children have health cards (Table 22) . If the child did not have a card, the mother was asked several questions about whether or not the child had received each of the vaccinations and, for DPT and Polio, how many times . Table 22 shows the percentages of children age 12 to 23 months that received each of the vaccinations according to either the vaccination card or the mother's report. Slightly over half of children aged 12 to 23 months are fully vaccinated (i.e., have received three doses of DPT and polio, and one dose of measles). The percentage fully vaccinated is greatest in urban areas (57.7 percent), somewhat lower in rural areas (53 percent), and lowest in the interior (50 percent). Vaccination coverage also varies by the education of the mother. Only 41 percent of children of mothers with no education are fully vaccinated compared to 48 percent of those whose mothers have primary schooling and 61.2 percent of those whose mothers have secondary or higher education . Approximately 89 percent of children age 12-23 have received the first dose of DPT. This percentage declines for subsequent doses to 84.4 percent for the second dose, 79.1 percent for the third dose and 52.4 percent for the fourth dose. Similarly, 87.8 percent of children received Polio 1 and this declines to 51.8 percent by the fourth dose. The coverage for measles vaccine is lower than for the other vac- cines at 60.2 percent. SuJJil.tlllL' :\ l ult1pk IIHJJ'-4ttor Clu-.;ter Surh·) :woo "'~ ~z:~J,.,,1Pl!P? ~W'-.P' ~ R~>IO -Cidld H••"h 100 80 CD Cl 60 s c: CD !::! 40 ~ 20 0 Figure 7: Percentage of children 12-23 months who received immunizations by age 12 months, Suriname, 1999-2000 DPT • Dose 1 . Dose2 Polio 0 Dose3 Measles • Dose4 Diarrhea Dehydration caused by diarrhea is a major cause of mortality among children in Suriname. Home management of diarrhea - either through oral rehydration salts (ORS) or a recommended home fluid (RHF) - can prevent many of these deaths. Preventing dehydration and malnutrition by increasing fluid intake and continuing to feed the child are also important strategies for managing diarrhea. • In the MICS questionnaire, mothers (or caretakers) were asked to report whether their child had had diarrhea in the two weeks prior to the survey. If so, the mother was asked a series of questions about what the child had to drink and eat during the episode and whether this was more or less than the child usually ate and drank. Overall, 14.8 percent of under five children had diarrhea in the two weeks pre- • ceding the survey (Table 23). Diarrhea prevalence was significantly higher in the interior at 25.6 percent than in other regions. The peak of diarrhea prevalence occurs in the weaning period, among children age 6-23 months. Table 23 also shows the percentage of children receiving various types of recommended liquids during the episode of diarrhea. Since mothers were able to name more than one type of liquid, the percentages do not necessarily add to 100. One in four children received breast milk while they had diarrhea. Children under age 12 months are especially likely to have received breast milk. About 26 percent of children received gruel and 35.5 percent received ORS. Children of mothers with secondary education appear to be less likely than other children to receive ORS and breast milk, but more likely to receive gruel. Approximately six in ten children with diarrhea received one or more of the recommended home treatments (i.e., were treated with ORS or RHF). Slightly less than one third of under five children with diarrhea drank more than usual while 65.1 per- cent drank the same or less (Table 24). About 71 percent ate somewhat less, the same, or more than usual while 24.5 percent ate much less than usual or none. Overall, only 24.2 percent of children with diarrhea received increased fluids and continued eating as recommended. Acute respiratory infection Acute lower respiratory infections, particularly pneumonia, are one of the leading causes of child deaths in Suriname. In the MICS questionnaire , children with acute respiratory infection are defined as those who had an illness with a cough accompanied by rapid or difficult breathing and whose symp- toms were due to a problem in the chest, or both a problem in the chest and a blocked nose, or whose mother did not know the source of the problem. Slightly over 4 percent of under five children had an acute respiratory infection in the two weeks prior to the survey according to these criteria (Table 25). Of these, 35.4 percent were taken to a doctor for treatment, and 18.9 percent were taken to a nurse or health assistant. About 5 percent were taken to a specialist and 5 percent to a family member, friend, or neighbor. Fewer than five percent were taken to any other type of health provider. Overall, almost 58 percent of children with ARI were taken to an appropriate health provider (i.e., doctor, specialist, nurse/health assistant, hospital). • • • • ~ ·~#Y~ ' o " "~ \ ,,, ~ . Sun name Multiple lnthc.!tor Cluster Survey 2000 , IMCI initiative The Integrated Management of Childhood Illnesses (IMCI) is a programme developed by UNICEF and WHO that combines strategies for control and treatment of five major killers of children - acute lower respiratory tract infections, diarrheal dehydration, measles, malaria, and malnutrition. The pro- gramme focuses on the improvement of case management skills by health workers, improvement of the health system, and improvement of family and community practices in the prevention and early man- agement of childhood illnesses. Appropriate home management of illness is one component of IMCI. The approach teaches mothers that appropriate home management of diarrhea or any other illness requires giving more fluids and continuing to feed sick children as they are normally fed. Table 26 presents information on the drinking and eating behavior of sick children. Almost half of children were reported to have had diarrhea or some other illness in the two weeks preceding the sur- vey. Of these, 20.5 percent drank more liquids during the illness and 75.2 perc'ent continued eating (i.e., ate somewhat less, the same, or more). Overall, only 15.3 percent of ill children received increased fluids and continued eating as recommended under the IMCI programme. Promoting knowledge among caretakers about when it is appropriate to seek care for ill children is another important component of the IMCI programme. In the Suriname MICS, mothers or caretakers of children were asked to name all of the symptoms that would cause them to take a child to a health facility right away. The most common response, given by 74.5 percent of mothers, was that they would take their child to a health facility right away if he/she developed a fever (Table 27). About 14 percent said that the child becoming sicker would cause them to take the child to a health facility and 12.6 percent mentioned difficulty breathing. Between 4.8 and 8 percent of mothers cited an inability to breastfeed, fast breath- ing, blood in stools, and drinking poorly as reasons for taking a child to a health facility right away . Among the districts, mothers in the Sipaliwini and, to a lesser extent, in Saramacca are more likely than mothers in other districts to know the signs for seeking care immediately. Overall, almost 41 percent of mothers in the Sipaliwini know at least two signs for seeking care compared to 25 percent in the Saramacca, 24.4 percent in Nickerie, and 17.8 percent or less in the remaining districts. These region- al differences are also reflected in the urban-rural, interior and educational differentials. Mothers from the interior and those with no education were more likely to mention at least two signs for seeking care than other mothers . Malaria Malaria is a leading cause of death of children under age five in Suriname. It also contributes to ane- mia in children and is a common cause of school absenteeism. Preventive measures, especially the use of mosquito nets treated with insecticide, can dramatically reduce malaria mortality rates among chil- dren. In areas where malaria is common, international recommendations suggest treating any fever in children as if it were malaria and immediately giving the child a full course of recommended anti- malarial tablets. Children with severe malaria symptoms, such as fever or convulsions, should be taken to a health facility. Also, children recovering from malaria should be given extra liquids and food and should continue breastfeeding. The MICS questionnaire incorporates questions on the use ofbednets among children. In the Suriname MICS, these questions were only asked in the interior since these are considered the areas of highest malaria risk. Slightly over 72 percent of under five children slept under a bednet the night prior to the survey interview (Table 28). This percentage declines steadily with age. The vast majority of infants under 6 months of age (91.1 percent) sleep under a bednet compared to 68.6 percent of children aged 12- 23 months and 61.7 percent of children aged 48-59 months. Most of the bednets are not treated with insecticide, however. Overall, only about five percent of the bednets used are impregnated with insec- ticide. Results -Child Health F. HIV/AIDS AIDS knowledge One of the most important strategies for reducing the rate of HIV I AIDS infection is the promotion of accurate knowledge of how AIDS is transmitted and how to prevent transmission. Among women aged 12-49 in Suriname, 92.6 percent have ever heard of AIDS (Table 30). This percentage is very high in urban areas (96.2 percent) and somewhat lower in rural areas (92 percent). The interior has the low- est percentage (82 percent). Women in the MICS were read several statements about means of HIV/AIDS transmission and asked to state whether they believed the statements were true. Approximately 60 percent believe that having only one uninfected sex partner can prevent HIV transmission. Slightly over 58 percent believe that using a condom every time one has sex can prevent HIV transmission and 43.3 percent agreed that abstaining from sex prevents HIV transmission. Overall, almost 36 percent knew all three ways and 66.8 percent were aware of at least one of the means of preventing transmission. Accurate knowledge of the means of HIV/AIDS transmission is substantially less among women in the interior than among other women. Also, education is a very important factor in AIDS knowledge. The percentage who know all three means of preventing transmission is more than seven times greater among women with secondary or more education compared to women with no education. Differences across age groups are not particularly large; the percentage of women who know all three means ranges from 32.9 percent among 20-24 year olds to 40.6 percent among 35-39 year olds. Approximately 56 percent of women correctly stated that AIDS can not be transmitted by supernatu- ral means whereas 47.1 percent stated that AIDS can't be spread by mosquito bites (Table 31). Almost seven in ten women correctly believe that a healthy looking person can be infected (69.1 percent). Women in the interior are more likely to believe misconceptions about AIDS transmission than other women. Women in the urban region are most likely to recognize all three misconceptions. Still, only a little less than half (46.1 percent) of these women correctly identified all three misconceptions. Slightly over 72 percent of women in Suriname know that AIDS can be transmitted from mother to child (Table 32). When asked specifically about the mechanisms through which mother to child trans- mission can take place, 67.4 percent said that transmission during pregnancy was possible, 48.5 per- cent said that transmission at delivery was possible, and only 44.1 percent agreed that AIDS can be transmitted through breast milk. Slightly less than one in three women knew all three modes of trans- mission (31.3 percent). This percentage does not vary much across background categories. The MICS survey also attempted to measure discriminatory attitudes towards people living with HIV/AIDS. To this end, respondents were asked whether they agreed with two questions. The first asked whether a teacher who has the AIDS virus but is not sick should be allowed to continue teaching in school. The second question asked whether the respondent would buy food from a shopkeeper or food seller who the respondent knew to be infected with AIDS. The results are presented in Table 33. Almost half of the respondents believe that a teacher with HIV I AIDS should not be allowed to work. This percentage is highest in the urban region at 58.7 percent and lowest in the interior at 25.8 per- cent. Urban women and those with secondary or higher education are more likely to express this dis- criminatory attitude than rural women and those with no or primary education. About 14 percent of women would not buy food from a person infected with AIDS. Interestingly, this measure shows a • • different regional pattern than the first question. Women in the interior are the most likely and women • in the urban region are the second most likely to express a discriminatory attitude on this question. Overall, 49.3 percent of women agree with at least one of the discriminatory statements. • • • " t~:-:::1' '?-' " ~:;i? , Sunnumc \lu!t.p!e lnJ ' r 'l!ll' 21 11 j A~ ::·.;'""' , Table 34 summarizes information from two previous tables on AIDS knowledge (Tables 30 and 31) . The second column shows the percentage of women who know all three means of preventing HIV trans- mission- having one faithful uninfected partner, using a condom every time, and abstaining from sex. About 36 percent of women know all three ways. The third column of the table shows the percentage of women who correctly identified all three misconceptions about HIV transmission- that HIV can be transmitted through supernatural means, that it can be transmitted through mosquito bites, and that a healthy looking person cannot be infected. Slightly over 35 percent of women correctly identified these misconceptions. Finally, the fourth column of the table shows the percentage of women who have 'sufficient knowledge' of HIVIAIDS transmission. These are women who know all three ways of pre- venting HIV transmission and correctly identified all three misconceptions. Only 20.2 percent of women aged 12-49 fall into this category. Knowledge of HIVIAIDS transmission varies dramatically by level of education (Figure 8). Women with secondary or higher education are almost eight times more likely to know all three ways to pre- vent transmission than women with no education. They are also about eight times more likely to cor- rectly identify all three misconceptions about AIDS and about 15 times more likely to have sufficient know ledge of HIV I AIDS transmission 60 50 40 (]) Ol ell c 30 (]) ~ (]) a. 20 10 0 Figure 8: Percentage of women aged 12-49 who have sufficient knowledge of HIV/AIDS transmission, Suriname, 1999-2000 ~ None • Primary • secondary Know 3 way's to prevent Correctly identify 3 misconceptions Have sufficient Knowledge HIV transmission about HIV transmission AIDS testing Voluntary testing for AIDS, accompanied by counseling, allows those infected to seek health care and to prevent the infection of others. Testing is particularly important for pregnant women who can then take steps to prevent infecting their babies. The indicators shown in Table 35 are designed to moni- tor whether women are aware of places to get tested for HIV I AIDS, the extent to which they have been tested, and the extent to which those tested have been told the result of the test. In some places, a rel- atively large proportion of people who are tested do not return to get their results due to fear of hav- ing the disease, fear that their privacy will be violated, or