Donor Support for Contraceptives and Condoms for STI/HIV Prevention 2010

Publication date: 2010

Donor Support for Contraceptives and Condoms for Family Planning and STI/HIV Prevention 2010 . ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS UNFPA is grateful for the valuable contributions made to this report by staff and partners, and for the active engagement and support of the donors and agencies that made this report possible. The report has also benefitted significantly from the guiding efforts of Jagdish Upadhyay, Chief of UNFPA’s Commodity Security Branch. Also within the branch, special thanks goes to Dr. Kabir Ahmed, Technical Adviser, and Dr. Sukanta Sarker, Technical Specialist, for coordinating with donors and other stakeholders to collect, compile and clean data and for authoring this report. The writers would like to thank Asmeret Tekeste and colleagues in the Commodity Security Branch for their support. For more information, visit: www.unfpa.org Commodity Security Branch United Nations Population Fund 605 Third Avenue New York, NY 10158 USA August 2011 CONTENTS INTRODUCTION . i EXECUTIVE SUMMARY . iv BACKGROUND . vi Findings A. GLOBAL PATTERNS AND TRENDS IN DONOR SUPPORT .1 Trend analysis . 3 Couple years of protection (CYP) . 6 B. DONOR SUPPORT IN 2010 .9 UK Department for International Development (DFID) . 9 International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) . 9 Federal German Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ/KfW) . 11 Marie Stopes International (MSI) . 12 Population Services International (PSI) . 13 United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) . 14 United States Agency for International Development (USAID) . 17 C. DONOR SUPPORT FOR MALE AND FEMALE CONDOMS . 20 Condom requirements . 20 Patterns and trends in donor support for condoms versus other contraceptives . 20 D. COMPARISON OF CONTRACEPTIVE NEEDS AND DONOR SUPPORT . 24 Unmet need . 25 Standard costs . 25 Varying degrees of donor dependency . 25 Linking donor support to CPR . 25 Annex 1: Donor support 2010 at a Glance . 26 Annex 2: Commodities: Donors’ Contribution . 31 Annex 3: Country Tables: Donors, Commodities and Values………………………………………………. 34 Figures Figure 1: Commodity expenditure (%) 2010 Figure 2: Trends in major donor support for commodities, 2005–2010 Figure 3: Regional distribution of donor support, 2005–2010 Figure 4: Trend in donor expenditure by commodities, 2005–2010 Figure 5: Cost per CYP, 2005-2010 Figure 6: Values and CYPs, 2005–2010 Figure 7: Distribution of short- and long-acting methods in CYP, 2005–2010 Figure 8: Expenditure on condoms and other contraceptives, 2005–2010 Figure 9: Proportion of expenditure: Condoms and other contraceptives, 2005–2010 Figure 10: Expenditure trend of male and female condoms, 2005–2010 Figure 11: Donor expenditure of male condoms, 2005–2010 Figure 12: Donor expenditure of female condoms, 2007–2010 Figure 13: Projected contraceptive need Figure 14: Commodity Expenditure (%) 2010 Figure 15: Quantity of Male Condom Supplied by Donors (%) 2010 Figure 16: Quantity of Female Condom Supplied by Donors (%) 2010 Figure 17: Quantity of Oral Pills (Low dose & Progesteron only) Supplied by Donors (%) 2010 Figure 18: Quantity of Emergency Contraceptives Supplied by Donors (%) 2010 Figure 19: Quantity of Injectables Supplied by Donors (%) 2010 Figure 20: Quantity of IUD Supplied by Donors (%) 2010 Figure 21: Quantity of Implant Supplied by Donors (%) 2010 Tables Table 1: Donor support in 2010 Table 2: Comparison of expenditure (in US$) between 2009 and 2010 Table 3: Quantity and value of commodities in 2010 Table 4: Regional distribution of commodities, 2010 Table 5: Comparison of commodity quantity, 2009 and 2010 Table 6: CYP by commodity, 2005–2010 Table 7: Support of DFID, 2010 Table 8: Regional distribution of IPPF resources Table 9: Support of IPPF, 2010 Table 10: Regional distribution of BMZ/KfW support Table 11: Support of BMZ/KfW, 2010 Table 12: Regional distribution of MSI, 2010 Table 13: Support of MSI, 2010 Table 14: Regional distribution of PSI, 2010 Table 15: Support of PSI, 2010 Table 16: Regional distribution of UNFPA support, 2010 Table 17: Support of UNFPA, 2010 Table 18: Regional distribution of male and female condoms by UNFPA, 2010 Table 19: Regional distribution of USAID, 2010 Table 20: Support of USAID, 2010 Table 21: Regional distribution of male and female condoms, USAID 2010 Table 22: Donor Support, 2010 Table 23: Male Condom Table 24: Female Condom Table 25: Oral Contraceptives Table 26: Emergency Contraceptive Pills Table 27: Injectable Contraceptives Table 28: Intra Uterine Device Table 29: Sub-dermal Implants Table 30: Quantity & Value of Commodities in 2010 Table 31: Regional Distribution of Commodities (Quantities) Table 32: Comparison of Expenditure in US$, 2009-2010 Table 33: Comparison of Commodity Quantity Table 34: Expenditure Trend by Donor in US$, 2005-2010 Table 35: Expenditure Trend by Region in US$, 2005-2010 Table 36: Method-wise Expenditure Trend in US$, 2005-2010 Donor Support for Contraceptives and Condoms for Family Planning and STI/HIV Prevention 2010 i INTRODUCTION I. About the report UNFPA, the United Nations Population Fund, has been tracking donor support for contraceptives and condoms for STI/HIV prevention since 1990 and publishing an annual donor support report since 1997. These annual reports are produced by the Commodity Security Branch in UNFPA’s Technical Division, which is pleased to present the 2010 Donor Support report. This report highlights trends in support from bi-lateral and multi-lateral donors as well as social marketing organizations. In addition, the report provides information on donor support for essential reproductive health (RH) commodities, including contraceptives and condoms, for reproductive health programmes in developing countries. Data is presented and analyzed by region, major donor and contraceptive methods. There is also a section on donor support for male and female condoms. The report covers (1) family planning supplies and (2) condoms for the prevention of sexually transmitted infections (STIs), including HIV. It does not cover any reproductive health commodities required for maternal health services such as prenatal care, obstetric services, postpartum care or abortion-related services, nor does it cover supplies required for the diagnosis and treatment of STIs including HIV. The report has four main sections: 1. The first and second sections examine patterns and trends in individual donor support in 2010 as well as from 2005-2010. Trends are analyzed in terms of expenditures, quantities and approximated couple years of protection. These trends are then analyzed by several major variables—or combination of variables—such as distributions by commodity type, individual donor governments/agencies and regions; 2. The third section takes a closer look at donor support for male and female condoms over time and by region; 3. The fourth section compares aggregate donor support to global contraceptive needs for 2006- 2010 and provides projections of contraceptive needs through 2015. Purpose of report This report provides data for development – the kind of data that makes a difference and drives good planning and decision making. This data can be used on behalf of the women, men and young people in developing countries who count on contraceptives and condoms to plan and space their families and prevent sexually transmitted infections, including HIV. Ultimately, this data supports the right to enjoy a life of health and equal opportunity. The report is intended mainly for use in planning for contraceptive supply, advocacy and resource mobilization. In addition, the report has a ‘value added’ impact on issues related to Reproductive Health Donor Support for Contraceptives and Condoms for Family Planning and STI/HIV Prevention 2010 ii Commodity Security (RHCS) in areas such as policy dialogue, advocacy and interagency work. UNFPA hopes that, among its many potential benefits, this annual report can help to enhance coordination among donors, improve partnerships between donors and national governments, and mobilize the resources needed to accelerate progress towards universal access to sexual and reproductive health, as set forth in the ICPD Programme of Action and the Millennium Development Goals. Global Donor Support Database The primary source of data for this report is UNFPA’s Global Donor Support Database. As the lead United Nations agency in the area of sexual and reproductive health, UNFPA is charged with tracking international financial support in this area. Since, 1990 the database – the largest of its kind – has tracked more than 20,000 procurement records of contraceptives, condoms for STI/HIV prevention and other types of related RH commodities by major bilateral, multilateral and NGOs. The database records the financing organization and recipient country, and also the commodity type, quantity and expenditure. UNFPA actively solicits relevant data from major donors on an annual basis; the database itself is updated continuously based on the latest information. (N.B. This database does not capture private sector, country procurements or procurements financed by the Global Fund or World Bank.) To make this database useful to a wider audience, UNFPA summarizes and analyzes the data for the benefit of donors, national governments and other partners. A few caveats should be noted The 2010 Donor Support report includes the latest year for which data is available, and it also updates data from previous years where new information is available. Consequently, data prior to 2010 may differ from that which appears in previous years’ reports.  This report tracks donor support, not the entire universe of global commodity procurement. Most commodities procured directly by countries, for example, are not included. This is particularly the case for large, middle-income countries such as Brazil and China. The database currently does not include data from the Global Fund. World Bank contraceptive financing is not included since these are loans provided for contraceptive procurement.  While UNFPA makes every effort to obtain comprehensive, reliable and current data, some errors in reporting and maintaining such a large database inevitably occur. UNFPA reviews records to ensure accuracy, making modifications where possible when errors are evident. Such errors and adjustments occur infrequently in the database and should not have a large influence on the outcomes of this report’s analyses.  The data in this report pertain to the supply of commodities, not ultimate utilization. A variety of factors can affect rates of commodity utilization by end users.  Finally, it should be remembered that certain commodities covered by this report are utilized for purposes in addition to, or other than, contraception. Male and female condoms, for example, are mostly procured and utilized for STI/HIV prevention. This report does not distinguish between the dual purposes of condom use. Donor Support for Contraceptives and Condoms for Family Planning and STI/HIV Prevention 2010 iii Process of producing the report All donors/partner are requested to send their respective 2010 data for the report before the end of the first quarter of 2011. UNFPA produces an updated report every year upon receipt and analysis of the necessary data from participating organizations. The data consist of the following pieces of information: 1. name of the country to which commodities were sent; 2. type of contraceptives sent, e.g. pills, injectables, IUD, condoms (male and female); 3. unit price (price by units related to number 4 below); 4. total quantity (for the quantity, the unit is specified, e.g. cycles of pills, number of condoms, number of IUDs, number of injection vials, etc.); 5. total amount spent in 2010. Once the data are received, the process by the Commodity Security Branch in UNFPA’s Technical Division consists of the following steps: 1. review the data provided to check any quality issues as well as any double counting between different data providers; 2. send a spreadsheet back to each data provider following the review, highlighting any issues identified and request for data validation to allow to proceed for finalizing the report; 3. establish a final data set once the data has been validated by all data providers; 4. produce a final draft report and send back to all for feedbacks and inputs; 5. incorporate all relevant inputs, prepare the final report and disseminate electronically as well as post in the UNFPA website. Geographical distribution For this report the countries have been grouped into four regions. Almost all African countries were included in the African region. However, some of the Northern African countries were included in Arab States. Arab States includes Egypt, Morocco and Yemen as well as countries from the Middle East, Eastern Europe and Central Asia, as well as Ukraine from Eastern Europe. Countries from Asia and Pacific Island countries were included in the Asia and Pacific region. Latin American countries and countries from Caribbean are grouped as the Latin American region. Unit of measurement In this report unit of measurement is reported for male and female condom as ‘piece’, all kinds of pills as ‘cycles’, emergency contraception as ‘pack’, injectable as ‘vial’, IUD as ‘piece’ and implant as ‘set’. Donor Support for Contraceptives and Condoms for Family Planning and STI/HIV Prevention 2010 iv EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Access to a reliable supply of contraceptives, condoms and other reproductive health commodities is essential to all UNFPA programming and to achievement of the Millennium Development Goals. The need for voluntary family planning is growing fast, and condom use is a critical element in a comprehensive approach to HIV prevention and treatment. Each year, UNFPA looks at the level of support provided by donors for selected reproductive health commodities. In 2010, donors including BMZ/KfW, DFID, IPPF & MSI, PSI, UNFPA and USAID provided $235.6 million to support the procurement of male and female condoms, oral contraceptives, emergency contraceptive, injectables and IUDs in 143 developing countries. Highlights of the report Donor Support for Contraceptives and Condoms for STI/HIV Prevention 2010 include the following: Total donor support  Donors provided $235.16 million in 2010, a slight decrease of 1.5 per cent from $238.8 million in 2009;  About two thirds of total donor support came from UNFPA1 (35 per cent) and USAID (32.2 per cent). From 2009 to 2010, UNFPA’s contribution increased by $1.2 million to $82.3 million, while USAID’s contribution decreased by $11.5 million to $76 million.  A number of donors increased support over the previous year, notably BMZ/KfW and PSI, and also DFID and UNFPA. Support from IPPF, MSI and USAID decreased.  Bilateral funding accounted for 51.7 per cent of total donor support in 2010. Another 34.7 per cent was channeled through UNFPA and 12.9 per cent through social marketing organizations; Support by region  Most support continued to be directed to sub-Saharan Africa, followed by Asia and the Pacific. Of total donor support in 2010, sub-Saharan Africa received 63 per cent, Asia and the Pacific region received 25 per cent, Latin America and the Caribbean received 7 per cent and the Arab States received 4 per cent.  Increases in support occurred in two regions in 2010. Donor support to Asia and the Pacific increased by 60 per cent in 2010 compared to 2009, and support to the Arab States increased by 1.7 percent. Decreases in support affected two regions. Support to sub-Saharan Africa was 15 per cent lower in 2010 than in 2009, and support to Latin America and the Caribbean was down by 7 per cent. Data collected 2005-2010 shows no pattern in regional trends in donor support, although totals vary year to year.  Asia and the Pacific Region received $22.3 million more than in the previous years, up from $37.2 million in 2009 to $59.5 million in 2010. 1 UNFPA data includes third party procurement 2 Reproductive Health Supplies Coalition, Contraceptive Projections and the Donor Gap: Meeting the Challenge 2009. Donor Support for Contraceptives and Condoms for Family Planning and STI/HIV Prevention 2010 v  Sub-Saharan Africa received $25.4 million less than in the previous year, down from $173.1 million in 2009 to $147.6 million in 2010. Support by commodity  More than 77 per cent of donor support in 2010 was allocated to three types of commodities: male condoms (32 per cent), injectables (24 per cent) and oral contraceptives (21 per cent).  Donors provided less support in 2010 than in 2009 for three contraceptives methods, with a decrease of 51 per cent for female condoms, 31 per cent for emergency contraceptives, and 17.5 per cent for implants.  Donors provided more support for IUDs, with an increase of nearly 14 per cent from 2009 to 2010. Despite the increase, the IUD accounted for only 1.32 per cent of total expenditures in 2010. The IUD provided nearly 25 million contraceptive years of protection (CYP) in 2010.  Like previous years, the highest expenditure in 2010 was on condoms. Expenditure on both male and female condoms together was 37 per cent of total donor support; followed by 24 per cent on injectables and 22 per cent on oral contraceptives (combined oral pills and emergency contraceptive pills).  In 2010, the cost of commodities required to provide one CYP was $3.32. Data collected over six years shows that cost was lowest in 2005 ($2.27 per CYP) and highest in 2006 ($4.66 per CYP). This cost is largely influenced by the IUD. In 2005, nearly 15.5 million IUDs (pieces) were procured, providing some 55 million CYP. In 2006, only 2.5 million IUD pieces were procured, providing only 9 million couple years of protection. Despite difficult economic times, donor support for contraceptives and condoms remained strong, with only a slight decrease from 2009 to 2010. The future is the challenge. To meet current population growth rates, donor funding for contraceptives will need to increase by 60 per cent, from about $230 million per year today to about $370 million by 2020, or by more than 80 per cent to more than $420 million by 2020 to eliminate unmet need.2 2 Reproductive Health Supplies Coalition, Contraceptive Projections and the Donor Gap: Meeting the Challenge 2009. Donor Support for Contraceptives and Condoms for Family Planning and STI/HIV Prevention 2010 vi BACKGROUND The reproductive health context The goal of universal access to reproductive health services was first put forth in the Programme of Action adopted at the International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD) held in Cairo in 1994. This goal was reinforced in 2007 when the General Assembly of the United Nations added universal access to reproductive health—to be achieved by 2015—to the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). Contraceptive prevalence and unmet need for contraception were added to the MDGs indicator framework to measure progress in the coming years. Ensuring that reproductive health commodities are available to all who need them is essential to the provision of reproductive health services/family planning and thus to the achievement of the ICPD and MDGs. Together with family planning, maternal health services and STI/HIV diagnosis and treatment have a tremendous impact on the welfare of a society, with benefits going far beyond the medical benefits of averting death and morbidity and improving child survival. Improved reproductive health in a country also strengthens the position of women and contributes to economic growth. Maternal health More than 100 countries worldwide have eliminated or nearly eliminated maternal mortality as a public health problem. In spite of this, there are still approximately 350,000 maternal deaths and over 1 million newborn deaths yearly in the world. For every woman who dies in childbirth, at least 20 more suffer injuries, infections or disabilities. The vast majority of these deaths occur in sub-Saharan Africa and southern Asia.3 In sub-Saharan Africa, a woman’s risk of dying from such complications over the course of her lifetime is 1 in 22 compared to 1 in 7,300 in the developed world.4 This reality could be averted with highly cost-effective and feasible interventions. UNFPA promotes a three-pronged strategy:  All women have access to contraception to avoid unintended pregnancies  All pregnant women have access to skilled care at the time of birth  All those with complications have timely access to quality emergency obstetric care When interventions, including family planning, are adopted and scaled up with a rights-based and equity-driven approach, rapid progress is possible. Voluntary family planning Family planning is a powerful tool in combating poverty. However, universal access to family planning it is not yet a reality – particularly not among the poorest. Worldwide, 200 million women would like to delay or prevent pregnancy, but are not using effective contraception. The demand for contraceptives is expected to grow by 40 per cent in the next 15 years. 3 WHO, UNICEF, UNFPA, World Bank 2005. Maternal Mortality in 2005. 4 The Millennium Development Goals Report 2008 (MDG Report 2008). Donor Support for Contraceptives and Condoms for Family Planning and STI/HIV Prevention 2010 vii Family planning saves lives. It reduces maternal and newborn mortality rates and improves the health and well-being of women and their existing children. Estimates have indicated that, by preventing pregnancies and unsafe abortions, reliable access to quality family planning services and information can reduce maternal deaths by one third, which equates to saving the lives of 100,000 to 175,000 women each year. Family planning programmes create conditions that enable women to enter the labour force and families to devote more resources to each child, thereby improving family nutrition, education levels and living standards. Slower population growth cuts the cost of social services as fewer women die in childbirth; and demand eases for water, food, education, health care, housing, transportation and jobs. Comprehensive condom programming Condoms, both male and female, are recognized as the only currently available and effective technology to prevent HIV – and other sexually transmitted infections – among sexually active people. The goal of condom programming is to reduce the number of unprotected sex acts, which will, in turn, reduce the incidence of unintended pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections. Comprehensive condom programming works towards that goal through promotion, communication for behavior change, optimized use of entry points like RH clinics, and management of supplies, among other strategies. An estimated 13 billion condoms per year are needed to help halt the spread of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections, according to UNAIDS. For many other developing countries, the gap between condom needs and donor support means paying for imported condoms with funds needed for food, medicine and other necessities. The role of reproductive health commodities Effective strategies to achieve global reproductive health goals will require integrated, country-driven approaches that include: (1) expanded reach and quality of affordable reproductive health services in the context of overall health systems strengthening; (2) improved capacity to plan, implement and monitor and evaluate at country level; (3) increased government and international financial and technical resources; (4) enhanced coordination within the donor community; and (5) advocacy and changes in attitudes that prevent women and girls from exercising their reproductive health choices. One of the critical components underpinning any strategy is the availability of affordable, quality RH commodities to all individuals who need them. Availability of and access to RH commodities are not only basic human rights, as established in the ICPD and MDG frameworks, but are also critical to improving related health outcomes, such as maternal health and HIV prevention. RH commodities play integral roles not only before pregnancy but also during pregnancy and childbirth. Most antenatal services, delivery and post-partum care and emergency obstetric care could not be delivered effectively and safely without appropriate RH commodities in the right place and at the right time. Availability of and access to RH commodities (contraceptive, condoms, medicine and equipment) are critical to improving health outcomes in maternal health and STI/HIV prevention and to allowing individuals to plan the size of their families. RH commodities, including HIV test kits and diagnostics, are critical for successful HIV prevention strategies and programmes—and so are male and female condoms, Donor Support for Contraceptives and Condoms for Family Planning and STI/HIV Prevention 2010 viii which can reduce risk of STIs, including HIV. It is for these reasons that UNFPA and other agencies are committed to working with governments to prioritize gender and sexual and reproductive health in response to HIV and AIDS, and making contraceptives available to all who need them to space or limit the number of children they will have. Funding is needed for more than commodities This report covers only a subset of reproductive health commodities: family planning supplies and condoms for STI/HIV prevention, as noted above. It does not cover any commodities required for maternal health services such as prenatal care, obstetric services, postpartum care, and abortion-related services, nor does it cover supplies required for the diagnosis and treatment of sexually transmitted infections (STIs), including HIV. Investing in the commodities required in those areas is just as crucial as investing in contraceptives and condoms. Commodities themselves constitute only a small portion of what is needed. To improve reproductive health and reach the goal of universal access, countries need to ensure that investments in supplies will complement large investments targeted at strengthening supply chains and service delivery systems as well as information, education and communication activities. The development of capacity in health systems is an important aspect reproductive health commodity security. So too is the provision of essential RH supplies including the contraceptives and condoms featured in this report. Donor Support for Contraceptives and Condoms for Family Planning and STI/HIV Prevention 2010 1 A. GLOBAL PATTERNS AND TRENDS IN DONOR SUPPORT The total donor support in 2010 was just over $235 million (Table 1), which was 3.6 million (1.5 per cent per cent) less than the total of $238.8 million in 2009. Contributions from different donors changed from the previous year. UNFPA’s contribution was the highest at just over $82 million (35 per cent of total support), followed by USAID at $76 million (32 per cent of total support) (Table 2). Figure 1 shows donor contributions in 2010 by percentage. The largest increase in contributions was by BMZ/KfW, which increased more than 80 per cent from $16.1 million in 2009 to $29.1 million in 2010. This was followed by PSI, with an increase in contributions of nearly 50 per cent from $17.9 million to $26.9 million. DFID’s contribution increased by 27.57 per cent. UNFPA’s contribution increased by 1.5 per cent. IPPF and MSI contributions decreased by a combined 82 per cent, and USAID’s contribution declined by 13 per cent. 7.06 1.01 12.41 0.73 11.44 35.04 32.32 Figure 1: Commodity expenditure (%) 2010 DFID IPPF KFW MSI PSI UNFPA USAID Total: $235.16m Table 1: Donor support in 2010 Donors Amount (US$) Percentage DFID 16,590,831 7.06 IPPF 2,367,315 1.01 BMZ/KfW 29,180,788 12.41 MSI 1,708,477 0.73 PSI 26,909,321 11.44 UNFPA 82,391,543 35.04 USAID 76,014,739 32.32 Total 235,163,014 100 Donor Support for Contraceptives and Condoms for Family Planning and STI/HIV Prevention 2010 2 Table 2: Comparison of expenditure (in US$) between 2009 and 2010 2009 2010 Comparison 2009-2010 Change Percentage DFID 13,005,195 16,590,831 3,585,636 27.57 BMZ/KfW 16,189,032 29,180,788 12,991,756 80.25 PSI 17,942,658 26,909,321 8,966,663 49.97 UNFPA 81,136,535 82,391,543 1,255,008 1.55 USAID 87,549,507 76,014,739 (11,534,768) -13.18 IPPF & MSI 22,977,954 4,075,792 (18,902,162) -82.26 Total 238,800,882 235,163,014 (3,637,868) -1.52 Like previous years, the highest expenditure in 2010 was on condoms (Table 3). Expenditure on both male and female condoms together was 37 per cent; followed by 24 per cent on injectables and more than 22 per cent on oral contraceptives (combined oral pills and emergency contraceptive pills). Table 3: Quantity and value of commodities in 2010 Methods Quantity Value Percentage of total value Male condoms 2,797,251,012 76,090,517 32.36 Female condoms 18,405,464 11,344,582 4.82 Oral contraceptives 161,882,534 51,171,091 21.76 Emergency contraceptive 3,262,617 1,207,429 0.51 Injectables 89,683,629 56,960,511 24.22 IUDs 7,118,425 3,103,107 1.32 Implants 1,561,545 32,984,272 14.03 Other* 2,301,505 0.98 Total 235,163,014 100 * sampling, testing of condoms, art work In 2010, Africa received commodities valued at more than $147 million, which was approximately 63 per cent of the total (Table 4). The next recipient region was Asia with nearly $59 million (25 per cent). The Arab States region received 4.46 per cent and the Latin America region 7 per cent. Donor Support for Contraceptives and Condoms for Family Planning and STI/HIV Prevention 2010 3 Table 4: Regional distribution of commodities, 2010 Regions Amount (US$) Percentage Africa 147,670,950 62.80 Asia and Pacific Islands 59,338,695 25.23 Arab States 10,495,041 4.46 Latin America and Caribbean 16,621,266 7.07 Others * 1,037,062 0.44 Total* 235,163,014 100 * IPPF had commodities worth $442,623 on hand and could not distribute them to the countries by the end of December. UNFPA provided $594,438 worth of commodities to an organization, and regional distribution of those commodities are not yet available. So, in total, $1,037,062 was not included in regional distribution but listed as ‘others’. Table 5 shows a comparison of commodity support between 2009 and 2010. The highest increase was an increase in support for IUDs (13.95 per cent) and injectables (13.19 per cent), followed by oral contraceptives (10.85 per cent) and then male condoms (2.79 per cent). The largest decrease was in support for female condoms (more than 51 per cent), followed by emergency contraceptives (31.43 per cent) and implants (17.55 per cent). Table 5: Comparison of commodity quantity, 2009 and 2010 2009 2010 Change in percentage Male Condoms 2,721,195,550 2,797,251,012 2.79 Female Condoms 37,842,502 18,405,464 (51.36) Oral Contraceptives 146,031,399 161,882,534 10.85 Emergency Contraceptive 4,758,270 3,262,617 (31.43) Injectables 79,235,645 89,683,629 13.19 IUDs 6,247,021 7,118,425 13.95 Implants 1,893,894 1,561,545 (17.55) Trend analysis Figure 2 shows the trend of major donors’ support from 2005 to 2010. UNFPA and USAID are the two major donors but contribution of other donors is also substantial. The figure does not show any pattern of support over the past six years. Donor Support for Contraceptives and Condoms for Family Planning and STI/HIV Prevention 2010 4 Figure 2: Trends in major donor support for commodities, 2005–2010 Figure 3 shows the regional trend in donor support from 2005–2010. Throughout this time period, Africa has been the highest recipient of support, followed by Asia. For Africa, support decreased slightly from 2005 to 2006, increased through 2009 and then, in 2010, support to Africa decreased substantially. It declined from $173 million in 2009 to $147 million in 2010 – down by some $25 million. Support to the Asia region started to decline from 2006 to 2009, and then in 2010 it increased from $37 million to