other reasons. Fifty six percent of women of reproductive age in Suriname know a place to get tested for AIDS. Women living in the urban region are most likely to know a place, followed by those in the rural region and the interior, respectively. Only 18.6 percent of women with no education know of a place to get tested compared to 39 percent of women with primary school education and 70.3 percent of women with secondary or higher education. Results -HJV/AIDS About 10 percent of women have been tested for AIDS. Again, this percentage is highest in urban region at 12 percent, lowest in the interior at 7.6 percent and 8.7 percent in the rural region. The vast majority of women who have been tested were told the result, however, there is some variation across regions, age groups, and education levels . Among the regions, women in the interior are least likely to have been told their result. Adolescent women (age 15-19) are the least likely of any age group to have been tested and least likely to know the result. Finally, women with no education are less likely than women with more education to be tested and least likely to have been told the result of the test. G. Reproductive Health Contraception Current use of contraception was reported by 42.1 percent of married or in union women (Table 36). The most popular method is the pill which is used by one in four married women in Suriname. The next most popular method is female sterilization, which accounts for 9.3 percent of married women. Between two and three percent of women reported use of the IUD, injectables, and the condom. Fewer than one percent use periodic abstinence, withdrawal, male sterilization, vaginal methods, or the lactational amenorrhea method (LAM). Contraceptive prevalence is highest in the urban region at 51 .2 percent and in the rural region at 45.1 percent. In the interior, contraceptive use is rare; only 7.1 percent of married women reported using any method. Adolescents are far less likely to use contraception than older women. Only 23.4 per- cent of married or in union women aged 15-19 currently use a method of contraception compared to 39.9 percent of 20-24 year olds and 44.5 percent of older women. . I I I I Women's education level is strongly associated with contraceptive prevalence. The percentage of • women using any method of contraception rises from 8.9 percent among those with no education to 32.6 percent among women with primary education, and to 52.7 percent among women with secondary or higher education. In addition to differences in prevalence, the method mix varies by edu- cation. About half of contraceptive users with no or primary education use the pill and 12.6 percent are sterilized. In contrast, 32.1 percent of contraceptive users with secondary or higher education use the pill and 10.3 percent are sterilized. Prenatal care Quality prenatal care can contribute to the prevention of maternal mortality by detecting and managing potential complications and risk factors, including pre-eclampsia, anemia, and sexually transmitted diseases. Antenatal care also provides opportunities for women to learn the danger signs of pregnancy and delivery, to be immunized against tetanus, to learn about infant care, and be treated for existing conditions, such as ml;llaria and anemia. Female respondents who had had a birth in the year prior to the Suriname MICS were asked whether they had received antenatal care for the birth and, if so, what type of person provided the care. If the woman saw more than one type of provider, all were recorded in the questionnaire. Table 38 presents the percent distribution of women with a birth in the year prior to the MICS by the type of personnel who delivered antenatal care. If more than one provider was mentioned by the respondent, she is cat- egorized as having seen the most skilled person she mentioned. VIrtually all women in Suriname receive some type of prenatal care and 90.6 percent receive antenatal care from skilled personnel (doctor, nurse, midwife, village health worker). A little over half of women with a birth in the year prior to the survey received antenatal care from a doctor, 21.7 percent from a vil- lage health worker, 6.3 percent from a nurse, and 12.2 percent from a midwife (Figure 9). Note that villa~ health workers are only used for prenatal care in Brokopondo and Sipaliwini where almost all • women received care from them. In the other regions, doctors are most likely to provide prenatal care. • • • Figure 9: Percent distribution of women with a birth in the last year by type of personnel delivering antenatal care, Suriname, 1999-2000 Village health workers 22% Midwife 12% Assistance at delivery Other 9% None 0% Nurse 6% The provision of delivery assistance by trained attendants can greatly improve outcomes for mothers and children by the use of technically appropriate procedures, and accurate and speedy diagnosis and treatment of complications . Skilled assistance at delivery is defined as assistance provided by a doc- tor, nurse, or midwife. About 85 percent of births occurring in the year prior to the MICS survey were delivered by skilled personnel (Table 39) . This percentage is highest in Commewijne at 100 percent and lowest in Brokopondo at 42.3 percent. J'he more educated a woman is, the more likely she is to have delivered with the assistance of a skilled person. More than one in three of the births in the year prior to the MICS survey were delivered with assistance by a midwife. Doctors assisted with the delivery of 24 percent of births and nurses assisted with 9.3 percent. Village health workers delivered about 13 .6 percent of births, but these births occurred only among women in the ditricts of Sipaliwini and Brokopondo where the type of personnel providing delivery assistance is noticeably different from the other regions . H. ChildRights Birth registration The International Convention on the Rights of the Child states that every child has the right to a name and a nationality and the right to protection from being deprived of his or her identity. Birth registra- tion is a fundamental means of securing these rights for children. The births of 94 .9 percent of chil- dren under five years in Suriname have been registered (Table 40). This percentage is highest in the districts of Coronie and Para at respectively 100 and 99 percent and lowest in the district of Nickerie at 82 .7 percent. There are no significant variations in birth registration across sex, age , or education . Among those whose births are not registered, cost, travel distance , and lack of knowledge do not appear to be the main reasons . Orphanhood and living arrangements of children Children who are orphaned or living away from their parents may be at increased risk of impoverishment, discrimination , denial of property rights and rights to inheritance, various forms of ahuse, neglect, and exploitation of their labor or sexuality. Monitoring the level of orphanhood and the li ving arrange- ments of children assists in identifying those who may be at risk and in tracking changes over time . Results -C hild Rights ' f'J";,;.,._~, """' Sunn.tme Multtple lndtcator Cluster Survey 2000 :~~~;;;b:"li;x ~-"~it:Jtlw.r In Suriname , 62 .2 percent of children aged 0-14 are living with both parents (Table 41). A substantial percentage - 22.5 percent - are living with their mother only although their father is • alive. About 7 percent are living with neither parent although both parents are alive. Children who Results -Child Rights are not living with a biological parent comprise 7.8 percent and children who have one or both parents dead amount to 3.5 percent of all children aged 0-14. Older children are more likely to live away without their biological parents than younger children . While only 3.5 percent of children under age five are not living with a biological parent, 10.8 percent of children aged 10-14 do so. The situation of children in the interior differs from that of other children in Suriname. In the interior, less than half of children live with both parents . Slightly over 34 percent live with their mother only but their father is alive and a relatively large proportion (10.4 percent) are living with neither parent. This pat- tern is most likely due to labor migration of men and, to some extent women, from the interior to other regions and neighboring countries. • • !Pi*'',, ' ,~'f'J,~'' , " Sun name Multtple lnd1cator Cluster Survey 2000 ~ ,r'if~w,"' . Appendix A: Sample Design Table 1: Listed dwellings per cluster, stratum, district and ressort ** STRATUM DISTRICT RESSORT CLUSTER CLUSTER Dwellings listed Dwellings listed nr name per cluster per district Urban Paramaribo Blauwgrond 3 St.Helenaschool I Louis Goveiastr. 230 Urban Paramaribo Blauwgrond 6 Openbare school Clevia Pisangrodjostr II 394 Urban Paramaribo Blauwgrond 10 Jongens internaat I Hk.Gemini-/ Mercuriusstr. 400 Urban Paramaribo Blauwgrond 13 O.S. Tourtonne 3 Max Woiskiestr II 298 Urban Paramaribo Blauwgrond 17 Nene Creche Hk. Johannes Vermeer/ Joz.lsraelstr. 244 Urban Paramaribo Blauwgrond 20 O.S. Blauwgrond 4 Const. Vredestr 234 Urban Paramaribo Munderbuiten 24 Piaralalschool Hk.Nw.Charlesburgweg/Boontjediefstr 270 Urban Paramaribo Munderbuiten 28 Swami Wir Jajandschool Denemarkenstr.l 264 Urban Paramaribo Munderbuiten 33 St.Ciemensschool 3 Karamatalistraat 307 Urban Paramaribo Munderbuiten 37 O.S. Munderbuiten 2 Munderweg 233 Urban Paramaribo Centrum 41 Oranjeschool Gravensstr. 394 Urban Paramaribo Centrum 45 O.S .Petunia links 2 Residastr/Giadiolenstr 262 Urban Paramaribo Centrum 49 A.Burgosschool Wanicastraat 156 164 Urban Paramaribo Centrum 52 Danszaal Halden Hk.Rust en Vrede/Kopstr. 168 Urban Paramaribo Centrum 56 Jeugdcentrum I Dr. S. Redmondstr 5-7 206 Urban Paramaribo Centrum 60 Kong Ming Tong Sang Domineestr 35 142 Urban Paramaribo Centrum 64 Maria Hartmanschool 2 Zonnebloemstr 35-41 332 • Urban Paramaribo Centrum 69 Shri Vishnuschool Vergeet Mij Nietstr. 201 Urban Paramaribo Beekhuizen 72 E.T.O. Corantijnstr 72 284 Urban Paramaribo Beekhuizen 76 O.S. Beekhuizen Gronfolostr 210 Urban Paramaribo Beekhuizen 81 Leeuwinschool I Fisherweg Djoemoeweg 251 Urban Paramaribo Beekhuizen 85 Letitiaschool 2 Awaradam 14 177 Urban Paramaribo Rainville 89 Dennertschool I Archillesstr 4-6 311 Urban Paramaribo Rainville 93 Petrus Donderschool Hk.Hofstede Crull'l./Wilhelminastr. 203 Urban Paramaribo Rainville 97 N.G.V.B. Koninginnestr 1-3 231 Urban Paramaribo Rainville 102 Christelijke school Gravenstr 134 381 Urban Paramaribo Rainville 106 Christelijk Pedagogisch lnstituut 2 Nengrekopoestr 299 Urban Paramaribo Rainville 110 J.T.H. Wenzelschool 2 Rattan Oemrawsinghstr 1 195 Urban Paramaribo Rainville 114 Dennertschool I Archillesstr 4-6 217 Urban Paramaribo Latour 118 Dep.Berreaschool Hk.Tapai/Pokopawstr 166 Urban Paramaribo Latour 122 Mulo Latour I Mastklimmenstr 191 Urban Paramaribo Latour 127 O.S. Majosteeg 2- Majosteeg 3 176 Urban Paramaribo Latour 131 St.Herman Jozefschool 2 aid Franklynweg 111 Urban Paramaribo Latour 136 Kamtaschool Hk. Rust en Werk 2/ Latourweg 100 Urban Paramaribo Latour 140 P.D.T. Ramadharschool 3 Hk. Bakki-Agenorisaweg 233 Urban Paramaribo Livomo 141 Bereaschool Grensweg 265 Urban Paramaribo Livorno 147 O.S. Livomo I Botromankiweg/P.Tewarieweg 263 Urban Paramaribo Pontbuiten 154 Stichting Koela 2 Frederikshoopweg 98 160 Urban Paramaribo Pontbuiten 158 Taborschool 2 Nw. Zorgweg 52 191 Urban Paramaribo Pontbuiten 163 O.S. WintiWai· l Bronkolonkostr. 288 Urban Paramaribo Tammenga 167 O.S. Mottonshoop 2-2 Keskesmakastr 304 • Urban - Paramaribo Tammenga 171 O.S. Tammenga I Asidonhopostr 4-8 257 Urban Paramaribo Tammenga 175 O.S. Leysweg 2 Leysweg 103 208 Urban Paramaribo Flora 179 L.Simonschool Gemenelandsweg 207 263 Urban Paramaribo Flora 183 L.B.G.O. Balona Emielaan 94 276 Urban Paramaribo Flora 187 Huize Ashiana Lala Rookhweg 91 112 Appendix A: Sample Design 35 STRATUM DISTRICT RES SORT Dwellings listed Dwellings listed per cluster per district 419 36 Appendix A: Sample Design f • • • 1:""'~7"'' ;'~ > ~""' IF~~ e :t %, ', ,, Sun name Multiple lndJCatOJ Cluster Survey 2000 ~J._ !,._ STRATUM DISTRICT RES SORT CLUSTER CLUSTER Dwellings listed Dwellings listed nr name per cluster per district Rural Commewijne Nw Amsterdam 351 O.S. te Nw. Amsterdam 151 Rural Commewijne Bakkie 356 O.S. te Bakki 56 Rural Commewijne Meerzorg 358 O.S. te Meerzorg 1-1 291 Rural Commewijne Meerzorg 360 O.S. te Meerzorg 11-2 278 Rural Commewijne Alkmaar 365 O.S. te Marienburg 160 Rural Commewijne Alkmaar 369 O.S. te Alkmaar 225 Rural Commewijne Tamanredjo 373 O.S. te De Hulp 140 1301 Interior Marowijne Galibi 381 R.K. school te Galibi 129 Rural Marowijne Moengo 382 Recreatiezaal Moengo 367 Rural Marowijne Moen go 384 H.L.Waaldijkschool te Moengo 438 Rural Marowijne Moen go 387 School te Abadoekondre 305 Interior Marowijne Wanhatti 389 Intemaat te Tamarin 54 Rural Marowijne Patamacca 390 Gemeenschapshuis te Ovia Olo 132 1425 Rural Para Noord Para 394 St. Ferdinandschool Copieweg I 293 Rural Para Noord Para 396 St.Bernhardschool Bemharddorp 236 Rural Para Oost Para 400 G .L.O .Einaarschool Paranam 240 Interior Para Zuid Para 404 G.L.O. school E.B.G. Bersaba 226 Interior Para Carolina 407 Recreatiezaal Pierre Kondre 69 1064 Interior Brokopondo* Sarakreek 413 O.S. Sarakreek 367 Interior Brokopondo* Centrum 415 O.S. Brokopondo Centrum 747 1114 Interior Sipaliwini* Tapanahoni 419 Ampomatapoe 332 Interior Sipaliwini* Tapanahoni 424 Man lobi 637 Interior Sipaliwini* Tapanahoni 427 Drietabbetje 898 Interior Sipaliwini* Boven Suriname 431 Abenaston 924 Interior Sipaliwini* Boven Suriname 434 Pikienslee 582 Interior Sipaliwini* Boven Suriname 436 Masai kriki 356 Interior Sipaliwini* Boven Suriname 440 Botopasi 219 Interior Sipaliwini* Bov. Saramacca 443 Poesoegroenoe 154 Interior Sipaliwini* Bov. Saramacca 448 K wamalasemoetoe 274 4376 TOTAL NUMBER 123 33637 * * Data in this table constitute the final sampling frame for drawing the sample for the MICS in Suriname * For these districts in the interior the patient's list of the Medical Mission was used as a sampling frame Appendix A: Sample Design 37 Table 2: Response rates and final weights • COUNTRY SAMPLE Stratum Area Sampling Design weight Number of Number of fraction clusters completed clusters selected in the stratum in the stratum Vl HI6 V2 V3 V4 V5 URBAN 1 0.13912 7.188091 70 70 RURAL 2 0.14217 7.033833 38 38 INTERIOR 3 0 .08646 11 .565908 15 15 TOTAL 123 123 • • 38 Appendix A: Sample Design > 1i = c. ;;;· ;> en 3 '*' ~ c§. w ~ • Table 2: Response rates and final weights (continued) Number of Number of Number of Number of Number of households households households households households with a complete with a refusal not at home not found or with an other interview in in the stratum in the stratum destroyed result the stratum in the stratum in the stratum (HilO=l) (HI10=2) (Hll0=3) (Hll0=4) (Hll0=5) V6 V7 V8 V9 VlO 2313 82 146 4 54 1495 14 45 1 21 485 3 2 0 23 4293 99 193 5 98 . ----- WOMEN Number of Number of Raw Wei~ted Normalized eligible women eligible women woman's num rof woman's in the stratum with a weight women with a weight complete complete interview interview in the stratum in the stratum (Hill) (HI12) V16 V17 VIS V19 WMWEIGH1 2698 2392 1.096328 2622.42 0.991091 1813 1640 0.996414 1634.12 0.900767 544 523 1.495469 782.13 1.351918 5055 4555 5038.67 • • HOUSEHOLDS Number of Total number Number of Raw Weighted Normalized Weighted households of households households household number of household number of with in selected found weight households weight households the stratum · in the stratum in the stratum with a complete with a complete interview interview (Hl10=6) (HilO= 1+2+3) in the stratum in the stratum VlOA Vll V12 Vl3 V14 HHWEIGHT V15 1 2600 2542 7 .899752 18272.13 0.971985 2248.20 3 1579 1557 7 .325537 10951.68 0.901334 1347.49 0 513 490 11.685144 5667 .30 1.437740 697.30 4692 4589 34891.10 4293.00 CHILDREN Wei~ted Number of Number of Raw Wei~ted Normalized Wei~ted num rof eligible eligible children children's num r of children's num rof women with a children with a weight children with weight children with complete in the stratum complete a complete a complete interview interview interview interview in the stratum in the stratum in the stratum in the stratum (HI13) (HI14) V20 V21 V22 V23 V24 CHWEIGHT V25 2370.69 929 889 1.015719 902.97 0.941421 836.92 1477.26 658 633 0.936932 593.08 0.868397 549.70 707.05 374 363 1.481308 537.71 1.372952 498.38 4555.00 1961 1885 2033.77 1885.00 •w ' Sun name Multiple lndtcator Clu;ter S<trve) 2000 . "~ . ~ Jf~A Appendix B: List of Personnel Involved in the Suriname MICS Categorie Personnel Type Personnel Number !.Administrative staff 7 2 .Field workers ·Interviewers 65 ·Supervisors 11 ·Editors Field editor 7 Office editor 7 ·Drivers 7 ·Listing 23 ·Mapping 6 3 .Data-entry typists 10 40 Appendix A: Sample Design • • • MICS QUESTIONNAIRE SURINAME ALGEMENE VRAGENLIJST District: ------ Clusternr: ------ Huishoudnr: ----- Enqueteursnr: __ _ 13 december 1999 0 ~ • 0 1 "' 4 ~% •'V"j~~l Surm,Jmc Multiple lnd1catbr Cluster Survey 2000 o • ·' ,\'J :;:""'lF'l\ll , 0 ~., " ';~,.,~:~i{' ~ ENQUETEUR: GEEF EEN KORTE INTRODUCTIE OVER HET ONDERZOEK HUISHOUD INFORMATIE 1. Clusteroummer: I 2. Huisboudnummer: ----- • 3. Datum interview: I _ !