nearly $59 million, an increase of $22 million. The countries in the region of the Arab States, Middle Eastern countries, Eastern Europe and Central Asia received the lowest levels of funding during all these years. This region received approximately $10.31 million in 2009 and the amount increased slightly to $10.49 million in 2010. The Latin American region has been consistent in securing donor support over the last several years ranging from $16 million to $20 million, in spite of slight decrease in 2010. Detailed figures are available in the tables of Annex 1. $0 $10 $20 $30 $40 $50 $60 $70 $80 $90 $100 DFID KFW PSI UNFPA USAID IPPF & MSI M ill io n s 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 Donor Support for Contraceptives and Condoms for Family Planning and STI/HIV Prevention 2010 5 Figure 3: Regional distribution of donor support, 2005–2010 Figure 4 summarizes expenditure trends for commodities from 2005 to 2010. Donor expenditure slightly increased from 2005 to 2006; and then increased by 7 per cent in 2007 but it dropped by more than 4 per cent in 2008 and then increased by nearly 12 per cent in 2009. However, in 2010 support decreased by 1.5 per cent. Figure 4: Trend in donor expenditure by commodities, 2005–2010 The largest expenditure has been for male condoms, with an increase of 5 per cent from $72.6 million in 2009 to $76 million in 2010. Donor support for female condoms doubled from 2008 to 2009, but it decreased sharply from $29 million in 2009 to $11.3 million in 2010. There has been a substantial $0 $20 $40 $60 $80 $100 $120 $140 $160 $180 $200 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 M ill io n s Africa Asia & Pacific Arab States Latin America & Caribbean $0 $50 $100 $150 $200 $250 $300 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 M ill io n s Male Condoms Female Condoms Oral Contraceptives Injectables IUDs Implants Other* Donor Support for Contraceptives and Condoms for Family Planning and STI/HIV Prevention 2010 6 increase in oral contraceptives (14 per cent) and injectables (8 per cent), while expenditures for IUDs and implants decreased slightly. Figures in Annex 2 illustrate the quantities of contraceptives including condoms provided by donors in 2010. UNFPA and USAID were the largest suppliers of male condoms (30 per cent and 26.5 per cent respectively). For female condoms, UNFPA’s contribution was nearly 54 per cent, followed by USAID at 31 per cent. PSI also made a substantial contribution to female condoms, at nearly 16 per cent. Again, UNFPA and USAID combined contributed nearly 50 per cent of oral contraceptives (approximately 24 per cent each). UNFPA was the largest supplier of implants (nearly 66 per cent), IUDs (65 per cent), injectables (nearly 59 per cent) and female condoms (53.5 per cent). Couple years of protection (CYP) Condoms are used for both for contraception and prevention of sexually transmitted infections, including HIV. In a study in 132 low- and middle-income countries, it was estimated that approximately 30 per cent of condoms, both male and female, are required to meet family planning needs.5 Table 6: CYP by commodity, 2005–2010 CYP '05 CYP '06 CYP '07 CYP '08 CYP '09 CYP '10 Male Condom (FP) 6,114,308 5,588,278 8,071,223 5,901,258 6,802,989 6,993,128 Female Condom (FP) 17,543 33,534 41,120 45,473 94,606 46,014 Oral Contraceptive 13,488,820 11,910,886 12,812,580 15,559,921 9,735,427 10,792,169 Emergency Contraceptive 203,255 335,313 152,640 655,027 317,218 217,508 Injectable 16,772,305 16,921,649 17,431,727 23,612,963 19,808,911 22,420,907 IUD 53,995,732 8,999,648 19,130,341 9,953,993 21,864,574 24,914,488 Implant 759,731 1,003,457 3,016,622 3,693,704 6,628,629 5,465,408 Total CYP 91,351,694 44,792,766 60,656,252 59,422,339 65,252,353 70,849,620 In 2010, the total contributed by all methods was nearly 71 million couple years of protection. This represents an increase of 8.5 per cent in CYP from 2009 (Table 6). IUDs and injectables each contributed one third of the total CYP. The contribution of oral contraceptives was about 15 per cent and for male condoms was less than 10 per cent. Although implants accounted for 14 per cent of total expenditures, they contributed only 7.7 per cent of the total CYP. 5 Contraceptive Projections and the Donor Gap: Meeting the Challenge, Reproductive Health Supplies Coalition, 2009 Donor Support for Contraceptives and Condoms for Family Planning and STI/HIV Prevention 2010 7 Figure 5 shows that $3.32 was required for commodities to provide one couple year of protection. The graph also shows that cost was lowest in 2005, when $2.27 was spent to provide one CYP, and it was highest in 2006 when $4.66 was spent to provide one CYP. The data revealed that in 2005 nearly 15.5 million IUDs (pieces) were procured, providing nearly 55 million couple years of protection. In contrast, in 2006 only 2.5 million IUD pieces were procured, providing only 9 million couple years of protection. Figure 6 shows total expenditure and estimated CYP from 2005 to 2010. The total couple years of protection provided in 2010 was 71 million. The graph also shows that approximately 91 million CYP were provided with a cost of approximately $207.5 million in 2005. About $1 million more was spent to procure commodities in 2006 than in 2005, but less than half the number of couple years of protection were provided in that year than in the previous year. 2.27 4.66 3.68 3.60 3.66 3.32 $0 $1 $2 $3 $4 $5 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 Figure 5: Cost per CYP, 2005-2010 208 209 223 214 239 235 91 45 61 59 65 71 - 50 100 150 200 250 300 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 M ill io n s Figure 6: Values and CYPs, 2005–2010 Value CYPs Donor Support for Contraceptives and Condoms for Family Planning and STI/HIV Prevention 2010 8 Figure 7 gives a comparison of short- and long-acting methods of contraception for the last six years. The effect of procurement of a high number of IUDs in 2005 had an impact on the proportion of short- and long-acting methods in that year. In 2008, the gap between short- and long-acting methods was very large; in that year, expenditure on IUDs decreased. In 2009 and 2010, expenditure for short- and long-acting methods was more consistent. - 10 20 30 40 50 60 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 M ill io n s Figure 7: Distribution of short- and long-acting methods in CYP, 2005–2010 Short Acting Methods Long Acting Methods Donor Support for Contraceptives and Condoms for Family Planning and STI/HIV Prevention 2010 9 B. DONOR SUPPORT IN 2010 UK Department for International Development (DFID) Contraceptive support by DFID in 2010 was more than $16.5 million. Male condom support was the highest at more than $10 million, which constituted nearly 62 per cent of total support, followed by injectables (19.78 per cent), oral contraceptives (15.22 per cent) and implants (nearly 3 per cent). Female condom support amounted to 5,000 pieces (Table 7). DFID support for male and female condoms, oral contraceptives and implants went to five African countries (Angola, Kenya, Nigeria, Uganda and Zimbabwe) and to China in Asia. Table 7: Support of DFID, 2010 Methods Quantity Value (US$) Percentage of total value Male Condom 449,091,810 10,283,152 61.98 Female Condom 5,000 3,300 0.02 Oral Contraceptives 9,580,400 2,525,795 15.22 Injectables 3,508,000 3,282,265 19.78 Implants 20,600 496,319 2.99 Total 16,590,831 100 Most support for male condoms went to Nigeria (nearly 441 million pieces). Much smaller quantities of male condoms in Africa also went to Angola, Kenya and Uganda. In Asia, China received some male condoms and also received 5,000 pieces of female condoms from DFID. Zimbabwe was the major recipient of oral contraceptives at 5.6 million cycles. Kenya received nearly 4 million cycles of oral contraceptives. Zimbabwe received 20,600 implants. International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) IPPF spent $2.36 million for the procurement of commodities in 2010. Out of this, IPPF sent commodities to different countries worth $1.9 million, and retained commodities worth $442,623 as ‘stock on hand’ for future distribution. Table 8: Regional distribution of IPPF resources Regions Total (US$) Percentage Africa 835,146 35.28 Arab States 114,444 4.83 Asia and Pacific 270,308 11.42 Latin America and Caribbean 704,794 29.77 Stock on hand 442,624 18.70 Total 2,367,316 100 Donor Support for Contraceptives and Condoms for Family Planning and STI/HIV Prevention 2010 10 The highest amount of commodities went to Africa (35.28 per cent). Latin American and Caribbean countries received the second highest quantities of commodities (29.77 per cent). Commodities retained as ‘stock on hand’ accounted for more than 18 per cent (Table 8). IPPF support went to 83 countries: 33 in Africa, 29 in Latin America and the Caribbean, 17 in Asia and Pacific and four in the Arab regions. Support ranged from approximately $191,000 for Honduras to a little over $500 for Kiribati, a Pacific Island country. Table 9: Support of IPPF, 2010 Quantity Value Percentage of total value Male condom 10,991,376 309,246 13.06 Female condom 39,000 26,286 1.11 Oral pills 15,290,555 808,764 34.16 Emergency contraceptives 21,040 18,726 0.79 Injectables 721,750 868,998 36.71 IUDs 104,140 41,346 1.75 Implants 4,855 146,129 6.17 Others 147,820 6.24 Total 2,367,315 100 IPPF’s highest support as shown in Table 9 was for injectables (36.71 per cent), followed by oral pills (34.16 per cent) and male condoms (13 per cent). Approximately 48 per cent of injectable support went to Latin American countries, followed by the African region. Support to other regions was minimal. In the Latin American region, Honduras received the highest quantity of injectables (135,200), followed by El Salvador (69,100). In Africa, Côte d’Ivoire received 54,700 injectables, followed by Democratic Republic of Congo with 36,700. In Asia, the Philippines received 14,500. In 2010, IFFP provided more than 15 million cycles of oral contraceptives. Guinea-Conakry received nearly 4 million cycles, and Democratic Republic of Congo received 2.6 million cycles. In Latin America, El Salvador received 2.3 million cycles and the next highest recipient of pills was Aruba with 480,600 cycles. Sarawak, with 136,620 cycles, was the highest recipient of pills in Asian and Pacific countries. Approximately 37 per cent of support for male condoms went to Africa, where the highest recipient was Burkina Faso (1.1 million pieces), followed by Zambia (933,120 pieces), Togo (549,936 pieces), Mozambique (354,240 pieces) and Niger (329,472 pieces). Some 27 per cent of support for male condoms went to Latin America, where the highest recipient was Chile (1.2 million pieces), followed by El Salvador (610,560 pieces) and Peru (302,400 pieces). IPPF spent $128,845 for spermicides and 16 African countries received approximately 87 per cent of this support. Mali received the highest amount of spermicides. Donor Support for Contraceptives and Condoms for Family Planning and STI/HIV Prevention 2010 11 Federal German Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development/Kreditanstalt für Wiederaufbau (BMZ/KfW) BMZ/KfW provided more than $29 million in support for family planning commodities in 2010. Table 10: Regional distribution of BMZ/KfW support Regions Total (US$) Percentage Africa 9,898,095 33.92 Arab States 449,236 1.54 Asia Pacific 17,627,900 60.41 Latin America 1,205,558 4.13 Total 29,180,788 100 The Asia Pacific region over 60 per cent of BMZ/KfW support in 2010 (Cambodia, Nepal and Pakistan), followed by Africa with nearly 34 per cent (Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Congo- Brazzaville, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Mali, Sierra Leone, Somaliland and Tanzania). Commodities in a relatively small percentage of total value were also received by Yemen (1.54 per cent) in the Arab States region, and by four countries in Latin America (4.13 per cent), namely El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua (Table 10). Among all the countries that received commodities from BMZ/KfW, Cambodia received the most support at more than $14.6 million, followed by Cameroon at $3.2 million and Mali at $3.1 million. Sierra Leone was the lowest, with $15,300. Table 11: Support of BMZ/KfW, 2010 Quantity Value (US$) Percentage of total value Male condoms 294,856,894 10,432,288 35.75 Oral pills 25,528,888 14,060,892 48.19 Emergency contraceptives 15,000 15,300 0.05 Injectables 7,059,096 4,508,584 15.45 IUDs 208,494 163,725 0.56 Total 29,180,788 100 Male condoms amounting to 294 million pieces constituted nearly 36 per cent of BMZ/KfW’s total commodity support. Of this support, nearly 63 per cent went to Africa and 22 per cent went to Asia (Table 11). In Africa, Cameroon received 88 million pieces of male condoms and Mali received nearly 35 million pieces. In Asia, Pakistan received nearly 65 million pieces. In Latin America, Guatemala received 18 million pieces. BMZ/KfW provided more than 25.5 million cycles of oral contraceptives, excluding emergency contraceptives (Table 10), and value of this commodity was 48 per cent of the total support. Sixty-four per cent of support for oral contraceptives went to the Asia Pacific region, where Cambodia was the only recipient (10 million cycles). Cambodia received the highest quantity of injectables (3.4 million vials), Donor Support for Contraceptives and Condoms for Family Planning and STI/HIV Prevention 2010 12 followed by Mali (1.5 million vials) and Nepal (1.1 million vials). In addition to these countries, Pakistan received 929,000 vials and Yemen 130,000 vials. Marie Stopes International (MSI) MSI provided over $1.7 million in commodities support to ten African and six Asian countries in 2010. In regional distribution, out of the total, nearly 55.7 per cent went to Asia, followed by Africa with 37.6 per cent (Table 12). In the Arab States region, support went to Sudan and Yemen. Bolivia in the Latin America region received support from MSI. The commodities that MSI provided included male condoms, oral pills (both combined and emergency contraceptive pills), injectables, IUDs and sub-dermal implants (Table 13). The figures for oral contraceptives in Table 12 contain both combined and emergency oral contraceptives. At 42.31 per cent, the percentage of oral contraceptives was highest among all five types of contraceptives that MSI provided. After pills, MSI support for male condoms was 25.93 per cent and for implants 23.52 per cent. IUDs accounted for 4.84 per cent and injectables for 3.42 per cent. Table 13: Support of MSI, 2010 Quantity Value Percentage of total value Male condom 13,567,520 442,934 25.93 Oral contraceptives 6 4,028,002 722,797 42.31 Injectable contraceptives 77,500 58,355 3.42 Intrauterine device (IUD) 216,793 82,610 4.84 Sub-dermal implants 36,222 401,782 23.52 Total 1,708,477 100 MSI provided male condoms to six countries in 2010, of which three were from Asia, two from Africa and one from the Arab States. The countries that received male condoms included Malawi (5.3 million), Mongolia (2.1 million), Afghanistan (1.6 million), Kenya (1.5 million) and Nepal (1.2 million). 6 Oral contraceptives contain both combined pills and emergency contraceptive mbined pills. Table 12: Regional distribution of MSI, 2010 Regions Total (US$) Percentage Africa 642,404 37.60 Asia 934,543 54.70 Arab States 131,086 7.67 Latin America 444 0.03 Total 1,708,477 100 Donor Support for Contraceptives and Condoms for Family Planning and STI/HIV Prevention 2010 13 Sierra Leone received 12,000 sets of implants. Several other African countries also received implants, including Burkina Faso, Kenya, Nigeria, Senegal, Sudan and Uganda. In Asia, Pakistan received implants from MSI, and in Latin America, Bolivia received a minimal supply of 50 sets. The Philippines received highest quantity of IUDs followed by Yemen and Madagascar. Sierra Leone received the highest quantity of injectables from MSI in 2010. Population Services International (PSI) PSI provided approximately $27 million worth of commodities in 2010. Out of this total, 49.78 per cent of support went to seven Asian countries and 46.31 per cent went to 23 African countries. In Latin America, 3.78 per cent of resources went to nine countries. One country in the Arab Stated received PSI assistance. Table 14: Regional distribution of PSI, 2010 Regions Total (US$) Per cent Africa 12,460,514 46.31 Asia 13,399,271 49.79 Arab States 31,353 0.12 Latin America 1,018,183 3.78 Total 26,909,321 100 Three African countries received more than $1 million worth of commodities from PSI. Those countries were Tanzania at$3.55 million, Nigeria at $1.26 million and Côte d’Ivoire at $1.21 million. In Asia, India received more than $8 million, followed by Cambodia at $3.8 million. In Latin America, Paraguay received the most support in that region at $581,404. PSI procured male and female condoms, oral contraceptives including emergency contraceptives, injectables, IUDs and sub-dermal implants. Male condoms were the dominant commodity (48.81 per cent), followed by oral contraceptives (28.82 per cent). The share of the other four commodities varied from 7 per cent to as low as 1.76 per cent (Table 15). Table 15: Support of PSI, 2010 Quantity Value (US$) Percentage of total value Male condom 446,906,368 13,134,268 48.81 Female condom 2,898,315 1,941,166 7.21 Oral contraceptives 30,639,977 7,754,569 28.82 Emergency contraceptive 1,450,000 699,704 2.60 Injectable Contraceptives 1,773,699 1,121,286 4.17 Intrauterine device (IUD) 980,870 473,804 1.76 Sub-dermal implants 81,000 1,784,524 6.63 Total 26,909,321 100 Donor Support for Contraceptives and Condoms for Family Planning and STI/HIV Prevention 2010 14 Regarding male condoms, five African countries received more than 10 million pieces from PSi. Those countries included Tanzania (111.6 million), Côte d’Ivoire (28.8 million), South Africa (28.4 million), Uganda (14.6 million) and Togo (12.3 million). In Asia, three countries received male condoms and all of them received more than 10 million pieces. Support to India was the highest with nearly 142 million pieces, while Lao People’s Democratic Republic received 17 million and Myanmar received 11.5 million. In Latin America, Guatemala received 3.1 million pieces. In support for female condoms, PSI provided approximately 2.9 million pieces, of which 92 per cent of went to Africa and 8 per cent to Asia. Countries from Arab States and Latin America did not receive female condoms from PSI. In Africa, Cameroon was the highest recipient of female condoms at more than 0.6 million pieces, followed by Nigeria, Mozambique and Tanzania (see Table on female condoms in appendix). PSI provided both combined and emergency contraceptive pills. Oral combined contraceptive pills accounted for 28.82 per cent of total PSI support for commodities. Of this amount, four Asian countries received over 87 per cent, including India (14.2 million cycles), Cambodia (11.4 million cycles), Pakistan (813,340 cycles) and Myanmar (720,000 cycles). In Africa, Nigeria received nearly 1.2 million cycles of oral combined pills. In Latin America, Paraguay received 1.8 million cycles and Guatemala 40,000 cycles. Only Nigeria, Myanmar and Paraguay received emergency contraceptive pills. Of support for injectables from PSI, 87 per cent went to Asia, where Cambodia received 1.1 million vials and Pakistan received 400,000 vials. African countries received 13 per cent of support, with Côte d’Ivoire at 227,000 vials.A majority IUDs (85 per cent) went to Asia, where Pakistan and India were the highest recipients, with 591,000 and 155,000 respectively. In Africa, a notable receiver was Uganda with 100,000 IUDs, followed by Tanzania and Democratic Republic of Congo. Three countries in Latin America received IUDs from PSI, including Nicaragua (30,000), El Salvador (25,000) and Guatemala (20,000). Nine countries in the Africa region received 100 per cent of 43,000 implants. United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) In 2010, UNFPA’s total support for commodities was $82,391,5437 (see Table 16). UNFPA provided support to 106 countries in 2010. Of this support, about 66 per cent went to the Africa region, followed by 13 per cent to Asia and the Pacific Islands; 12.88 per cent to Latin America and the Caribbean; and 7.22 per cent to Eastern Europe, Central Asia and the Arab States. UNFPA support went to 43 countries in Africa; 23 countries in Asia and the Pacific Islands; 19 countries in Eastern Europe, Central Asia and the Arab States; and 21 countries in Latin America and the Caribbean. 7 UNFPA data includes third party procurement Donor Support for Contraceptives and Condoms for Family Planning and STI/HIV Prevention 2010 15 Table 16: Regional distribution of UNFPA support, 2010 Regions Total (US$) Per cent Africa 54,434,802 66.07 Asia 10,796,404 13.10 Arab States 5,951,283 7.22 Latin America 10,614,616 12.88 Others 8 594,439 0.72 Total 82,391,543 100.00 Of total expenditures, the share for sub-dermal implants was the highest (25.83 per cent). The share for injectables was close to implants (24.98 per cent), followed by male condoms (22.25 per cent), oral contraceptives (nearly 16 per cent) and finally female condoms (7.06 per cent) (Table 17). Table 17: Support of UNFPA, 2010 Quantity Value (US$) Percentage of total value Male condom 840,921,044 18,331,177 22.25 Female condom 9,852,149 5,813,821 7.06 Oral contraceptives 38,348,592 13,090,277 15.89 Emergency contraceptives 1,641,577 417,750 0.51 Injectables 52,699,184 20,580,674 24.98 IUDs 4,640,028 1,749,874 2.12 Implants 1,025,968 21,278,808 25.83 Others 9 1,129,162 1.37 Total 82,391,542 100 Ninety per cent of implants went to Africa. Twelve African countries received more than 20,000 implants each. Ethiopia was the largest implants recipient at 260,000 pieces, followed by Uganda at 114,200 pieces, Kenya at 75,000 and Burundi at 60,000. In other regions, Asia received 29,100 pieces, the Arab States received 21,451 and Latin America received 31,608. 8 Some commodities were given to IPPF and MSI. That amount has not been included in regional distribution. 9 The cost associated with the procurement of lubricants, sampling and testing of condoms was included as ‘others’. Value of lubricant was little, so it was put under ‘others’. To ensure quality of condoms, UNFPA conducts testing. The cost of testing includes testing cost and other associated expenditures. So, cost of testing was also included as ‘others’. Donor Support for Contraceptives and Condoms for Family Planning and STI/HIV Prevention 2010 16 Similar to implants, Africa was the major recipient of injectables (65.18 per cent), followed by Latin America (18.42 per cent), Asia (11.06 per cent) and the Arab States (5.34 per cent). Ten countries in Africa received more than 1 million vials of injectables. The highest quantity went to Malawi (5.3 million), followed by Nigeria (5.1 million) and Madagascar (5 million). The highest quantity in the Asia region went to Pakistan (over 2 million) followed by Myanmar (1.55 million) and Papua New Guinea (1.1 million). In the Arab States region, Uzbekistan received 1.5 million. In Latin America, five countries (Bolivia, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua) received more than 1 million vials of injectables each. UNFPA supplied more than 39 million cycles of pills in 2010. Many countries received more than one million cycles:  Africa: Nigeria (3.4 million), Madagascar (3.1 million), Uganda (3 million) and Mozambique (1.6 million);  Asia: Myanmar (1.1 million) and Philippines (1 million);  Arab States: Yemen (3 million), Uzbekistan (1.1 million) and Tajikistan (1.1 million); and  Latin America: Ecuador (2.7 million), Uruguay (2.1 million) and Paraguay (1 million). UNFPA provided support for 4.64 million IUDs in 2010. Nearly 3 million IUDs went to Latin America followed by 2 million to the Arab State region, 1.87 million to Asia, and 466,906 to Africa. Two countries received more than 1 million IUDs: Pakistan and Uzbekistan. In 2010, UNFPA provided support for nearly 841 million pieces of male condoms and 9.8 million pieces of female condoms (Table 18). The value of male and female condoms constituted more than 29 per cent of the total UNFPA contribution in 2010, of which male condoms accounted for 22.25 per cent and female condoms for 7 per cent. Out of the total male condoms, more than 509 million pieces went to Africa, 187 million to Asia, 31 million to the Arab States and 100 million to Latin America (Table 18).  In Africa, Kenya received more than 180 million pieces. More than 10 million pieces went to Angola, Democratic Republic of Congo, Côte d’Ivoire, Malawi, Mozambique, Nigeria and Uganda.  In Asia, Pakistan received the highest quantity of male condom (132 million), followed by Myanmar (33 million) and Bhutan (3 million). East Timor and Lao PDR received 1 million pieces each.  In the Arab States region, the highest quantity of male condom went to Sudan (12 million) followed by Uzbekistan (3.6 million), Yemen (3.5 million), Belarus (3 million), Syria (2.8 million) and Tajikistan (2.1 million).  In Latin America, Cuba, Honduras, Mexico and Uruguay each received more than 10 millions pieces. Of the total, a little over 12 million pieces of male condoms were distributed through IPPF programmes in the developing countries. Donor Support for Contraceptives and Condoms for Family Planning and STI/HIV Prevention 2010 17 Table 18: Regional distribution of male and female condoms by UNFPA, 2010 Male condom Female condom Quantity % Quantity % Africa 509,311,940 60.57 8,230,149 83.54 Asia & Pacific 187,760,880 22.33 1,317,000 13.37 Arab States 31,195,584 3.71 143,000 1.45 Latin America 100,602,720 11.96 135,000 1.37 Others* 12,049,920 1.43 27,000 0.27 Total 840,921,044 100 9,852,149 100 * These quantities were given to organizations, and so were not included in the regional distribution. More than 83 per cent of female condoms went to Africa and 13 per cent went to Asia. Less than 2 per cent went to the Arab States and Latin America. The six major recipient African countries for female condoms were Mozambique (1.5 million), Zimbabwe (955,000), Malawi (800,000), Uganda (800,000), Kenya (715,000) and Niger (408,000). In Asia, Indonesia received 1 million pieces, Fiji received 200,000 and Myanmar received 83,000. In the Arab States region, Sudan received 1 million. UNFPA provided IPPF with 27,000 female condoms for other developing countries. United States Agency for International Development (USAID) USAID provided more than $76 million for commodities to 42 countries in 2010. Of this total support, 69.5 per cent of resources went to Africa followed by Asia at 21.43 per cent (Table 19). The Arab States region received a little over 5 per cent and Latin America and the Caribbean received 4 per cent. USAID support went to 23 countries in Africa, 10 countries in Asia, one country in the Arab States, and eight countries in Latin America and the Caribbean. The highest level of support in Africa went to Uganda ($8.8 million) and the lowest went to Burundi ($32,000). In Asia, the most support went to Pakistan ($8.6 million) and the lowest to China ($26,000). In the Arab States, the only recipient was Ukraine ( $3.8 million). In Latin America and the Caribbean, Haiti received $2 million and Guatemala received nearly $11,000. Along with other modern methods, USAID supported the Standard Days Method with $837,856 and lubricant with $187,667 (Table 20). The highest level of support from USAID went to injectables (34.91 per cent), followed by male condoms (30.46 per cent), oral pills (16.13 per cent) and implants (11.68 per cent). Table 19: Regional distribution of USAID, 2010 Regions Total (US$) Per cent Africa 52,826,916 69.50 Asia 16,292,513 21.43 Arab States 3,817,639 5.02 Latin America 3,077,671 4.05 Total 76,014,739 100 Donor Support for Contraceptives and Condoms for Family Planning and STI/HIV Prevention 2010 18 Table 20: Support of USAID, 2010 Methods Quantity Value (US$) Percentage of total value Male Condom 740,916,000 23,157,452 30.46 Female Condom 5,611,000 3,560,009 4.68 Oral contraceptive Pills 38,601,120 12,263,947 16.13 Injectable Contraceptives 23,844,400 26,540,350 34.91 Intrauterine device (IUD) 968,100 591,748 0.78 Sub-dermal implants 392,900 8,876,710 11.68 Standard Days Method 487,500 837,856 1.10 Others (lubricant) 3,535,000 186,667 0.25 Total 76,014,739 100 Male and female condoms together constituted more than 35 per cent of USAID’s total support in 2010. USAID provided support for more than 740 million male condoms and more than 3.5 million female condoms in 2010 (Table 20). Table 21 shows that nearly 50 per cent of support for male condoms went to Africa, followed by Asia with 34.6 per cent. Support to the Arab States was 8.45 per cent and Latin America regions received 7.5 per cent. Table 21: Regional distribution of male and female condoms, USAID 2010 Male condom Female condom Quantity % Quantity % Africa 366,066,000 49.41 4,816,000 85.83 Asia 256,542,000 34.62 305,000 5.44 Arab States 62,601,000 8.45 450,000 8.02 Latin America 55,707,000 7.52 40,000 0.71 Total 740,916,000 100 5,611,000 100.00 In terms of quantity for male condoms, Africa received support for 366 million pieces, followed by Asia (256 million pieces), Arab States (62 million pieces) and Latin American (55 million pieces) (See Annex 3). In Africa, six countries each received 25 million pieces or more. Those countries were Ethiopia (47 million), Uganda (47 million), Zimbabwe (44 million), Democratic Republic of Congo (33 million), Zambia (31 million) and Malawi (25 million). In Asia, the highest recipients of male condoms were Pakistan (170 million), Nepal (27 million), Bangladesh (20 million), Myanmar (15 million) and Afghanistan (10 million). Ukraine received support for 62.6 million male condoms in 2010 from USAID.In Latin America, Haiti was the highest recipient (24 million), followed by Peru (20 million) and Dominican Republic (11.3 million). Most of the female condoms went to Africa (85 per cent), followed by relatively much lesser quantities to the Arab States (8 per cent) and Asia (5.4 per cent). Less than 1 per cent of female condoms went to Latin American and Caribbean countries. Among the African countries, the highest quantity of female Donor Support for Contraceptives and Condoms for Family Planning and STI/HIV Prevention 2010 19 condoms went to the Democratic Republic of Congo (more than 1.8 million pieces), followed by Malawi (1.5 million pieces) and Zambia (1.2 million pieces). Among the higher recipients in Asia, Myanmar received 200,000 pieces and Thailand received 100,000. Ukraine received 450,000 and in the Latin American region, Trinidad and Tobago received 40,000. Six countries from Africa received more than 1 million cycles of pills: Tanzania (4.5 million cycles), Mozambique (3.8 million cycles), Uganda (2.3 million), Rwanda (1.6 million), Madagascar (1.2 million) and Ethiopia (1.1 million). In Asia, Pakistan received the highest amount (8.1 million cycles), followed by Bangladesh (7.7 million). Ukraine from Europe received 1.7 million cycles. More than 84 per cent of the total 23.8 million vials of injectables went to Africa, where 17 countries received Injectables: Uganda (4.8 million vials), Ethiopia (2.8 million), Kenya (2.7 million), Ghana (2.2 million), Nigeria (2.1 million), Mozambique (1 million) and Rwanda (1 million). Most of the remaining support, 12 per cent, went to Asia where four countries received injectables: Pakistan (1.3 million), Bangladesh (768,000), Afghanistan (480,000) and Nepal (327,600). In Latin America, only Haiti received injectables (685,600) (Ssee Annex 3). Less than one million IUD pieces were provided by USAID. The highest quantity of IUDs went to Pakistan (366,600), followed by Bangladesh (94,200). Nigeria was the only country that received 100,000 pieces in Africa, although