_ -- I 4. Enqueteursnummer: -- 4a.Adres: 4b. Aantal buisboudens binnen wooing: 5. Vooroaam boofd van bet buisbouden: 6. Stratum: . Urbaan . . . . l 7. District: { 4- Ruraal . .2 Paramaribo . . . . . l Commewijne . . . 6 "·· B innenland . 3 Wanica . 2 Marowijne . . . 7 Nickerie . 3 Para . 8 Coronie . . 4 Brokopondo . . 9 Saramacca . 5 SipaliwinL. . 10 8. Materiaal van de vloer van 9. Hoeveel kamers zijn er in bet bois? (afgeronde bet bois: kamers waarin men woont, voorkamer meegerekend) Tegels . ! Een kamer met 2 functies en zonder scheidsmuur , is I kamer Plankenlcement. . 2 Zand/riet/papaja . . . . . .3 kamers Parketvloer . . . . . . . . A Ander materiaal nl .5 9a. Hoeveel beeft u de afgelopen maand uitgegeven aan voeding? Sf . 9b. Hoe groot waren uw totale buisbouduitgaven de afgelopen maand? (dus voeding en aile andere benodigdbeden) Sf . . . . . . . 9c. Hoe groot is bet totale (scboon ontvangen) buisboudinkomen ongeveer per maand? Sf . . . . • 10. Resultaat van bet interview: Afgerond . . . . . 1 Huis onvindbaar/vemietigd . . . . . A Weigering . . . . . . . . 2 Overig namelijk. . . 5 Niet thuis . 3 Gedeeltelijk afgerond . . . 6 11. Aantal vrouwen van 12 - 49 jaar in bet 12. Aantal afgeronde interviews vrouwen: buisbouden: 12a. Aantal vrouwen bevallen van 12b. Aantal afgeronde interviews van bevallen levendgeboren kinderen in bet afge- vrouwen in bet afgelopen jaar: lopen jaar: ------ 12c. Aantal doodgeboren babies in bet afgelopen jaar in dit buisbouden: ~ 13. Aantal kinderen jonger dan 5 jaar: 14. Aantal afgeronde interviews kinderen: Niet bestemd voor de enqueteur ! 15. Data invoer door: ------ Notities enqueteur/supervisor: Gebruik onderstaande ruimte voor notities (terugbellen, onvolledig ingevulde vragenlijsten , aantal bezoeken bij not-at-homes etc.) • ] Appendix C:Questionnaires 2 • • • CLUSTERNR: __________ _ HUISHOUDNR: ______ _ HUISHOUDLISTING / - Kunt U mij vertellen hoe bet hoofd van dit huishouden beet, ernfaarna de namen noemen van aile andere mensen die tot dit huishouden behoren*. Schrijf aile namen op beginnend met het hoofd, dan de andere volwassenen gevolgd fo;;r de kinderen. Vraag daarna: Zijn er nog anderen die tot dit huishouden behoren en nu niet thuis zijn? Vul dan de lijst verder in en vraag dan de toepasselijke vragen: zoals in de handleiding is aangegeven. Indien u niet genoeg ruimte heeft om te schrijven, ga dan verder op een extra bladzijde. Kruis het hokje op deze regel aan als u een extra bladzijde gebruikt. Modules Verzor.s?ers van kinderen onder de 15 .iaar Als E1 Als E Kind <5jr Personen van Personen van 12 2-49 jr 12-49 jr 15 jaar en oude jaar en ouder 1 2 3 4 5 Sa 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 Per- Voornaam Is (naam) Hoe oud is Omcirkel Bent u in bet Wie is de Kan hij /zij Wat is de Is (naam) lndien Is (naam) Indien soon mannelijk of (naam) hetnummer afgelopen jaa moederof de krant met burgerlijke zijn/haar JA: zijn/haar JA: nr: vrouwelijk van geworden op als dit van bevallen van verzorger gemak of met staat van (naam)? natuur-lijke woont zij natuurlijke woont hij geslacht? zijn/haar toepassing is een levend van dit moeite of 1 = gehuwd/ moeder nog in dit huis- vader nog in dit 1=man laatste kind? kind? helemaal niet concubinaat in Ieven? houden? in Ieven? huishouden? 2=vrouw verjaardag? l=ja Schrijf lezen? 2=weduwe l=ja l=ja 1=ja l=ja Schrijf het 2=nee Nr.op 1=makkelijk 3=bij wet 2=nee 2=nee 2=nee 2=nee aantal jaren 2=moeilijk gescheiden 9=WN 9=WN 9=WN 9=WN op. 3= niet 4=afloop van 99=weet niet 9=WN concubinaat 5=nooit gehuwd Nr Voornaam M v Leeftiid E is 12-49 ir J N Moeder 01 1 2 01 1 2 1 2 3 9 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 9 1 2 9 I 2 9 1 2 9 02 1 2 02 __.y 2 1 2 3 9 1 2 3 ~5 I 2 9 1 2 9 1 2 9 1 2 9 03 I 2 03 .--- 1 2 I 2 3 9 I 2 3 4 5 I 2 9 1 2 9 1 2 9 1 2 9 04 I 2 04 1 2 I 2 3 9 I 2 3 4 5 I 2 9 1 2 9 1 2 9 1 2 9 05 I 2 05 1 2 1 2 3 9 I 2 3 4 5 I 2 9 1 2 9 1 2 9 1 2 9 06 I 2 06 I 2 1 2 3 9 I 2 3 4 5 1 2 9 I 2 9 1 2 9 1 2 9 07 I 2 07 I 2 1 2 3 9 I 2 3 4 5 I 2 9 I 2 9 I 2 9 I 2 9 08 I 2 08 I 2 I 2 3 9 I 2 3 4 5 I 2 9 I 2 9 I 2 9 I 2 9 09 1 2 09 1 2 I 2 3 9 I 2 3 4 5 I 2 9 I 2 9 I 2 9 1 2 9 10 I 2 10 1 2 I 2 3 9 I 2 3 4 5 I 2 9 I 2 9 I 2 9 1 2 9 Indien er meer kinderen hier wonen, al zijn ze geen dee] van het gezin en zijn ze zonder hun ouders in huis, voeg ze dan erbij. *Definitie van I huishouden: een of meerdere personen die minstens 4 dagen in de week op het adres wonen en slapen, met gezamenlijke voorzieningen voor basisbehoeften. J CLUSTERNR: ______ HUISHOUDNR: ___ _ ONDERWUS MODULE Stel vraag 15 en 16 over personen van 5 jaar en ouder Stel vraag 17 t/m 22 over kinderen van 5 jaar t/m 17 jaar 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. Persoon Heeft (naam) Wat is de hoogst genoten Zit (naam) op dit Is (naam) dit Hoeveel Op welke opleiding in en Ging (naam) Op welke opleiding nr ooit de school opleiding van (naam)? moment op school? schooljaar ooit dagen is welke klas zat/zit (naam)? vorig jaar naar en in welke klas zat bezocht? I Kleuterschool naar school (naam) Opleiding: school? (naam) vorig jaar? I ja.-Vrg. 16 2 lagere school I ja .-vrg 19 geweest? naar school 1 kleuterschool I ja Opleiding: 2 nee .- 3 VOJ (MU LO. LBGO. LTS) 2 nee geweest 2 lagere school 2 nee .- I kleuterschool volgende 4 VQS (HAVO. VWO. IMEO. NATIN) 3 de school I ja vanaf 3 VOJ (MULO. LBGO. LTS) volgende 2 lagere school persoon 5 HBO/Uni versitair staakt 2 nee .- afgelopen 4 VQS (HAVO, VWO, IMEO. NATIN) persoon 3 VOJ (MU LO. LBGO. LTS) onderwijs 9 weet niet Vrg 21 (dag van 5 HBO/universitair onderwijs 9WN .- 4 VQS (HAVO, VWO.IMEO, NATIN) 9 weet niet.- Omcirkel 3 als de 9WN.- de week)? 9 weet niet volgende 5 HBO/universitair volgende Welke is de hoogste klas school staakt Vrg. 21 klas: persoon onderwijs persoon die (naam) heeft afgerond? 99 = weet niet 9 weet niet Klas: 99 = weet niet Persoon Ja Nee WN Nivo Klas Ja Nee Staking Ja Nee WN Dagen Nivo Klas Ja Nee WN Nivo Klas 01 I 2 9 I 2 3 4 5 9 I 2 3 I 2 9 I 2 3 4 5 9 1 2 9 I 2 3 4 5 9 02 I 2 9 1 2 3 4 5 9 I 2 3 I 2 9 I 2 3 4 5 9 1 2 9 I 2 3 4 5 9 03 1 2 9 1 2 3 4 5 9 I 2 3 I 2 9 1 2 3 4 5 9 I 2 9 I 2 3 4 5 9 04 I 2 9 1 2 3 4 5 9 I 2 3 I 2 9 I 2 3 4 5 9 1 2 9 I 2 3 4 5 9 OS 1 2 9 1 2 3 4 5 9 I 2 3 I 2 9 I 2 3 4 5 9 1 2 9 I 2 3 4 5 9 06 I 2 9 I 2 3 4 5 9 I 2 3 I 2 9 I 2 3 4 5 9 1 2 9 I 2 3 4 5 9 07 1 2 9 1 2 3 4 5 9 I 2 3 1 2 9 I 2 3 4 5 9 1 2 9 I 2 3 4 5 9 08 I 2 9 1 2 3 4 5 9 1 2 3 I 2 9 1 2 3 4 5 9 I 2 9 1 2 3 4 5 9 09 I 2 9 I 2 3 4 5 9 1 2 3 I 2 9 I 2 3 4 5 9 1 2 9 I 2 3 4 5 9 10 I 2 9 I 2 3 4 5 9 I 2 3 I 2 9 I 2 3 4 5 9 1 2 9 I 2 3 4 5 9 Voor elke vrouw van 12-49 jaar moet de naam en het persoonsnummer bovenaan de pagina van de vrouwenvragenlijst geschreven worden. Voor elk kind onder de 5 jaar, moet de naam en het persoonsnummer en de naam en persoonsnummer van zijn/haar moeder of verzorger bovenaan elke pagina in de kindervragenlijst geschreven worden. Voor elke vrouw van 12-49 jaar en voor elk kind in het huishouden wordt een aparte vrouwen- of kindervragenlijst gebruikt I • • • - • • ~ • CLUSTERNR: HUISHOUDNR: ~;; IGEHANDICAPTEN MODULE Stel deze vragen aan ouderslverzorgers aile kinderen in de leeftijd van 2 tot en met 9 jaar die wonen in het huishouden. Vraag: Ik wil weten of er kinderen in dit huishouden zijn die een van de gezondheidsproblemen hebben, die ik ga opnoemen. Als het antwoord op een vraag 'ja ' is, omcirkel het persoonsnummer van dat kind in de juiste ruimte. lndien u niet genoeg ruimte heeft om te schrijven, ga dan verder op een extra bladzijde . Kruis het hokje op deze regel aan als je een extra bladzijde gebruikt D Voor ouders/verzorgers van kinderen in de leeftijd 2 tim 9 jaar 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 IIA llB 12 (VOOR KIND (VOOR VAN 3-9 JAAR KIND VAN OUD) 2 JAAR) Per- Heeft (naam) in Kan (naam) in Heeft (naam) Wanneer u Heeft (naam) Krijgt (naam) Kan (naam) Kan (naam) Praat (naam) Kan (naam) Schijnt (naam) soon vergelijking met vergelijking met problemen met (naam) zegt problemen met soms stuipen , dezelfde praten (dus anders dan ten minste in vergelijking nr: andere kinderen andere kinderen zijn/haar om iets te !open of met het wordt hij/zij stijf dingen doen verstaan-bare normaal 1 woord met ander een grote overdag of gehoor? doen, begrijpt bewegen van of raakt hij/zij als andere woorden (dus moeilijk uitspreken? kinderen van achterstand bij 's avonds met (het kind heeft hij/zij wat u zijn/haar armen, soms bewusteloos? kinderen van uitspreken)? verstaanbaar l = ja dezelfde bet zitten, staan moeite zien? een gehoor- bedoelt? of beeft bet kind l = ja zijn-/haar l = ja voor andere 2 =nee leeftijd langzaam, en !open? l = ja apparaat, l = ja stijve armen 2 =nee leeftijd? 2 =nee mensen dan de 9=WN suf of acbterlijk? l = ja 2 = nee boort slecbt of 2 =nee en benen? 9=WN 1 = ja 9=WN directe l = ja 2 =nee 9=WN is helemaal doof) 9 =WN I = ja 2 =nee familieleden)? 2 =nee 9=WN I= ja 2 =nee 9=WN I =ja 9=WN 2 =nee 9=WN 2 =nee 9=WN 9=WN Nr 01 I 2 9 I 2 9 l 2 9 l 2 9 l 2 9 l 2 9 I 2 9 I 2 9 l 2 9 l 2 9 I 2 9 02 l 2 9 1 2 9 I 2 9 l 2 9 l 2 9 I 2 9 1 2 9 1 2 9 I 2 9 I 2 9 I 2 9 03 I 2 9 1 2 9 l 2 9 1 2 9 1 2 9 1 2 9 1 2 9 I 2 9 1 2 9 I 2 9 1 2 9 04 I 2 9 1 2 9 l 2 9 l 2 9 1 2 9 l 2 9 I 2 9 I 2 9 l 2 9 I 2 9 l 2 9 OS I 2 9 l 2 9 I 2 9 1 2 9 1 2 9 I 2 9 I 2 9 1 2 9 l 2 9 l 2 9 1 2 9 06 1 2 9 l 2 9 1 2 9 1 2 9 l 2 9 l 2 9 1 2 9 l 2 9 1 2 9 l 2 9 l 2 9 07 1 2 9 l 2 9 l 2 9 l 2 9 1 2 9 I 2 9 I 2 9 I 2 9 1 2 9 I 2 9 I 2 9 08 I 2 9 l 2 9 I 2 9 l 2 9 l 2 9 I 2 9 I 2 9 I 2 9 I 2 9 l 2 9 I 2 9 09 l 2 9 I 2 9 I 2 9 I 2 9 I 2 9 l 2 9 l 2 9 l 2 9 I 2 9 I 2 9 I 2 9 10 I 2 9 1 2 9 I 2 9 I 2 9 I 2 9 I 2 9 l 2 9 l 2 9 l 2 9 1 2 9 I 2 9 0 ' Sun name Multtple lndtcator CJu,ter Survey 2000 ' CLUSTERNR: ______ HUISHOUDNR: ___ _ IWATER EN HYGIENE MODULE IDeze module is bestemd voor elk huishouden dat geinterviewd wordt. Als er meer dan een antwoord gegeven wordt, ~ruis aan wat het meest gebruikt wordt door het huishouden. 1. Wat is de belangrijkste bron van drinkwater Binnenkraan (aansluiting in huis) . 01 voor personen van dit huishouden? Erfkraan (aansluiting op het erf) . 02 Indien er meerdere bronnen worden genoemd, vraag welke het meest gebruikt wordt la. Hoe ver is uw drinkwater verwijderd van uw huis? Indien de watervoorziening in huis of op het erf is, omcirkel 888 2. Hoe lang duurt het om water te halen en terug te komen naar huis? Indien de watervoorziening in huis of op het erf is, omcirkel 888 3. Welke toilet voorziening gebruikt uw Huishouden het meest? 4. Waar staat het toilet of de plee? lndien er babies of peuters in het huishouden zijn: 5. Wat gebeurt er met de ontlasting van het jongste kind in de leeftijd 0 tim 3 jaar? Indien er geen babies of peuters in het huishouden zijn, omcirkel 8 Sa. Hoe wordt het huisvuil verwijderd? GA NAAR DE VOLGENDE MODULE ,._ Open bare kraan (niet op het erf) . . . . . 03 Bron (put) of boorput met pomp . . . . . . . . . . 04 Beschermde bron (put) . 05 Beschermde boorput . 06 Gebotteld water (in een fles) . . . . 07 Regenwater . . . 08 Onbeschermde bron . 09 Onbeschermde boor . . 10 Kreek of rivier . . . 11 Watertruck, waterverkoper . 12 Doorgesneden pijp . 13 Anders, nl . 14 Geen antwoord of WN . . 99 Aantal meters . ___ _ Water in het huis of op het erf . . . . 888 WN . . 999 Aantal minuten _ _ _ Water in het huis of op het erf . 888 WN . . . . . . . 999 we met waterspoeling en septic tank . . Plee (privaat) . 2 Geventileerde plee . 3 Plee met spoeling (zonder septic tank). 4 Rivier . 5 Open put of gat in de grond . 6 Anders (vb emmer) nl. 7 Geen voorziening, bos, veld. 8 In huis . . . . 1 Op het erf . 2 Openbaar (niet in huis en niet op erf) . 3 WN . 9 Kinderen gebruiken altijd toilet of we. 1 Wordt gegooid in toilet of latrine. . . . 2 Wordt bij het huisvuil gedaan (luiers) . 3 Wordt gegooid op het erf . 4 Wordt begraven op het erf . 5 Wordt niet weggegooid, blijft op de grond . . 6 Anders, nl . 7 Geen babies/peuters in het huishouden . 8 Huisvuil wordt op het erf verbrand . . . . . . Huisvuil wordt opgehaald door vuilophaaldienst . 2 Huisvuil wordt op het erf begraven . 3 Huisvuil wordt op het erf gegooid . 4 Anders nl 5 • • 8,._Vrg.5 • • MICS QUESTIONNAIRE SURINAME VROUWENVRAGENLIJST District: _____ _ Clustemr: -----,------ Huishoudnr: ____ _ Vrouwnr: ------ Enqueteursnr: __ _ 13 december 1999 CLUSTERNR· HUISHOUDNR : -- VROUWNR : --- 11\.lNUI'JK l'llEKJ:IlE MODIJLR Deze module is bestemd voor aile vrouwen van 12 tot en met 49 jaar in het huishouden . Aile vragen hebben aileen betrekking op LEVEND-GEBOREN kinderen . Volg de instructies op van de interview training (zie interview instructies) . Nu volgen wat vragen over aile bevallingen die u Ja 1 heeft gehad. Neen 2 2• 1. Bent u ooit bevallen? Ga naar ANTICONCEPTIE lndien "Neen" doorvragen: MODULE Ik bedoel bent u bevallen van een kind dat ademde of huilde of waaraan je kon zien dat het leefde - ook al leefde het een paar minuten of uren? 2a. Op welke datum bent u bevallen van uw eerste kind? Datum van eerste bevalling • Vrg. 3 Dus: oak als het kind niet meer leeft, of oak als het kind DagiMaandiJaar __ I __ I ____ WN •Vrg. 2b van een andere man dan uw huidige partner is . WN datum van 1 ste bevalling . 99999999 Deze vraag ste/len indien 15 cuuurtedatum niet bekend is: 2b. Hoeveel jaar geleden beviel u voor het eerst van een Aantal volledige jaren sinds de eerste kind? Bevalling 3. Wonen er zonen of dochters van wie u bent bevallen Ja 1 Momenteel met u? Neen 2 2•Vrg.5 4. Hoeveel zonen wonen met u? Zoons die thuis wonen . . . . . -- Hoeveel dochters wonen met u? Dochters die thuis wonen . . . . . . 5. Zijn er kinderen van wie u bevallen bent, die niet met Ja 1 u wonen? Neen 2 2•Vrg. 7 6. Hoeveel zonen wonen niet met u? Zoons die elders wonen . . . . . . -- Hoeveel dochters wonen niet met u? Dochters die elders wonen . . . . -- 7. Bent u ooit bevallen een kind dat in Ieven ' Ja I maar na enkele urenl da!!enljaren is""""" '""? Neen 2 2•Vrg.9 8. Hoeveel zonen zijn gestorven? Overleden zonen . . . . . . . . . . . . . -- Hoeveel dochters zijn """lUI v.oll i Over! eden dochters . . . . . . . . . Sa. Hoe oud was het kind toen hij/zij stierf? Kind 1. . . . ___ jaar Kind2 . . . ___ jaar Kind 3 . . . ___ jaar Kind4 . . . ___ jaar Kind 5 . . . ___ jaar 9. Tel de antwoorden van vraag Q. 4, 6, en 8 op voor het totaal aantal kinderen Totaal. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . -- 10. Om er zeker van te zijn dat ik de juiste antwoorden heb: U bent gedurende uw hele Ieven dus in totaal van kinderen bevallen. Klopt dit? D Ja ._ GA NAAR VRAAG 11 D NEEN • CONTROLEER DE ANTWOORDEN, PLEEG CORRECTJES EN GA DAARNA NAAR VRAAG 11 11. Wanneer bent u voor het laatst bevallen (ook al is Datum van de laatste bevalling dat kind intussen gestorven)? Dag/Maand/Jaar __ I __ I ____ Is de vrouw in het afgelopenjaar voor het laatst bevallen (dus maxtmaal eenjaar voor de datum van het interview)? [] Ja, ze is bevallen van een levend geboren kind in het afgelopen jaar. • GA NAAR GEZONDHEIDSMODULE le VOOR MOEDERS EN PASGEBORENEN [] Neen , geen bevalling of levend geboren kind in het afgelopen jaar. • GA NAAR ANT/CONCEPTI£ MODULE 48 Appendix C:Questionnaires • • • ,t!!fo;;:Ys "' ~~40, ~ Swmame \1uJtJple Indtcator Clu,ter Sun e~ ~tlOO ' ~ CLUSTERNR: HUISHOUDNR: ___ _ VROUWNR: __ _ jGEZONDHEIDSMODULE VOOR MOEDERS EN PASGEBORENEN Deze module is voor elke vrouw die in hetjaar voor datum van interview een levendReboren kind heeft Rebaard, la. Heeft u na uw laatste bevalling tabletten voor Ja . . . . . I bloedarmoede (lage sali/anaemie) gehad? Nee . . . . 2 2. Bent u bij een hulpverlener geweest voor zwangerschapszorg of controle? 2a. lndien ja: Bij wie bent u geweest? • En bij nog iemand anders? Ga nauwkeurig na bij hoevee/ verschillende hulpverleners de vrouw is geweest en kruis alles aan) Noteer bij 'ander' letterlijk wat de vrouw zegt 3. Wie heeft u geassisteerd bij uw laatste bevalling? Nog iemand anders? Ga nauwkeurig na hoeveel verschillende hulpverleners de vrouw assisteerden en kruis alles aan Noteer bij 'ander' letterlijk wat de vrouw zegt 4. Hoe groot was uw laatste kind bij de geboorte ? 5. Is (naam) gewogen bij de geboorte? 6. Hoeveel woog (naam)? Lees dit van een document a is mogelijk Weet niet . 9 Ja . I Nee . 2 Gezondheidswerkers: . vrg. 2a . vrg. 3 Arts . l Vroedvrouw . 2 Verpleegster . . . . . . 3 Gezondheidswerker binnenland (gezondheidsassistent) . 4 Andere hulpverlener: Traditionele vroedvrouw . 5 Ander namelijk . . . 6 Bij niemand . 0 Gezondheidswerkers: Arts . . . . . . . . . . 1 Vroedvrouw . 2 Verpleegster . 3 Gezondheidswerker binnenland (gezondheidsassistent) . 4 Andere hulpverlener: Traditionele vroedvrouw . 5 Ander namelijk . 6 Bij niemand . 0 Erg groat . I Grater dan normaal . . . . . . . . . . 2 Normale grootte . . . . . . . . . . 3 Kleiner dan normaal . 4 Erg klein . 5 Weet het niet . . 9 Ja . . . I I.,. Vrg. 6 Nee . 2 Weet niet . 9 Van document . . . . I Uit het hoofd . 2 2 .,. Volgende module 9.,. Volgende module gram_, __ _ gram_, __ _ Weet niet . . . 99999 Appendix C:Questionnaires CLUSTERNR. HUISHOUDNR. VROUWNR. IAN'IICUNCEl" HE MODULE !Stet deze vragen aan aile vrouwen in de vruchtbare leeftijd 12 - 49 jaar INu zal ik enkele vragen stellen over ;., Dit zijn methoden om zwangerschap uit te stellen of te voorkomen. 1. Bent u momenteel 3a. Mensen gebruiken verschillende manieren/methoden om zwangerschap te voorkomen of uit te stellen. Kent u manieren/methoden om zwangerschap te voorkomen? 3b. Welke manieren /methoden kent u? Enqueteur: Niets opnoemen! Aileen omcirkelen wat de respondent ze/f noemt 2. Bent u nu zwanger? 2a. Had u geprobeerd deze ~ .~ . e~·~~··~l' te voorkomen? 3. Doet u of uw partner momenteel iets om zwangerschap uit te stellen of te voorkomen? 4. Wat doet u of uw partner om zwangerschap uit te stellen of te voorkomen? Niet doorvragen, aileen omcirkelen wat genoemd wordt GA NAAR DE VOLGENDE MODULE ._ 50 Appendix C:Questionnaires Getrouwd . I Samenwonend met partner . 2 Vaste relatie, apart wonend . . . . . . 3 Bij wet gescheiden . 4 Alleenstaande moeder . . . . . . 5 Alleenstaand zonder kinderen . 6 Anders nl . . . . 7 Ongehuwd, thuis wonend . 8 Geen antwoord . . 9 Ja . I Nee . 2 Sterilisatie van de vrouw . 0 I Sterilisatie van de man 02 De Pil . 03 Spiraaltje . 04 Prikpil . 05 Hormoon implants . 06 Condoom . 07 Vrouwen condoom 08 Diafragma (pessarium) . 09 Schuimtabletten/zaaddodend middel!pasta . 10 Borstvoeding . 11 Periodieke onthouding/kalenderlfluoronderzoek . 12 Terugtrekk:en . 13 Anders, nl . 14 Weet niet . . . . 99 Ja . . Nee . . 2 Niet zeker of WN 9 Ja . I Nee . 2 Ja . 1 Nee . . . . 2 Sterilisatie van de vrouw . 01 Sterilisatie van de man . 02 De Pi1 . . . . 03 Spiraaltje . 04 Prikpil . . . . 05 Hormoon implants . 06 Condoom 07 Vrouwen condoom . 08 Diafragma (pessarium) . 09 Schuimtabletten/zaaddodend middel/pasta . 10 Borstvoeding . 11 Periodieke onthouding/kalender/fluoronderzoek . 12 Terugtrekken . 13 Anders, nl . 14 Weet niet 99 2._Vrg. 2 1._Vrg. 2a 2._Vrg.3 9._Vrg.3 1 , 2 ._ Vo1gende module 1._Vrg.4 2._Vo1gende module • • • • """"" -""-"' ,,_,. ' , 'i;lt· ' '> Sun name Multiple lnd1cator Cluster Sun e) 2000 ~~trw CLUSTER NR. ___ _ HUISHOUDNR. ___ _ VROUW NR. ____ _ IHIV-AIDS MODULE Stel deze vragen aan aile vrouwen in de leeftijd 12- 49 jaar. Zie interviewers instructies voor meer informatie rver deze vragen ~eze vragen gaan over uw kennis over HIV en AIDS, en zijn dus niet om te weten of u AIDS beeft. 1. Heeft u ooit geboord van HIV of van de ziekte AIDS? Ja ------------------------------------------------ 1 2. Kan men iets doen om geen HIV te Krijgen, bet virus dat AIDS veroorzaakt? Ik zal nu een aantal dingen voorlezen over HIV en AIDS. Antwoordt ja als u denkt dat bet waar is, nee als u denkt dat bet niet waar is, of weet niet als u niet zeker weet. 3. Mensen kunnen zicbzelf bescbermen tegen bet HIV virus door maar een onbesmette partner te bebben die ook geen andere partners beeft 4. Iemand kan besmet raken met bet HIV virus door bovennatuurlijke oorzaken 5. Mensen kunnen zicbzelf bescbermen tegen bet HIV virus door elke keer als ze sex bebben een condoom te gebruiken op de juiste wijze 6. Iemand kan bet HIV virus krijgen van een muskietenbeet 7. Mensen kunnen zicbzelf bescbermen tegen bet HIV virus door belemaal geen sex te bebben · 8. Is bet mogelijk dat iemand die er gezond uitziet bet HIV virus beeft? 9. Kan een moeder bet HIV virus aan baar kind overdragen? 10. Kan een moeder bet HIV virus aan baar kind overdragen tijdens de zwangerscbap? 11. Kan een moeder bet HIV virus aan baar kind overdragen tijdens de bevalling? 12. Kan een moeder bet HIV virus aan baar kind geven door borstvoeding? Nee . , . 2 Ja . 1 Nee . 2 WN . , . . , . , . 9 Ja . , . 1 Nee . . . 2 WN . . . . . . . . . 9 Ja . . Nee . . . 2 WN . 9 Ja . . l Nee . . . . . 2 WN . -. . . 9 Ja . . . Nee . 2 WN . 9 Ja . . . . . Nee 2 WN . 9 Ja . . . . 1 Nee 2 WN . . . . . 9 Ja . . . I Nee . 2 WN . . . 9 Ja . . . . . l Nee . 2 WN . . . 9 Ja . . . 1 Nee . . . 2 WN . . . . . 9 Ja . . . . . . Nee . . . . . . . 2 WN . . . . 9 2 .,._Vrg. 18 2 .,._ Vrg .8 9 .,._ Vrg .8 .,._ Vrg. 13 .,._ Vrg. 13 I · Appendix C:Questionnaires 51 HIV-AIDS MODULE 13. Als een onderwijzer het HIV virus heeft maar niet Ja ···· ············································ I • ziek is, mag die persoon dan blijven les geven Nee . . . . . . . 2 op school? WN . . . . . . . . . . . 9 14. Als u wist dat een winkelier of iemand die eten Ja . . . . . . I verkoopt AIDS of het HIV virus heeft, zou u dan eten Nee . . . 2 kopen bij die persoon? WN . . . . . . 9 15. We zouden graag willen weten hoeveel behoefte er in Ja . 1 de gemeenschap is aan testen en begeleiding. Ik wit de Nee . . . . 2 2 . vrg. 17 uitslag niet weten, maar bent u ooit getest om te zien WN . . . 9 9 .,. Vrg. 17 als u het HIV virus heeft? 16. Ik wit de uitslag niet weten, maar heeft men u toen de Ja . . . I uitslag van de test gegeven? Nee . . 2 17. Kent u op dit moment een plaats waar u zou kunnen Ja . . . 1 gaan om zo een HIV of AIDS test te doen? Nee . . . . . 2 18. Is de vrouw verzorger van kinderen jonger dan vijf jaar? D Ja .,._ Ga naar de questionnaire voor kinderen jonger dan 5 jr. en vul een formulier in voor elk kind waarvan deze respondent de verzorger is D Nee .,._ Vervolg met vraag 19 19. Wonen er meer vrouwen van 12 tot en met 49 jaar in dit huishouden? •• D Ja . Beeindig het interview met deze vrouw, bedank de respondent voor haar medewerking , en ga verder met de volgende vrouw die in aanmerking komt voor deze module D Nee.,._ Beifindig het interview met deze vrouw en bedank de respondent voor haar medewerking. Verzamel aile questionnaires van vrouwen in dit huishouden en noteer het aantal vrouwen-interviews op de huishoudvragenlijst • 52 Appendix C:Questionnaires • MICS QUESTIONNAIRE SURINAME KINDERVRAGENLIJST District: _____ _ Clusternr: ------ Huishoudnr: ____ _ Kindnr: ------- Enqueteursnr: __ _ 13 december 1 999 Sunn.1me \1ultiple lndi C <~tor Cluster Survey 2000 - .•· -~ . [ :.; :· ·, .: r-::::C-:::L::::U-::::ST~E:-::R:::N:;::R:--:-. ~~~~~~:-=-;-H:;-;U::::I-::::SH-:::O=U:-::D~N:-::R::-:. ::::::=:::-V_E_R_z_o_R_G_E_R_N_R_. =======--K-I_N_D_N_R_. ____ ____,. GEBOORTE AANGIFfE EN VROEGE ONTWIKKELING 1. Naam van bet kind 2. Leeftijd van bet kind Copieer van VR. 4 van Huishoud listing forumlier 3. Ik wit u enkele vragen stellen over de gezondheid van elk kind onder de 5 jaar, die nu met u woont. Nu volgen er vragen over (naam). In welke maand en jaar is (naam) geboren? Doorvragen: Wat is zijnlhaar verjaardag? Jndien de moeder de juiste geboorte datum kent, vul oak de dag in; anders, vul 99 in voor dag. 4. Is (naam) geregistreerd in een familieboekje of een geboorteakte? Zou ik bet mogen zien? Als geboorte akte wordt getoond, verifieer de opgegeven geboorte datumAls er geen geboorte akte wordt getoond, probeer de datum te verifieren dmv een ander document (o.a. huwelijks-akte, dokterskaart, enz.) .Verander opgegeven leeftijd, indien nodig. lndien er geenfamilieboekje of geboorte akte wordt getoond, vraag: 5. Is (naam) na de geboorte aangegeven? 6. Waarom is (naam) geboorte niet aangegeven? 7. Weet u hoe u de geboorte van uw kind moet aangeven? lndien een kind 3 jaar of ouder is, vraag: 8. Bezoekt (naam) een particuliere of overheidscreche, peuterschool of kleuterschool? 9. Binnen de afgelopen zeven dagen, hoeveel uren heeft (naam) een creche, peuterschool of kleuterschool in totaal bezocht? 54 Appendix C:Questionnaires Naam Leeftijd (in volledige jaren) Geboorte datum _ _ I __ I _ ___ _ Ja, gezien . .l .,. Vrg.8 Ja, niet gezien . . . . . . . . . 2 Nee . . . . . . 3 Weet niet. . 9 Ja . l .,. Vrg.8 Nee . . . . . . . 2 Weet niet waar aangifte te doen . 9 9 .,. Vrg.7 • Kost teveel . l Moet te ver rei zen . 2 Wist niet dat het aangegeven moest worden . 3 Te laat, en wilde geen boete betalen . .4 Weet niet waar aan te geven . 5 Anders nl . ;:: . 6 Weet niet . 9 Ja . . . . l Nee . . . . . 2 Weet niet . . . . 9 I a . I Nee . . . 2 2 .,. Volgende module Weet niet. . . 9 9 .,. Volgende module A an tal uren . __ • ~. ';- ":~.-: Sunname ~!ulllpk lndtc<~tor Clu;ter Suncy 2000 6' • CLUSTERNR. ____ __ HUISHOUDNR. ____ __ VERZORGERNR KINDNR • BORSTVOEDINGSMODULE I Deze vragen zi)n bestemd voor verzorgers van kinderen on~er 5 jaar 1. Heeft (naam) ooit borstvoeding gekregen? Ja . . . . , . 1 Nee . , . ,.,, . , . , . , . , . , . , . 2 2.-Vrg.4 WN (weet niet) ···--················--·························· ·· ·· ··--· ···· ··9 9.-Vrg.4 la. Hoeveel maanden heeft u uitsluitend borstvoeding Aantal maanden ------- gegeven? 2. Krijgt (naam) nog steeds borstvoeding? Ja . ,, . , . 1 Nee . . . . . . . . 2 2 .-vrg.4 WN ( weet niet) --·····--·--··· ····--·····--········--···--·········--·········· 9 9 .-vrg.4 3. Heeft u een van de volgende producten de afgelopen 24 uur aan (naam) gegeven? Lees elk product luidop en noteer het antwoord van elk apart alvorens de volgende op te lezen J N WN 3a. Vitamine, mineralen, of medicijn? a. Vitamine, mineralen,Medicijn 1 2 9 3b. Gewoon water? b. Gewoon water 1 2 9 3c. Stroop of vruchtensap of thee? c. Stroop of vruchtensap of Thee 1 2 9 • 3d. Diosol (ORS)? d. Dioso1 (ORS) 1 2 9 3e. Poedermelk, verse melk, of babyvoeding uit blik? e. Poederrnelk, verse me1k, Of babyvoeding uit blik 1 2 9 3f. Andere drank nl f. Andere drank 1 2 9 3g. Vast voedsel of puree? g. Vast voedsel of puree 1 2 9 4. Sinds deze tijd gisteren, heeft (naam) iets gedronken }a . . . . . . . . I uit een fles met een tuit of speen? Nee . , . , . , . , . 2 WN . ,., . , . . . . . . . . . . , . 9 GA NAAR DE VOLGENDE MODUL ._ • Appendix C:Questionnaires 55 CLUSTERNR __ _ HUISHOUDNR __ _ VERZORGERNR ___ KINDNR __ MODULE CARE OF ILLNESS Deze vragen zijn bestemd voor verzorgers van kinderen onder 5 jaar 1. Heeft (naam) diarree gehad in de afgelopen Ja . . . . . I I ~ Vrg. 3 twee weken? (Diarree is 3 of meer malen per dag papperig, waterig of bloederig ontlasten). 2. Heeft (naam) in de afgelopen twee· weken een andere ziekte of aandoening, bijvoorbeeld koorts of hoesten, gehad? 2a. Indien ja, welke andere ziekte of aandoening heeft (naam) gehad? 3. Tijdens de laatste diarree episode, heeft (naam) een van de volgende zaken gedronken? 3A. Borstvoeding 3B. Pap met melk 30. Diosol (ORS) 3J. Pap zonder melk 3K. Cocoswater 3L. Rijstwater 3M. Huismiddel nl 4. Dronk (naam) tijdens de ziekte veel minder dan normaal, ongeveer hetzelfde als gewoonlijk, of meer dan normaal? 5. At (naam) tijdens de ziekte veel minder dan normaal, ongeveer hetzelfde als gewoonlijk, of meer da:1 normaal? Indien respondent 'minder' zegt, vraag door: At (naam) iets minder of veel minder dan normaal? Nee . 2 Weet niet. . . . . . 9 Ja . . . . I Nee . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Weet niet. . . . . 9 N WN A. Borstvoeding 2 9 B. Pap met melk 2 9 D. Diosol (ORS) 2 9 J. Pap zonder melk 2 9 K. Cocoswater 2 9 L. Rijstwater 2 9 M.Huismiddel 2 9 Veel minder of niets . I Ongeveer hetzelfde . . . . . 2 Meer. . . . . . . . 3 Weet niet. . . . . . . . . . . 9 Niels . . . . . . . . I Vee I minder. . . . . . . 2 lets minder . . . . . . . . 3 Hetzel fde . 4 Meer . . . . . . . . . 5 Weet niet . . . . . . 9 I ~Vrg. 2a 2~Vrg. II 9 ~Vrg. II ~Vrg 4 Stet de vragen Sa en Sb aileen indien het kind in de afgelopen twee weken diarree heeft gehad (Vrg.J = ']a'). Anders ga naar vraag 6. Sa. Bent u voor de diarree advies (of behandeling) gaan zoeken buitenshuis? Sb. Waar ging u voor behandeling of advies? (MEER KEUZEMOGELIJKHEDEN) 6. Heeft ( naam) in de laatste 2 weken last gehad van hoest? Ja . . . . . . . l Nee . 2 Onbekend . . . . . 9 Familielid, kennis,buur . 1 Arts . 2 Drogist/apotheek . 3 Special ist . . . . . . 4 Verpleegkundige (gezondheids-assistent) . 5 EHB0 . . 6 Ziekenhuis . 7 Elders nl 8 Ja . l Nee . . 2 Onbekend . 9 7. Had (naam) de laatste 2 weken last bij het ademhalen? !a . I Nee . 2 Onbekend . 9 56 Appendi x C:Questionnaires 2~Vrg. 11 9 ~Vrg. 11 2~Vrg. 11 9~Vrg.11 • • • • • • MODULE CARE OF ILLNESS 8. Had (naam) de laatste 2 weken last van verstopte neus of slijm op de borst? 9. Heeft u voor deze klacht(en) buitenshuis advies of behandeling gezocht? 10. Waar ging u voor behandeling of ad vies? (MEER KEUZEMOGELIJKHEDEN) 11. Soms zijn kinderen ernstig ziek en moeten ze direct naar de poli (arts, verpleegster of gezondheidsassistent) worden gebracht. Bij wat voor klachten zou u uw kind direct naar een poli brengen? (MEER KEUZEMOGELIJKHEDEN) Enqueteur:noem de antwoordmogelijkheden niet op! Omcirkel aile symptomen die de respondent opsomt . Verstopte neus. . . . . . I Slijm op de borst. . . 2 Allebei . . . . . . . . . 3 1)1oo.Vrg. 11 2)1oo.Vrg. 9 3)1oo.Vrg. 9 Anders nl. . 4 4)1oo.Vrg. 11 Onbekend . . . 9 9)1oo.Vrg. 9 Ja . . . . . l Nee . . 2 2 )1oo.Vrg. 11 Onbekend . . . 9 9)1oo.Vrg. 11 Familielid, kennis,buur . I Arts . 2 Drogist/apotheek . 3 Specialist . . . . . . 4 Verpleegkundige (gezondheids-assistent) . 5 EHBO . 6 Ziekenhuis . 7 Elders nl . 8 Het kind kan niet drinken of zuigen a an de borst . 0 I Het kind wordt zieker . . 02 Het kind krijgt koorts . . . 03 Het kind ademt (te) snel . 04 Het kind kan met moeite ademhalen . 05 Het kind heeft bloed in de ontlasting . 06 Het kind drinkt weinig . 07 Anders nl . 08 Anders nl . . 09 Anders nl . . . . . . I 0 ~:~ ~:~: ~~:~ :~:;:~ :::::::::::::::: ::::::::::::::::::::: ~~ I Appendix C:Questionnaires CLUSTERNR. __ _ HUISHOUDNR. __ _ VERZORGERNR ___ _ KINDNR __ • MODULE MALARIA (ALLEEN VOOR HET BINNENLAND) Deze vragen zijn bestemd voor venorgers van kinderen onder 5 jaar 8. Heeft (naam) gisteren onder een kJamboe geslapen? Ja . . I I,. Vrg. 9 Nee . 