seven additional countries from Africa received support for IUDs. Ukraine received 288,000; Peru received 12,000 IUDs. Support for implants was nearly 12 per cent of the total value of USAID support, which provided 40,000 sets. Most of this support (94 per cent) went to Africa (see Annex 3). Fourteen African countries received support for implants. Ethiopia was the highest recipient, receiving 60,000 sets, followed by Zambia (52,000) and Tanzania (50,000). In Asia, Nepal receive 8,500 sets of Implants. Two Latin American countries, Haiti (14,200 sets) and Guatemala (500 sets), also received implants. Seven countries from Africa received the Standard Days Method. No other country from any other regions received this method. In Africa, the highest support for this method went to the Democratic Republic of Congo (400,000 sets) followed by Madagascar (30,000 sets). Donor Support for Contraceptives and Condoms for Family Planning and STI/HIV Prevention 2010 20 C. DONOR SUPPORT FOR MALE AND FEMALE CONDOMS Male and female condoms are the only methods that provide couples simultaneous protection against unintended pregnancies and STIs/HIV. Male and female condoms, when used consistently and correctly, are highly effective at preventing STIs, including HIV. Indeed, male and female condoms are central to efforts to halt the spread of HIV as recognized at the ICPD in 1994 as well as by the UNGASS Political Declaration on HIV/AIDS, adopted unanimously by United Nations Member States on 2 June 2006. In particular, the female condom is currently the only technology that gives women and adolescent girls greater control over protecting themselves from HIV, other STIs and unintended pregnancy. The product, however, has not yet achieved its full potential due to inadequate promotional activities, insufficient supply and comparatively higher cost than male condoms ($0.80 for a polyurethane female condom versus $0.03 for a male latex condom). The Female Health Company recently developed a new version of the female condom FC2, which is nearly identical to its predecessor but is made of synthetic nitrile and considerably less expensive to manufacture. After technical consultation with WHO in January 2006 to review the new female condoms dossier, experts concluded that FC2 was compatible with the FC1 and recommended that all donors consider procuring it for public sector programmes. Condom requirements The total need for family planning condoms in low- and middle-income countries in 2015 is estimated at almost 5 billion pieces, according to a Reproductive Health Supplies Coalition report where condom requirements are estimated separately (those used primarily for family planning and those used primarily for prevention of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections). The total (for both purposes) would be nearly 18 billion in 2015. Yet, as large countries such as Brazil, China, India and South Africa do not depend on donors for their condom supply, the requirement for donor support is much less: nearly 4.4 billion in 2015 of which 2.4 billion are for STI/HIV prevention and 2.0 billion are for family planning10. Patterns and trends in donor support for condoms versus other contraceptives Figures 9 and 10 show trends in the distribution of donor support for condoms relative to other types of contraceptives from 2005 to 2010. Overall, donor support for condoms remained between 37 per cent to 43 per cent of all commodities. 10 Reproductive Health Supplies Coalition, Contraceptive Projections and the Donor Gap: Meeting the Challenge 2009. Donor Support for Contraceptives and Condoms for Family Planning and STI/HIV Prevention 2010 21 Support for male condoms did not follow any pattern, with rises and falls almost every alternate year since 2005. There was a drop in 2006, a rise in 2007, a drop in 2008, and then again an increase during 2009 and 2010. For female condoms there was a gradual increase between 2005 to 2008, then a sharp rise in 2009 from 14 million in 2008 to 38 million in 2009, followed by a sharp fall in 2010 to 18.5 million. $0 $50 $100 $150 $200 $250 $300 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 M ill io n s Figure 8: Expenditure on condoms and other contraceptives, 2005–2010 Condoms Other contraceptives Total 39.1 37.6 43.4 37.4 42.6 39.0 60.9 62.4 56.6 62.6 57.4 61.0 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 Figure 9: Proportion of expenditure: Condoms and other contraceptives, 2005–2010 Condoms Other contraceptives $207m $207m $222m S213m $239m $256m Donor Support for Contraceptives and Condoms for Family Planning and STI/HIV Prevention 2010 22 Figure 12 summarizes trends in donor expenditures for female condoms by region from 2007 to 2010. There was an increase from 2007 to 2008 of $2.5 million, and then there was a sharp rise in 2009, doubling support by all donors for female condoms from $14 million to $29 million. But there was a sharp decrease in 2010 when support dropped to $12.6 million. For female condoms, more than 90 per cent of supplies went to sub-Saharan Africa, and most of the remaining went to Asia. - 20 40 60 80 100 120 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 M ill io n s Figure 10: Expenditure trend of male and female condoms, 2005-2010 Male condom Female condom Total - 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 M ill io n s Figure 11: Donor expenditure of male condoms, 2005–2010 Africa Asia Arab States Latin America Donor Support for Contraceptives and Condoms for Family Planning and STI/HIV Prevention 2010 23 Detailed quantities and values for both male and female condoms, by country and regions, are appended in Annex 3. $0 $5 $10 $15 $20 $25 $30 $35 2007 2008 2009 2010 M ill io n s Figure 12: Donor expenditure of female condoms, 2007–2010 Africa Asia Arab States Latin America Donor Support for Contraceptives and Condoms for Family Planning and STI/HIV Prevention 2010 24 D. COMPARISON OF CONTRACEPTIVE NEEDS AND DONOR SUPPORT This section compares donor support with estimated costs of contraception and condoms for STI/HIV prevention (from Reproductive Health Supplies Coalition, Contraceptives Projections and the Donor Gap, 2009). The donor support requirements were estimated for a set of 88 donor-dependent countries by leveraging data sources such as the DHS surveys to estimate the current contraceptive prevalence rate, current unmet need for family planning and the current method mix of different family planning options. The projected number of users was computed using population projections, projected CPR rates for all women and projected method mixes. The population receiving service (the number of women projected to be using each type of family planning service) was multiplied by the cost of a couple year protections to estimate the family planning costs. A separate calculation was performed to estimate the number of condoms need for STI/HIV prevention and added to the commodity requirements. The donor funding share was estimated based on historical donor shares. It is important to note that this is not meant to indicate that the historical donor share is the ’correct share’, but rather was used as a basis for asking the question, “What would donor costs be in the future if the donor share remained the same and the current unmet need was reduced to 0 by 2015?” Figure 13 clearly displays that the donor share requirements would nearly need to double in order for the current unmet need to be met in 2015. Figure 13: Projected contraceptive need Source: Reproductive Health Supplies Coalition, Contraceptives Projections and the Donor Gap, 2009 Several factors need to be kept in mind when analyzing resource requirements in the context of available funding. Individuals’ unmet needs for family planning, use of standard costs and exclusion of programming costs increase the requirements shown above; other factors reduce them. The following provides a brief overview of some of the main factors that influence the estimated requirements. Donor Support for Contraceptives and Condoms for Family Planning and STI/HIV Prevention 2010 25 Future needs for contraceptive commodities are determined by three key factors: (a) growth in the numbers of women of reproductive age as a consequence of high fertility rates in the past, (b) increasing demand for family planning, and (c) changes in the family planning methods used, particularly the shift from traditional to modern methods as programmes mature. The estimation of donor support requirements in 88 countries by the RH Supplies Coalition in 2009 revealed that the number of women of childbearing age is expected to increase by 33 per cent in the next 15 years, from 525 million in 2005 to 696 million in 2020. If current unmet need is to be met by 2015, the total number of users of modern methods would increase from 144 million to 252 million, an increase of 75 per cent. Even under the more moderate medium variant scenario, the number of modern method users is projected to increase by 49 per cent during that same period, from 144 million to 214 million. In both scenarios, around 80 per cent of this increase would take place in Asia and sub-Saharan Africa. Unmet need The projections of family planning users assume that the current unmet need for family planning is reduced to zero by 2015. There is no assumption of latent demand. According to UNFPA estimates, approximately 215 million women worldwide would like to limit or space the number of children they have, but are not using contraceptives.11 Standard costs The projections of commodity requirements were developed assuming unit costs paid by USAID and UNFPA in 2006. Unit costs were weighted according to the quantities procured by the two agencies. An upward adjustment of 15 per cent was applied to account for transportation and wastage costs. These prices are at the very low end of the cost spectrum, which means that the actual costs might be substantially higher. Varying degrees of donor dependency There are also factors that effectively change the presented donor requirements. The numbers shown in the graph were calculated based on historical donor share which may change in the future. Linking donor support to CPR Contraceptive prevalence in developing countries has grown dramatically in the past decades. Since the mid-1960s, the contraceptive prevalence rate has increased from approximately 10 per cent to almost 60 per cent. The United Nations Population Division projections show that the reproductive-age population in developing countries will increase some 23 per cent between 2000 and 2015. To meet current growth rates, donor funding for contraceptives will need to increase by 60 per cent, from about $230 million per year today to about $370 million by 2020, or by more than 80 per cent to more than $420 million by 2020 to eliminate unmet need.12 11 As defined by Demographic Health Surveys, ‘unmet need’ is the measure of the discrepancy between the number of women in surveys who respond that they would like to limit or space childbirth but are not currently using contraception. 12 Reproductive Health Supplies Coalition, Contraceptive Projection s and the Donor Gap: Meeting the Challenge 2009. Donor Support for Contraceptives and Condoms for Family Planning and STI/HIV Prevention 2010 26 ANNEX 1: DONOR SUPPORT 2010 AT A GLANCE Table 22: Donor Support 2010 Donors Amount in(US$) Percentage DFID 16,590,831 7.06 IPPF 2,367,315 1.01 BMZ/KfW 29,180,788 12.41 MSI 1,708,477 0.73 PSI 26,909,321 11.44 UNFPA 82,391,543 35.04 USAID 76,014,739 32.32 Total 235,163,014 100.00 Table 23: Male Condom Donors Quantity Value( in US$) DFID 449,091,810 10,283,152 IPPF 10,991,376 309,246 BMZ/KfW 294,856,894 10,432,288 MSI 13,567,520 442,934 PSI 446,906,368 13,134,268 UNFPA 840,921,044 18,331,176 USAID 740,916,000 23,157,452 Total 2,797,251,012 76,090,517 Table 24: Female Condom Donors Quantity Value( in US$) DFID 5,000 3,300 IPPF 39,000 26,286 PSI 2,898,315 1,941,166 UNFPA 9,852,149 5,813,821 USAID 5,611,000 3,560,009 Total 18,405,464 11,344,582 Table 25: Oral Contraceptives Donors Quantity Value( in US$) DFID 9,580,400 2,525,795 IPPF 15,290,555 808,764 BMZ/KfW 25,528,888 14,060,892 MSI 3,893,002 666,847 PSI 30,639,977 7,754,569 UNFPA 38,348,592 13,090,277 USAID 38,601,120 12,263,947 Total 161,882,534 51,171,091 Donor Support for Contraceptives and Condoms for Family Planning and STI/HIV Prevention 2010 27 Table 26: Emergency Contraceptive Pills Donors Quantity Value( in US$) IPPF 21,040 18,726 BMZ/KfW 15,000 15,300 MSI 135,000 55,950 PSI 1,450,000 699,704 UNFPA 1,641,577 417,750 Total 3,262,617 1,207,429 Table 27: Injectable Contraceptives Donors Quantity Value( in US$) DFID 3,508,000 3,282,265 IPPF 721,750 868,998 BMZ/KfW 7,059,096 4,508,584 MSI 77,500 58,355 PSI 1,773,699 1,121,286 UNFPA 52,699,184 20,580,674 USAID 23,844,400 26,540,350 Total 89,683,629 56,960,511 Table 28: Intra Uterine Device Donors Quantity Value( in US$) IPPF 104,140 41,346 BMZ/KfW 208,494 163,725 MSI 216,793 82,610 PSI 980,870 473,804 UNFPA 4,640,028 1,749,875 USAID 968,100 591,748 Total 7,118,425 3,103,107 Table 29: Sub-dermal Implants Donors Quantity Value( in US$) DFID 20,600 496,319 IPPF 4,855 146,129 MSI 36,222 401,782 PSI 81,000 1,784,524 UNFPA 1,025,968 21,278,808 USAID 392,900 8,876,710 Total 1,561,545 32,984,272 Donor Support for Contraceptives and Condoms for Family Planning and STI/HIV Prevention 2010 28 Table 30: Quantity & Value of Commodities in 2010 Method Quantity Value Percentage Male Condoms 2,797,251,012 76,090,517 32.36 Female Condoms 18,405,464 11,344,582 4.82 Oral Contraceptives 161,882,534 51,171,091 21.76 Emergency Contraceptive 3,262,617 1,207,429 0.51 Injectables 89,683,629 56,960,511 24.22 IUDs 7,118,425 3,103,107 1.32 Implants 1,561,545 32,984,272 14.03 Other* 2,301,505 0.98 Total 235,163,014 100 Table 31: Regional Distribution of Commodities (Quantities) Regions Amount Percentage Africa 147,507,295 62.73 Asia & Pacific 59,502,351 25.30 Arab States 10,495,041 4.46 Latin America & Caribbean 16,621,266 7.07 Others 1,037,062 0.44 Total 235,163,015 100 Table 32: Comparison of Expenditure in US$, 2009-2010 Donors 2009 2010 Comparison 2009-2010 Change Percentage DFID 13,005,195 16,590,831 3,585,636 27.57 BMZ/KfW 16,189,032 29,180,788 12,991,756 80.25 PSI 17,942,658 26,909,321 8,966,663 49.97 UNFPA 81,136,535 82,391,543 1,255,008 1.55 USAID 87,549,507 76,014,739 (11,534,768) -13.18 IPPF & MSI 22,977,954 4,075,792 (18,902,162) -82.26 Total 238,800,882 235,163,014 (3,637,868) -1.52 Donor Support for Contraceptives and Condoms for Family Planning and STI/HIV Prevention 2010 29 Table 33: Comparison of Commodity Quantity Method 2009 2010 Change Change in % Male Condoms 2,721,195,550 2,797,251,012 76,055,462.00 2.79 Female Condoms 37,842,502 18,405,464 (19,437,038.00) (51.36) Oral Contraceptives 146,031,399 161,882,534 15,851,135.40 10.85 Emergency Contraceptive 4,758,270 3,262,617 (1,495,653.00) (31.43) Injectables 79,235,645 89,683,629 10,447,984.00 13.19 IUDs 6,247,021 7,118,425 871,404.00 13.95 Implants 1,893,894 1,561,545 (332,349.00) (17.55) Table 34: Expenditure Trend by Donor in US$, 2005-2010 Donors 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 DFID 4,645,009 12,074,215 22,509,607 11,082,505 13,005,195 16,590,831 BMZ/KfW 13,141,863 23,628,162 24,581,698 15,458,390 16,189,032 29,180,788 PSI 28,815,939 30,619,669 24,899,764 14,139,388 17,942,658 26,909,321 UNFPA 82,569,544 74,367,557 63,891,923 89,323,477 81,136,535 82,391,543 USAID 68,774,981 62,761,027 80,862,868 68,852,015 87,549,507 76,014,739 IPPF & MSI 9,571,480 5,104,072 6,410,753 14,872,391 22,977,954 4,075,792 Total 207,518,815 208,554,702 223,156,613 213,728,167 238,800,882 235,163,014 Percent of increase (or decrease than previous year) 0.50 7.00 -4.23 11.73 -1.52 Table 35: Expenditure Trend by Region in US$, 2005-2010 Regions 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 Africa 98,001,400 88,988,154 133,893,291 133,109,503 173,103,825 147,507,295 Asia & Pacific 62,061,112 72,810,718 