2 2,. Volgende module Weet niet . 9 9 ,. Volgende module 9. Was deze klamboe gewassen met een middel tegen Ja . . . . . . 1 I ,.Vrg. 10 muskieten? Nee . . . . . . 2 2 ,. Volgende module Weet niet . 9 9 ,. Volgende module 10. Hoe lang geleden was de klamboe gewassen met bet Maand(en) geleden middel? Weet niet . 99 • • 58 Appendix C:Questionnaires -; t;;'k~il; Surmamt" \1u.ur~t: lr"~ ,.).· r (,. . ty , . -.~ : •• ,k'>' • CLUSTER NR __ _ HUISHOUDNR __ _ VERZORGERNR __ _ KINDNR __ IMMUNISATIE MODULE Als het kind een vaccinatie boekje (of kaart) heeft vraag er dan naar en vul daarmee vraag 4 met de datum in. Heeft het kind geen vaccinatie boekje vul dan vraag 4 met ja! nee in. 0. Is (naam) gevaccineerd? Ja . l ~ Vrg . 1 Nee . 2 ~ Stop Weet niet . 9 ~ Stop 1. Heeft u zijn/haar vaccinatie boekje bij de hand? Ja , gezien . l lndien ]a: Ja, niet gezien . 2 ~ Vrg. 7 Mag ik het boekje zien? Nee . 3 ~ Vrg. 7 Schrijf de vaccinatie gegevens over. lndien er geen Doc( datum) documentatie van het vaccin is maar de respondent aangeeft dat deze is gegeven vul dan 44 in bij dag Dag Mnd Jaar 3a. Polio! 3b.Polio2 3c . Polio3 3d . Polio4 4a. DKTl 4b. DKT2 4c. DKT3 4d . DKT4 5. Mazelen/MMR 6. Heeft (naam) behalve de eerder genoemde ]a . I ~ Vrg.l4a • vaccinaties ook andere vaccinaties gehad - inclusief (Vraag naar vaccinaties en vul dan '66' vaccinaties tijdens een vaccinatie campagne? in bij corresponderende dag kolom in Vrg . 3a tim 5) Schrijf ']a' aileen indien de respondent Polio, DKT, Maze/en en/of MMR noemt. Ga daarna naar Nee . 2 ~ Vrg.l4a vraag 14a Weet niet . 9 ~ Vrg.l4a 7. Heeft (naam) ooit vaccinaties gehad om hem!haar Ja . l te beschermen tegen ziektes, inclusief vaccinaties Nee . 2 ~ Vrg.l4a tijdens een vaccinatie campagne? Weet niet . 9 ~ Vrg.1 4a 9. Heeft (naam) ooit vaccinatie druppels in de mood ]a . . I gehad om hem!haar te beschermen tegen polio? Nee . 2 ~ Vrg.l2 Weet niet . . 9 ~ Vrg.l2 11. Hoe vaak heeft hij/zij de druppels gehad? Aantal keren 12. Heeft (naam) ooit een spuitje om te voorkomen ]a . I dat hij/zij klem(tetanus) , kinkhoest en difterie zou Nee . 2 ~ Vrg.l4 krijgen? Weet niet . 9 ~ Vrg.l4 13. Hoe vaak heeft hij/zij zo een spuitje gehad? Aantal keren 14. Heeft (naam) ooit een spuitje in de arm gehad Ja . l toen hij/zij 9 maanden oud of ouder was om Nee . 2 mazelen te voorkomen? Weet niet . 9 14a. Heeft (naam) een prikje tegen tuberculose gehad? Ja . l Dat is een prikje waar een lidteken van achterblijft, Nee . 2 meestal op je linkerschouder. Weet niet . 9 • 15. Is (naam) gevaccineerd tijdens een van de volgende Ja Nee Weet niet campagnes? A. (maart-aug 1998) mazelen-MMR Campagne A. l 2 9 B. (december 1997) maze! en Campagne B. I 2 9 C. ( 1999) maze len - MMR Campagne C. I 2 9 Appendix C:Questionnaires CLUSTER NR. __ _ HUISHOUDNR __ _ VERZORGERNR __ _ KINDNR: __ _ • ANTHROPOMETRIE MODULE (VOOR ALLE KINDEREN ONDER 5 JAAR) Weeg en meet elk kind tussen o en 5 jaar. Noteer het gewicht en de lengte. 2. Gewicht van het kind. Kilogram (kg) . . __ . _ 3. Lengte van het kind Kruis aan: D Het kind is onder 2 jaar --.meet het kind liggend Lengte in em Liggend . . . . . 1) ___ . _ [] Het kind is 2 tot 5 jaar. --. meet het kind staand Lengte in em Staand . . . 2) ___ . _ 4. Gemeten door (enqueteurnr van interviewer) Enqueteurnr --- 5. Resultaat van anthropometrie Gemeten en gewogen . . 1 Niet thuis . . . . 2 Weigering . 3 Anders namelijk 4 6. Is er een ander kind in het huishouden tussen 0 en 5 jaar, dat gemeten en gewogen moet worden? [] Ja.~ Noteer de lengte en het gewicht van elk kind • [] Nee~Beeindig het interview met dit huishouden . Bedank aile participanten voor hun medewerking. Zet aile vragenlijsten van dit huishouden bij elkaar en controleer dat het huishoudnummer en de volgnummers op elke pagina geschreven zijn . Noteer op het Huishoud Informatie blad het aantal afgeronde vrouwen- en kinder-interviews . • 60 Appendix C:Questionnaires • • • Appendix D: Tables Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey Table 1 : Number of households and women , and response rates, Suriname, 1999-2000 Table 2 : Single year age distribution of household population by sex, Table 3 : Table 4 : Table 5 : Table 6 : Table 7 : Table 7w: Table 9: Table 10: Table 11: Table 12: Table 13: Table 14: Table 15: Suriname, 1999-2000 Percentage of cases with missing information, Suriname, 1999-2000 Percent distribution of households by background characteristics , Suriname, 1999-2000 Percent distribution of women 12-49 by background characteristics , Suriname, 1999-2000 Percent distribution of children under 5 by background characteristics, Suriname, 1999-2000 Mean number of children ever born (CEB) and proportion dead by mother's age, Suriname, 1999-2000 Sex ratio at birth by mother's age , Suriname, 1999-2000 Percentage of children age 36-59 months who are attending some form of organized early childhood education programme, Suriname , 1999-2000 Percentage of children of primary school age attending primary school, Suriname, 1999-2000 Percentage of children entering first grade of primary school who eventually reach grade 5, Suriname, 1999-2000 Percentage of the population aged 15 years and older that is literate, Suriname, 1999-2000 Percentage of the population using improved drinking water sources , Suriname, 1999-2000 Percentage of the population using sanitary means of excreta disposal, Suriname, 1999-2000 Percentage of under-five children who are severely or moderately undernourished, Suriname, 1999-2000 Table 15a: Percentage of under-five children with missing height or weight, Suriname, 1999-2000 Table 16: Percentage of living children by breast feeding status , Suriname, 1999-2000 Table 16w:Percent distribution of children by breast feeding status, Suriname, 1999-2000 Table 20: Percentage of live births in the last 12 months that weighed below 2500 grams at birth , Suriname, 1999-2000 Table 20a: Birth weight and size at birth , Suriname, 1999-2000 Table 21 : Percentage of children age 12-23 months immunized against childhood diseases at any time before the survey and before the first birthday, Suriname, 1999-2000 Table 2la: Percentage of children 12-23 months immunized against childhood diseases before the first birthday, for children who had a complete date on their vaccination card, Suriname, 1999-2000 Table 22: Percentage of children age 12-23 months currently vaccinated against childhood diseases, Suriname, 1999-2000 Table 23: Percentage of under- five children with diarrhea in the last two weeks and treatment with ORS or ORT, Suriname, 1999-2000 Table 24: Percentage of under- five children with diarrhea in the last two weeks who took increased fluids and continued to feed during the episode, Suriname, 1999-2000 Table 25: Percentage of under- five children with acute respiratory infection in the last two weeks and treatment by health providers , Suriname 1999-2000 Table 26: Percentage of children 0-59 months of age reported ill during the last two weeks who received increased fluids and continued feeding , Suriname, 1999-2000 Tab!e 27: Percentage of caretakers of children 0-59 months who know at least 2 signs for seeking care immediately, Suriname, 1999-2000 63 64 66 66 67 68 68 69 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 75 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 Appendi x D: Tables 61 Table 28: Percentage of children 0-59 months of age who slept under an insecticide- 89 • impregnated bednet during the previous night, Suriname, 1999-2000 Table 30: Percentage of women aged 12-49 who know the main ways of preventing HIV 90 transmission, Suriname, 1999-2000 Table 31: Percentage of women aged 12-49 who correctly identify misconceptions about 91 HIV/AIDS, Suriname, 1999-2000 Table 32: Percentage of women aged 12-49 who correctly identify means of HIV 92 transmission from mother to child, Suriname, 1999-2000 Table 33: Percentage of women aged 12-49 who express a discriminatory attitude towards 93 people with HIV/AIDS, Suriname, 1999-2000 Table 34: Percentage of women aged 12-49 who have sufficient knowledge of HIV/AIDS 94 transmission , Suriname , 1999-2000 Table 35: Percentage of women aged 12-49 who know where to get an AIDS test and 95 who have been tested , Suriname, 1999-2000 Table 36: Percentage of married or in union women aged 12-49 who are using 96 (or whose partner is using) a contraceptive method , Suriname , 1999-2000 Table 38: Percent distribution of women aged 12-49 with a birth in the last year by 97 type of personnel delivering antenatalcare, Suriname, 1999-2000 Table 39: Percent distribution of women aged 12-49 with a birth the last year by type 98 of personnel assisting at delivery, Suriname, 1999--2000 Table 40: Percent distribution of children age 0-59 months by whether birth is registered 99 and reasons for non-registration, Suriname , 1999-2000 Table 41: Percentage of children 0-14 years of age in households not living with a 100 biological parent , Suriname, 1999-2000 • • 62 Appendix D: Tables • • • """ff>M'"~ " ' • ''I , Sunnanh,' \lultipk lndh.dtor ( lthtu Sui\L'\ 2000 ~ . ~: Table 1: Number of households and women, and response rates, Suriname, 1999-2000 Stratum Urban Rural Interior Sampled households 2600 1579 513 Found households 2541 1554 490 Completed households 2313 1495 485 Household response rate 91.0 96.2 99.0 Eligible women 2698 1813 544 Interviewed women 2392 1640 523 Women response rate 88.7 90.5 96.1 Children under 5 929 658 374 Interviewed children under 5 889 633 363 Child response rate 95.7 96.2 97.1 Total 4692 4585 4293 93.6 5055 4555 90.1 1961 1885 96.1 Appendix D: Tables 63 .-->~~"> Sunn.tmt· Mulupk lnda.:~r (luster Sul\ey 2000 , :~\ 64 Appendix D: Tables ,' f"!. Table 2: Single year age distribution of household population by sex, Suriname, 1999-2000 Sex Male Female Number Percent Number Percent Age 0 232 2.7 201 2.3 1 208 2.4 198 2.3 2 272 3.2 195 2.3 3 178 2.1 201 2.4 4 179 2.1 170 2.0 5 161 1.9 159 1.9 6 183 2.2 165 1.9 7 207 2.4 164 1.9 8 177 2.1 147 1.7 9 182 2.1 177 2.1 10 195 2.3 176 2.1 11 158 1.9 176 2.1 12 178 2.1 152 1.8 13 182 2.1 202 2.4 14 186 2.2 194 2.3 15 189 2.2 224 2.6 16 162 1.9 2.8 2.4 17 181 2.1 190 2.2 18 173 2.0 141 1.6 19 153 1.8 164 1.9 20 162 1.9 178 2.1 21 135 1.6 137 1.6 22 141 1.7 149 1.7 23 136 1.6 130 1.5 24 113 1.3 129 1.5 25 136 1.6 152 1.8 26 119 1.4 115 1.4 27 119 1.4 131 1.5 28 139 1.6 128 1.5 29 117 1.4 135 1.6 30 163 1.9 158 1.9 31 112 1.3 I 13 1.3 32 141 1.7 151 1.8 33 120 1.4 139 1.6 34 117 1.4 I 12 1.3 35 159 1.9 136 1.6 36 123 1.5 120 1.4 37 101 1.2 I 15 1.3 38 119 1.4 119 1.4 39 128 1.5 114 1.3 40 124 1.5 122 1.4 • • Sex Male Female Number Percent Number Percent Age 41 89 1.0 106 1.2 42 106 4.2 77 .9 43 79 .9 96 1.1 44 86 1.0 86 1.0 45 104 1.2 103 1.2 46 55 .6 .68 .8 47 75 .9 88 1.0 48 64 .8 89 1.0 49 53 .6 66 .8 . 50 75 .9 82 1.0 51 40 .5 51 .6 52 59 .7 44 .5 53 51 .6 47 .6 54 49 .6 70 .8 55 53 .6 62 .7 56 39 .5 53 .6 57 37 .4 47 .5 58 48 .6 53 .6 59 33 .4 57 .7 60 57 .7 60 .7 61 42 .5 48 .6 • 62 33 .4 44 .5 63 43 .5 50 .6 64 37 .4 42 .5 65 52 .6 62 .7 66 30 .4 41 .5 67 43 .5 44 .5 68 33 .4 35 .4 69 35 .4 38 .4 70+ 258 3.0 297 3.5 Miss ing/ 181 . 2.1 49 .6 DK Total 8491 100.0 8542 100.0 • Appendix D: Tables 65 ~ ~~ ~v"' , "'1t"G Sun name Mult1ple lnd1cator Cluster Survey 2000 _!,,viii ' ~ ;"·~-~ -~ "'" 66 Appendix D: Tables Table 3: Percentage of cases missing information for selected questions, Suriname, 1999-2000 Percent missing Number Level of education .6 13468 Year of education 3.2 13467 I Table 3: Percentage of cases missing information for selected questions, Suriname, 1999-2000 Percent missing . Number Ever been tested for HIV .9 4221 Table 3: Percentage of cases missing information for selected questions, Suriname, 1999-2000 Percent missing Number Complete birth date .3 1885 Diarrhea in last 2 weeks 1.3 1885 Weight 4.6 1885 Height 4 .6 1885 Table 4: Percent distribution of household by background characteristics, Suriname, 1999-2000 Percent missing Number Unweighted District Paramaribo 38.9 1669 1717 Wanica 20.6 884 950 Nickerie 10.6 457 491 Coronie 1.5 66 73 Saramacca 2.6 114 126 Commewijne 3.6 153 170 Marowijne 4.3 187 191 Para 3.7 160 155 Brokopondo 3.1 132 92 Sipaliwini 11.0 471 328 Stratum Urban 52.4 2249 2313 Rural 31.4 1347 1495 Interior 16.2 697 485 NumberorHH I 10.4 445 435 members · 2-3 34.6 1484 1475 4-5 35.0 1504 1522 6-7 13.6 585 593 8-9 4.6 196 194 10+ 1.8 78 74 Total 100.0 4293 4293 • • • • ~ • • ,::r,;"}__:.¥ 0 ':;~,~-s ~ Sun name Multtple Indtcator Cluster Sun e) 2000 ii~> ""~ ~ Table 4: Percent distribution of household by background characteristics, Suriname, 1999-2000 - Percent Number Unweighted At least one child age< 15 63.7 4293 4293 At least one child age < 5 37 .9 4293 4293 At least one woman age 12-49 79.3 4293 4293 Table 5: Percent distribution of women 12-49 by background characteristics, Suriname, 1999-2000 Percent Number Unweighted District Paramaribo 37 .6 1715 1730 Wanica 22.6 1028 1096 Nickerie 11.4 518 554 Coronie 1.3 60 67 Saramacca 2.6 117 130 Commewijne 3.3 150 167 Marowijne 4.1 185 194 Para 3.7 167 162 Brokopondo 3.4 153 113 Sipaliwini 10.1 462 342 Stratum Urban 52.1 2371 2392 Rural f 32.4 1477 1640 Interior 15.5 707 523 Age 12-14 10.5 478 477 15-19 18.6 845 846 20-24 14.4 654 647 25-29 13.2 603 604 30-34 13.5 614 616 35-39 12.2 554 555 40-44 9.8 444 450 45-49 8.0 363 360 Marital status Currently married 58.5 2666 2669 Not currently married 41.5 1889 1886 Ever given birth Yes 61.3 2794 2776 No 38.7 1761 1779 Woman's education None 8.1 371 301 level Primary 30.7 1399 1369 Secondary+ 59.9 2728 2827 Missing/DK 1.3 58 58 Total 100.0 4555 4555 Appendix D: Tables · 67 ~ ""'W•~v~~~" Sunname Multtple lndtcat<Jr Cluster Survey 2000 ' '';:~f!li' ,_"'~. ~ 68 Appendix D: Tables Table 6: Percent distribution of children under 5 by background characteristics, Suriname, 1999-2000 Percent Number Unweighted Sex Male 52 .6 992 994 Female 47.4 893 891 District Paramaribo 33.1 623 662 Wanica 18.1 342 381 Nickerie 9.4 177 198 Coronie 1.7 32 37 Saramacca 2.2 42 48 Commewijne 2.1 40 46 Marowijne 4.9 92 98 Para 4.6 86 87 Brokopondo 6.6 124 90 Sipaliwini 17.3 327 238 Stratum Urban 44.4 837 889 Rural 29.2 550 633 Interior 26.4 498 363 Age < 6 months 12.3 231 224 6-11 months 8.6 163 162 12-23 months 20.0 376 369 24-35 months 22.8 430 435 36-4 7 months 18.8 354 361 48-59 months 17.5 329 332 Mother's education None 14.9 281 229 level Primary 29.1 549 521 Secondary+ 54.8 10.4 1113 Missing/DK 1.2 22 22 Total 100.0 1885 1885 Table 7: Mean number of children ever born (CEB) and proportion dead by mother's age, Suriname, 1999-2000 Mean number of CEB Proportion dead Number of women - Age 12-14 .008 .333 478 15-19 .179 .052 845 20-24 1.007 .063 654 25-29 1.832 .037 603 30-34 2.655 .057 614 35-39 3.316 .048 554 40-44 3.826 . 056 444 45-49 4.321 .084 363 Total 1.899 . . 058 4555 • • • • • • ,.~-~ . -- ;r<;'" ~ :) ., , " Sunname Multiple lndtcatm Cluster Sune} 2000 !'l:,o, c*" o Table 7w: Sex ratio at birth by mother's age, Suriname, 1999-2000 Total number of boys Total number of girls Sex ratio at birth Age 12-14 1 3 .50 15-19 79 72 1.09 20-24 340 319 1.06 25-29 577 528 1.09 30-34 844 786 1.07 35-39 938 898 1.04 40-44 867 832 1.04 45-49 804 763 1.05 Table 9: Percent of children aged 36-59 months who are attending some form of organized early childhood education programme, Suriname, 1999-2000 Attending programme Number of children Sex Male 38.3 338 Female 35.6 345 District Paramaribo 53.6 223 Wanica 42.5 126 Nickerie 46.0 76 Coronie 47.6 18 Saramacca 47.1 15 Commewijne 40.0 17 Marowijne 27.5 33 Para 31.7 35 Brokopondo .0 41 Sipaliwini 1.4 99 Stratum Urban 51.6 296 Rural 40.8 227 Interior 4.3 161 Age 36-47 months 14.1 354 48-59 months 61.4 329 Mother's education None 12.8 96 level Primary 26.5 210 Secondary+ 49.2 373 Missing/DK 17.7 5 Total 36.9 684 World Summit for Children Goal => Number 26 Appendix D: Tab les 69 \ ' "'1!.~·''1\~' Sunn,une Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey 2000' • <v V "; 70 Appendix D: Tables ~ ,, f Table 10: Percentage of children of primary s chool age attending primary school , Suriname, 1999-2000 Sex Total Male Female Attending Attending primary school Attending primary school Attending Number Attending Number District Paramaribo 80.9 472 80.9 427 80.9 Wanica 80.9 309 86.4 280 83.5 Nickerie 86.2 134 78.9 141 82.4 Coronie 76.0 23 70.8 22 73.5 Saramacca 83.8 33 84.6 35 84.2 Commewijne 84.3 46 93 .0 39 88.3 Marowijne 77.1 87 80.9 76 78.9 Para 81.0 75 81.0 58 81.0 Brokopondo 69.2 56 82 .2 65 76.25 Sipaliwini 49.3 204 54.5 174 51.7 Stratum Urban - 81.6 661 81.7 589 81.6 Rural 80.7 476 83 .3 452 81.9 Interior 57.8 303 64.9 275 61.2 Age 5 1.8 161 6.2 159 4.0 6 76.6 183 80 .3 165 78.4 7 87.5 207 89 .3 164. 88.3 8 92.2 177 94.6 147 93.3 9 89.4 182 95 .0 177 92.2 10 91.1 195 94.7 176 92.8 11 90.4 158 90.5 176 90.5 12 72.4 178 75 .0 152 73.6 Total 76.3 1440 78.7 1316 77.5 World Summit for Children Goal => Number 6 • Number 899 590 275 44 68 85 164 132 121 378 1250 928 578 320 348 370 324 • 359 372 334 330 2156 • • • • .,.;rN?;,t:f,. 0 ;:"'. ;•'! "''. Surmamc Mulllple lnthcator Cluster Survq 2000 /~'"".,>(' ~ "'.: Table 11: Percentage of children entering first grade of primary school who eventually reach grade 5, Suriname, 1999-2000 Percent Percent Percent Percent Percent grade 1 grade 2 grade 3 grade 4 grade 5 reaching reaching reaching reaching reaching grade 2 grade3 grade4 gradeS grade 6 Sex Male. 94.0 97.5 97.2 92.9 82.7 Female 97.9 97.1 98.2 91.3 85.2 District Paramaribo 100.0 99.1 98.5 94.9 92.6 Wanica 98.7 98.9 98.3 96.0 92.1 Nickerie 97.0 94.6 100.0 82.1 75.4 Coronie 100.0 100.0 88.9 100.0 88.9 Saramacca 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 Commewijne 100.0 100.0 100.0 90.0 90.0 Marowiine 90.7 84.7 100.0 89.2 68.5 Para 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 Brokopondo 86.7 100.0 100.0 92.3 80.0 Sipaliwini 81.5 92.9 85.0 71.4 45.9 Stratum Urban 100.0 99.3 98.9 94.4 92.8 Rural 96.6 95.3 98.2 91.3 82.5 Interior 84.8 96.2 91.9 86.1 64.5 Total 1.00 95.8 97.3 97.6 92.1 83.8 World Summit for Children Goal => Number 6 Appendix D: Tables 71 Table 12: Percentage of the population aged 15 years and older that is literate, Suriname, 1999-2000 Sex Total Male Female Literate Not known Number Literate Not known Number Literate Not known Number District Paramaribo 95.2 .6 2262 93.2 .6 2271 94.2 .6 4533 Wanica 91.8 1.0 1291 88.7 .2 1245 90.3 .6 2536 Nickerie 85.9 4.5 689 85.9 3.9 639 85.9 4.2 1328 Coronie 93.4 3.3 82 87.3 2.5 71 90.6 2.9 153 Saramacca 79.9 11.2 152 73.8 9.1 148 76.9 10.2 300 Commewijne 94.3 .4 236 84.5 .0 215 89.6 .2 451 Marowijne 85.8 1.1 238 74.6 1.7 246 80 .1 1.4 485 Para 93.4 .8 215 90.1 .4 211 91.8 .6 426 Brokopondo 70.0 12.5 57 54.1 2.5 175 58.0 4.9 233 Sipaliwini 50.0 14.4 210 33.4 9.7 594 37.7 10.9 804 Stratum Urban 94.1 1.0 3126 91.8 .8 3081 92.9 .9 6207 Rural 89.0 2.6 1910 84.9 1.9 1846 87 .0 2.3 3755 Interior 65 .9 9.4 397 44.4 7.1 890 51.1 7.8 1287 Age 15-24 92.2 3.1 1543 91.3 .9 1651 91.7 1.9 3194 25-34 94.5 1.5 1280 89.6 1.4 1335 92.0 1.4 2615 35-44 93.6 1.4 1113 85.8 1.8 1091 89.7 1.6 2204 45-54 89.5 1.2 625 75.4 3.2 708 82 .0 2.3 1333 55-64 80.5 2.8 422 65.7 4.5 SIS 72.4 3.7 937 65+ 73.1 4.1 450 53 .8 4 .6 516 62.8 4.4 966 Total 90.2 2.2 5433 82.3 2.1 5816 86.2 2.1 11249 World Summit for Children Goal =>Number 7 • • • • • • Table 13· Percentage of the population using improved drinking water sources, Suriname, 1999-2000 Main source of water Total Total with Number of safe persons drinking water Piped Piped Public Tubewell/ Protected Protected Bottled Rainwater Unprotecte< Unprotected River or Tanker Cut Other Missing/ into into tap borehole spring dug well water collection spring dug well stream truck official DK dwelling yard with vendor pipe or plot pump District Paramaribo 14.0 .7 .0 .1 .0 .1 4.3 .0 .0 .0 .0 .0 .5 .4 100.0 94.7 6388 Wanica 44.6 24.6 .5 1.4 1.7 .4 .0 21.8 .3 .0 .0 .0 2.1 2.5 .2 100.0 73.1 3681 Nickerie 49.9 31.8 .6 .0 .0 .0 .2 3.7 .0 .0 .7 1.3 8.5 1.9 1.4 100.0 82.5 1887 Coronie 43.1 41.2 .4 .0 .0 .0 .0 12.0 .0 .0 .0 .0 .0 3.4 .0 100.0 84.6 241 Saramacca 52 .0 29 .0 .4 1.3 .0 .8 .8 11.3 .0 1.5 1.5 .0 1.5 .0 .0 100.0 84.3 432 Commewijne 16.9 7.4 .0 .0 2.1 .0 .0 70.3 1.5 .0 .0 .0 1.8 .0 .0 100.0 26.4 598 Marowijne 42 .1 20.9 .0 2.1 2.0 .0 .8 9.4 2.6 .0 18 .3 .0 .0 1.9 .0 100.0 67 .9 828 Para 33.2 36.7 4.2 3.4 4.3 .7 .0 10.3 2.5 .0 1.7 .0 1.3 1.7 .1 100.0 82.4 685 Brokopondo .0 9.0 8.2 .0 .0 .0 .0 5.0 .0 .0 77.9 .0 .0 .0 .0 100.0 17.2 578 Sipaliwini .0 6.9 .0 .0 .0 .0 .0 26.6 .0 .7 65.5 .0 .0 .0 .4 100.0 6.9 1715 Stratum Urban 74.5 16.1 .5 .6 .7 .2 .1 5.5 .2 .0 .0 .1 .1 1.1 .5 100.0 92.6 8783 Rural 37.1 27.4 .6 .2 1.0 .I .2 23.4 .5 .1 2.5 .3 4.6 1.5 .4 100.0 66.6 5549 Interior 3.2 12 .1 2.7 i 1.4 .5 .0 .0 18.3 .8 .4 59 .8 .0 .0 .4 .3 100.0 20.0 2701 Total 51.0 19.1 .9 .6 .7 .1 .1 13.4 .4 .1 10.3 .1 1.6 1.1 .4 100.0 72.6 17033 World Summit for Children Goal =>Number 4 Table 14: Percentage of the population using sanitary means of excreta disposal , Suriname, 1999-2000 Type of toilet facility Total Total with sanitar Number of means of excreta persons disposal Flush to sewage Pour flush Improved Traditional River Open pit Other No facilities/ Missing system/ ~atrine pit latrine pit latrine bush/field septic tank District Paramaribo 87.6 11.4 .2 .0 .0 .0 .5 .0 .4 100.0 99 .2 6388 Wanica 73.8 25.6 .0 .2 .0 .l .1 .I .0 100.0 99.6 368 1 Nickerie 77.0 18.7 .0 1.4 .0 .9 .8 .2 1.0 100.0 97.2 1887 Coronie 53.2 46.8 .0 .0 .0 .0 .0 .0 .0 100.0 100.0 241 Saramacca 53.0 37.6 9.2 .0 .0 .0 .0 .2 .0 100 .0 99 .8 432 Commewijne 58.3 37.5 1.7 1.2 .0 .6 .8 .0 .0 100.0 98.6 598 Marowijne 45.3 46.5 .0 1.3 .0 4 .2 2.4 .3 .0 100.0 93 .1 828 Para 46.2 52.5 .0 .4 .0 .0 .0 .8 .1 100 .0 99.1 685 Brokopondo 1.0 5.5 .0 .0 .0 .0 .0 93.5 .0 100.0 6.5 578 Sipaliwini .8 2 1.5 .0 .8 38.1 1.4 .0 36.6 .8 100.0 23.1 1715 Stratum Urban 84.3 14.6 .I .0 .0 .0 .5 .0 .4 100.0 99 .1 8783 Rural 65.6 30.9 .9 .9 .0 .8 .5 .3 .1 100.0 98.3 5549 Interior 5.0 24 .9 .0 .6 . 24 .2 1.4 .I 43.4 .5 100.0 30.5 2701 Total 65.6 21.5 .3 .4 3.8 .5 .4 7.0 .3 100.0 88.0 17033 World Summit for Children Goal =>Number 5 • • • • • • Table 15: Percentage of the under-five children who are severly or moderately undernourished, Suriname, 1999-2000 Weight for Weight for Height for Height for Weight for Weight for Number of age: -2 SD age: -3 SD age: -2 SD age: -3 SD height: -2 SD height: -3 SD children Sex Male 14.3 2.7 11.8 3 .0 7 .3 1.5 907 Female 12.3 1.5 7 .7 2.3 5 .6 1.5 809 District Paramaribo 10 .8 2.0 6.0 1.5 6.5 1.5 576 Wanica 16.5 1.9 8.5 2.5 9 .5 2.4 324 Nickerie 10.3 .0 6.2 .6 7.4 .6 146 Coronie 2.9 .0 .0 .0 2 .9 .0 30 Saramacca 22 .0 4 .9 9.8 7 .3 17.1 .0 36 Commewijne 20.0 4.4 6.7 .0 6.7 2.2 39 Marowijne •3.0 .0 7 .0 .0 .0 .0 86 Para 3.2 .0 6.3 1.1 .0 .0 82 Brokopondo 21.4 6.0 21.4 11.9 4 .8 .0 115 Sipa1iwini 18.5 2.9 20.0 3.9 5.9 2.4 281 Stratum Urban 10 .7 1.5 6.3 1.3 6.5 1.2 767 . Rural 13.8 1.9 8.0 2.0 7.7 1.7 510 Interior 17.5 3.4 18.4 5.6 5.0 1.6 439 Age < 6 months 3.5 1.1 2 .6 .7 1.3 .4 210 6-11 months 12.9 3.7 9.5 2.9 9.0 4.4 144 12-23 months 17.9 2.6 14.2 4.7 8.7 1.0 353 24-35 months 12.5 1.8 10.2 2.4 5 .3 .7 385 36-47 months 13.7 1.6 9.8 2.7 5.6 1.7 326 48-59 months 15 .6 2.4 9 .6 1.8 8.7 2.0 297 Mother's None ~ 16.9 4.0 17 .8 5 .7 4.3 2.0 254 education Primary 16.3 2.3 14.0 2.8 6.3 1.3 488 . level Secondary+ )0.9 . 1.4 ·' 5.6 1.8 7.0 1.3 955 Missing/DK 15.6 · ~ 4.4 16.0 .0 13.5 4.4 20 Total 13.3 2.1 9.9 2.7 6.5 1.5 1716 World Summit for Children Goal=> Number 3,9 ,26 ·' , • -~'lf o Sunn,•me Mult1ple Indicator Cluster Survey 2000 $' 76 Appendix D: Tables s._ Table 15a: Percentage of under-five children with missing height or weight, Suriname, 1999-2000 Missing height or weight Number of children Sex Male 45 992 Female 5.9 893 District Paramaribo 5.3 623 Wanica 4.7 342 Nickerie 15 .3 177 Coronie 0 32 Saramacca 10.4 42 Commewijne 2.2 40 Marowijne 1.9 92 Para 1.6 86 Brokopondo .0 124 Sipaliwini 3.8 327 Stratum Urban 6.5 837 Rural 5.2 550 Interior 2.8 498 Age < 6 months 3.2 231 6-11 months 6.7 163 12-23 months 3.3 376 24-35 months 6.3 430 36-47 months 5.8 354 48-59 months 5.6 329 Mother's education None 2.6 281 level Primary 4.4 549 Secondary+ 6.2 1034 Missing/DK 8.3 22 Total 5.1 1885 World Summit for Children Goal=> Number 3,9 ,26 • • • • • • Table 16: Percent of living children by bre.astfeeding status, Suriname, 1999-2000 Exclusive breastfeeding Complementary feeding Continued breastfeeding Continued breastfeeding rate rate rate Children 0-3 Number of Children 6-9 Number of Children 12-15 Number of Children 20·23 Number of months children months children months children months children Sex Male 15.4 84 19.2 61 43 .7 65 9.1 52 Female 9.9 73 30.8 52 42 .2 78 13 .2 52 Distr ict Paramaribo 8.6 55 20.0 33 38.1 40 16.7 34 Wanica 18.8 24 38 .2 19 16.1 28 5.0 19 Nickerie 27.2 10 37.4 7 33 .2 14 43.0 6 Coronie .0 I 50.0 2 .0 .0 2 Saramacca .0 4 40 .0 4 33.3 3 33.3 3 Commewijne .0 2 .0 3 25 .0 3 .0 2 Marowijne .0 9 37 .5 7 45.4 8 .0 3 Para .0 2 26.4 7 46.2 7 .0 3 Brokopondo 7 .I 19 .0 4 50 .0 8 .0 14 Sipaliwini 21.7 32 15 .8 26 75.0 33 7.7 18 Stratum Urban 12.3 69 25.0 45 31.7 59 17 .0 44 Rural 9.5 36 34.1 36 26 .8 36 9 .4 28 Interior 15.8 52 13 .0 32 68.6 48 4.3 32 Mother's None 14.0 29 16.9 13 55.1 22 9.2 25 education Primary 20.0 53 18.9 29 57.4 43 7.0 27 level Secondary+ 7.3 75 28 .6 66 31.3 75 14.4 51 Missing/DK 0 21.8 4 33.3 3 .0 1 Total 12.8 157 24.5 112 42.9 143 11.1 104 World Summit for Children Goal => Number 16 -~-.~ "'"" Sunn,une 1\lulliple lmhcator Cluster SurVC) 2000 < • ':,;1/ ' a ' "":/"' ' . _., "'1>'1:.Ni.lol;.;~ Ta ble 16w: Pe rce nt dis tribution of childre n by breastfee ding status , Suriname, 1999-2000 • Breastfeeding status Total Not Exclusively Breast milk Breast milk and Breast milk and Total Number of breastfeeding breastfed and water only liquids only solid/mushy food children Age 0-1 6.6 15 .7 29.3 46.9 1.4 100.0 61 2-3 17.4 12.0 17.7 48.8 4.0 100.0 88 4-5 32.8 .0 12.3 36.6 18.3 100.0 71 6-7 31.4 2.3 6.1 34.5 25.7 100.0 59 8-9 37.3 .0 2.9 33.9 26 .0 100.0 47 10-11 40.7 .0 10.5 13.4 35.5 100.0 48 12-13 39.9 2.5 5.0 12.5 40.1 100.0 55 14-15 63 .7 1.1 .0 9.3 25.9 100.0 78 16-17 69.1 1.3 .0 3.7 26.0 100.0 75 18-19 82.9 .0 .0 .0 17.1 100.0 48 20-21 88.9 .0 .0 3.2 7.9 100.0 29 22-23 87.3 1.4 .0 1.3 9.9 100.0 65 24-25 93.6 .0 .0 1.2 5.2 100.0 79 26-27 93 .0 .0 .0 .0 7.0 100.0 73 28-29 88.0 .0 .0 2.8 9.2 100.0 67 30-31 92.0 .0 1.9 .0 6.1 100.0 74 32-33 95.5 2.7 .0 .0 1.7 100.0 50 34-35 95 .2 .0 .0 .0 4.8 100.0 58 • Exclusively breastfed includes vitamin, mineral supplements and medicine • 78 Appendix D: Tables • • • ,~-~~~ 'T "', :t";/~,, -;_ . .:-, ;t, Sl!lllldlll~' ~lulupl. l nd1, d1H ( lu-.flr "Ul\L\ 2tJIUJ Table 20: Percentage of live births in the last 12 months th~t weighed below 2500 grams at birth , Suriname, 1999-2000 Percent of live Percent of live Number of births below births weighed live births 2500 grams at birth - ~ - . - - ~ District Paramaribo 12.3 86.0 142 Wan ica 12.5 86.0 73 Nickerie 9.0 91.0 30 Coronie 6.5 100.0 5 Saramacca 11.2 64.3 13 Commewijne 17.0 100.0 9 Marowijne 16.1 62.5 18 Para 11 .8 67.7 14 Brokopondo 7.2 46.2 35 Sipaliwini 10.1 67.2 91 Stratum Urban 11.7 87.4 188 Rural 12.5 80.8 108 Interior 9.9 60.2 132 Woman's None 11.7 60 .9 59 education Primary 10 .7 67.2 139 level Secondary+ 11.8 87.6 223 Missing/DK 5.6 87.8 7 Total 11.4 77.3 429 World Summit for Children Goal=> Number 12 Working table for table 20 Number of Number of Proportion of Total number Estimated percent weighed births weighed births live births of births of live births below 2500 grams below 2500 grams below 2500 grams Size of Child Very Large 7.8 .9 .1 1 6.7 1.0 Larger than average 47 .0 1.9 .04 54 .7 2.2 Average 229.0 13.3 .06 287.9 16.8 Smaller than average 38.4 17.0 .44 50.5 22.4 Very small 5.8 4 .8 .83 7.7 6.3 Miss ing 3.6 .0 .00 16.8 .0 Don ' t know .0 .0 .00 2.7 .0 Appendix 0: Tables 79 Table 20a: Birth weight and size at birth, Suriname, 1999-2000 Birth weight Size of Child <2500 2500+ DK/Missing Not weighted Very large Larger than Average Smaller than Very small Don't know Total Number at birth average average District Paramaribo 9.8 76 .2 14.0 .0 4.2 13.3 64 .3 10.5 3.5 4 .2 100.0 142 Wanica 15.3 71.9 11.5 1.2 3.8 11.3 66.0 15.2 1.2 2.5 100.0 73 Nickerie 12 .7 78 .3 6.0 3.0 .0 15.4 72.3 9.3 .0 3.0 100.0 30 Coronie .0 100.0 .0 .0 .0 20. 80. .0 .0 .0 100 .0 5 Saramacca 14 .3 50.0 28.6 7 .1 .0 7.1 78.6 14.3 .0 .0 100.0 13 Commewijne 10 .0 90.0 .0 .0 .0 20.0 60.0 10.0 10.0 .0 iOO .O 9 Marowijne .0 62 .5 25.0 12.5 .0 15 .0 62 .5 17 .5 5.0 .0 100.0 18 Para 6.5 61.3 16.1 16. 1 .0 12.9 7 1.0 16.1 .0 .0 100.0 14 Brokopondo 7.7 38 .5 7 .7 46.2 .0 7.7 88.5 3.8 .0 .0 10.0 35 Sipaliwini 3.0 64 .2 20.9 11.9 .0 13.4 6 1.2 13.4 .0 11.9 100.0 91 Str:.tum Urban 11.1 76.3 12.6 .0 3.7 11.6 68.4 10 .5 2 .6 3.2 100.0 188 . Rural 10.8 70.8 14.2 4.2 1.7 16.7 63 .3 13.3 2.5 2.5 100.0 108 Interior 4 .1 56. 1 17.3 22.4 .0 11.2 68.4 12.2 .0 8.2 100.0 132 Woman's None 6.8 54.0 12.5 26.6 .0 12.3 64.1 16.7 .0 5 .8 100 .0 59 education Primary 4.8 62.4 20 .8 12.0 1.4 12.3 68 .2 12.5 .7 4 .9 100.0 139 level Secondary+ 11.6 76.5 11.2 .8 3 .0 13.1 66.6 10.4 3.0 3.9 100 .0 223 Missing/DK 18.3 69 .5 12.2 .0 .0 12.2 87 .8 .0 .0 .0 100 .0 7 Total 8.8 68 .7 14.5 8.0 2.0 12 .8 67 .1 11.8 1.8 4 .5 100.0 429 ~ Monitoring Children's Rights Indicator • • • • • ;JO::~"!"~,.,.J<C ~t.;>w /'""!.•~:!:' . •4·~~~j1f~~~ Sunn.tme l\.1ultiplc lndl<.:.ltor Clu,tel Sul\c; 2000 , lt:.~;!il:c<: •• ~ . __ • Table 21: Percentage of children 12-23 months immunized against childhood diseases at any time before the survey, Suriname, 1999-2000 DPTl Vaccination Card 83.7 Mother's Report 5 .1 Not vaccinated 11.2 DPT2 Vaccination Card 81.2 Mother's Report 3.3 Not vaccinated 15.6 DPT3 Vaccination Card 75.8 Mother's Report 3.3 Not vaccinated 20.9 DPT4 Vaccination Card 50.7 Mother's Report 1.7 Not vaccinated 47 .6 Polio 1 Vaccination Card 84.0 Mother 's Report 3.8 Not vaccinated 12.2 Polio 2 Vaccination Card 81.2 Mother 's Report 3.8 Not vaccinated 15 .0 Polio 3 Vaccination Card 75 .8 Mother's Report 2.7 Not vaccinated 21.5 Polio 4 Vaccination Card 50.2 Mother 's Report 1.6 Not vaccinated 48.2 Measles Vaccination Card 55.5 Mother's Report 4 .6 Not vaccinated 39.8 All vaccinations Vaccination Card 52.9 Mother 's Report 1.2 Doesn't have all vaccinations 45.9 No vaccinations Vaccination Card 1.1 Mother 's Report 3.3 Has some vaccinations 95.7 Total Number of children 376.1 World Summit for Children Goal => Number 22 ,, Appendix 0: Tables 81 Sunn,mle Multiple Indicator Cluster Surve) 2000 :< ';' i(;l~, 82 Appendix D: Tables /:.