60,184,220 53,243,126 37,240,205 59,502,351 Arab States, ME, CA, EU 14,450,838 10,770,186 11,019,114 8,214,680 10,317,812 10,495,041 Latin America & Caribbean 20,595,648 21,859,899 16,090,787 18,877,820 17,871,861 16,621,266 Others 12,409,817 14,125,745 1,969,201 283,037 267,179 1,037,062 Total 207,518,815 208,554,702 223,156,613 213,728,167 238,800,882 235,163,015 Donor Support for Contraceptives and Condoms for Family Planning and STI/HIV Prevention 2010 30 Table 36: Method-wise Expenditure Trend in US$, 2005-2010 Method 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 Male Condoms 75,716,312 68,903,030 83,472,771 65,665,032 72,609,025 76,090,517 Female Condoms 5,307,622 8,997,611 12,807,286 14,265,265 29,198,748 11,344,582 Oral Contraceptives 55,942,227 58,231,403 52,284,410 52,844,113 45,784,413 52,378,520 Injectables 58,884,772 58,409,796 53,250,968 53,237,932 52,609,728 56,960,511 IUDs 4,337,192 3,992,670 2,540,851 1,704,399 3,165,913 3,103,107 Implants 5,537,104 7,213,713 16,220,743 23,289,713 33,371,936 32,984,272 Other* 1,514,436 1,681,488 1,397,382 2,496,505 2,100,000 2,301,505 Total 207,239,665 207,429,712 221,974,412 213,502,958 238,839,763 235,163,014 Donor Support for Contraceptives and Condoms for Family Planning and STI/HIV Prevention 2010 31 ANNEX 2: COMMODITIES: DONORS’ CONTRIBUTION 7.06 1.01 12.41 0.73 11.44 35.04 32.32 Figure 14: Commodity Expenditure (%) 2010 DFID IPPF BMZ/KfW MSI PSI UNFPA USAID Total: $ 235.16m 16.05 0.39 10.54 0.49 15.98 30.06 26.49 Figure 15: Quantity of Male Condom Supplied by Donors (%) 2010 DFID IPPF BMZ/KfW MSI PSI UNFPA USAID Total: 2,797m 0.03 0.21 15.75 53.53 30.49 Figure 16: Quantity of Female Condom Supplied by Donors (%) 2010 DFID IPPF PSI UNFPA USAID Total: 18.4m Donor Support for Contraceptives and Condoms for Family Planning and STI/HIV Prevention 2010 32 5.92 9.45 15.77 2.40 18.93 23.69 23.85 Figure 17: Quantity of Oral Pills (Low dose & Progesteron only) Supplied by Donors (%) 2010 DFID IPPF BMZ/KfW MSI PSI UNFPA USAID Total: 161.88m 0.64 0.46 4.14 44.44 50.31 Figure 18: Quantity of Emergency Contraceptives Supplied by Donors (%) 2010 IPPF BMZ/KfW MSI PSI UNFPA Total : 3.26m 3.91 0.80 7.87 0.09 1.98 58.76 26.59 Figure 19: Quantity of Injectables Supplied by Donors (%) 2010 DFID IPPF BMZ/ KfW MSI Total: 89.68m Donor Support for Contraceptives and Condoms for Family Planning and STI/HIV Prevention 2010 33 1.67 3.35 3.49 1.30 74.62 15.57 Figure 20: Quantity of IUD Supplied by Donors (%) 2010 IPPF BMZ/KfW MSI PSI UNFPA USAID Total: 7.11m 0.84 0.20 1.47 39.85 41.68 15.96 Figure 21: Quantity of Implant Supplied by Donors (%) 2010 DFID IPPF MSI PSI UNFPA USAID Total: 1.56m Donor Support for Contraceptives and Condoms for Family Planning and STI/HIV Prevention 2010 34 ANNEX 3: COUNTRY TABLES: DONORS, COMMODITIES AND VALUES Country Table 1: Male Condoms – Donors, Commodities and Values Country Table 2: Female Condoms – Donors, Commodities and Values Country Table 3: Oral Contraceptives – Donors, Commodities and Values Country Table 3: Oral Contraceptives – Donors, Commodities and Values Country Table 4: Emergency Contraceptive Pills – Donors, Commodities and Values Country Table 5: Injectables – Donors, Commodities and Values Country Table 6: IUD – Donors, Commodities and Values Country Table 7: Implant – Donors, Commodities and Values C o u n try Tab le 1 : M ale C o n d o m s - D o n o rs, C o m m o d itie s & V alu e s Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ A n go la 4,176,216 125,286 20,000,448 426,400 3,000,000 109,026 27,176,664 660,712 B e n in 164,160 4,184 4,101,408 105,383 - - 3,402,000 106,456 7,667,568 216,023 B o tsw an a 5,384,988 152,910 21,600 537 5,406,588 153,447 B u rkin a Faso 1,154,880 29,433 14,400,000 432,000 7,294,032 181,338 - - 22,848,912 642,771 B u ru n d i - - 2,880,000 86,400 3,002,400 63,202 - - 5,882,400 149,602 C am e ro o n 76,032 1,938 88,200,000 3,368,368 - - 8,208,000 179,417 96,484,032 3,549,723 C e n tral A frican R e p u b lic 5,760 147 14,241,000 845,338 2,741,040 82,231 2,317,536 46,673 19,305,336 974,388 C h ad - - 7,000,000 365,504 3,705,984 91,575 10,705,984 457,079 C o n go - - 1,872,000 50,830 1,872,000 50,830 C o n go - B razzaville 10,800,000 711,473 10,800,000 711,473 C o n go , D e m o cratic R e p u b lic o f 33,006,000 1,015,783 33,006,000 1,015,783 C o n go , D R C 30,672,000 604,920 30,672,000 604,920 C o n go , Th e D e m o cratic R e p u b lic 201,600 5,138 201,600 5,138 C o te D 'Ivo ire - - 28,847,853 865,436 10,000,080 201,391 38,847,933 1,066,826 D e m o cratic R e p u b lic o f C o n go 6,616,400 198,492 6,616,400 198,492 Eq u ato rial G u in e a 1,000,800 24,881 1,000,800 24,881 Eritre a 4,593,600 100,874 4,593,600 100,874 Eth io p ia - - 250,128 7,504 - - 47,757,000 1,586,005 48,007,128 1,593,509 G ab o n 37,440 2,827 37,440 2,827 G am b ia 2,694,672 66,085 2,694,672 66,085 G h an a - - - - 14,397,000 531,231 14,397,000 531,231 G u in e a 11,914,038 357,421 622,080 16,929 12,536,118 374,350 G u in e a-B issau - - 2,361,384 60,683 2,880,000 65,050 5,241,384 125,733 K e n ya 33,502 1,005 - - 1,566,720 46,784 6,061,824 401,774 180,504,000 3,617,080 - - 188,166,046 4,066,643 Le so th o - - 2,001,600 60,048 - - 2,001,600 60,048 Lib e ria - - 682,854 20,486 - - 10,413,000 302,814 11,095,854 323,300 M ad agascar - - - - - - - - 20,640,000 599,461 20,640,000 599,461 M alaw i 5,319,200 195,378 25,632,000 525,100 25,002,000 753,172 55,953,200 1,473,650 M ali - - 34,999,200 1,370,194 - - 4,268,592 86,706 1,842,000 82,191 41,109,792 1,539,091 M au ritan ia - - 2,160,000 42,975 2,160,000 42,975 M o zam b iq u e 354,240 9,028 7,190,904 215,727 70,780,032 1,409,499 20,520,000 626,776 98,845,176 2,261,031 N am ib ia 8,034,255 260,249 - - 8,034,255 260,249 N ige r 329,472 11,094 - - 329,472 11,094 N ige ria 440,935,544 10,062,404 144,000 3,670 - - 2,160,000 208,500 45,792,288 1,009,781 5,340,000 155,552 494,371,832 11,439,907 R w an d a 11,520 294 6,000,048 281,252 4,766,400 100,955 12,300,000 376,473 23,077,968 758,974 Sao To m e an d P rin cip e 95,040 3,359 3,937,680 85,295 4,032,720 88,654 Se n e gal - - 6,744,000 189,898 6,744,000 189,898 Sie rra Le o n e - - - - - - 7,200,000 145,000 - - 7,200,000 145,000 So u th A frica 28,451,808 846,740 23,001,000 780,917 51,452,808 1,627,657 Sw azilan d 4,500,000 90,625 4,500,000 90,625 Tan zan ia - - - - 111,600,000 2,513,750 - - 15,546,000 489,512 127,146,000 3,003,262 To go 549,936 16,066 12,376,368 547,628 - - - - 12,926,304 563,694 U gan d a 3,464,640 80,000 - - - - 14,600,688 359,355 59,870,448 1,194,616 47,574,000 1,494,247 125,509,776 3,128,218 D o n o r Su p p o rt fo r C o n trace p tive s an d C o n d o m s fo r Fam ily P lan n in g an d STI/H IV P re ve n tio n 34 A n n e x - 3 To tal Q u an tity To tal A m o u n t in D e stin atio n C o u n trie s: A frica U SA ID D FID IP P F K FW M SI P SI U N FP A * C o u n try Tab le 1 : M ale C o n d o m s - D o n o rs, C o m m o d itie s & V alu e s Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ Zam b ia 933,120 23,782 420,000 12,600 1,015,268 29,213 31,005,000 997,273 33,373,388 1,062,868 Zim b ab w e - - - - 44,577,000 1,440,651 44,577,000 1,440,651 A frica To tal 448,609,902 10,268,695 4,057,200 110,958 184,434,238 7,536,699 6,885,920 242,162 249,883,550 7,200,749 509,311,940 10,456,946 366,066,000 11,637,438 1,769,248,750 47,453,647 A sia P acific A fgh an istan 1,658,880 43,268 - - 10,050,000 262,969 11,708,880 306,237 B an glad e sh 187,200 4,356 20,391,000 583,373 20,578,200 587,729 B h u tan 3,888,000 83,700 3,888,000 83,700 C am b o d ia - - 7,776,000 233,280 - 7,776,000 233,280 C h in a 481,908 14,457 - - 399,000 11,555 880,908 26,012 C o o k Islan d s 288 26 288 26 East Tim o r 1,065,600 23,277 1,065,600 23,277 In d ia 141,795,998 4,253,880 141,795,998 4,253,880 In d o n e sia 130,320 3,208 130,320 3,208 Iran (Islam ic R e p u b lic O f) 499,968 12,569 499,968 12,569 K irib ati 5,760 147 5,760 147 Lao P e o p le 's D e m o cratic R e p 1,000,080 25,697 1,000,080 25,697 Lao s 17,000,260 602,919 1,674,000 61,432 18,674,260 664,351 M alaysia - - 36,000 763 36,000 763 M ald ive s 72,000 1,773 72,000 1,773 M o n go lia - - 2,160,000 84,700 6,788,304 168,414 8,948,304 253,114 M yan m ar 43,200 1,101 - - 11,499,840 251,593 33,768,000 682,500 15,000,000 513,919 60,311,040 1,449,112 N e p al 1,296,000 36,900 - - 2,246,400 54,735 27,180,000 774,940 30,722,400 866,575 P akistan 64,800,000 1,604,600 - - 132,184,800 3,061,363 170,454,000 4,634,657 367,438,800 9,300,620 P ap u a N e w G u in e a 4,595,404 137,862 4,595,404 137,862 P ap u a N e w G u in e a - - - - 600,000 29,674 600,000 29,674 P h ilip p in e s 365,760 9,322 - - 499,968 12,846 865,728 22,168 Sam o a 2,880 73 2,880 73 So lo m o n Islan d s 3,024 86 3,024 86 Th ailan d 18,432 553 302,400 6,405 795,000 46,043 1,115,832 53,001 To n ga ETC 43,200 2,974 43,200 2,974 V an u ta 11,664 494 11,664 494 V ie t N am - - 5,091,840 208,955 5,091,840 208,955 V ie tn am 9,999,000 261,811 9,999,000 261,811 A sia P acific To tal 481,908 14,457 475,776 14,223 64,800,000 1,604,600 5,114,880 164,868 182,685,934 5,480,087 187,760,880 4,350,560 256,542,000 7,180,373 697,861,378 18,809,167 A rab State s A lb an ia 388,800 10,614 388,800 10,614 A R O 2,880 73 2,880 73 B e laru s 3,063,744 69,286 3,063,744 69,286 B o sn ia an d H e rze go vin a 617,040 14,355 617,040 14,355 D o n o r Su p p o rt fo r C o n trace p tive s an d C o n d o m s fo r Fam ily P lan n in g an d STI/H IV P re ve n tio n 35 P SI U N FP A U SA ID To tal Q u an tity To tal A m o u n t in D e stin atio n C o u n trie s: A frica D FID IP P F K FW M SI A n n e x - 3 C o u n try Tab le 1 : M ale C o n d o m s - D o n o rs, C o m m o d itie s & V alu e s Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ D jib o u ti 20,160 501 20,160 501 Egyp t 50,400 1,225 50,400 1,225 Iraq 288,000 7,340 734,400 20,048 1,022,400 27,388 K azakh stan 144,000 3,931 144,000 3,931 K o so vo 1,008,000 27,517 1,008,000 27,517 M o ro cco 100,944 6,514 100,944 6,514 O m an 504,000 12,250 504,000 12,250 P ale stin e - - 302,400 8,255 302,400 8,255 Su d an - - - - 699,984 31,353 12,096,000 287,605 12,795,984 318,958 Syrian A rab R e p u b lic 2,880,000 70,000 2,880,000 70,000 Tajikistan 2,170,368 51,960 2,170,368 51,960 U krain e 62,601,000 2,659,731 62,601,000 2,659,731 U n ite d A rab Em irate s 5,040 107 5,040 107 U zb e kistan 3,676,032 76,839 3,676,032 76,839 Y e m e n 2,706,624 85,431 1,566,720 35,904 3,535,200 86,901 7,808,544 208,236 A rab State s To tal - - 391,824 13,928 2,706,624 85,431 1,566,720 35,904 699,984 31,353 31,195,584 741,394 62,601,000 2,659,731 99,161,736 3,567,742 Latin A m e rica an d C arib b e an A ru b a 67,536 1,805 67,536 1,805 B arb ad o s 41,040 1,842 - - 41,040 1,842 B e lize 75,168 5,492 324,000 12,240 399,168 17,732 B o livia - - - - 1,142,928 27,780 1,142,928 27,780 C h ile 1,278,720 32,590 1,278,720 32,590 C o lo m b ia 1,108,224 27,582 1,108,224 27,582 C o sta R ica - - 240,800 9,285 - - 240,800 9,285 C u b a 21,500,208 797,578 21,500,208 797,578 C u racao 28,800 734 28,800 734 D o m in ican R e p u b lic 145,440 3,707 878,400 20,435 11,304,000 339,041 12,327,840 363,183 Ecu ad o r 8,640,000 198,000 8,640,000 198,000 El Salvad o r 610,560 15,561 4,320,000 118,500 756,000 26,728 6,450,048 153,300 12,136,608 314,088 G re n ad a 3,600 139 3,600 139 G u ate m ala - - 18,000,000 493,750 3,196,800 100,570 4,739,328 96,268 - - 25,936,128 690,587 H aiti 864,000 20,100 24,000,000 693,388 24,864,000 713,488 H o n d u ras - - 9,868,032 299,033 2,253,600 71,711 11,000,016 252,084 - - 23,121,648 622,827 Jam aica 92,160 2,349 - - 92,160 2,349 M e xico - - 25,700 771 20,949,840 421,890 20,975,540 422,661 N icaragu a - - 10,728,000 294,275 2,037,600 64,862 2,692,944 64,895 - - 15,458,544 424,032 P an am a - - 3,074,400 89,713 5,922,288 137,775 8,996,688 227,489 P aragu ay - - 1,728,000 46,200 4,626,432 107,629 - - 6,354,432 153,829 P e ru 302,400 7,707 - - 20,001,000 631,358 20,303,400 639,065 D o n o r Su p p o rt fo r C o n trace p tive s an d C o n d o m s fo r Fam ily P lan n in g an d STI/H IV P re ve n tio n 36 A n n e x - 3 D e stin atio n C o u n trie s: A rab D FID IP P F K FW M SI P SI U N FP A U SA ID To tal Q u an tity To tal A m o u n t in C o u n try Tab le 1 : M ale C o n d o m s - D o n o rs, C o m m o d itie s & V alu e s Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ St V in ce n t 864 78 864 78 Su rin am e 195,840 13,605 - - 195,840 13,605 Trin id ad an d To b ago 18,144 1,455 402,000 16,123 420,144 17,578 U ru gu ay 10,080,000 217,000 10,080,000 217,000 V e n e zu e la 103,680 2,642 8,064 220 111,744 2,863 Latin A m e rica an d C arib b e an To tal - - 2,963,952 89,706 42,916,032 1,205,558 - - 13,636,900 422,079 100,602,720 2,542,534 55,707,000 1,679,910 215,826,604 5,939,787 O TH ER S IP P F 12,049,920 239,743 12,049,920 239,743 IP P F Sto ck o n H an d 3,102,624 80,431 3,102,624 80,431 O TH ER S To tal - - 3,102,624 80,431 - - - - - - 12,049,920 239,743 - - 15,152,544 320,174 M ale C o n d o m To tal 449,091,810 10,283,152 10,991,376 309,246 294,856,894 10,432,288 13,567,520 442,934 446,906,368 13,134,268 840,921,044 18,331,176 740,916,000 23,157,452 2,797,251,012 76,090,517 D o n o r Su p p o rt fo r C o n trace p tive s an d C o n d o m s fo r Fam ily P lan n in g an d STI/H IV P re ve n tio n 37 O th e rs A n n e x - 3 D e stin atio n C o u n trie s: Latin A m e rica an d C arib b e an D FID IP P F K FW M SI P SI U N FP A U SA ID To tal Q u an tity To tal A m o u n t in U S$ C o u n try Tab le 2 : Fe m ale C o n d o m s - D o n o rs, C o m m o d itie s & V alu e s Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ B o tsw an a 1,900 1,254 - - - 1,900 1,254 B u rkin a Faso 2,000 1,348 - - - 2,000 1,348 B u ru n d i - - 200,000 117,000 - - 200,000 117,000 C am e ro o n 2,000 1,348 600,000 396,000 100,000 60,000 702,000 457,348 C ap e V e rd e 9,000 5,400 9,000 5,400 C e n tral A frican R e p u b lic 1,000 674 - - 330,002 226,869 331,002 227,543 C h ad - - 170,001 124,836 170,001 124,836 C o n go , D R e p u b lic 1,817,000 1,104,818 1,817,000 1,104,818 C o te D 'Ivo ire - - 51,914 34,263 300,000 180,000 351,914 214,263 Eq u ato rial G u in e a 10,000 6,000 10,000 6,000 G am b ia 1,000 600 1,000 600 G h an a - - 100,000 59,000 40,000 27,588 140,000 86,588 G u in e a 119,000 70,400 119,000 70,400 G u in e a-B issau - - - - 5,000 3,000 5,000 3,000 K e n ya - - - - 715,000 415,000 - - 715,000 415,000 M ad agascar - - - - - - 49,000 36,601 49,000 36,601 M alaw i 862,146 505,016 1,500,000 923,386 2,362,146 1,428,402 M ali - - - - 135,000 81,000 60,000 41,141 195,000 122,141 M au ritan ia - - 15,000 9,000 15,000 9,000 M au ritiu s - - 20,000 12,000 20,000 12,000 M o zam b iq u e - - 450,000 297,000 1,500,000 855,000 - - 1,950,000 1,152,000 N am ib ia 134,765 88,945 200,000 117,000 334,765 205,945 N ige r - - 525,000 304,500 525,000 304,500 N ige ria - 1,000 674 659,852 435,502 408,000 241,800 - - 1,068,852 677,976 Sao To m e an d P rin cip e 1,000 674 - - 1,000 674 Sie rra Le o n e - - 403,000 241,800 - - 403,000 241,800 So u th A frica - - 250,000 180,129 250,000 180,129 Sw azilan d 121,000 72,600 121,000 72,600 Tan zan ia - - 576,000 370,368 - - - - 576,000 370,368 To go - - 162,000 144,990 7,000 4,200 - - 169,000 149,190 U gan d a - - - - - 800,000 468,000 - - 800,000 468,000 Zam b ia 8,000 5,392 - - 220,000 141,600 1,100,000 667,276 1,328,000 814,268 Zim b ab w e 955,000 554,000 - - 955,000 554,000 A frica To tal - - 15,000 10,110 - - - - 2,636,431 1,768,322 8,230,149 4,875,621 4,816,000 2,980,939 15,697,580 9,634,992 B an glad e sh 1,000 600 - - 1,000 600 B h u tan 5,000 3,000 5,000 3,000 C h in a 5,000 3,300 - - 5,000 3,552 10,000 6,852 East Tim o r 1,000 600 1,000 600 Fiji 200,000 116,000 200,000 116,000 In d ia 222,803 147,050 222,803 147,050 In d o n e sia 1,000,000 570,000 1,000,000 570,000 M o n go lia - - 18,000 10,800 18,000 10,800 M yan m ar - - - - 83,000 49,800 200,000 120,245 283,000 170,045 P ap au N e w G u in e a 39,081 25,793 39,081 25,793 So lo m o n Islan d s 1,000 674 1,000 674 Sri Lan ka 5,000 3,000 5,000 3,000 Th ailan d - - - - 100,000 - 100,000 - V ie t N am - - 4,000 2,400 4,000 2,400 A R O 1,000 674 1,000 674 A sia P acific To tal 5,000 3,300 1,000 674 - - - - 261,884 172,843 1,317,000 756,200 305,000 123,797 1,890,884 1,057,488 D o n o r Su p p o rt fo r C o n trace p tive s an d C o n d o m s fo r Fam ily P lan n in g an d STI/H IV P re ve n tio n 38 U SA ID To tal Q u an tity To tal A m o u n t in A n n e x - 3 D e stin atio n C o u n trie s: A frica D FID IP P F K FW M SI P SI U N FP A * D e stin atio n C o u n trie s: A sia P acific C o u n try Tab le 2 : Fe m ale C o n d o m s - D o n o rs, C o m m o d itie s & V alu e s Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ B o sn ia an d H e rze go vin a 4,000 2,400 4,000 2,400 D jib o u ti 3,000 1,800 3,000 1,800 K yrgyzstan 20,000 12,000 20,000 12,000 M o ro cco 2,000 1,348 2,000 1,348 Su d an - - - - 106,000 62,600 106,000 62,600 Tu rkm e n istan 10,000 6,000 10,000 6,000 U krain e 450,000 418,508 450,000 418,508 A rab State s To tal 5,000 3,300 4,000 2,696 - - - - 261,884 172,843 1,460,000 841,000 755,000 542,305 595,000 504,656 B o livia - - 6,000 3,600 6,000 3,600 C o lo m b ia 5,000 3,000 5,000 3,000 C o sta R ica 1,000 674 - - 9,000 5,400 10,000 6,074 Ecu ad o r 20,000 12,000 20,000 12,000 El Salvad o r - - - - 58,000 34,800 58,000 34,800 H aiti 10,000 6,000 - - 10,000 6,000 P e ru - - 20,000 12,000 - - 20,000 12,000 Trin id ad an d To b ago - - 40,000 36,765 40,000 36,765 U ru gu ay 5,000 3,000 5,000 3,000 V e n e zu e la - - 2,000 1,200 2,000 1,200 Latin A m e rica an d C arib b e an To tal - - 1,000 674 - - - - - - 135,000 81,000 40,000 36,765 176,000 118,439 O TH ER S D e n m ark (o th e rs) 3,000 1,800 3,000 1,800 IP P F 24,000 14,400 24,000 14,400 IP P F Sto ck o n H an d 19,000 12,806 19,000 12,806 O TH ER S To tal - - 19,000 12,806 - - - - - - 27,000 16,200 - - 46,000 29,006 Fe m ale C o n d o m To tal 10,000 6,600 40,000 26,960 - - - - 3,160,199 2,114,009 11,169,149 6,570,021 5,916,000 3,683,806 18,405,464 11,344,582 D o n o r Su p p o rt fo r C o n trace p tive s an d C o n d o m s fo r Fam ily P lan n in g an d STI/H IV P re ve n tio n 39 *U N FPA d a ta in clu d e s th ird p a rty p ro cu re m e n ts U SA ID To tal Q u an tity To tal A m o u n t in U S$ IP P F K FW M SI P SI U N FP A Latin A m e rica an d C arib b e an A n n e x - 3 D e stin atio n C o u n trie s: A rab State s D FID C o u n try Tab le 3 : O ral C o n trace p tive s - D o n o rs, C o m m o d itie s & V alu e s Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ B e n in 720,000 2,304 - - 50,700 16,900 264,000 99,381 1,034,700 118,585 B u rkin a Faso 36,000 11,844 - - 972,664 306,285 - - 1,008,664 318,129 C am e ro o n - - 50,000 12,500 512,000 162,175 562,000 174,675 C ap e V e rd e 170,000 56,586 170,000 56,586 C e n tral A frican R e p u b lic 847,252 14,556 - - 480,943 156,109 1,328,195 170,665 C h ad 2,160 711 - - 2,160 711 C o m o ro s 30,000 10,000 30,000 10,000 C o n go 720 237 202,857 69,866 203,577 70,103 C o n go , D e m o cratic R e p u b lic o f 411,840 136,033 411,840 136,033 C o n go , Th e D e m o cratic R e p u b lic 2,604,500 16,209 39,999 18,266 2,644,499 34,475 C o te D 'Ivo ire 66,240 20,925 695,692 173,923 137,000 47,830 898,932 242,678 Eq u ato rial G u in e a 19,998 7,899 19,998 7,899 Eritre a 90,999 31,073 90,999 31,073 Eth io p ia 117,120 39,318 - - - - 1,150,560 350,639 1,267,680 389,957 G ab o n 720 326 720 326 G am b ia 430,200 161,965 430,200 161,965 G h an a 40,320 13,265 - - - - 40,320 13,265 G u in e a 500,000 160,000 430,002 152,868 930,002 312,868 G u in e a-B issau 9,100 3,676 - - 33,984 13,055 43,084 16,731 G u in e a-C o n akry 3,992,240 17,849 3,992,240 17,849 K e n ya 3,910,000 1,257,065 494,500 8,026 - - 570,000 180,320 506,880 167,479 5,481,380 1,612,890 Le so th o 18,000 5,836 - - 413,004 134,863 431,004 140,699 Lib e ria 14,520 5,067 - - - - 260,640 82,121 275,160 87,188 M ad agascar 3,000 2,158 2,005,200 545,235 3,157,821 962,236 1,243,200 416,661 6,409,221 1,926,289 M alaw i 625,700 195,957 - - 625,700 195,957 M ali 50,880 16,391 2,600,000 346,060 - - 12,800 5,488 999,600 372,404 3,663,280 740,343 M au ritan ia 245,040 2,426 571,979 215,929 817,019 218,355 M au ritiu s 16,560 5,287 130,000 41,126 146,560 46,413 M o zam b iq u e 7,200 2,815 - - 1,644,435 696,573 3,841,920 1,188,790 5,493,555 1,888,178 N ige r 540,880 8,534 412,446 178,931 953,326 187,465 N ige ria 123,000 1,862 - - 3,424,000 1,057,370 - - 3,547,000 1,059,232 R w an d a - - - - - - 1,672,560 567,706 1,672,560 567,706 Sao To m e an d P rin cip e 1,440 563 7,728 2,576 9,168 3,139 Se n e gal - - - - 902,640 292,619 902,640 292,619 Se ych e lle s M H O 1,608 1,552 1,608 1,552 Sie rra Le o n e 7,200 2,726 55,002 15,113 736,176 259,962 - - 798,378 277,802 So m alilan d 479,888 119,972 479,888 119,972 Tan zan ia 16,120 5,769 1,045,000 261,250 - - 155,900 53,528 4,924,080 1,560,858 6,141,100 1,881,405 To go 712,000 3,470 - - 16,260 5,420 180,000 67,042 908,260 75,932 U gan d a 25,200 8,291 - - - - 2,110,000 645,191 2,301,840 806,273 4,437,040 1,459,755 Zam b ia 40,320 13,801 - - - - - - 40,320 13,801 Zim b ab w e 5,670,400 1,268,730 5,670,400 1,268,730 A frica To tal 9,580,400 2,525,795 10,753,840 235,795 4,624,888 887,282 55,002 15,113 2,750,892 731,658 17,589,595 5,846,345 18,659,760 6,108,006 64,014,377 16,349,994 D o n o r Su p p o rt fo r C o n trace p tive s an d C o n d o m s fo r Fam ily P lan n in g an d STI/H IV P re ve n tio n 40 U SA ID To tal Q u an tity To tal A m o u n t in A n n e x - 3 D e stin atio n C o u n trie s: A frica D FID IP P F K FW M SI P SI U N FP A * C o u n try Tab le 3 : O ral C o n trace p tive s - D o n o rs, C o m m o d itie s & V alu e s Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ A fgh an istan 200,000 47,003 80,000 26,666 660,240 198,581 940,240 272,250 B an glad e sh - - 7,776,000 2,417,147 7,776,000 2,417,147 B h u tan 50,000 16,667 50,000 16,667 C am b o d ia 20,000,000 12,961,760 10,499,965 2,624,991 1,008,000 252,667 - - 31,507,965 15,839,418 C o o k Islan d s 7,920 2,845 7,920 2,845 East Tim o r 43,500 16,956 43,500 16,956 Fiji 54,873 22,468 54,873 22,468 In d ia 14,215,780 3,553,945 14,215,780 3,553,945 K o re a, D e m o cratic P e o p le 's R e p 146,100 51,901 146,100 51,901 Lao P e o p le 's D e m o cratic R e p 250,000 108,458 250,000 108,458 M alaysia 46,040 25,195 - - 46,040 25,195 M o n go lia - - 34,000 11,291 170,000 56,666 204,000 67,957 M yan m ar 12,960 4,264 2,700,000 453,900 720,000 158,400 1,120,000 355,925 - - 4,552,960 972,489 N e p al 500,000 85,000 - - - - 734,400 245,969 1,234,400 330,969 P akistan - - - - 813,340 203,335 100,001 36,133 8,114,400 2,503,050 9,027,741 2,742,518 P ap u a N e w G u in e a 10,080 3,406 1,000 333 - - 11,080 3,739 P h ilip p in e s 88,444 39,909 - - 1,050,000 445,230 1,138,444 485,139 Sab ah 75,920 31,969 75,920 31,969 Sam o a 6,480 2,331 6,480 2,331 Saraw ak 136,620 54,657 136,620 54,657 So lo m o n Islan d s 1,440 563 1,440 563 To n ga ETC 720 237 720 237 Tu valu 720 326 720 326 V an u ta 1,320 441 1,320 441 V ie t N am 29,520 9,712 - - 29,520 9,712 A sia P acific To tal - - 418,184 175,856 20,000,000 12,961,760 3,434,000 597,193 26,249,085 6,540,671 4,073,474 1,390,071 17,285,040 5,364,747 71,459,783 27,030,298 A rab State s A lb an ia 97,000 33,777 97,000 33,777 Iraq 42,000 17,634 750,000 254,885 792,000 272,519 K azakstan 10,000 7,000 10,000 7,000 K o so vo 100,000 31,635 100,000 31,635 K yrgyzstan 60,000 23,670 60,000 23,670 M o ro cco 185,040 61,503 185,040 61,503 O m an 150,000 50,804 150,000 50,804 P ale stin e 7,200 2,677 496,200 177,441 503,400 180,119 Su d an 6,240 6,022 - - 85,500 30,450 91,740 36,472 Syrian A rab R e p u b lic 675,003 222,671 675,003 222,671 Tajikistan 1,129,800 375,583 1,129,800 375,583 Tu rkm e n istan 50,000 18,495 50,000 18,495 U krain e 1,786,320 510,335 1,786,320 510,335 U zb e kistan 1,121,253 399,292 1,121,253 399,292 Y e m e n 904,000 211,850 404,000 54,540 3,066,000 1,102,357 4,374,000 1,368,747 A rab State s To tal - - 240,480 87,836 904,000 211,850 404,000 54,540 - - 7,790,756 2,728,060 1,786,320 510,335 11,125,556 3,592,622 D o n o r Su p p o rt fo r C o n trace p tive s an d C o n d o m s fo r Fam ily P lan n in g an d STI/H IV P re ve n tio n 41 A n n e x - 3 D e stin atio n C o u n trie s: A sia D FID IP P F K FW M SI P SI U N FP A U SA ID To tal Q u an tity To tal A m o u n t in C o u n try Tab le 3 : O ral C o n trace p tive s - D o n o rs, C o m m o d itie s & V alu e s Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ A n tigu a an d B arb u d a 5,740 2,003 5,740 2,003 A ru b a 480,600 1,750 480,600 1,750 B ah am as 5,040 1,546 5,040 1,546 B arb ad o s 3,600 1,205 28,602 9,534 32,202 10,739 B e lize 2,160 711 - - 2,160 711 B o livia - - - - 222,570 71,225 222,570 71,225 C h ile 25,920 8,528 25,920 8,528 C o sta R ica - - - - 720 240 720 240 D o m in ican R e p u b lic 7,440 2,342 930,000 294,206 - - 937,440 296,547 Ecu ad o r 2,729,500 958,981 2,729,500 958,981 El Salvad o r 2,358,780 24,134 - - - - 198,100 71,531 2,556,880 95,665 G am m o l - B e lgiu m 4,320 1,421 4,320 1,421 G re n ad a 243,280 2,123 243,280 2,123 G u ate m ala - - - - 40,000 14,400 520,224 164,573 - - 560,224 178,973 H aiti 33,048 11,016 870,000 280,859 903,048 291,875 H o n d u ras 125,040 41,138 - - - 215,001 267,351 - - 340,041 308,489 Jam aica - - 150,001 48,302 150,001 48,302 N icaragu a - - - - - 717,000 226,823 - - 717,000 226,823 P an am a 1,002 2,110 - - - - 1,002 2,110 P aragu ay 5,400 1,930 1,600,000 467,840 1,000,000 306,900 - - 2,605,400 776,670 P e ru 10,080 3,316 - - - - 10,080 3,316 St Lu cia 12,270 4,433 12,270 4,433 St V in ce n t 5,340 1,804 5,340 1,804 Su rin am e 77,760 25,603 50,001 16,667 127,761 42,270 U ru gu ay 2,100,000 678,453 2,100,000 678,453 Latin A m e rica an d C arib b e an To tal - - 3,373,772 126,096 - - - - 1,640,000 482,240 8,894,767 3,125,801 870,000 280,859 14,778,539 4,014,996 IP P F Sto ck o n H an d 504,279 183,181 504,279 183,181 O ral C o n trace p tive P ills To tal 9,580,400 2,525,795 15,290,555 808,764 25,528,888 14,060,892 3,893,002 666,847 30,639,977 7,754,569 38,348,592 13,090,277 38,601,120 12,263,947 161,882,534 51,171,091 D o n o r Su p p o rt fo r C o n trace p tive s an d C o n d o m s fo r Fam ily P lan n in g an d STI/H IV P re ve n tio n 42 *U N FP A d a ta in clu d e s th ird p a rty p ro cu re m e n ts U N FP A U SA ID To tal Q u an tity To tal A m o u n t in U S$ D FID IP P F K FW M SI P SI D e stin atio n C o u n trie s:Latin A m e rica & C arib e e an A n n e x - 3 C o u n try Tab le 4 : Em e rge n cy C o n trace p tive P ills - D o n o rs, C o m m o d itie s & V alu e s Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ B u ru n d i - - 30,000 7,500 30,000 7,500 C am e ro o n 1,900 1,691 - - - - 1,900 1,691 C o m o ro s 200 50 200 50 C o n go 1,920 1,709 - - 1,920 1,709 C o n go - B razzaville C o te D 'Ivo ire 720 641 - - 13,500 10,175 14,220 10,816 Eq u ato rial G u in e a 10,000 2,500 10,000 2,500 G ab o n 240 214 240 214 G u in e a-C o n akry 2,400 2,136 2,400 2,136 Le so th o - - - - 21,000 5,250 21,000 5,250 Lib e ria 400 356 - - - - 400 356 M alaw i 20,000 5,000 20,000 5,000 M au ritiu s - - 10,000 2,500 10,000 2,500 N ige ria 240 214 1,200,000 624,000 - - 1,200,240 624,214 R w an d a 1,200 1,068 - - - - 1,200 1,068 Sie rra Le o n e 240 214 15,000 15,300 20,000 20,400 1,000 250 36,240 36,164 Tan zan ia 500 445 - - - - 500 445 U gan d a 2,100 1,869 - - - - 900,000 225,000 902,100 226,869 A frica To tal - - 11,860 10,555 15,000 15,300 20,000 20,400 1,200,000 624,000 1,005,700 258,225 - - 2,252,560 928,480 B h u tan 2,500 625 2,500 625 Fiji 1,200 300 1,200 300 M o n go lia - - 80,000 20,800 5,000 1,250 85,000 22,050 M yan m ar - - 35,000 14,750 30,000 8,340 29,177 7,850 94,177 30,940 P akistan - - - - 210,000 52,500 210,000 52,500 Sri Lan ka 10,000 2,500 10,000 2,500 A sia P acific To tal - - - - - - 115,000 35,550 30,000 8,340 257,877 65,025 - - 402,877 108,915 Iraq 2,880 2,563 - - 2,880 2,563 K azakstan 5,000 1,250 5,000 1,250 K o so vo 30,000 7,500 30,000 7,500 P ale stin e 480 427 - - 480 427 Tu rkm e n istan 15,000 3,750 15,000 3,750 A rab State s To tal - - 3,360 2,990 - - - - - - 50,000 12,500 - - 53,360 15,490 A ru b a 100 89 100 89 C u b a 180,000 45,000 180,000 45,000 D o m in ican R e p u b lic 720 641 50,000 12,500 50,720 13,141 G re n ad a 400 356 400 356 G u ate m ala - - - - 2,000 500 2,000 500 H aiti 16,000 4,000 16,000 4,000 P aragu ay - - 220,000 67,364 20,000 5,000 240,000 72,364 St Lu cia 1,900 1,691 1,900 1,691 St V in ce n t 2,700 2,403 2,700 2,403 U ru gu ay 60,000 15,000 60,000 15,000 Latin A m e rica an d C arib b e an To tal - - 5,820 5,180 - - - - 220,000 67,364 328,000 82,000 - - 553,820 154,544 Em e rge n cy C o n trace p tive To tal - - 21,040 18,726 15,000 15,300 135,000 55,950 1,450,000 699,704 1,641,577 417,750 - - 3,262,617 1,207,429 D o n o r Su p p o rt fo r C o n trace p tive s an d C o n d o m s fo r Fam ily P lan n in g an d STI/H IV P re ve n tio n 43 *U N FP A d a ta in clu d e s th ird p a rty p ro cu re m e n ts Latin A m e rica an d C arib b e an A sia P acific A rab State s A n n e x - 3 D e stin atio n C o u n trie s: A frica D FID IP P F K FW M SI P SI U N FP A * U SA ID To tal Q u an tity To tal A m o u n t in C o u n try Tab le 5 : In je ctab le s - D o n o rs, C o m m o d itie s & V alu e s Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ A n go la 100,000 42,000 180,800 220,363 280,800 262,363 B e n in - - - 78,000 102,258 - - 78,000 102,258 C am e ro o n - - 5,000 3,161 400,000 144,000 405,000 147,161 C ap e V e rd e 140,000 53,200 140,000 53,200 C e n tral A frican R e p u b lic 7,000 9,065 - - 339,090 213,188 346,090 222,253 C h ad 2,100 2,289 13,000 7,960 15,100 10,249 C o m o ro s 82,800 61,272 82,800 61,272 C o n go 2,000 2,746 46,000 19,320 48,000 22,066 C o n go , D e m o cratic R e p u b lic o f 513,200 509,828 513,200 509,828 C o n go , Th e D e m o cratic R e p u b lic 36,700 40,000 2,860,000 970,350 2,896,700 1,010,350 C o te D 'Ivo ire 54,700 73,525 227,229 143,648 432,801 292,005 714,730 509,179 Eq u ato rial G u in e a 20,000 11,600 20,000 11,600 Eritre a 190,000 79,800 190,000 79,800 Eth io p ia - - - - - - 2,800,000 2,990,276 2,800,000 2,990,276 G ab o n 1,000 1,373 1,000 1,373 G am b ia 420,000 180,325 420,000 180,325 G h an a - - 2,992,000 1,077,300 2,200,000 2,436,925 5,192,000 3,514,225 G u in e a 300,000 114,000 300,000 114,000 G u in e a-B issau - - - - 40,000 16,000 40,000 16,000 G u in e a-C o n akry 13,300 14,496 13,300 14,496 K e n ya 7,700 8,903 - - - - 1,994,000 791,540 2,700,000 3,108,620 4,701,700 3,909,063 Le so th o 7,900 8,973 - - 423,700 176,706 431,600 185,679 Lib e ria 9,000 9,809 - - 96,000 40,320 156,000 196,201 261,000 246,330 M ad agascar 2,600 3,570 - - - - 5,094,400 1,582,702 970,400 1,089,427 6,067,400 2,675,699 M alaw i - - 5,330,000 1,863,600 592,000 696,663 5,922,000 2,560,263 M ali - - 1,500,000 1,458,815 - - 1,152,300 390,424 226,800 275,013 2,879,100 2,124,252 M au ritan ia 2,500 2,725 22,400 10,994 24,900 13,719 M au ritiu s 400 436 - - 400 436 M o zam b iq u e 4,200 5,059 - - - - 1,052,800 1,170,796 1,057,000 1,175,855 N am ib ia - - 387,050 148,897 387,050 148,897 N ige r 1,500 1,635 219,200 78,912 220,700 80,547 N ige ria 3,508,000 3,282,265 21,000 26,969 - - 5,118,101 2,566,464 2,118,000 2,370,292 10,765,101 8,245,990 R w an d a 7,200 8,903 - - - - 1,032,800 1,166,792 1,040,000 1,175,695 Sao To m e an d P rin cip e 1,300 1,417 12,400 5,208 13,700 6,625 Se n e gal - - 1,600,000 484,000 - - 1,600,000 484,000 Sie rra Le o n e 4,500 5,329 27,000 24,339 784,650 271,031 99,600 122,388 915,750 423,086 Sw azilan d 1 3,748 1 3,748 Tan zan ia 400 436 - - 1,500,000 495,000 177,200 222,846 1,677,600 718,282 To go 1,700 2,334 - - 392,000 163,604 40,000 48,455 433,700 214,393 U gan d a 1,000 922 - - - - 1,732,000 573,360 4,819,200 5,560,028 6,552,200 6,134,310 Zam b ia 