-:-; . Table 21a: Percentage of children 12-23 months immunized against childhood diseases before the first birthday, for children who had a complete date on their vaccination card,Suriname, 1999-2000 DPTl 98.8 DPT2 97.1 DPT3 96.3 DPT4 43.9 Polio 1 98.8 Polio 2 97.1 Polio 3 96.3 Polio 4 43.4 Measles 36.3 All vaccinations 15.6 No vaccinations .0 World Summit for Children Goal =>Number 22 • ( • • • • • Table 22: Percentage of children age 12-23 months currently vaccinated against chldhood diseases, Suriname, 1999-2000 DPT1 DPT2 DPT3 DPT4 Polio 1 Polio 2 Polio 3 Polio 4 Measles All None %with healt Numbero card children Sex Male 89.4 82.8 77.8 54.9 87.7 83 .3 77.0 54.2 57 .1 51.0 3.3 86.2 189 Female 88.3 86.1 80.4 49.9 87.8 86.6 80.0 49.5 63.2 57.2 5.4 83.9 187 District Paramaribo 88.0 82.9 80.3 62.4 87.2 85 .5 81.2 62.4 63.2 57.3 3.4 82.1 110 Wanica 93 .9 89.1 85 .6 64.0 90.3 88.0 84.5 65.2 59.1 53.0 .0 87.8 75 Nickerie 90 .7 94.0 90 .7 71.9 94.0 94 .0 90.7 88.6 62.8 62.8 .0 94.0 29 Coronie 100.0 100.0 100.0 60.0 100.0 100 .0 100.0 60.0 80.0 80.0 .0 100.0 4 Sararnacca 100.0 100.0 100 .0 55.6 100.0 100.0 100.0 55.6 55.6 55 .6 .0 100.0 8 Commewijne 100.0 100.0 100.0 77 .8 100.0 100.0 100 .0 77.8 55.6 55.6 .0 100.0 8 Marowijne 71.1 71.1 71.1 49.0 71.1 71.1 71.1 49.0 49.0 49.0 24.1 8037 18 Para 64.0 64.0 56.6 41.9 64.0 64.0 52.0 37.2 39.9 27.9 .0 54.7 19 Brokopondo 90.5 81.0 76.2 38.1 90.5 81.0 76.2 38.1 81.0 71.4 9.5 90.5 29 Sipaliwini 91.1 83 .9 69.6 25.0 89.3 83.9 67.9 23.2 55.4 46.4 7.1 85.7 77 Stratum Urban 89.3 85.1 82.7 64.3 88.7 87.5 83.9 64.3 63.1 57.7 2.4 83.9 158 Rural 88.7 87.0 84.3 62.6 87.0 85.2 81.7 61.7 56.5 53.0 4 .3 87.0 100 Interior 88.4 81.4 69.8 27.9 87.2 81.4 68 .6 26.7 59.3 50 .0 7.0 84.9 118 Woman's None 84.7 75.9 61.1 27 .5 79.9 73 .9 59.1 25.5 53 .2 41.0 9.3 79.9 68 education Primary 84.3 81.6 76 .5 41.6 85.2 83.0 76.5 40.7 51.9 48 .0 6.0 82.5 104 level Secondary+ 92.8 88.8 86.5 65.6 91.9 89.8 86.1 65.7 66.5 61.2 1.4 87 .7 197 Missing/DK 86.4 86.4 86.4 86.4 86.4 86.4 86.4 86.4 72.7 72.7 13 .6 100.0 6 Total 88.8 84.4 79.1 52.4 87.8 85.0 78.5 51.8 60.2 54.1 4.3 85. 376 Table 23: Percentage of under-five children with diarrhea in the last two weeks and treatment with ORS or ORT, Suriname, 1999-2000 Had diarrhea Number of Breast Gruel ORS Gruel Coconut Rice Homemade Any No in last children milk without water water cure recommended treatment 2 weeks under5 milk treatment - ~ - - - = ·". «--=- - Sex Male 14.3 992 2 1.5 28.5 35.4 14.5 11 .7 7.4 26.5 81.0 19.0 Female 15.4 893 30.0 22.8 35.5 10.3 9.3 5 .1 28.5 81. 1 18 .9 District Paramari bo 11.8 623 23.1 37.2 34.6 19 .2 9.0 11.5 28 .2 82. 1 17 .9 Wanica 11.8 342 15.6 26.5 31.3 24 .7 13 .1 8.8 22 .0 80.1 19.9 Nickerie 7 .5 177 39.3 39.9 20.2 26.8 6.6 .0 13.1 73 .2 26.8 Coronie 16.2 32 16.7 .0 33.3 16.7 33.3 .0 50.0 100.0 0 Saramacca 6.2 42 33.3 .0 .0 .0 .0 .0 .0 66 .7 33.3 Commewijne 4 .3 40 50.0 50 .0 .0 .0 .0 .0 50.0 100 .0 .0 Marowijne 20 .1 92 36.3 40 .2 23.4 33.6 35.6 9.4 41.0 85.9 14 .1 Para 13 .2 86 7.7 36.3 .0 .0 .0 7 .7 84.7 100 .0 .0 Brokopondo 36 .7 124 18 .2 9.1 54.5 .0 9.1 3.0 15.2 81.8 18.2 Sipaliwini 20.6 327 36.7 16.3 40.8 .0 6 .1 2.0 26.5 75.5 24.5 Stratum Urban 11.2 837 21.0 34.0 35.0 22.0 8.0 10.0 25 .0 82.0 18.0 Rural 10.4 550 25.8 33 .3 24.2 19 .7 2 1.2 9.1 25 .8 80.3 19.7 Interior 25.6 498 29 .0 16.1 40.9 2.2 7.5 2.2 30 .1 80 .6 19.4 Age < 6 months 14.4 23 1 53 .3 31.2 27.5 14 .8 4. 1 .0 13.5 72 .7 27.3 6-11 months 24 .4 163 59.8 54.0 38.0 16.3 2 .2 2.4 20.8 95.4 4.6 12-23 months 21.6 376 27.3 27.9 39.7 15 .9 16.2 9.0 25.4 81.4 18 .6 24-35 months 13.8 430 8.4 16.1 3 1.6 13.3 11.3 6 .2 31.6 80.9 19 .1 36-47 months 10. 1 354 6.2 18.9 28 .0 7.2 15. 1 7.4 43 .1 75 .8 24.2 48-59 months 9 .1 329 2.9 3.2 46.4 .0 5.8 9 .2 30.6 76 .7 23.3 Woman's None 23.0 28 1 26.9 13.5 4 1.3 2.9 14.1 1.5 21.3 8 1.5 18 .5 education Primary 18.6 549 30. 1 24.8 37.0 13 .7 7.8 7 .2 24 .8 79.0 21.0 level Secondary+ 10.5 1034 20.8 33.1 29 .8 17.4 11.3 7 .6 33.5 82 .0 18 .0 Missing/DK 118 .7 22 23.2 44 .7 57.1 .0 .0 2 1.4 33.9 100 .0 .0 Total 14.8 1885 25.7 25.7 35.5 12.4 10.5 6.2 27.5 81.0 19.0 World Summit for Chi ldren Goal =>Number 23 • • Number of ~ children )! with diarrhea 1.00 1.42 137 73 40 13 5 3 2 19 II 45 67 94 57 128 33 40 8 1 59 36 30 64 102 108 4 279 • • • Table 24: Percentage of under-five children with diarrhea in the last two weeks who took increased fluids and continued to feed • during the episode, Suriname, 1999-2000 Had diarrhea Number of Drinking during diarrhea Total Eating during diarrhea Total Received increased Number of in last children fluids and children with 2 weeks under 5 continued eating diarrhea More Same Missing/ somewhat Much Missing/ /Less DK less/same! less/none Dk more 1.00 Sex Male 14.3 992 30.8 66.3 2 .9 100.0 75.5 2 1.6 2.9 100 .0 23.6 142 Female 15.4 893 3 1.9 63.9 4.3 100.0 66.7 27.4 5.9 100.0 24.8 137 District Paramaribo 11.8 623 44 .9 53.8 1.3 100.0 66.7 32. 1 1.3 100.0 33.3 73 Wanica 11.8 342 27.2 66.2 6.6 100.0 64.4 29.0 6 .6 100 .0 17 .9 40 Nickerie 7.5 177 6.6 86.9 6.6 100.0 86 .9 6.6 6 .6 100.0 6.6 13 Coronie 16.2 32 16.7 83.3 .0 100 .0 100.0 .0 .0 100 .0 16 .7 5 Saramacca 6.2 42 33.3 66.7 .0 100 .0 h lO .O .0 .0 100.0 33.3 3 Commewijnf' 4.3 40 50.0 50.0 .0 100.0 50.0 50.0 .0 100.0 50 .0 2 Marowijne 20. 1 92 41.0 59.0 .0 100.0 57.0 43.0 0. 100.0 21.5 19 Para 13 .2 86 56.0 44.0 .0 100.0 68.1 24.2 7.7 100.0 3 1.9 11 Brokopondo 36.7 124 24.2 69 .7 6. 1 100.0 75 .8 18 .2 6.1 100.0 24.2 45 Sipaliwini 20.6 327 22.4 73.5 4.1 100.0 75 .5 18.4 6 .1 100.0 20.4 67 Stratum Urban 11.2 837 43.0 55.0 2.0 100.0 67.0 3 1.0 2.0 100 .0 30.0 94 Rural 10.4 550 19 .7 75.8 4 .5 100.0 71.2 22.7 6. 1 100.0 18.2 57 Inter ior 25.6 498 28.0 67.7 4.3 100.0 74.2 20.4 5.4 100 .0 22.6 128 Age < 6 months 14.4 23 1 16 .8 69.4 13.8 100 .0 71 .2 8.3 20 .5 100 .0 14.0 33 6-11 months 24.4 163 21.0 76.8 2.2 100.0 72.4 25.4 2.2 100.0 18 .6 40 12-23 months 21.6 376 27 .7 68.9 3.4 100.0 75.1 23.2 1.7 100 .0 25 .4 81 24-35 months 13.8 430 45.5 54.5 .0 100.0 78.2 21.8 .0 100 .0 32.2 59 36-47 months 10.1 354 36.0 61.4 2.6 100 .0 58.3 39.0 2.6 100.0 21.9 36 . 48-59 months 9.1 329 37.1 59.9 2.9 100.0 60 .0 32.5 7.5 100 .0 26.2 30 Woman's None 23.0 281 29 .8 70.2 .0 100.0 69.5 27.0 3.5 100.0 26.9 64 education Primary 18.6 549 26.5 68.6 5.0 100 .0 77.4 16.4 6 .3 100.0 24.2 102 level Secondary+ 10.5 1034 38.0 57.5 4.5 100 .0 66 .9 29.8 3.3 100.0 23.4 108 Missing/DK 18 .7 22 .0 100 .0 .0 100.0 55 .3 44.7 .0 100.0 .0 4 Total 14.8 1885 31.3 65.1 3.6 100.0 71.2 24.5 4.4 100.0 24.2 279 World Summit for Children Goal=> Number 23 Table 25: Percentage of under-five children with acute respiratory infection in the last two weeks and treatment by health providers, Suriname, 1999-2000 Had acute Number of Private Medical Village Emergency Hospital Family Pharmacy Other Other Any respiratory children physician specialist health room friend or care appropriate infection under 5 worker neighbour provider Sex Male 4.7 992 31.1 5 .9 20.8 .0 1.9 3.8 .0 5 .9 9.7 55.9 Female 3.8 893 41.3 2.8 16.3 .0 .0 6.8 .0 .0 6.8 60.4 District Paramaribo 3.6 623 29.2 12.5 .0 .0 .0 4.2 .0 8.3 12.5 41.7 Wanica 5.8 342 68 .0 4.4 .0 .0 4.4 4.4 .0 .0 4.4 68.0 Nickerie 1.0 177 100.0 .0 .0 .0 .0 .0 .0 .0 .0 100.0 Coronie 5.4 32 .0 .0 .0 .0 .0 .0 .0 .0 .0 .0 Saramacca .0 42 Commewijne 4 .3 40 100.0 .0 .0 .0 .0 .0 .0 .0 .0 100.0 Marowijne 6.2 92 45.6 .0 .0 .0 .0 .0 .0 15 .2 15 .2 45.6 Para 4.0 86 25 .0 .0 .0 .0 .0 25 .0 .0 .0 25.0 25 .0 Brokopondo 4.4 124 .0 .0 50 . .0 .0 25 .0 .0 .0 25.0 50.0 Sipaliwini 25.5 327 7.7 .0 69 .2 .0 .0 .0 .0 .0 .0 76.9 Stratum Urban 3.7 837 39.4 9.1 .0 .0 .0 3.0 .0 6.1 9.1 48 .5 Rural 4.4 550 6037 3.6 .0 .0 3.6 7.1 .0 3.6 10.7 60.7 Interior 5 .0 498 5.6 .0 61.1 .0 .0 5 .6 .0 .0 5.6 66.7 Age < 6 months 2.3 231 32.5 16 .2 25.7 .0 16.2 .0 .0 .0 .0 58.1 6-11 months 4 .0 163 42.2 .0 .0 .0 .0 .0 .0 .0 .0 42 .2 12-23 months 4 .6 376 44.4 5.4 15 .9 .0 .0 .0 .0 5.4 5.4 65 .7 24-35 months 5.6 430 41.3 .0 28 .6 .0 .0 7.5 .0 3.6 11.1 69.9 36-47 months 4.0 354 18.9 6.6 .0 .0 .0 9 .7 .0 .0 9 .7 25 .5 48-59 months 3.9 329 28.4 7.4 32 .3 .0 .0 6.8 .0 7.4 14.2 68 .2 Woman's None 6.2 28.1 18.6 .0 54.9 .0 .0 .0 .0 .0 .0 73.5 education Primary 3.5 549 23.2 .0 28.3 .0 .0 7.1 .0 .0 7.1 51.5 level Secondary+ 4.2 1034 47.7 8.5 .0 .0 2.0 6.2 .0 6.4 12.6 54.3 Missing/DK .0 22 Total 4.2 1885 35.4 4.6 18.9 .0 1.1 5.1 .0 3.4 8.5 57.8 World Summit for Children Goal =>Number 24 • • Number of children withARI 1.00 46 34 23 20 2 2 0 2 6 3 5 18 31 24 25 5 7 17 24 14 13 17 19 43 0 80 • Table 26: . ntage of children 0-59 months of age reported ill during the last . eeks received increased fluids and continued feeding , Suriname, 1999-2000 Reported ilness Number of Dr inking during illness Total Eating d uring illness Total Received in last two weeks children increased fluids under 5 and continued More Same/Less Missing I somewhat Much Missing/ eating DK less/same/ less/ DK more none Sex Male 46.4 992 18.9 79.4 1.8 100.0 75 .2 22.6 2.2 100.0 14.2 Female 47 .3 893 22.2 75 .2 2.6 100.0 75.1 21.2 3.7 100.0 16.5 District Paramaribo 41. 1 623 25.4 73.5 l.l 100.0 80 .9 17.3 1.8 100.0 19.5 Wan ica 46.8 342 16.9 8 1.4 1.7 100.0 73 .6 24 .2 2.2 100.0 12.3 Nickerie 36.4 177 15 .2 82.1 2.7 100.0 82.1 15 .2 2.7 100.0 13.9 Coronie 5 1.4 32 3 1.6 68.4 .0 100 .0 73 .7 26.3 .0 100.0 10.5 Saramacca 35.4 42 5 .9 76.5 17.6 100.0 70.6 11 .8 17 .6 100.0 5.9 Commewijne 37.0 40 29.4 64.7 5.9 100.0 76.5 23 .5 .0 100 .0 17 .6 Marowijne 53.8 92 38.4 69.6 .0 100.0 62 .6 37.4 .0 100.0 17.8 Para 46.2 86 33.8 66.2 .0 100.0 77.8 17.8 4.4 100 .0 26 .9 Brokopondo 77.8 124 17.1 78.6 4.3 100.0 74.3 18.6 7.1 100 .0 12.9 Sipaliwin i 52. 1 327 13.7 83 .9 2.4 100 .0 69.4 28.2 2.4 100.0 11.3 Stratum Urban 4 1.2 837 23.8 75 .1 1. 1 100.0 . 79.2 19.1 1.6 100 .0 18 .0 Rural 45 .2 550 18.2 79.0 2 .8 100 .0 74.8 21.7 3.5 100.0 13 .3 Interior 58.1 498 18.5 78.7 2.8 100 .0 70.6 25.6 3.8 100.0 13 .7 Age < 6 months 4 1.5 23 1 7.8 86.5 5 .7 100.0 75.4 13 .2 11.4 100.0 6.8 6- 11 months 51.1 163 13.3 84 .6 2.1 100.0 73.4 21.8 4.8 100.0 12.2 12-23 months 57.4 376 17 .2 80 .7 2. 1 100.0 74.2 23 .9 1.9 100.0 14.8 24-35 months 46.5 430 27 .8 71.0 1.1 100 .0 77.7 21.6 .7 100.0 20.9 36-47 months 40.7 354 25.0 74.4 .7 100 .0 71.4 28.0 .7 100.0 14.6 48-59 months 43.7 329 23.2 74.0 2.8 100.0 77.8 19.4 2.8 100.0 16 .2 Woman's None 55.0 281 21.5 77.6 .9 100 .0 69 .0 29 .6 1.5 100.0 16.0 education Primary 47 .9 549 17.4 80 .2 2.4 100.0 73.9 21.7 4.4 100.0 14.1 level Secondary+ 43.9 1034 22 .4 75.1 2.5 100.0 78.2 19 .2 2.6 100.0 16.2 Missing/DK .56.3 22 .0 10.0 .0 100 .0 66.3 33 .7 .0 100 .0 .0 Total 46.8 1885 20.5 77.4 2.1 100.0 75.2 22.0 2.9 100.0 15.3 Monitoring IMCI and Malaria Indicator ~. • Number of sick children 1.00 461 422 256 160 65 16 15 15 50 40 96 170 345 248 290 96 83 216 200 144 144 154 263 453 12 883 00 oe Table 27: Percentage of caretakers of chi ldren 0-59 months who know at least 2 signs for seeking care immediately, Suriname, 1999-2000 Not able to Becomes Develops Has fast Has difficult Has blood Is drinking Knows at drinklbreastfeed sicker a fever breathin~ breathing in stool poorly least two sigm District Paramaribo .0 8.9 68.6 .9 6 .9 1.1 .6 10.6 Wanica .3 15.1 69.5 2.6 8.2 4.4 3.9 17.8 Nickerie 10.8 18.3 73 .6 15.3 19.3 13.8 14.8 24.4 Coronie .0 8.1 75.7 .0 5.4 .0 .0 5.4 Saramacca 16.7 14.6 75.0 14.6 18.7 10.4 8.3 25.0 Commewijne .0 23.9 69.6 2.2 4.3 .0 2.2 13.0 Marowijne 1.9 7.5 66.2 3.0 4.3 2.4 .0 8 .1 Para .0 5.2 60.5 3.0 6.6 .0 .0 9.8 Brokopondo .0 10.0 95 .6 8.9 1.1 .0 .0 17 .8 Sipaliwini 18 .9 26.5 90.3 26.5 33.6 20.6 18.9 40.8 Stratum Urban .3 10.3 69.6 1.3 6.3 1.5 1.2 11.6 Rural 4 .7 14.5 69.2 7.3 13.0 7.1 6.8 18.3 Interior 12.4 20 .4 88 .7 20.1 22 .9 13.8 12.4 32.2 Mother's None 8 .1 21.1 88.2 13 .5 19.7 8.8 9.1 29.6 education Primary 8 .4 16.7 75.7 13.3 17.1 10.8 9.0 21.9 level Secondary+ 1.9 II. I 70.4 3.7 8.4 3.3 3.1 14.8 Missing/DK 10.3 10.3 63.3 10.3 10.3 10.3 10.3 10.3 Total 4.8 14.2 74.5 8.0 12.6 6.4 5.8 19.0 Monitoring IMCI and Malaria Indicator • • Number of caretakers 623 342 177 32 42 40 92 86 124 327 837 550 498 281 549 1034 22 1885 • • • Table 28: Percentage of children 0-59 months of age who slept under an insecticide-impregnated bednet during the previous night, Suriname, 1999-2000 Slept under a bednet Number of children Bednet treated Children who slept under a bednet Yes No DK/missing Yes No Sex Male 71.4 22.8 5.8 259 3.7 96 .3 185 Female 73.0 20.1 6.9 239 5.5 94.5 174 District Marowijne 100.0 .0 .0 19 21.4 78 .6 19 Para .0 .0 100.0 29 .0 .0 0 Brokopondo 68 .9 31.1 .0 124 .0 100.0 85 Sipaliwini 78.2 21.0 .8 327 4 .8 95.2 255 Stratum Interior 72.2 21.5 6.3 498 4 .6 95.4 360 Age < 6 months 91.1 7.1 1.8 77 5.9 94.1 70 6-11 months 81.8 15.2 3.0 45 3.7 96.3 37 12-23 months 68.6 23.3 8.1 118 8.5 91.5 81 24-35 months 71.8 22.5 5.6 97 2.0 98.0 70 36-47 months 64.9 24.6 10.5 78 5.4 94.6 51 48-59 months 61.7 31.7 6.7 82 .0 100.0 51 Total 72.2 21.5 6.3 498 4.6 95.4 360 Monitoring IMCI and Malaria Indicator • • "' ""-!!-"'"' e~ Sun name Multtple Indtc.ttor Cluster Survey 2000 '';~J 0 f~*"'--"'""'1', :: 'l Table 30: Percentage of women aged 12-49 who know the main ways of preventing HIV transmission, Suriname, 1999-2000 Heard of AIDS Have only one Using a Abstainin~ Knows all Knows at Doesn't know Number of faithful uninfected condom from sex three way least one anyway women sex partner every tim1 way 1.00 District Paramaribo 97.0 74.2 74 .7 53 .2 45.8 81.7 18.3 1715 Wanica 92 .7 62.5 62 .6 44.9 36.5 71.1 28.9 1028 Nickerie 91.1 52.0 44.3 38.4 27.4 59.2 40.8 518 Coronie 98.5 67 .2 61.2 47.8 41.8 71.6 28.4 60 Saramacca 88.5 39.2 33.8 25.4 17 .7 46.9 53.1 117 Commewijne 95.2 72 .5 67.1 52 .7 43 .1 76.6 23.4 150 Marowijne 89.3 51.7 52.7 40.7 33 .2 58 .5 41.5 185 Para 95.1 62.2 60.0 40.3 35.4 67.0 33 .0 167 Brokopondo 94.7 22.1 21.2 18.6 14.2 25.7 74.3 153 Sipaliwini 77 .2 24.3 21.3 19.6 14.3 28.4 71.6 462 Stratum Urban 96.2 71.9 71.4 51.6 43.9 79.5 20.5 2371 Rural 92.0 56.2 53 .7 40.5 31.5 63.7 36.3 1477 Interior 82 .0 26.8 24.7 21.4 16.4 30 .6 69.4 707 Age 12-14 82.5 43.9 43.1 37.4 28.5 50.0 50.0 478 15-19 92.7 57.4 55 .5 42.2 33.2 64.9 35.1 845 20-24 94.6 59.3 61.4 41.8 32.9 69.7 30.3 654 25-29 95.0 65.0 62.3 45.0 38.6 70.8 29.2 603 30-34 95 .9 66.9 62 .9 46 .6 40.1 72.0 28.0 614 35-39 94.3 65.1 64.2 46.8 40.6 72.0 28.0 554 40-44 93.3 64 .6 61.4 46.1 37.3 71.4 28.6 444 45-49 89 .7 53 .0 53.4 39.3 33.0 59.0 41.0 363 Woman' None 79.4 16.0 13.3 9.9 6.0 19.6 80.4 371 educatio Primary 85 .8 38.7 37.2 30.0 22.4 45.4 54.6 1399 level Secondary+ 98.0 76.8 75.6 54.8 46.4 84.4 15.6 2728 Missing/DK 91.1 51.1 47 .7 39.6 34.6 54.3 45.7 58 Total 92.6 59.8 58.4 43.3 35.6 66.8 33.2 4555 Monitoring HIV/AIDS Indicator 90 Appendix D: Tables • • • • • • Table 31: Percentage of women aged 12-49 who correctly identify misconceptions about HIV/AIDS, Suriname, 1999-2000 -- Heard of AIDS AIDS can't be AIDS can't be A healthy Knows all three Knows at least Doesn't correctly Numb:~ - of transmitted by transmitted by looking person misconceptions one misconception identify any worn~:: supernatural mosquito bites can be infected misconception means 1.00 District Paramaribo 97.0 69.4 61.7 80.9 49.6 89.8 10.2 1715 Wanica 92.7 58.9 47.7 70.3 34.3 81.7 18.3 1028 Nickerie 9l.l 45 .7 36.5 65.4 26.5 75.2 24.8 518 Coronie 98.5 61.2 50.7 68.7 38.8 80.6 19.4 60 Saramacca 88.5 49.2 34.6 58.5 23.8 73.1 26 .9 117 Commewijne 95.2 61.1 49.7 68.3 29.9 86.2 13.8 150 Marowijne 89.3 41.0 41.2 56.3 23.7 70.0 30.0 185 Para 95.1 54.1 45.7 67.0 29.7 80.5 19.5 167 Brokopondo 94.7 26.5 20.4 43.4 11.5 55 .8 44.2 153 Sipaiiwini 77.2 25.1 16.7 44.4 13.2 50.9 49 .1 462 Stratum Urban 96.2 66.7 58.4 78.6 46.1 88.0 12.0 237 1 Rural 92 .0 52.1 42.2 64.9 28.5 77.9 22.1 1477 Interior 82.0 26.8 19.5 45.9 13.2 53 .9 46.1 707 Age 12-14 82.5 38.3 36.2 50.4 18.5 64 .8 35.2 478 15-19 92.7 55.0 44.7 68.0 30.9 80.8 19 .2 845 20-24 94.6 58.5 47 .6 72.9 37.5 82.3 17 .7 654 25-29 95.0 61.0 53.5 74.0 41.9 82.5 17.5 603 30-34 95.9 61.8 51.6 73.0 40.6 83.7 16.3 614 35-39 94.3 61.1 52.2 72.0 42.1 81.3 18.7 554 40-44 93.3 54.8 47.0 73.0 37.0 80.9 19.1 444 45-49 89.7 50.0 40.1 65.6 31.5 73.3 26.7 363 Woman's None 79.4 15.7 9.5 36.8 6.5 44.4 55.6 371 education Primary 85.8 33.6 27.3 51.5 15 .7 63 .1 36.9 1399 level Secondary+ 98.0 72.8 62.6 82.8 49.5 92.7 7.3 2728 Missing/DK 9Ll 45 .7 33 .4 59.0 23 .9 74.4 25.6 58 Total 92.6 55.8 47.1 69.1 35.3 79.4 20.6 4555 Monitoring HIV/AIDS Indicator ' "'"" Stnm.tm~ l\hlltiplc lndK.Itor Clu~tcr Sunc~ :woo " ~ 1: . ':~1' ·d:~" Table 32: Percentage of women aged 12-49 who correctly identify means of HIV transmission from mother to child, Suriname, 1999-2000 Know AIDS can Transmission Transmission Transmission Knows all Did not Number be transmitted daring at through three know any women from mother pregnancy delivery breastmilk specific to child possible possible possible way ~ ~ - 1.00 District Paramaribo 84.4 78.7 55.3 45.6 32 .1 17.6 17 15 Wanica 73.4 68.5 48.2 44 .5 30.3 28.2 1028 Nickerie 67.1 61.0 43.0 45.4 30 .5 35.8 518 Coronie 83.6 71.6 56 .7 59 .7 43.3 22.4 60 Saramacca 66.2 63 .8 49 .2 37.7 32.3 36 .2 117 Commewijne 78.4 76.0 50.9 48.5 34. 1 2 1.6 150 Marowijne 69.3 64.1 48.3 48.0 33.4 32.4 185 Para 7 1.6 69.2 52.2 46.8 37.0 28.4 167 Brokopondo 46.9 39.8 31.9 35.4 25.7 56.6 !53 Sipaliwini 39.2 37.4 3 1.9 34.2 28.1 6 1. 1 462 Stratum Urban 82 .0 76.0 53.5 45 .9 3 1.6 20.2 237 1 Rural 7 1.0 66.7 48.2 45 .9 33.1 30.5 1477 Interior 42.8 39.8 32. 1 34 .2 26 .6 58.3 707 Age 12- 14 53.2 47.0 3 1.5 34.4 21.7 49.2 478 15-19 70.2 64.5 43 .9 44 .7 30.5 32.2 845 20-24 75.2 69.7 49. 1 46.2 31.7 25.7 654 25-29 77.2 72.4 53 .8 42.4 3 1.0 24.4 603 30-34 78.7 74.3 54.9 47. 1 34.6 22.9 614 35-39 76.7 71.2 54.8 45. 1 34.4 25.3 554 40-44 76.0 72.0 5 1.6 48.7 35.2 25.8 444 45-49 67.6 65.2 47. 1 41.9 30.9 34.0 363 Woman's None 42 .7 39.7 33.8 36.6 30.2 58.3 37 1 education Primary 54.4 50 .1 38.0 38.9 28.5 47.6 1399 level Secondary + 85.5 79.9 55.8 47.5 32 .8 16.2 2728 Missing/DK 74.4 7 1.0 48.3 52.8 38 .4 29.0 58 ' Total 72.4 67A 48.5 44.1 31.3 29A 4555 Monitoring HIV/AIDS Indicator 92 Appendix D: Tables • • • • • • Table 33: Percentage of women aged 12-49 who express a discriminatory attitude towards people with HIV/AIDS, Suriname, 1999-2000 Believe that a Would not buy Agree with at Agree with neither Number or teacher with HIV food from a person least one discriminatory women should not be with HIV I AIDS discriminatory statement allowed to work statement 1.00 District Paramaribo 62.0 15.0 63.2 36.8 1715 Wanica 46.6 11.3 48 .0 52.0 1028 Nickerie 37.3 10.3 38.8 61.2 518 Coronie 35.8 11.9 37.3 62.7 60 Saramacca 47.7 20.0 51.5 48.5 117 Commewijne 42.5 17.4 44.3 55.7 150 Marowijne 31.5 9.5 32.0 68.0 185 Para 49 .5 8.9 50.5 49.5 167 Brokopondo 16.8 6.2 18.6 81.4 153 Sipa1iwini 26.3 25.4 32.2 67.8 462 Stratum Urban 58.7 14.0 59.9 40 .1 2371 Rural 40.1 12.0 41.7 58.3 1477 Interior 25.8 19.1 30.0 70.0 707 Age 12-14 33 .9 11.4 36.5 63.5 478 15-19 48. 1 19.1 50.7 49.3 845 20-24 49.7 14.9 51.5 48.5 654 25-29 50 .2 13 .0 52 .3 47.7 603 30-34 51.0 13 .3 51 .8 48 .2 614 35-39 50.1 12.5 51.5 48.5 554 40-44 49.5 14 .2 50.7 49.3 444 45-49 43.4 10.6 45.4 54.6 363 Woman's None 21.9 16.8 26.5 73.5 371 education Primary 25.7 9.5 27.5 72.5 1399 level Secondary + 62.5 16.3 64.0 36.0 2728 Missing/DK 35.4 6.5 35.4 64 .6 58 Total 47.5 14.1 49.3 50.7 4555 Monitoring HIV/AIDS Indicator Appendi x D: Table~ 93 • ~~· rr::n~·~ ~ ~~ ' Sun name Multople lndoc<llor Cluster Survey 2000 ' :" ' , '"';~ 94 Appendix 0: Tables ' ' Table 34: Percentage of women aged 12-49 who have sufficient knowledge of HIV/AIDS transmission , Suriname, 1999-2000 Heard of AIDS Know 3 ways to Correctly identify Have sufficient Number of prevent HIV 3 misconceptions knowledge women transmission aboutiDV transmission LOO Distr ict Paramaribo 97.0 45 .8 49 .6 28 .9 1715 Wanica 92.7 36.5 343 19.9 1028 Nickerie 9Ll 27.4 26.5 14.6 518 Coronie 98.5 4L8 38 .8 22.4 60 Saramacca 88.5 17.7 23 .8 7.7 117 Commewijne 95.2 43 .1 29.9 17.4 150 Marowijne 89.3 33.2 23 .7 14.9 185 Para 95.1 35.4 29.7 14.1 167 Brokopondo 94.7 14.2 11.5 4.4 153 Sipa1iwini 77.2 14.3 13.2 7.9 462 Stratum Urban 96.2 43 .9 46.1 27.0 2371 Rural 92.0 3L5 28.5 15.2 1477 Interior 82.0 16.4 13.2 7.8 707 Age 12-14 82.5 28 .5 18.5 11.0 478 15-19 92.7 33 .2 30.9 16.1 845 20-24 94.6 32.9 37.5 18.8 654 25-29 95 .0 38 .6 41.9 25.3 603 30-34 95.9 40.1 40.6 23.4 614 35-39 94.3 40 .6 42.1 25.9 554 40-44 93.3 37.3 37 .0 21.8 444 45-49 89.7 33.0 31.5 19.5 363 Woman's None 79.4 6.0 6.5 1.9 371 education Primary 85 .8 22.4 15 .7 9.2 1399 level Secondary+ 98 .0 46.4 49.5 28.3 2728 Missing/DK 91.1 34.6 23.9 16.5 58 Total 92.6 35.6 35.3 20.2 4555 Monitoring HIV I AIDS Indicator • • • • • • Table 35: Percentage of women aged 12-49 who know where to get an AIDS test and who have been tested , Suriname, 1999-2000 Know a place Have been If tested, Number of to get tested tested have been women told result 1.00 District Paramaribo 69.3 13.0 87.1 1715 Wanica 59.4 9.6 89.1 1028 Nickerie 44 .8 8.6 80.7 518 Coronie 49 .3 10.4 57.1 60 Saramacca 36.9 3.8 60.0 117 Commewijne 56.9 4.2 57 .1 150 Marowijne 46.8 11.0 95 .6 185 Para 55.4 11 .9 81.8 167 Brokopondo 32.7 5.3 83 .3 153 Sipaliwini 30 .1 7.9 66.7 462 Stratum Urban 66.4 12.0 87 .8 2371 Rural 51.0 8.7 82.5 1477 Interior 32.3 7.6 70.0 707 Age 12-14 32.7 .8 47.6 478 15-19 53.8 3.4 65.1 845 20-24 64.7 11.9 87 .5 654 25-29 62 .6 14 .9 88 .2 603 30-34 59.6 16 .3 88.8 614 35-39 57.7 13 .2 80.1 554 40-44 60.4 12 .0 75.0 444 45-49 52.9 11 .5 95.3 363 Woman's None 18.6 6.9 75.4 371 education Primary 39.0 8.5 80.1 1399 level Secondary+ 70.3 11.6 86.6 2728 Missing/DK 42.7 12.1 85 .9 58 Total 56.1 10.3 84.3 4555 Monitoring HIV I AIDS Indicator Appendix D: Tables 95 :> "" -g s. ;; · 9 ;;;l C' if Table 36: Percentage of married or in union women aged 12-49 who are using (or whose partner is using) a contraceptive method, Suriname, 1999-2000 Current method Total Any moder11 Any Any Number of method traditional method currently method married women No method Female Male Pill IUD Injections Condom Diaphragm LAM Periodic Withdrawal Other sterilization sterilization /foam/jelly abstinence 1.00 District Paramaribo 47.7 10.8 .2 29.8 2.3 3.3 4.7 .0 .2 .4 .2 .3 100.0 51.1 1.2 52.3 93 1 Wanica 55 .9 14.0 .0 22.8 1.7 2.1 1.5 .0 .0 .9 .7 .3 100.0 42. 1 1.9 44.1 6 13 Nickerie 47.4 6.3 .0 35 .7 1.1 5.2 2.2 .0 .0 .6 .8 .6 100.0 50.6 2.0 52 .6 342 Coronie 6 1.0 4.9 .0 29.3 2.4 .0 2.4 .0 .0 .0 .0 .0 100.0 39 .0 .0 39 .0 37 Saramacca 49 .4 16.9 .0 27 .0 1.1 3.4 !. I .0 .0 .0 .0 l.i 100.0 49.4 1.1 50 .6 80 Commewijne 50 .9 12.3 .0 30.2 2.8 .0 .9 .0 .0 .9 .0 1.9 100.0 46.2 2.8 49 .1 95 Marowijne 72 .9 5.8 .0 17.9 .0 .8 .8 .8 .0 .8 .0 .0 100.0 26.2 .8 27. 1 108 Para 60.4 7. 1 .0 20.3 4. 1 3.0 3.0 .0 .0 .0 1.0 1.0 100 .0 37.6 2.0 39 .6 89 Brokopondo 100.0 .0 .0 .0 .0 .0 .0 .0 .0 .0 .0 .0 100.0 .0 .0 .0 84 Sipali win i 92 .9 .0 .0 5.2 .0 .5 .0 .0 .0 .5 .5 .5 100.0 5.7 1.4 7. 1 287 Stratum Urban 48.8 10.9 .I 29.4 2.2 3.3 3 .9 .0 .I .4 .3 .4 100.0 49 .8 1.3 51.2 1335 Rural 54.9 11.2 .0 26.2 1.4 2.6 1.7 .I .0 .8 .7 .5 100.0 43 .1 2.0 45. 1 9 10 Interior 92 .9 .0 .0 5. 1 .6 .3 .0 .0 .0 .3 .3 .3 100.0 6. 1 1.0 7 .1 420 Age 12- 14 76. 1 .0 .0 16.8 .0 .0 7. 1 .0 .0 .0 .0 .0 100 .0 23.9 .0 23.9 14 15- 19 76.6 .0 .0 18.2 .5 .5 1.9 .0 .0 .5 .9 .9 100.0 21. 1 2 .3 23.4 196 20-24 60 .1 .2 .0 33.7 .7 1.6 2. 1 .0 .2 .4 .5 .5 100.0 38.3 1.6 39 .9 4 15 25-49 55.5 12.1 .I 23.3 2.0 3.0 2.6 .0 .0 .6 .4 .4 100.0 43.1 1.4 44.5 204 1 Woman's None 91.1 3.2 .0 4.9 .4 .3 .0 .0 .0 .0 .0 .0 100.0 8.9 .0 8 .9 262 education Primary 67.4 9.4 .0 16.2 .8 3.4 1.3 .0 .0 .3 .6 .5 100.0 3 1.1 1.5 32 .6 801 level Secondary + 47.3 10.2 .I 32 .1 2.3 2.5 3.6 .I .I .8 .4 .4' 100.0 51.0 1.7 52 .7 1559 Missing/DK 58.2 8.8 .0 22.0 .0 4.5 2.3 .0 .0 .0 .0 4. 1 100 .0 37.7 4. 1 4 1.8 44 Total 57.9 9.3 .1 24.5 1.7 2.6 2.5 .0 .1 .5 .4 .4 100.0 40.6 1.5 42.1 2666 World Summ it for Children Goal => Number 10 • • • • • • Table 38: Percent distribution of women aged 12-49 with a birth in the last year by type of personnel delivering antenatal care , Suriname, 1999-2000 Person delivering antenatal care Total Any skilled Number of personnel women .00 Doctor Midwife Nurse Village health Other/ No antenatal worker missing care received 1.00 District Paramaribo 10.5 75.5 9 .1 2.8 .7 .7 .7 100 .0 88.1 142 Wanica 4.9 72.6 19.8 2.7 .0 .0 .0 100.0 95.1 73 Nickerie 12.3 37.7 2 1.7 13.0 .0 15.4 .0 100.0 72.3 30 Coronie .0 100.0 .0 .0 .0 .0 .0 100.0 100 .0 5 Saramacca 7.1 78.6 14.3 .0 .0 .0 .0 100.0 92.9 13 Commewijne 20.0 60.0 10.0 10.0 .0 .0 .0 100.0 80.0 9 Marowijne 20.0 45.0 25.0 10.0 .0 .0 .0 100.0 80.0 18 Para 9.7 51.6 22 .6 16.1 .0 .0 .0 100.0 90.3 14 Brokopondo .0 .0 15.4 3.8 80.8 .0 .0 100.0 100.0 35 Sipaliwini 4.5 10.4 3.0 11.9 70. 1 .0 .0 100.0 95.5 91 Stratum Urban 8.4 71.1 13.7 4.7 .5 1.1 .5 100.0 90.0 188 Rural 9 .2 67.5 15.8 4.2 .0 3.3 .0 100.0 87.5 108 Interior 6.1 7.1 7.1 10.2 69.4 .0 .0 100.0 93.9 132 Woman's None .0 13.4 8.7 10.0 66.2 1.7 .0 100.0 98.3 59 education Primary 9.0 34.9 11.4 9.6 33.8 1.3 .0 100 .0 89.7 139 level Secondary+ 9.6 70 .2 13.6 3.0 1.8 1.2 .4 100.0 88.7 223 Missing/DK .0 39.0 12.2 12.2 36 .6 .0 .0 100.0 100.0 7 Total 7.9 50.4 12.2 6.3 21.7 1.3 .2 100.0 90.6 429 World Summit for Children Goals => Numbers 9. II Appendix D: Tables 97 . ~~ Surin,tme Multtple Indtcator Cluster Survey 2000 •. ,, :2 '.,; ¥" ~~w;;.; 'iii! Table 39: Percent distribution of women aged 12-49 with a birth in the last year by type of personnel assisting at delivery, Suriname, 1999-2000 Person assisting at delivery Total Any skilled personnel Doctor Midwife Nurse Village health Traditional Other/ No worker birth missing assistance attendant received District Paramaribo 32.2 48.3 11.2 .0 .0 7.0 1.4 100.0 9 1.6 Wanica 30.4 55.6 12.8 .0 .0 1.2 .0 100.0 98 .8 Nickerie 34.6 30.7 13.0 .0 .0 21.7 .0 100.0 78 .3 Coronie 60.0 20.0 .0 .0 .0 .0 20 .0 100.0 80.0 Saramacca 14.3 64 .3 7.1 .0 7 .1 7.1 .0 100.0 85.7 Commewijne 30.0 60.0 10 .0 .0 .0 .0 .0 100.0 100.0 Marowijne 30.0 40.0 5.0 .0 5.0 20.0 .0 100.0 75.0 Para 19.4 54.8 19.4 .0 .0 6.5 .0 100.0 93.5 Brokopondo 7.7 11.5 .0 23. 1 57.7 .0 .0 100 .0 42 .3 Sipaliwini 7.5 10.4 6 .0 55 .2 14.9 6.0 .0 100.0 79. 1 Stratum Urban 3 1.1 49.5 12.1 .0 .0 6.3 1. 1 100.0 92.6 Rural 32.5 49.2 8.3 .0 1.7 7 .5 .8 100.0 90.0 In terior 7. 1 11.2 6.1 43.9 25.5 6. 1 .0 100.0 68 .4 Woman's None 11.7 14.8 1.7 36 .5 29 .7 4 .0 1.7 100.0 64.7 education Primary 18.6 28.6 13.2 22.4 10.7 6 .6 .0 100.0 82 .7 level Secondary + 3 1.5 48.8 8.8 1.8 .8 7 .5 .8 100 .0 90 .9 Missing/DK .0 5 1.2 12.2 18.3 18.3 . 0 .0 100.0 81.7 Total 24.0 37.6 9.3 13.6 8.3 6.6 .7 100.0 84.5 World Summit fo r Children Goal =>Numbers 11 98 Appendix D: Tables • Number of women 1.00 142 73 30 5 13 9 18 14 35 9 1 188 108 132 59 139 223 7 429 • • • • • Table 40: Percent distribution of children aged 0-59 months by whether birth is registered and reasons for non-registration, Suriname, 1999-2000 Registration status Birth DK if birth Costs Must Didn' t know Doesn't Other Reason 9.00 registered registered too travel it should be know where DKor much too far registered to register Missing Sex Male 94.4 3.8 . I .3 .I . I .6 .5 .I Female 95.4 3.4 .0 .I .2 . I .3 .5 .0 District Paramaribo 95.5 . 2.4 .2 .2 .3 .2 .6 .8 .0 Wanica 95.0 2.9 .0 .6 .0 .3 I. I .0 .3 Nickeric 82 .7 16.2 .0 .0 .0 .0 .0 1.0 .0 Coronie 100.0 .0 .0 .0 .0 .0 .0 .0 .0 Saramacca 91.7 6.2 .0 .0 2.1 .0 .0 .0 .0 Commewijne 97.8 2.2 .0 .0 .0 .0 .0 .0 .0 Marow ijne 94.7 2.4 .0 .9 .0 .0 1.9 .0 .0 Para 99.0 1.0 .0 .0 .0 .0 .0 .0 .0 Brokopondo 97.8 2.2 .0 .0 .0 .0 .0 .0 .0 Sipali wini 97 .5 1.7 .0 .0 .0 .0 .0 .8 .0 Stratum Urban 93 .9 3.8 . I .3 .2 .2 .7 .7 .0 Rural 93.8 4.9 .0 .2 .2 .0 .6 .2 .2 Interior 97 .5 1.9 .0 .0 .0 .0 .0 .6 .0 Age < 6 months 91.7 4.1 .0 .8 .0 .0 2.0 1.4 .0 6-11 months 97.2 1.7 .0 .0 .0 .0 .5 .6 .0 12-23 months 95.9 2.4 .0 .3 .3 .0 .7 .3 .2 24-35 months 94.2 5.0 .2 .0 .2 .0 .2 .2 .0 36-47 months 94. 1 4 .0 .0 .3 .2 .5 .0 .9 .0 48-59 months 96.4 3.6 .0 .0 .0 .0 .0 .0 .0 Mother's None 93.9 2.4 .0 .3 .7 .7 .7 1.3 .0 education Primary 93.4 4.9 .2 .5 .2 .0 .6 .2 .0 level Secondary+ 95.8 3.4 .0 .0 .0 .0 .3 .4 . I Miss ing/DK 95.7 .0 .0 .0 .0 .0 4.3 .0 .0 Total 94.9 3.6 .0 .2 .1 .1 .5 .5 .0 Monitori ng Chi ldren's Rights Indicator Total Number of children 1.00 100.0 992 100.0 893 100.0 623 100.0 342 100.0 177 100.0 32 100 .0 42 100.0 40 100.0 92 100.0 86 100.0 124 100.0 327 100.0 837 100.0 550 100 .0 498 100.0 231 100.0 163 100.0 376 100.0 430 100 .0 354 100 .0 329 100 .0 281 100.0 549 100.0 1034 100.0 22 100.0 1885 Appendix D: Tables 99 Table 41: Percentage of children 0-14 years of age in households not living with a biological parent, Suriname, 1999-2000 Living arrangement Total Not living One or Number with a both of biological sa rents children parent ead Living with Living with Living with Living with Living with Living with Living with Living with Living with Impossible both neither: neither: neither: neither: mother mother father only: father only: to parents only father only mother both are both are only: only: mother mother determine alive alive alive dead father alive father dead alive dead Sex Male 63.0 .6 .2 6.4 .2 2 1.5 2.2 2.1 .2 3.7 100.0 7.4 3.4 2877 Female 61.3 .7 .6 6.7 .2 23 .5 2.0 1.3 .3 3.4 100.0 8.2 3.7 2677 District Paramaribo 61.4 .7 .4 5.5 .l 24.9 2.5 2.2 .4 1.9 100.0 6.6 4.1 1835 Wanica 74 .9 .4 .2 4. 1 .2 14.3 2.7 1.7 .1 1.4 100.0 4.8 3.5 1127 Nickerie 7 1.0 .3 .2 5.7 .5 9.9 .5 2.6 .7 8.6 100.0 6.7 2.2 555 Coronie 70. 1 .0 .0 8.2 2. 1 8.2 3. 1 .0 .0 8.2 100.0 10 .3 5.2 87 Saramacca 72 .7 2. 1 .0 4 .9 .0 7.7 2.8 .0 .0 9.8 100.0 7.0 4 .9 129 Commewij ne 70 .6 .6 .0 6.7 .0 17.2 1.2 3.1 .6 .0 100.0 7.4 2.5 147 Marowijne 57. 1 .6 .0 10 .4 .0 23.8 2. 1 2.4 .0 3.6 100.0 11.0 2.7 318 Para 59.7 .7 .6 6.8 .4 23.6 3.2 1.7 .4 3.1 100.0 8.4 5.2 257 Brokopondo 64 .6 .5 .5 2.6 .5 27.7 1.5 .0 .0 2.1 100.0 4.1 3 .1 280 Sipaliwi ni 38. 1 .7 1.1 13.0 .0 38.8 1.2 .5 .0 6.5 100 .0 14.8 3.0 818 Stratum Urban 64.2 .7 .3 5.4 .2 2 1.5 2.6 2.1 .4 2 .7 100.0 6.5 4.1 2540 Rural 7 1.0 .6 .2 5.5 .2 15.5 1.8 1.8 .3 3.2 100.0 6.4 3.0 1762 -- Interior 45.6 .6 .9 10.4 .I 34.3 1.5 .8 .0 5.7 100 .0 12.1 3.J 1252 Age 0-4 years 66.7 .2 .3 3.9 .0 23.7 .9 1.1 .I 3.0 100.0 4.5 1.5 2034 5-9 years 62.1 .7 .2 7.6 .I 23 .3 2.3 1.3 .I 2.5 100.0 8.5 3.2 1721 - 10-14 years 57.0 1.1 .7 8.6 .4 20.4 3.3 2.8 .6 5.1 100.0 10.8 6.1 1799 Total 62.2 .6 .4 6.6 .2 22.5 2.1 1.7 .3 3.5 100.0 7.8 3.5 5554 Monitoring Children's Rights Indicator • • • • • • Appendix E: List of Abbreviations AIDS ARI BCG CEB I ~~: GBS GDP HIV IMCI IUD LAM MICS NCHS ORS ORT PAHO RGD RHF SAP SRG SWI TACRO TC TFR UN UNDP UNICEF UNIFEM USA WHO Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome Acute Respiratory Infection Vaccine Against Tuberculosis Children Ever Born Demographic Health Survey Diptheria, Pertussis and Tetanus General Bureau of Statistics Gross Domestic Product Human Immunodeficiency Virus Integrated Management of Childhood Illnesses Intrauterine Device Lactational Amenothea Method Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey National Center for Health Surveys Oral Rehydration Salt Oral Rehydration Therapy Pan American Health Organization Regionale Gezondheidsdienst (Regional Health Services) Recommended Home Fluid Structural Adjustment Program Surinamese Guilders Stichting Wetenschappelijke Informatie (Foundation for Information and Development) The Americas and the Caribbean Regional Office Technical Committee Total Fertility Rate United Nations United Nations Development Programme United Nations Children's Fund United Nations Development Fund for Women United States of America World Health Organization looe:"(Jix S: List of ;\bbrevtation~ ·101 j'""'!fl'J!f "' Surm<>me Multtple lndtcator Cluster Survey 2000 " ' '',!:?,~,~~;,\111 '""" .~ ~ / J ;!;."".;?fie • ~ 102 Appendix F: Appendix F: References Kish, L. 1965: Boerma, J. et a!. 1996: General Bureau of Statistics 1997: Menke, 1. 1998: SWI-INDEST 1998: General Bureau of Statistics 1999: UNICEF 2000: General Bureau of Statistics 2001: Survey Sampling, John Wiley & Sons, Inc, New York Data on Birth Weight in Developing Countries : Can Surveys Help ? WHO Bulletin 74. Statistical Yearbook 1996 of the Republic of Suriname, Suriname in Cijfers No. 179-97/01 Restructuring Urban Employment and Poverty : The case of Suriname (Ph. D. Dissertation, University of Amsterdam), SWI press. Leefsituatie en steekproefprocedures in het District Para, Paramaribo Demographic Data up to 1997, Suriname in Cijfers No.185-99/0l The State of the World's Children 2000 Household Budget Survey Suriname 1999/2000, Final Report, Suriname in Cijfers No. 190-200 I /0 1 • • • • • • 103 1

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