12,100 15,369 - - - - 500,000 506,665 512,100 522,034 Zim b ab w e - - 36,000 15,120 - - 36,000 15,120 A frica To tal 3,508,000 3,282,265 201,800 246,285 1,500,000 1,458,815 27,000 24,339 232,229 146,809 34,347,893 13,046,208 20,178,800 22,691,578 59,995,722 40,896,299 D o n o r Su p p o rt fo r C o n trace p tive s an d C o n d o m s fo r Fam ily P lan n in g an d STI/H IV P re ve n tio n 44 A n n e x - 3 D e stin atio n C o u n trie s: A frica D FID IP P F K FW M SI P SI U N FP A * U SA ID To tal Q u an tity To tal A m o u n t in C o u n try Tab le 5 : In je ctab le s - D o n o rs, C o m m o d itie s & V alu e s Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ A fgh an istan 50,000 33,570 80,000 33,600 480,000 528,145 610,000 595,315 B an glad e sh - - 768,000 750,874 768,000 750,874 C am b o d ia 3,400,000 1,652,976 1,101,270 696,194 124,500 76,160 - - 4,625,770 2,425,330 C o o k Islan d s 800 872 800 872 East Tim o r 120,600 60,942 120,600 60,942 In d ia 40,200 25,413 40,200 25,413 K irib ati 100 109 100 109 M alaysia 3,700 4,571 - - 3,700 4,571 M o n go lia - - 500 446 144,000 106,400 144,500 106,846 M yan m ar 12,500 13,624 - - - - 1,550,001 572,750 - - 1,562,501 586,374 N e p al - - - - 327,600 374,749 327,600 374,749 N e p al 1,100,000 689,816 1,100,000 689,816 P akistan 929,096 587,350 - - 400,000 252,869 2,020,000 1,029,790 1,346,800 1,382,720 4,695,896 3,252,729 P ap u a N e w G u in e a 500 545 1,178,000 389,100 - - 1,178,500 389,645 P h ilip p in e s 14,500 16,710 - - 610,000 202,200 624,500 218,910 Sab ah 3,100 3,690 3,100 3,690 Sam o a 5,000 5,450 5,000 5,450 Saraw ak 8,100 9,933 8,100 9,933 So lo m o n Islan d s 100 109 100 109 Tu valu 100 109 100 109 A sia P acific To tal - - 48,500 55,722 5,429,096 2,930,142 50,500 34,016 1,541,470 974,476 5,827,101 2,470,942 2,922,400 3,036,488 15,819,067 9,501,787 A rab State s A lb an ia 20,000 8,400 20,000 8,400 D jib o u ti 15,000 10,200 15,000 10,200 Iraq 3,325 3,624 200,000 72,000 203,325 75,624 K azakh stan 9,000 6,930 9,000 6,930 K o so vo 30,000 12,600 30,000 12,600 K yrgyzstan - - - - M o ro cco 5,000 5,450 5,000 5,450 O m an 47,000 36,190 47,000 36,190 P ale stin e 300 327 70,400 29,568 70,700 29,895 Su d an 4,000 4,360 - - - - 17,400 7,308 21,400 11,668 Syrian A rab R e p u b lic 35,000 48,300 35,000 48,300 Tajikistan 446,460 190,730 446,460 190,730 U krain e 57,600 67,798 57,600 67,798 U zb e kistan 1,597,600 656,290 1,597,600 656,290 Y e m e n 130,000 119,626 - - 328,000 126,360 458,000 245,986 A rab State s To tal - - 12,625 13,760 130,000 119,626 - - - - 2,815,860 1,204,876 57,600 67,798 3,016,085 1,406,061 D o n o r Su p p o rt fo r C o n trace p tive s an d C o n d o m s fo r Fam ily P lan n in g an d STI/H IV P re ve n tio n 45 A n n e x - 3 D e stin atio n C o u n trie s: A sia P acific D FID IP P F K FW M SI P SI U N FP A * U SA ID To tal Q u an tity To tal A m o u n t in U S$ C o u n try Tab le 5 : In je ctab le s - D o n o rs, C o m m o d itie s & V alu e s Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ A n tigu a an d B arb u d a 500 545 500 545 A ru b a 800 771 800 771 B ah am as 26,000 28,904 26,000 28,904 B arb ad o s 2,000 2,181 48,800 25,808 50,800 27,989 B e lize 7,425 7,665 - - 7,425 7,665 B o livia - - - - 1,081,600 366,268 1,081,600 366,268 C h ile 7,000 9,436 7,000 9,436 C u b a 85,200 32,376 85,200 32,376 C u racao 2,200 2,398 2,200 2,398 D o m in ican R e p u b lic 3,500 4,664 970,000 336,000 - - 973,500 340,664 El Salvad o r 69,100 90,010 - - 1,400,100 545,141 1,469,200 635,151 G re n ad a 1,600 1,857 1,600 1,857 G u ate m ala - - - - 1,559,230 941,913 - - 1,559,230 941,913 G u yan a 1,000 1,136 49,200 20,664 50,200 21,800 H aiti 66,950 28,119 685,600 744,486 752,550 772,605 H o n d u ras 135,200 147,357 - - 1,595,000 533,300 - - 1,730,200 680,657 Jam aica 5,000 5,450 500,000 162,750 505,000 168,200 M e xico 40,000 53,920 - - - - 40,000 53,920 N e vis 600 824 600 824 N icaragu a - - - - 1,424,200 506,462 - - 1,424,200 506,462 P an am a 4,500 4,148 - - 104,000 66,680 108,500 70,828 P aragu ay 15,800 15,540 - - 700,050 237,037 - - 715,850 252,576 P e ru 3,200 2,950 - - - - 3,200 2,950 St Lu cia 2,200 2,400 2,200 2,400 St V in ce n t 200 246 200 246 Su rin am e 13,000 14,169 4,000 1,680 17,000 15,849 Trin id ad an d To b ago 3,100 3,379 - - 3,100 3,379 U ru gu ay 120,000 54,450 120,000 54,450 V e n e zu e la 2,300 2,221 - - 2,300 2,221 Latin A m e rica an d C arib b e an To tal - - 346,225 402,171 - - - - - - 9,708,330 3,858,647 685,600 744,486 10,740,155 5,005,304 IP P F Sto ck o n H an d 112,600 151,060 112,600 151,060 In je ctab le To tal 3,508,000 3,282,265 721,750 868,998 7,059,096 4,508,584 77,500 58,355 1,773,699 1,121,286 52,699,184 20,580,674 23,844,400 26,540,350 89,683,629 56,960,511 D o n o r Su p p o rt fo r C o n trace p tive s an d C o n d o m s fo r Fam ily P lan n in g an d STI/H IV P re ve n tio n 46 *U N FP A d a ta in clu d e s th ird p a rty p ro cu re m e n ts A n n e x - 3 D e stin atio n C o u n trie s: Latin A m e rica an d C arib b e an D FID IP P F K FW M SI P SI U N FP A * U SA ID To tal Q u an tity To tal A m o u n t in U S$ C o u n try Tab le 6 : IU D - D o n o rs, C o m m o d itie s & V alu e s Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ B e n in - - 900 1,035 3,500 1,131 - - 4,400 2,166 B u rkin a Faso 2,650 908 - - 11,000 4,070 - - 13,650 4,978 C am e ro o n - - 3,000 1,380 5,750 1,749 8,750 3,129 C ap e V e rd e 1,000 309 1,000 309 C e n tral A frican R e p u b lic - - - - 5,477 1,692 5,477 1,692 C o n go 100 34 1,000 323 1,100 357 C o n go , D R e p u b lic 700 240 14,100 7,221 - - 14,800 7,461 C o te D 'Ivo ire 3,600 1,234 - - 4,000 1,236 7,600 2,470 Eq u ato rial G u in e a 1,500 328 1,500 328 Eritre a 3,000 969 3,000 969 Eth io p ia - - - - - - 40,500 28,111 40,500 28,111 G am b ia 1,500 485 1,500 485 G h an a - - - - 15,600 10,751 15,600 10,751 G u in e a 2,000 646 2,000 646 G u in e a-B issau - - - - 20,000 5,415 20,000 5,415 G u in e a-C o n akry - - - - K e n ya 1,540 840 - - 5,000 3,100 102,000 34,190 - - 108,540 38,130 M ad agascar - - 10,000 3,200 - - 29,500 9,529 31,200 24,272 70,700 37,001 M alaw i 5,000 995 - - 5,000 995 M ali - - 1,200 600 21,650 5,109 4,800 5,082 27,650 10,791 M au ritan ia - - 7,000 2,590 7,000 2,590 M au ritiu s 300 103 - - 300 103 M o zam b iq u e 50 17 - - 3,367 1,088 - - 3,417 1,105 N ige ria 1,500 514 - - - - 64,002 20,973 100,200 63,320 165,702 84,807 Se n e gal 300 180 5,100 1,576 - - 5,400 1,756 Sie rra Le o n e - - 18,500 6,033 - - 18,500 6,033 Sw azilan d 2,260 698 2,260 698 Tan zan ia - - 20,000 12,400 10,000 1,990 82,200 56,286 112,200 70,676 To go - - 1,000 460 18,000 5,814 - - 19,000 6,274 U gan d a - - 5,000 2,325 30,000 14,600 116,000 28,271 25,500 17,356 176,500 62,552 Zam b ia 400 137 - - 1,500 555 9,300 6,733 11,200 7,425 Zim b ab w e 100 45 3,300 1,136 - - 3,400 1,181 A frica To tal - - 10,840 4,027 - - 15,400 5,750 75,200 40,796 466,906 138,899 309,300 211,911 877,646 401,383 A fgh an istan 24,000 4,776 - - 24,000 4,776 B an glad e sh - - 94,200 61,519 94,200 61,519 B h u tan 5,000 1,615 5,000 1,615 C am b o d ia 25,000 11,500 3,000 597 - - 28,000 12,097 East Tim o r 13,000 3,096 13,000 3,096 Fiji 2,310 714 2,310 714 In d ia 154,670 71,148 154,670 71,148 K o re a, D e m o cratic P e o p le 's R e p 43,300 9,461 43,300 9,461 M alaysia 2,000 1,113 - - 2,000 1,113 M o n go lia - - 1,893 4,336 45,000 9,673 46,893 14,009 M yan m ar 5,000 1,714 50,000 23,000 80,000 23,112 - - 135,000 47,826 N e p al 10,000 9,000 - - - - 10,000 9,000 N e w Ze alan d 100 34 100 34 P akistan 176,994 131,397 591,000 271,860 1,499,002 842,506 264,600 149,960 2,531,596 1,395,723 P ap u a N e w G u in e a - - 1,000 199 - - 1,000 199 D o n o r Su p p o rt fo r C o n trace p tive s an d C o n d o m s fo r Fam ily P lan n in g an d STI/H IV P re ve n tio n 47 A n n e x - 3 D e stin atio n C o u n trie s: A frica D FID IP P F K FW M SI P SI U N FP A * U SA ID To tal Q u an tity To tal A m o u n t in A sia P acific C o u n try Tab le 6 : IU D - D o n o rs, C o m m o d itie s & V alu e s Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ P h ilip p in e s 2,000 685 168,000 51,419 160,000 37,640 330,000 89,744 Saraw ak 700 389 700 389 So lo m o n Islan d s 50 28 50 28 A sia P acific To tal - - 9,850 3,963 176,994 131,397 169,893 55,755 830,670 386,508 1,875,612 933,388 358,800 211,479 3,421,819 1,722,491 A lb an ia 3,500 1,295 3,500 1,295 A lge ria 30,000 10,500 30,000 10,500 D jib o u ti 1,000 323 1,000 323 Iraq 5,000 1,714 100,000 31,300 105,000 33,014 K azakstan 20,000 6,460 20,000 6,460 K yrgyzstan 90,000 28,620 90,000 28,620 M o ro cco 4,000 2,061 4,000 2,061 O m an 500 162 500 162 P ale stin e 1,500 514 40,000 12,024 41,500 12,538 Su d an - - - - 5,000 1,615 5,000 1,615 Syrian A rab R e p u b lic 10,000 3,230 10,000 3,230 Tajikistan 100 9,500 100 9,500 U krain e 288,000 161,267 288,000 161,267 U zb e kistan 1,588,350 432,781 1,588,350 432,781 Y e m e n 31,500 32,327 31,500 21,105 22,000 8,140 85,000 61,572 A rab State s To tal - - 10,500 4,289 31,500 32,327 31,500 21,105 - - 1,910,450 545,949 288,000 161,267 2,271,950 764,937 A n tigu a an d B arb u d a 200 69 200 69 A ru b a 50 28 50 28 B arb ad o s 200 69 - - 200 69 B o livia 15,000 5,141 35,000 10,815 50,000 15,956 C u b a 53,000 18,550 53,000 18,550 C u racao 350 120 350 120 D o m in ican R e p u b lic 100 34 - - - - 100 34 Ecu ad o r 112,500 39,375 112,500 39,375 El Salvad o r 300 103 25,000 15,500 1,500 555 26,800 16,158 G u ate m ala - - 20,000 12,400 9,000 3,330 - - 29,000 15,730 G u yan a - - 2,500 925 2,500 925 H o n d u ras 9,650 3,307 - - 21,000 7,770 - - 30,650 11,077 Jam aica - - 2,400 888 2,400 888 M e xico 15,200 5,211 - - - - 15,200 5,211 N e vis 50 17 50 17 N icaragu a 5,000 1,714 30,000 18,600 12,600 4,381 - - 47,600 24,695 P an am a - - - - 3,360 1,243 3,360 1,243 P aragu ay - - - - 25,200 9,324 - - 25,200 9,324 P e ru - - - - 12,000 7,091 12,000 7,091 St Lu cia 400 137 400 137 St V in ce n t 50 17 50 17 Su rin am e 450 154 - - 450 154 U ru gu ay 20,000 6,180 20,000 6,180 V e n e zu e la 6,550 5,110 - - 6,550 5,110 Latin A m e rica an d C arib b e an To tal - - 53,550 21,228 - - - - 75,000 46,500 298,060 103,337 12,000 7,091 438,610 178,156 D o n o r Su p p o rt fo r C o n trace p tive s an d C o n d o m s fo r Fam ily P lan n in g an d STI/H IV P re ve n tio n 48 A rab State s Latin A m e rica an d C arib b e an A n n e x - 3 D e stin atio n C o u n trie s: A frica D FID IP P F K FW M SI P SI U N FP A * U SA ID To tal Q u an tity To tal A m o u n t in U S$ C o u n try Tab le 6 : IU D - D o n o rs, C o m m o d itie s & V alu e s Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ IP P F 89,000 28,302 89,000 28,302 IP P F Sto ck o n H an d 19,400 7,839 19,400 7,839 O TH ER S To tal - - 19,400 7,839 - - - - - - 89,000 28,302 - - 108,400 36,141 IU D S To tal - - 123,540 49,184 208,494 163,725 216,793 82,610 980,870 473,804 4,640,028 1,749,875 968,100 591,748 7,118,425 3,103,107 D o n o r Su p p o rt fo r C o n trace p tive s an d C o n d o m s fo r Fam ily P lan n in g an d STI/H IV P re ve n tio n 49 * U N FPA d a ta in clu d e s th ird p a rty p ro cu re m e n ts A n n e x - 3 D e stin atio n C o u n trie s: A frica D FID IP P F K FW M SI P SI U N FP A U SA ID To tal Q u an tity To tal A m o u n t in C o u n try Tab le 7 : Im p lan t - D o n o rs, C o m m o d itie s & V alu e s Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ A n go la 500 10,500 - - 500 10,500 B e n in - - 7,400 188,642 27,800 583,800 2,000 46,058 37,200 818,500 B u rkin a Faso - - 2,050 16,617 48,600 1,060,600 12,000 270,762 62,650 1,347,979 B u ru n d i 300 9,250 60,000 1,300,000 - - 60,300 1,309,250 C am e ro o n 100 3,083 10,000 250,852 10,100 252,100 20,200 506,035 C e n tral A frican R e p u b lic 50 1,542 - - - - 50 1,542 C h ad 50 1,542 1,000 22,200 1,050 23,742 C o n go 20 617 500 10,500 520 11,117 C o te D 'Ivo ire - - - - 7,800 195,000 7,800 195,000 Eritre a 1,000 21,000 1,000 21,000 Eth io p ia 1,600 45,771 - - 260,000 5,096,000 60,000 1,350,101 321,600 6,491,872 G am b ia 100 2,100 100 2,100 G h an a 310 9,558 17,900 401,500 15,000 335,406 33,210 746,464 G u in e a 1,000 21,000 1,000 21,000 G u in e a-B issau - - - - 7,500 167,500 7,500 167,500 G u in e a-C o n akry 30 925 30 925 K e n ya - - 950 8,436 5,900 149,756 75,000 1,575,000 - - 81,850 1,733,192 Lib e ria - - - - 1,000 21,000 300 8,115 1,300 29,115 M ad agascar - - 3,700 34,499 37,008 733,694 - - 40,708 768,193 M alaw i 1,500 31,500 30,000 669,917 31,500 701,417 M ali - - 6,000 158,938 60,700 1,273,020 7,400 166,795 74,100 1,598,753 M au ritan ia - - 2,500 52,500 2,500 52,500 N ige r 300 9,250 9,300 195,300 9,600 204,550 N ige ria 50 1,542 5,352 97,428 - - 27,601 559,907 22,000 492,251 55,003 1,151,128 Se n e gal 3,600 70,164 3,700 92,500 27,100 612,008 34,400 774,672 Sie rra Le o n e 20 617 12,000 103,010 43,500 933,500 - - 55,520 1,037,127 Sw azilan d 2,600 65,000 2,600 65,000 Tan zan ia - - 25,000 659,137 50,600 1,015,000 50,000 1,115,481 125,600 2,789,618 To go 60 1,850 4,000 100,341 5,000 105,000 13,000 290,946 22,060 498,137 U gan d a - - 2,000 38,984 7,000 135,800 114,200 2,262,400 40,400 975,897 163,600 3,413,081 Zam b ia - - 12,000 106,560 36,300 858,000 52,500 1,176,463 100,800 2,141,023 Zim b ab w e 10,800 226,800 38,000 848,395 48,800 1,075,195 Zim b ab w e 20,600 496,319 20,600 496,319 A frica To tal 20,600 496,319 2,890 85,544 - - 25,952 334,640 81,000 1,784,524 925,109 19,143,921 369,700 8,358,595 1,425,251 30,203,543 A sia P acific C am b o d ia - - 2,000 42,000 - - 2,000 42,000 C o o k Islan d s 60 1,850 60 1,850 East Tim o r 5,600 134,000 5,600 134,000 Fiji 700 17,500 700 17,500 M o n go lia 300 9,250 - - 300 9,250 N e p al - - 4,000 84,000 8,500 189,555 12,500 273,555 P akistan 8,400 47,161 - - - - - - 8,400 47,161 P ap u a N e w G u in e a - - 800 16,800 - - 800 16,800 P h ilip p in e s - - - - 1,000 19,600 1,000 19,600 Sri Lan ka 15,000 315,000 15,000 315,000 Tu valu 20 617 20 617 A sia P acific To tal - - 380 11,716 - - 8,400 47,161 - - 29,100 628,900 8,500 189,555 46,380 877,332 D o n o r Su p p o rt fo r C o n trace p tive s an d C o n d o m s fo r Fam ily P lan n in g an d STI/H IV P re ve n tio n 50 U SA ID To tal Q u an tity To tal A m o u n t in A n n e x - 3 D e stin atio n C o u n trie s: A frica D FID IP P F K FW M SI P SI U N FP A * C o u n try Tab le 7 : Im p lan t - D o n o rs, C o m m o d itie s & V alu e s Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ Q u an tity A m o u n t U S$ D jib o u ti 500 10,500 500 10,500 Su d an - - 1,820 19,537 - - 5,000 105,000 6,820 124,537 Tajikistan 17,700 373,380 17,700 373,380 Y e m e n 3,251 63,850 3,251 63,850 A rab State s To tal - - - - - - 1,820 19,537 - - 26,451 552,730 - - 28,271 572,267 B ah am as 20 617 20 617 B o livia 900 27,749 50 444 - - 950 28,193 C o lo m b ia 4,300 90,300 4,300 90,300 C u b a 800 16,800 800 16,800 D o m in ican R e p u b lic - - 3,008 58,957 - - 3,008 58,957 Ecu ad o r 20,000 420,000 20,000 420,000 El Salvad o r 390 12,024 - - - - 390 12,024 G u ate m ala - - - - 2,000 42,000 500 11,765 2,500 53,765 H aiti - - 14,200 316,795 14,200 316,795 Jam aica 260 8,016 1,500 37,500 1,760 45,516 P P FA Latin A m e rica 15 462 15 462 Latin A m e rica an d C arib b e an To tal - - 1,585 48,869 - - 50 444 - - 31,608 665,557 14,700 328,560 47,943 1,043,430 O TH ER S IP P F 13,700 287,700 13,700 287,700 O TH ER S To tal - - - - - - - - - - 13,700 287,700 - - 13,700 287,700 Im p lan t To tal 20,600 496,319 4,855 146,129 - - 36,222 401,782 81,000 1,784,524 1,025,968 21,278,808 392,900 8,876,710 1,561,545 32,984,272 D o n o r Su p p o rt fo r C o n trace p tive s an d C o n d o m s fo r Fam ily P lan n in g an d STI/H IV P re ve n tio n 51 *U N FPA d a ta in clu d e s th ird p a rty p ro cu re m e n ts Latin A m e rica an d C arib b e an A n n e x - 3 D e stin atio n C o u n trie s: A rab D FID IP P F To tal Q u an tity To tal A m o u n t in K FW M SI P SI U N FP A U SA ID

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